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6324


Prime-time comprehension (Lower primary)

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing® 2012 Copyright© Lee-Ann Holmes 2010 ISBN 978-1-84654-343-2 PR– 6324

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Titles in this series:

Prime-time comprehension (Lower primary) Prime-time comprehension (Middle primary) Prime-time comprehension (Upper primary)

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Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

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Foreword Prime-time comprehension (Lower primary) is one title in a three-book series. In each book are 20 varied and interesting original texts. For each text there are comprehension questions (encompassing three different levels of reasoning) and a related activity. Included in each book are: • 5 fiction texts • 5 comic strips • 5 nonfiction texts • 5 poems The books in this series are:

Prime-time comprehension (Lower primary)

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Prime-time comprehension (Middle primary)

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Prime-time comprehension (Upper primary)

Contents

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Teachers notes.................................................................................... iv – v Curriculum links................................................................................. vi – vii My Lego® car (Fiction)...........................................................................2–5 The other side of the river (Comic).........................................................6–9 Snakes (Nonfiction)...........................................................................10–13 The firefighter (Poetry).......................................................................14–17 My red box (Fiction)...........................................................................18–21 Dear Grandma (Comic).....................................................................22–25 Crocodiles (Nonfiction)......................................................................26–29 Mum sings in the shower (Poetry)......................................................30–33 Helping Mum in the garden (Fiction)..................................................34–37 Slip, slop, slap (Comic)......................................................................38–41 Pirates (Nonfiction)............................................................................42–45 The wish (Poetry)...............................................................................46–49 Our walk (Fiction)..............................................................................50–53 The decision (Comic).........................................................................54–57 The fastest animal on Earth (Nonfiction).............................................58–61 Farmyard cat (Poetry)........................................................................62–65 Fun House (Fiction)...........................................................................66–69 Traffic light sandwiches (Comic)........................................................70–73 Why do we have toes? (Nonfiction)....................................................74–77 School photo (Poetry)........................................................................78–81 Answers............................................................................................82–85

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Prime-time comprehension

iii


Teachers otes n There are 20 age-appropriate texts from four different formats (fiction, comic strips, nonfiction and poetry) included in this book. The level of difficulty of the text among the formats differs. For example, the comic strips are generally much shorter and easier to read than the fiction and nonfiction texts and the poetry tends to be more challenging. The questions are organised into three categories—Levels A, B and C—which are outlined below. Four pages accompany each of the 20 texts. Each group of four pages consists of the following: Pupil page 1 The text, in the style of one of the four formats, with appropriate illustrations included.

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Pupil page 2 Questions related to the text – Level A (i.e. literal) and Level B (i.e. interpretive).

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Pupil page 3 Questions related to the text – Level C (i.e. evaluative). Pupil page 4 An activity related to the text. The three levels of questioning are:

Literal – the answer is provided in the text.

Level B

Interpretive – The answer is inferred using information in the text.

Level C

Evaluative – The answer requires associations to be made between the text’s content and personal experience and knowledge.

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Level A

Activity pages

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These may require pupils to apply knowledge gained from the text, from their personal experiences and, in some cases, to use their imagination.

Answers Answers to all questions are provided on pages 82–85. Levels B and C answers are provided as a guide only as answers to interpretive and evaluative questions will vary. Teachers may need to assess answers individually and judge whether they are acceptable.

iv

Prime-time comprehension

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Teachers otes n The text The format is stated.

Levels A and B questions The title of the text is given. Literal questions are presented.

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The text is presented.

Interpretive questions are presented.

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Evaluative questions are presented.

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Level C questions

Activity

Varied and interesting activities expand on some of the concepts presented in the text.

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Prime-time comprehension

v


Curriculu

m links

ENGLAND English, Key Stage One (Reading) Objectives: • focus on meaning derived from the text as a whole • draw on their background knowledge and understanding of the content • identify and describe characters, events and settings in fiction • use their knowledge of sequence and story language when they are retelling stories and predicting events • express preferences, giving reasons • identify patterns of rhyme and sounds in poems • respond imaginatively in different ways to what they read • read a range of literature and nonfiction, including stories and poems with familiar settings, and information texts

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Literacy, Year One and Two (Text) Objectives: • 1 – identify the main events and characters in stories, and find specific information in simple texts • 1 – use syntax and context when reading for meaning • 1 – make predictions showing an understanding of ideas, events and characters • 1 – visualise and comment on events, characters and ideas, making imaginative links to their own experiences • 2 – draw together ideas and information from across a whole text • 2 – give reasons why things happen • 2 – explain their reactions to texts, commenting on important aspects

NORTHERN IRELAND

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Language and Literacy, Reading

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Foundation Stage Objectives: • read with some independence • sequence stories in reasonable detail • make links between personal experience and the text • make and give predictions Key Stage One Objectives: • read a selection of poetry • read with some independence for information • use a range of comprehension skills, to interpret and discuss texts • explore and interpret a range of visual texts • express opinions and give reasons based on what they have read • begin to use evidence from text to support their views

REPUBLIC of IRELAND English (Reading), 1st/2nd Class Objectives: • develop comprehension strategies • predict future events and outcomes • engage with a wide variety of text • respond to characters and events in stories

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Prime-time comprehension

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Curriculu

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SCOTLAND Literacy and English (Reading) Early Objectives: • to help understand stories and other texts, ask questions and link what is being learnt with what is already known • explore events and characters in stories and other texts

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First Objectives: • identify and consider the purpose and main ideas of a text • to show understanding, respond to different kinds of questions and other close reading tasks • share thoughts about characters and settings, and relate the writer’s message to own experiences

WALES

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Language, Literacy and Communication Skills (Reading), Foundation Stage Objectives: • read with increasing accuracy and understanding • respond to texts in different ways, talking about characters and events, and predicting events and exploring meaning • experience and respond to a wide range of print

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Prime-time comprehension

vii


My Leg

n

Fictio

I make a box.

Step 2.

I make windows and doors.

Step 3.

I make the roof.

Step 4.

I put four wheels on it.

Step 5.

I make the lights.

Step 6.

I add a driver.

Step 7.

I make a big garage.

Step 8.

I call Mum to have a look at it.

Step 9.

I am playing with my new Lego® car.

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Step 1.

o ® car – 1

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Step 10. Brrrum! Brrrum! Beep! Beep!

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n Fictio

My Leg

o ® car – 2

Level A 1. At which step did he make the roof? 2. How many wheels did he add? 3. What was Step 7? 4. What was the car made from?

5. What did the boy make at Step 2?

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Level B

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1. What noises did the boy make when he played with the car?

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2. What part of a car would go ‘Beep! Beep!’?

3. What does a driver do? 4. Could the driver take the car out at night?

yes

no

Why/Why not? 5. What did the boy make to keep his car in? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

3


My Leg

n Fictio

o ® car – 3

Level C 1. Why do you think the boy wanted his mum to look at the car?

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2. Do you think the boy had fun making the car? Why/Why not?

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yes

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3. What do you think Step 11 could be?

4. Name two things you would like to make with Lego®. 5. If you didn’t have Lego®, how else could you make a car? 4

Prime-time comprehension

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ity

Activ

Sequencing

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Cut and paste the pictures from the story in the correct order.

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Prime-time comprehension

5


The other

side of t

he river – 1

HELLO!

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HELLO TO YOU, OVER THERE!

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c Comi

HOW DO I GET TO THE OTHER SIDE?

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Prime-time comprehension

BUT... YOU ARE ON THE OTHER SIDE!

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The other

c Comi

side of t

he river – 2

Level A 1. What is the girl doing? 2. Where does the story take place? 3. Who says, ‘How do I get to the other side?’ 4. Are the children in the city or the country?

no

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yes

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5. Are the children on the same side of the river?

Level B

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1. How can you tell who is speaking when reading a comic?

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2. Why do you think the words are in capital letters?

3. What do you think the boy is looking for at the beginning? 4. Why do the children cup their hands around their mouth? 5. How did the girl know the boy wants to fish? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

7


The other

c Comi

side of t

he river – 3

Level C 1. What might be in the boxes the children have with them? yes

no

Why/Why not?

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2. Do we need to know the names of the children in the story?

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no

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Why/Why not?

yes

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3. Do you think the children’s parents are near?

4. Why does the girl think he is asking her a silly question? 5. What do you think will happen next? 8

Prime-time comprehension

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Activ

Your turn!

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Write suitable words in the boxes for this comic strip.

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Prime-time comprehension

9


ction

Nonfi

Snakes – 1

Nonfiction

Snakes are long and legless. They live in many places but not where it is very cold.

All snakes hunt their prey.

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Most snakes can swim and climb trees well.

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Some snakes, like pythons and boa constrictors, can squeeze their prey to death.

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Anacondas belong to the boa family. They are some of the biggest snakes on Earth. They can grow to more than 100 centimetres thick around the middle and more than seven metres in length.

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When a snake grows too big for its skin it grows a new skin and leaves its old skin behind.

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Most snakes are shy and usually try to keep away from people. Most snakes are harmless but there are some that can be very dangerous. To be safe, don’t go near any snakes. Sea snakes live in clear, warm water. They feed, breed and grow in the sea. Their tails are flat, like a paddle. This helps them to swim.

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ction

Nonfi

Snakes – 2

Level A yes

no

2. Can most snakes swim?

yes

no

3. Do snakes hunt?

yes

no

4. Are most snakes dangerous? yes

no

5. How long can an anaconda grow?

Level B

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1. Do snakes have legs?

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1. Do sea snakes need to come out of water? Why/Why not?

no

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yes

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animals?

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2. Why are pythons and boa constrictors dangerous to other

3. Do snakes eat other animals or do they eat plants? 4. Are you more likely to see snakes in summer or winter?

Why?

5. What would a snake probably do if it saw you?

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Prime-time comprehension

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ction

Nonfi

Snakes – 3

Level CNonfiction 1. Why do you think people sometimes find old dried up snake skins on the ground?

Why/Why not? yes

no

no

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3. Have you ever seen a snake?

yes

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2. If you see a snake, should you try to touch it?

How did you feel or how do you think you would feel if you saw

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one?

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4. What should people do when they see a snake?

5. Would you like to see an anaconda at a zoo?

yes

no

Explain your answer.

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Prime-time comprehension

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ity

Activ

Snakes lo ok a

nd soun d

’ like the letter ‘S

Read the letter ‘s’ words and draw the pictures!

smile

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sandal

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school

sausage roll

skeleton

star

sandwich

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Santa Claus

sandcastle

saint

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Prime-time comprehension

13


The fir efighter – 1

y Poetr

I want to be a firefighter ‘Cos they are very brave. They climb right up tall buildings to Find young and old to save.

They get to ring the bell. Their job is really swell. Into the smoky rooms they go,

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At fires they squirt the long, red hose;

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They rescue cats from tops of trees,

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Flames billow round their head.

Their vision blurs, their face turns black …

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Mmmm … I might be Mayor instead!

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Lee-Ann Holmes

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Prime-time comprehension

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The fir efighter – 2

y Poetr

Level A 1. What does the boy in the poem first want to be when he grows up? 2. Who do they save? 3. Where do they rescue cats from?

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4. What colour is the hose in the poem?

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5. What do firefighters get to ring?

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Level B

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meaning.

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1. Underline the word ‘swell’. Write some words with the same

2. Why did the boy want to be a firefighter? 3. Why does he change his mind at the end of the poem? 4. The boy decides to become the leader of the town instead. What do we call this person? 5. What would have made the firefighters’ vision blur and their faces go black? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

15


The fir efighter – 3

y Poetr

Level C 1. What do you think would be the best things about being a firefighter? 2. What would the worst thing be?

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. What is the number to call in case of fire? 3 If there was a fire at your house, the fire brigade would want to know your street address. Write it below.

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4. What should you do if there’s a fire at your school? Write some instructions; e.g. where to line up.

5. Write two rules to follow to keep safe when around matches, barbeques, candles or heaters. 16

Prime-time comprehension

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Uses for

Activ

a bucket

of water

Water is not just used to put out fires. List ten ways you could use a bucket of water. Some of the pictures may help you.

1.

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2. 3.

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6.

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5.

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4.

7. 8. 9. 10.

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Prime-time comprehension

17


n

Fictio

My red box – 1

I have a big red box under my bed. I keep red things in it because I like red best. There are new things and old things in the box. I have some red toys. The red car and the fire engine were my brother’s. He can’t find them.

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There are red clothes, too. I have a red cap, some red ribbons and one old red sock I found in the park. Mum said it was smelly, so she washed it. Then I put it back in the box. And there are some things I like to use. There’s some red stickers, lots of red crayons, a red pen that Dad thinks he lost, some big sheets of red paper and red glitter.

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But, I think the best thing in my box is a beautiful red and black ladybird. I found it sleeping in the garden.

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Prime-time comprehension

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n Fictio

My red box – 2

Level A 1. Why are all the things in the girl’s box red? 2. Where does the girl keep her red box?

3. What toys are in the box? 4. How many socks are in the box?

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5. Which things in the box can she draw with?

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Level B

1. Did the old sock belong to the girl?

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2. Why can’t her brother find his toys?

3. What other red things could she put in her box? 4. Why was the girl able to catch the ladybird? 5. How do you know her brother hasn’t looked in the red box? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

19


n

Fictio

My red box – 3

Level C 1. If you had a special box, what colour would it be? What things would you put in your box?

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2. What other things would you like to collect?

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Why?

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3. Some things would not last long in the box; e.g. a red apple would rot. What are some things you could not put in your box?

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4. Do you think Dad really lost his pen?

yes

no

What happened to it?

5. Even adults collect things, like dolls, spoons or teacups. Write about a collector you know. 20

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The colour red

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Circle and colour all the things below that would be red.

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Prime-time comprehension

21


c Comi

Dear Gr andma – 1 Hmmm!

Love Nathan.

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Please come to my futball match.

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Dear Grandma

PS: bring muney for sweets, if you want.

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Dear Gr andma – 2

Level A 1. What is the boy doing? 2. Who is he writing to? 3. What does the boy want his grandma to bring?

5. What sport does the boy play?

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Level B

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4. What is the name of the boy who wrote the letter?

1. Circle the correct spelling for the two words spelt incorrectly in the story. muney marny monney money

(b)

futball football foobal fotball

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(a)

2. Does Nathan want Grandma to bring or buy sweets?

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How do you know this?

3. Who do you think wants the sweets? 4. Did Nathan post the letter?

yes

no

Why do you think he did

this? 5. Why are the words written inside a different shape in the first comic box? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

23


c Comi

Dear Gr andma – 3

Level C 1. What are some things the boy might need to take to his football match? 2. List some good reasons for playing football.

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3. Why do you think the boy wanted his grandma at the match?

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4. Do you think his grandma will go to the match and bring sweets?

Why/Why not?

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no

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yes

5. Have you ever invited someone to watch you play sport or watch no Write about it. you do something else? yes /)

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Activ

Acrostic

Choose words from the bottom of the page. Finish each sentence to tell why playing football is great.

.

O utside, you get fresh

.

O range juice at half-

.

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F ootball is good e

.

B all skills get

.

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T eam members become

.

L earn to work as a

.

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A great way to get

L ots and lots of

.

friends exercise

time fit

fun

team

air

better

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Prime-time comprehension

25


ction

Nonfi

Crocodiles – 1

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Nonfiction

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Long, long ago, when the dinosaurs were alive on Earth, crocodiles were here, too.

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Crocodiles often lie low in the water. They can keep very still and look just like a log. But they are ready to snap! Crocodiles can move very fast on land and in water. They can jump high too.

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Crocodiles can eat fish and birds with one bite. If they want to eat a big animal, they drag it into the water with their teeth and hold it under to drown it. Sometimes they put the animal under a log to hold it still. Then they rip off bits of meat as they roll over. Some crocodiles live for more than 70 years.

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Prime-time comprehension

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ction

Nonfi

Crocodiles – 2

Level A 1. What do crocodiles look like in the water? 2. Do they lie high or low in the water? 3. What small animals do crocodiles like to eat?

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4. Do crocodiles eat meat or do they eat plants?

5. Have crocodiles been around for a long time?

no

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Level B

yes

1. Why do crocodiles keep very still when they’re lying in the

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water?

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2. Why do crocodiles drag big animals into the water?

3. What do you think a crocodile’s teeth would be like? 4. Why would it be dangerous for you to swim in water where there might be a crocodile? 5. Why couldn’t you climb a small tree to get away from a crocodile? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

27


ction

Nonfi

Crocodiles – 3

Nonfiction

Level C

1. Do you like crocodiles?

yes

no

Why/Why not?

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2. A mother crocodile is very gentle with her babies and carries them in her mouth. How do you think she would treat you?

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3. Do you think crocodiles have many enemies? Write a list.

no

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yes

no

Why/Why not?

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yes

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4. There are lots of crocodiles in Australia because people are not allowed to kill them. Do you think this is a good thing?

5. Some crocodiles can grow seven metres long. Walk 14 steps to see approximately how long that is! How would you feel if you saw a crocodile this big? 28

Prime-time comprehension

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ity

We’re j u

Activ

st warming up!

Crocodiles often lie in the sun with their mouths wide open. They look like they’re smiling, but they’re just warming up.

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Draw two crocodiles lying in the sun.

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Prime-time comprehension

29


Mum sing

y Poetr

s in the

shower – 1

Mum sings in the shower, She does it all the time. She sings so out of tune, Her singing is a crime. So I thought up a plan,

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To stop the awful din. And quickly threw him in.

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I grabbed a lonely frog

Now when Mum takes a shower

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It’s just the coolest thing–

She just looks for the frog

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And she forgets to sing!

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Lee-Ann Holmes

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Prime-time comprehension

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Mum sing

y Poetr

s in the

shower – 2

Level A 1. Where did the mother sing? 2. How often did Mum sing? 3. What does the author say ‘is a crime’? 4. Why does Mum now forget to sing?

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5. What word in the poem rhymes with ‘crime’?

Sa m

Level B

1. Did the boy think his mother was a good singer? How do you know this?

yes

no

no

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Why/Why not?

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2. Do you think Mum likes frogs?

yes

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3. Circle the correct spelling for the word used in the poem that means the same as ‘tossed’ .

through throo threw thru

4. Is singing out of tune really a crime?

yes

no

Explain what

a crime is. 5. Did the boy’s plan work?

yes

no

What was his plan?

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Prime-time comprehension

31


Mum sing

y Poetr

s in the

shower – 3

Level C 1. Do you think the family is pleased that Mum no longer sings in the shower?

yes

no

Why/Why not?

yes

no

Why/Why not?

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2. Are you scared of frogs?

Sa m

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3. Some frogs are in danger of becoming extinct. How can we try to stop this from happening? Discuss this with a friend, then write two suggestions.

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4. Think about any frogs you have seen. What kind of habitat or environment were they in? 5. Do you think the mum will start to sing in the shower again? yes

no

Why/Why not?

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ity

Activ

Likes an

d dislikes

Write what you like and don’t like about frogs. Look back at the poem and at your answers to the questions.

What I don’t like about frogs

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What I like about frogs

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Prime-time comprehension

33


n

Fictio

Helping M

um in t he

garden – 1

Job 1. Rake all the leaves. Job 2. Put the leaves in the bin.

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Job 3. Pull out the weeds.

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Job 4. Put the weeds in the bin.

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Job 5. Fill the watering can.

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Job 6. Water the plants.

Job 7. Fill the jug. Job 8. Have a drink of water.

Job 9. Put air in our tyres. Job 10. Ride our bikes to the shop to buy ice-creams!

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Prime-time comprehension

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Helping M

n Fictio

um in t he

garden – 2

Level A 1. In which job did they pull out the weeds? 2. What was Job 6? 3. How did they go to the shop? 4. What did they drink?

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5. Where did the girl put the leaves in Job 2?

Sa m

Level B

in g

1. Which job do you think the girl liked best?

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2. Why did they have to put air in their bikes’ tyres?

3. Why was it a good idea to rake the leaves before they watered the plants? 4. Why did they need a drink of water in Job 8? 5. Did the order in which they did the jobs matter?

yes

no

Why/Why not? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

35


Helping M

n Fictio

um in t he

garden – 1

Level C 1. Which job wouldn’t you like doing? Why? 2. What do you think a Job 11 could be in the story?

pl e

your bike?

Where do you like to ride

in g

no

Sa m

yes

3. Can you ride a bike?

4. Do you think the mum liked the way her daughter had helped her?

How do you know this?

ew

no

Vi

yes

5. Do you think children should do jobs at home?

yes

no

Why/Why not? 36

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Helping D

ity

Activ

ad in the kitchen

Fill in the missing jobs and drawings to write about helping Dad in the kitchen. Job 1

Job 1. Make a cake.

Job 2

Job 2. Put it in the oven. Job 3. Put water in the sink. Job 4. Wash the dishes.

pl e

Job 3

Job 6.

Job 6

ew

in g

Job 5

Sa m

Job 5.

Job 4

Job 7

Vi

Job 7.

Job 8

Job 8. Job 9

Job 10

Job 9. Take cake out of oven. Job 10. Eat it!

Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

37


Slip, sl o p , sl a p – 1

c Comi

Have you got sunscreen on, Ben? You look red.

Sa m

pl e

Oh no! I forgot to put some on. Ouch! I’m burnt!

Slop on sunscreen.

Vi

ew

in g

I know what to do. Slip on a shirt.

And slap on a hat.

38

Prime-time comprehension

Thanks, Emma. I won’t forget next time.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Slip, sl o p , sl a p – 2

c Comi

Level A 1. Where are the children? 2. What are they doing? 3. What did the boy forget to do?

pl e

4. What was the first thing the girl told the boy to do?

Sa m

5. What was the second and third thing the boy had to do?

Level B

ew

in g

Vi

1. Who was dressed well to play at the beach? 2. Why was Ben burnt? 3. Had the children just arrived at the beach?

yes

no

4. How did Emma know Ben was burnt? 5. Was Emma a kind girl?

yes

no

Why/Why not?

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

39


Slip, sl o p , sl a p – 3

c Comi

Level C 1. What sort of hat is best to wear in the sun? 2. Have you ever been sunburnt?

yes

no

What did it feel like?

pl e

Sa m

3. If at the beach all day, how often do you think you should put sunscreen on?

4. The afternoon is often the hottest time of the day. What times of the day is it best to play on the beach so you are less likely to be burnt?

ew

in g

5. Is a top with no sleeves good enough to wear in the sun? no

Vi

yes

Explain what would be a good shirt to wear in the sun, then draw it. 40

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ity

Activ

Sun safety

Fill in the spaces and draw the pictures. When out in the sun, you should: slip on a

Vi

ew

in g

slop on

Sa m

pl e

,

and slap on a

Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

.

Prime-time comprehension

41


ction

Nonfi

Pirates – 1

Nonfiction

Pirates attack and rob people at sea. Lots of stories tell about pirates from long ago. But there are still some pirates at sea today. The pirate flag is scary. It is called the Jolly Roger.

pl e

Pirates wanted to look scary so they could frighten people, who would then just give them all their things.

Sa m

A pirate captain is the boss of the ship. Sometimes, pirate captains left people to die alone on islands. Sometimes, they threw people over the side of the ship. They even made some walk the plank.

ew

in g

It is believed that pirates had lots of treasure, which they hid and made a map to show where it was.

Vi

Blackbeard was a very scary pirate captain. He was very mean. After he was killed, people looked for his treasure. But no-one found it or was even sure if there was any.

42

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ction

Nonfi

Pirates – 2

Level A 1. What do pirates do? 2. Are there still pirates today?

no

yes

3. Who was a mean pirate? 4. Why didn’t anyone find his treasure?

pl e

5. Where did pirate captains throw people?

Sa m

Level B

in g

1. What is another word for ‘boat’ from the story?

ew

2. Pirates don’t live on land. Where do they live?

Vi

3. Why were people scared of pirates?

4. Where might pirates have got their treasure from? 5. Why did pirates have a scary flag? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

43


ction

Nonfi

Pirates – 3

Nonfiction

Level C

yes

1. Do you think pirates were kind and friendly?

no

Explain why you think this. yes

2. Do you like stories about pirates?

Why/Why not?

pl e

no

Sa m

3. Would you want to be a pirate?

no

Why/Why not?

in g

yes

no

Why/Why not?

Vi

yes

ew

4. Do you think pirates today bury their treasure on islands?

5. What is something a pirate might wear?

44

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ction

Nonfi

Captain Hook

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

In the story Peter Pan, the character named Hook was a pirate. Following the list, draw a picture of him in the box below. He had: • long, black, curly hair • a pirate hat • a black beard • a patch on one eye • a wooden leg • a hook on one hand. • a parrot on his shoulder

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

45


y Poetr

The wish – 1

Oh, I wish I could be a little bird, The earth and the sky is theirs.

pl e

They fly and land wherever they please,

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

They have no worries or cares.

But … The little bird lands, his heart pounding, And looks around this way and that. For much bigger birds could attack anytime, And he’d make a good meal for a cat. Lee-Ann Holmes 46

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


y Poetr

The wish – 2

Level A 1. When could bigger birds attack a little bird? 2. What does the girl wish she could be? 3. Where does the girl think little birds can fly and land?

4. Does the girl think little birds have any worries or cares?

yes

pl e

no

thinking

saying

in g

Level B

Sa m

5. Was the girl thinking or saying the first part of the poem?

1. Does the little bird think he has a great life?

no

ew

Why/Why not?

yes

Vi

2. What animals does the little bird have to be careful of? 3. Where might the little bird look for bigger birds that could attack? 4. Where might the little bird look for cats? 5. Why might the little bird never be able to relax? Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

47


y Poetr

The wish – 3

Level C 1. Why do you think large birds attack small birds? Describe it.

pl e

2. What is your favourite bird?

Sa m

ew

in g

3. How can we stop cats from killing birds?

Vi

4. If you were a bird, what would be your favourite things to do?

5. Would you rather be a bird or a human?

Draw your favourite bird.

Give reasons.

48

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ity

Activ

‘Free as a bird’

Write the good things and bad things about being a little bird. Look back at the poem and your answers to the questions for help. Disadvantages (Bad things)

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Advantages (Good things)

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

49


n

Fictio

Our walk – 1

When we were at the beach, Mum and I went for a long walk. The wet sand was hard and good to walk on. We saw lots of pretty shells on the sand. We picked some up to look at them. ‘Look at this, Sarah’, said Mum.

Sa m

pl e

I picked up a tiny, brown sand crab. It curled into a ball in my hand. Mum said it was scared. I put it back on the sand. I didn’t want to hurt it. Then we sat on a rock and ate the snack Mum had made. Then we put our rubbish in our bag to take home with us.

Vi

ew

in g

Mum said the only things we should leave at the beach are our footprints.

50

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


n Fictio

Our walk – 2

Level A 1. Where did they walk? 2. Was it a short walk or a long walk? 3. What colour was the crab?

5. Where did they put their rubbish?

Sa m

Level B

pl e

4. What is the name of the girl in the story?

1. How did Mum know the crab was scared?

ew

in g

2. Why do you think the crab was called a sand crab?

Vi

3. Why did they sit on a rock to eat?

4. Did they stop walking when they wanted to eat?

yes

no

5. Who is telling the story? How do you know? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

51


n Fictio

Our walk – 3

Level C 1. What do you think Sarah was wearing?

no

Sa m

3. Do you like walking on the beach?

yes

no

in g

Why/Why not?

yes

pl e

. Have you left footprints in the sand at the beach? 2 What happens to footprints left in the sand?

Vi

ew

4. Why did they take their rubbish home?

5. Why should we always put shells and creatures back where they were found?

52

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


A day

ity

Activ

at the beach

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Circle all the things you might take to the beach.

Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

53


c Comi

The decision – 1 Yes … … No

I could … just do it!

Vi

ew

in g

What if it is too cold? I might freeze!

Sa m

pl e

Hmmm! Will I or won’t I?

Okay: 1 … 2 … 3 … jump!

54

Prime-time comprehension

SPLASH!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


c Comi

The decision – 2

Level A 1. What is the title of the story? 2. How many times is the word ‘No’ written? 3. What numbers are in the story? 4. Which word is written in capital letters?

pl e

5. What word is written in a different print?

1. Where did the girl jump?

Sa m

Level B 2. How do you know she jumped?

in g

3. Was the girl talking to someone?

no

yes

Vi

ew

How do you know this?

4. Did the girl make a decision?

yes

no

What was it?

5. What was the girl worried about?

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

55


c Comi

The decision – 3

Level C 1. Do you think the girl’s decision was an important one? no

yes

Why/Why not?

2. Why do you think the girl couldn’t make up her mind?

pl e

Sa m

3. How important are the pictures in this comic? Why?

in g

What was it?

no

Vi

yes

ew

4. Have you ever had to make a difficult decision?

5. Name three reasons why children should learn to swim.

56

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ity

Activ

Pool safety

Vi

OW ALL

SH

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Circle the children doing unsafe things.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

57


The fast

ion

ct Nonfi

est an

imal on Earth – 1

Nonfiction

Sa m

The fastest animal of all of them is the peregrine falcon, able to dive through the air at a speed of 320 kilometres per hour! Why does it do this? It circles high in the sky looking for food. Then when it spots its prey, it tucks in its wings, sticks its claws out and dives down to grab a smaller bird or a furry animal.

pl e

Some animals walk or run on the Earth, while some swim in the water and others fly in the air.

in g

The fastest animal on land is the cheetah. This large cat is able to run at speeds of up to 120 kilometres per hour. That is faster than most cars driving down a street.

ew

The fastest swimming animal is the sailfish. It is a bit slower than a cheetah.

Vi

The fastest human on Earth is Usain Bolt. He runs at a speed of about 37.5 km/h. Isn’t it good that humans don’t have to run to catch their food? Gulp!

58

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


The fast

ion

ct Nonfi

est an

imal on Earth – 2

Level A 1. What is the fastest animal on Earth? 2. How fast can it fly? 3. Who is the fastest person on Earth? 4. How fast can the fastest human run?

pl e

5. Why do peregrine falcons circle in the sky?

Sa m

Level B

1. What do peregrine falcons eat?

in g

2. Would a cheetah be able to catch yes

no

ew

Usain Bolt?

Vi

3. Why do you think peregrine falcons stick their claws out when they dive in the air? 4. Why couldn’t a peregrine falcon, a sailfish and a human have a race? 5. Do you think peregrine falcons can see very well? yes

no

Why do you think this?

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

59


The fast

ion

ct Nonfi

est an

imal on Earth – 3

Level CNonfiction 1. Why don’t humans have to run to catch their food? 2. Would a car or a cheetah win a very long race?

pl e

Why?

Sa m

3. Name three animals that can run faster than you.

in g

4. What do you think peregrine falcons do with their wings when they’re flying so fast?

ew

yes

Vi

5. Would you like to be able to fly like a peregrine falcon? no

Why/Why not?

Draw a picture of you flying fast.

60

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ity

Activ

Speed

Colour, cut, sort and paste these pictures so the slowest animal is first and the fastest is last.

5.

pl e

4.

3.

Sa m

2.

6. Fastest

Vi

ew

in g

1. Slowest

Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

61


y Poetr

Farmya rd

cat – 1

I’m here to apply For the job of farmyard cat. My name is Edward Charles, But most people just say ‘Scat!’ The nicest cat you’ll meet,

Many cat hairs on the couch. Although I hate to boast,

Sa m

I promise not to leave

pl e

I am never one to grouch.

in g

I am good at everything.

ew

I tap dance, play the drums …

Vi

And wait till you hear me sing! I love to show affection— Much more than other cats. The only fault I have is … I’m very scared of rats! Lee-Ann Holmes

62

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


y Poetr

Farmya rd

cat – 2

Level A 1. What job does the cat want to apply for? 2. What is the cat’s real name? 3. What instrument does the cat play?

pl e

4. What type of dancing does the cat do?

Sa m

5. Which word in the poem rhymes with

Level B

in g

‘couch’?

Vi

ew

1. Where do you think the cat is?

2. Is the cat male or female?

How do you know?

3. To who is the cat probably talking? 4. What do people want cats to do when they say ‘scat’ to them? 5. Do you think the cat would be better as a pet or a farmyard cat?

Why?

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

63


y Poetr

Farmya rd

cat – 3

Level C 1. How do cats show affection? 2. Does the cat promise not to sit on the couch? Explain your answer.

pl e

Sa m

3. Besides owning a farmyard cat, what other things could farmers do to keep their grain safe from being eaten by rats?

in g

yes

no

ew

4. Do you think Edward Charles will get the job?

Vi

Why/Why not?

5. Write three words to describe a rat.

Draw a picture of a rat.

64

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Farmya rd cat wanted

ity

Activ

Make a poster for the job of farmyard cat. Make sure you include:

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

• what kind of cat can apply • what skills the cat needs to have; e.g. ‘must be able to …’ • what jobs it will be doing • where to send the application to.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

65


n

Fictio

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Fun House – 1

During the school holidays, my brother, my sister and I went to the ‘Fun House for Kids’. It’s a big room full of activities for children. There’s a pit filled with different coloured balls, a tunnel to slide through, padded stairs, slides, ladders, bridges and lots more. I liked the space tower the best. I sat at the top, looked out and pretended I was on another planet. We had a great time at the Fun House. Our favourite games to play there were ‘tag’ and ‘hide and seek’. If you go to the Fun House, take a pair of socks and a water bottle, because all that playing is very thirsty work! 66

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


n Fictio

Fun House – 2 TAG!

Level A 1. When did the children go to the Fun House? 2. Who is the Fun House for? 3. List three things that are part of the Fun House.

pl e

Sa m

4. What are the children’s favourite games at the Fun House?

5. What do children wear on their feet in the Fun House?

in g

Level B

1. How many children went to the Fun House?

ew

2. Do you think there were lots of other children there?

yes

no

Vi

Why/Why not?

3. Name some of the things children could do at the Fun House; e.g. crawling.

4. What could you do in the pit? 5. Do you think the space tower is tall?

yes

no

How do you

think children get to the top of it? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

67


n

Fictio

Fun House – 3

Level C 1. Why would playing ‘hide and seek’ in the Fun House be fun?

Sa m

3. Why do you think children need to wear socks in the Fun House?

pl e

2. What do you think the person telling the story wants you to do?

in g

ew

Vi

4. Which activity in the Fun House do you think would be the most fun? Why? 5. Would you like to own the Fun House?

yes

no

Why/Why not? 68

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Design yo

ity

Activ

ur own

Fun House!

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

Draw four Fun House activities.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

69


Traffic lig

c Comi

What’s for lunch, Dad? Traffic light sandwiches

ht sand

wiches – 1

First we punch three holes in each top slice.

Cheese for the yellow light, and lettuce for the green light.

Vi

ew

in g

Then we put different food on the bottom of the bread: tomato for the red light …

Sa m

pl e

WHAT?

Put the top slice on. See the traffic lights? Yeah, cool!

70

Prime-time comprehension

Now, what’s the next step?

EAT IT!

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Traffic lig

c Comi

ht sand

wiches – 2

Level A 1. What was the dad making for lunch? 2. How many holes did the dad punch in each top slice of bread?

pl e

3. What colours were the traffic lights?

Sa m

4. What food made the red light?

Level B

in g

5. What was lettuce used for in the sandwich?

Vi

ew

1. Do you think the children had seen traffic light sandwiches before? no Why do you think this? yes 2. Why did Dad punch holes in the top slice? 3. What colour was the middle light in the traffic light sandwiches?

4. Were the children helping dad or just watching him?

5. Do you think the children liked the traffic lights?

yes

no

How do you know? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

71


Traffic lig

c Comi

ht sand

wiches – 3

Level C 1. After the top slices were placed back on the sandwiches, how did they see the colours? 2. What is in your favourite healthy sandwich? yes

no

Why/Why not?

Sa m

mum or dad at home?

pl e

3. Do you think you will try making traffic light sandwiches with your

Vi

no

ew

Why/Why not?

yes

in g

4. Do you think traffic light sandwiches are healthy?

5. What other foods could you use to make traffic light sandwiches?

Draw a set of real traffic lights.

72

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Hea lth y sandwiches

ity

Activ

Write the steps and draw how to make your favourite healthy sandwich.

pl e

Step 1

Vi

Step 3

ew

in g

Sa m

Step 2

Step 4

Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

73


Why do w e have toes? – 1

ction

Nonfi

Nonfiction

pl e

Nearly every animal that walks has toes.

Sa m

Toes are a very small part of our body but they are a BIG help to us.

When we walk, run and jump, our toes help to push our legs off the ground.

in g

Our big toes are the most important. They help us to keep our balance.

Vi

ew

Most humans have 10 toes. Human toes have become shorter over the years, but we still need them to walk well. We must look after our toes and toenails. Our shoes need to fit well. They must not be too tight.

74

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Why do w e have toes? – 2

ction

Nonfi

Level A 1. Do our toes help to push us off the ground? yes

no

2. What could happen if we didn’t have big toes?

.

pl e

3. Our big toes help us to keep our

Sa m

4. Which toes are most important to us?

Level B

in g

5. How many toes do most humans have?

Vi

ew

1. Why did the author write ‘BIG’ in capital letters?

2. Why do we need to look after our toes? 3. How can we look after our toes? 4. Are your big toes your longest toes? 5. Is this fiction or nonfiction? Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

75


Why do w e have toes? – 3

ction

Nonfi

Nonfiction

Level C

1. What do you think would happen if we couldn’t move our toes? 2. Have you or someone you know hurt a toe? Who was it? What happened?

pl e

Sa m

3. How many toes would you like to have?

in g

Why?

(a)

Vi

ew

4. Humans have 10 toes. How many toes do you think these animals have? Guess, then find out! My guess

Actual number

An emu?

(b)

A hippopotamus?

(c)

A snail?

(d)

A sloth?

5. What are some different ways animals use their toes? 76

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ity

Activ

Toes

Sa m

pl e

Look at some different animals in books and draw their toes. See if your friends can guess which animal each set belongs to.

These toes belong to a

in g

These toes belong to a

.

Vi

ew

.

These toes belong to a

These toes belong to a .

Prim-Ed PublishingŽ – www.prim-ed.com

. Prime-time comprehension

77


y Poetr

School p

h ot o – 1

School photos are in. They’re giving them out. Here comes mine. ‘Arrrrghh!’ I shout. I look like

pl e

I am ready to sneeze. To see mine, please.

My eyes are closed. Is that a fly on

ew

The end of my nose?

in g

Front teeth are missing.

Sa m

Nobody ask

Vi

At home, I give it

To Mum with a shove.

‘Oh, what a gorgeous Photo, love.’ Lee-Ann Holmes

78

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


y Poetr

School p

h ot o – 2

Level A 1. Where were the photos taken?

OL S HO TO SCPHO

2. What is being handed out? 3. What did the boy think was on his nose?

pl e

4. What word in the poem rhymed with ‘out’?

5. What was wrong with the boy’s eyes in the photo?

Sa m

Level B

in g

1. Why did the boy shout, ‘Arrrrghh!’?

Vi

ew

2. What doesn’t the boy like about his mouth in the photo?

3. Why didn’t the boy want anyone to see his photo? 4. Who said, ‘What a gorgeous photo, love’? 5. The boy gave the photo to Mum ‘with a shove’. Explain what this means. Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

79


y Poetr

School p

h ot o – 3

Level C 1. Do you think the boy really had a fly on his nose?

yes

no

Why/Why not? 2. Do you think Mum really liked the photo or was she being kind?

pl e

Explain why you think this.

Sa m

3. What does the worst photo you’ve seen of yourself look like?

in g

Vi

ew

4. What do you think the boy’s mother will do with the photo?

5. What does your face look like just before you sneeze?

Draw a picture of yourself sneezing.

80

Prime-time comprehension

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


ity

Five fa vourite photos

Activ

Think about photos of you. Pick five and tell about them.

Where were you and why?

Who were you with?

Sa m

pl e

1.

Vi

ew

in g

2.

3.

Who took the photo?

4.

5.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Prime-time comprehension

81


Answers

Level C 1. Possible answers include: He was proud of it. He thought she’d like it. He wanted her to see it. 2. Possible answers include: Yes – because he made a whole car. Yes – because he played with it and made noises. Yes – because he wanted his mum to see it. 3. Possible answers include: I park it in the garage. I drive along the road. I put the Lego® blocks away. 4. Possible answers include: house, crane, aeroplane, fire engine. 5. Possible answers include: out of boxes, other toy blocks.

Level B 1. The callout/speech bubble/circle points to the person speaking. 2. To show they are calling out or yelling. 3. a bridge, a way to cross the river 4. Possible answers include: To direct the sound of their voices so they could be heard more easily. To act like a megaphone. 5. He had a fishing rod and tackle box. Level C 1. Possible answers include: hooks, sinkers, fishing line, swivels, bait. 2. No – It’s not important to the story. 3. Possible answers include: Yes – because parents wouldn’t leave small children alone near water. No – because the story didn’t mention them and they weren’t in the picture.

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Snakes......................... 10–13 Level A 1. no 2. yes 3. yes 4. no 5. more than seven metres.

Level B 1. No – They feed, breed and grow in the sea. 2. They can squeeze their prey to death. 3. Snakes eat other animals. 4. Summer. Snakes don’t like the cold. 5. Possible answers include: Slither away as fast as it can. Try to get away from you. Level C 1. Possible answers include: When a snake grows too large for its skin, it sheds it and leaves it behind. When a snake grows too big for its skin, it makes a new skin and leaves its old skin behind. 2. Possible answers include: No – It might bite you. No – It could be poisonous. 3. Answers will vary. 4. Possible answers include: Leave it alone. Call the local council. 5. Answers will vary.

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Level A 1. fishing 2. near a river 3. the boy 4. the country 5. no

Level C 1. Possible answers include: climbing the ladder, squirting the hose, saving people. 2. You could get burnt/die. 3. 999: Answers will vary. 4. Answers will vary. 5. Possible answers include: Keep children well away from fires. Don’t place heaters or candles near curtains. Blow candles out before you go to bed. Do not leave candles alight overnight.

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The other side of the river ........................................6–9

Activity – Your turn! Possible answers include: Boy – Would you like me to tie your shoelace for you? Girl – Yes, please! Girl – Thank you!

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Level B 1. Brrrum! Brrrum! Beep! Beep! 2. the horn 3. drive the cars 4. Yes – because it has lights. 5. a big garage

rooms, flames billow round their head. Their vision blurs and their face goes black. He doesn’t like getting smoke in his eyes. 4. Mayor 5. The smoke and heat from the fire.

Activity – Uses for a bucket of water Possible answers include: to use the water to: make a cup of tea, water the plants, drink, give pets a drink, wash the dishes, windows or clothes.

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Level A 1. Step 3 2. four 3. I make a big garage. 4. Lego® blocks 5. windows and doors

4. He was already on the other side of the river according to her position. 5. Possible answers include: The boy might ask, ‘How do I get over to your side?’ The boy might ask, ‘Is there a bridge?’

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My Lego® car...................2–5

The firefighter............. 14–17 Level A 1. a firefighter 2. people and animals (young and old, and cats) 3. the top of trees 4. red 5. a bell Level B 1. Possible answers include: good, great, terrific, cool. 2. He thinks it would be exciting. 3. Possible answers include: It’s also dangerous. They go into smoky

Prime-time comprehension

My red box.................. 18–21

Level A 1. The girl likes red best as a colour. 2. under her bed 3. a red car and a fire engine 4. one 5. red crayons and a red pen Level B 1. No, she found it. 2. They are in the girl’s box. 3. Possible answers include: a red book, a red bag, a red bottle 4. It was sleeping. 5. Possible answers include: He still hasn’t found his toys. The girl still has her brother’s toys. If he had, he would have taken his toys out of the box. Level C 1. Answers will vary. 2. Answers will vary. 3. Possible answers include: food, a butterfly/pet, plants 4. No – The girl took it. 5. Answers will vary. Activity – The colour red Rudolph’s nose, cherries, fire engine, tomato sauce, ladybird, robin, strawberries, tomato, wine, rose, top part of rainbow, Santa’s clothes, hearts (and possibly others; e.g. lollipop, boot and present). Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Answers

Level B 1. (a) money (b) football 2. Buy sweets. He invites her to bring money for sweets. 3. Nathan 4. Possible answers include: No, he handed it to his grandmother because she lives nearby. He handed it to his grandmother to save money on postage. He handed it to his grandmother because he wanted an answer right away. 5. He was thinking.

Level A 1. in the shower 2. all the time 3. Mum’s singing 4. She is looking for a frog. 5. time Level B 1. No – He says, ‘She sings so out of tune, Her singing is a crime.’ He also calls it an ‘awful din’. 2. No – She stops singing and looks for a frog. 3. threw 4. No – A crime is when a law is broken; e.g. stealing. 5. Yes – He threw a frog in the shower to frighten his mother. Now whenever she is in the shower, she looks for the frog instead of singing.

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Level C 1. Possible answers include: shin pads, water bottle, hat, football boots 2. Possible answers include: fitness, friendship, fun. 3. To watch him and to buy him sweets. 4. Possible answers include: Yes – she will probably go to the match and bring/buy sweets because Nathan invited her. 5. Answers will vary.

Mum sings in the shower .................................... 30–33

Level C 1. Possible answers include: Yes – She is a terrible singer. No – It’s nice to hear singing. 2. Possible answers include: No – They’re cute. Yes – They’re cold and wet. 3. Possible answers include: Get rid of toads because they eat frogs. Make a pond. Create gardens. Stop pollution. 4. Possible answers: wet, green, humid environment, pond, stream, river, lake. 5. Possible answer: Yes – If she doesn’t see the frog in the shower for a few days, she’ll sing.

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Activity – Acrostic F ootball is good exercise. O utside, you get fresh air. O range juice at half-time. T eam members become friends. B all skills get better. A great way to get fit L earn to work as a team. L ots and lots of fun

Crocodiles.................... 26–29 Level A 1. a log 2. low 3. fish and birds 4. meat 5. yes Level B 1. They are trying to look like a log so they can sneak up on their prey. 2. To drown them. 3. large and sharp 4. A crocodile might try to bite or eat you. 5. Crocodiles can jump to catch their meal. Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Level B 1. Job 10 2. The air in their tyres must have been low. 3. The plants and weeds wouldn’t be wet and soggy. 4. After all of their hard work, they were thirsty. 5. Yes - It wasn’t possible to do the second job before the first one. Level C 1. Answers will vary. 2. Possible answer: Ride home again. 3. Answers will vary. 4. Yes – She gave her a treat at the end. 5. Possible answers include: Yes – They could earn pocket money. Yes – It helps Mum and Dad.

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Level A 1. Writing a letter 2. To his grandma 3. Money for sweets 4. Nathan 5. football

Level C 1. Answers will vary. 2. Answers will vary; e.g. not very gently. 3. Answers will vary. 4. Answers may vary. 5. Possible answers include: scared, terrified, frightened, excited.

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Dear Grandma .................................... 22–25

Helping Mum in the garden .................................... 34–37 Level A 1. Job 3 2. Water the plants. 3. riding on bikes 4. water 5. in the bin

Prime-time comprehension

Slip, slop, slap............. 38–41

Level A 1. at the beach 2. building sandcastles 3. Put sunscreen on. 4. Slip on a shirt. 5. Slop on sunscreen and slap on a hat. Level B 1. Emma 2. He forgot to put sunscreen on. 3. no 4. His skin looked red. 5. Yes – She taught Ben what to do. Level C 1. A hat with a wide brim. 2. Answers will vary. 3. Answers will vary; e.g. at least every two hours, after swimming. 4. Early morning and late afternoon 5. No – Answers will vary.

Pirates......................... 42–45 Level A 1. Attack and rob people at sea. 2. yes 3. Blackbeard 4. He might not have had any. 5. Over the side of the ship Level B 1. ship 2. They live at sea. 3. Pirates looked scary and they robbed and killed people. 4. They took treasure off people on other boats or ships. 5. to frighten people

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Answers Level C 1. No – They robbed and killed people. 2. Possible answer: Yes – They are exciting. 3. Possible answers include: No – People don’t like them. Yes – They do lots of travelling. 4. No – There are too many people on islands. They sell the treasure and put money in the bank. 5. an eye patch, a wooden leg, an earring, a scarf, a sword

The wish...................... 46–49

Level C 1. long shorts, T-shirt, hat 2. Possible answers include: Yes – The water/tide washes them away. The wind blows the sand and covers them up. 3. Answers will vary. 4. There was no bin on the beach and they didn’t want to litter. 5. Possible answers include: Sometimes creatures live in shells. If everyone took shells from the beach, there would soon be none left. The creatures would die.

Level B 1. into a pool 2. Because of the words ‘1 … 2 … 3 … jump’. 3. No – She was thinking because the words were in thought bubbles. 4. yes – to jump 5. The water being too cold

Level C 1. No – It wouldn’t affect anyone else if she did or did not jump into the pool. 2. She didn’t want to go swimming in cold water. 3. Not very, the words are more important. 4. Teacher check 5. Possible answers: So that they can save themselves if they fall into a pool or the ocean. So that they can have a swim and feel safe. It’s healthy. It’s fun.

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Our walk..................... 50–53 Level A 1. along the beach 2. a long walk 3. brown 4. Sarah 5. in their bag Level B 1. It curled up in Sarah’s hand. 2. It lives in the sand. 3. Possible answers include: There were no tables and chairs around. The sand was wet. 4. yes 5. Sarah – In the story it says: ‘Look at this, Sarah’, said Mum.

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Level B 1. smaller birds and furry animals 2. yes 3. to grab their prey 4. The falcon moves in the air, the sailfish moves in the sea and a human moves on land. 5. Yes – They can see possible prey from high in the sky. Level C 1. Answers will vary; e.g. we are able to farm them in pens or cages. 2. A cheetah can run faster than some cars, but it would get tired. A car would be able to keep going. 3. Possible answers include: cheetah, lion, horse, dog, wombat (30 km/h), deer. 4. They tuck their wings in. 5. Answers will vary.

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Level A 1. The decision 2. once 3. 1, 2 and 3 4. SPLASH! 5. could

54–57

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Level C 1. They are smaller and weaker, and just the right size for a meal. 2. Possible answer: Willy Wag Tail. They are black and white and they wag their tails and sing all the time. 3. Possible answers include: Put a bell around their neck. Keep them indoors at night. 4. flying around in the sky 5. Answers will vary.

The decision

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Level B 1. No – He is frightened of being attacked. 2. bigger birds and cats 3. in the air or sky 4. on the ground 5. He always has to be careful of predators.

Level A 1. peregrine falcon 2. 320 km/h 3. Usain Bolt 4. 37.5 km/h 5. to look for food

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Activity – A day at the beach towel, flip flops, sunscreen, sunhat, sunglasses, picnic basket, binoculars, camera, baseball bat, ball, surfboard, toy boat.

Level A 1. anytime 2. a little bird 3. wherever they please 4. no 5. thinking

The fastest animal on Earth .................................... 58–61

Activity – Pool safety • hanging from a tree branch • diving in shallow end • eating ice-cream in the water • pushing another child in or under the water

Prime-time comprehension

Activity – Speed snail, turtle, human, horse, sailfish, cheetah

Farmyard cat.............. 62–65 Level A 1. farmyard cat 2. Edward Charles 3. the drums 4. tap dancing 5. grouch Level B 1. on a farm 2. Male. His name is Edward Charles, which is a name for a male. 3. A human, possibly the owner of the farm. 4. to go away 5. Pet - He wouldn’t be good at catching rats. Level C 1. They rub themselves against your legs or jump onto your lap. 2. No – He just promises not to leave many cat hairs on the couch. 3. Keep their grain in silos. Put poison around to kill the rats.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com


Answers

Level A 1. during the school holidays 2. children/kids 3. Pupils can choose three from the following list: a pit filled with balls of different colours, a tunnel to slide through, padded stairs, slides, ladders, bridges and a space tower. 4. tag and hide and seek 5. socks Level B 1. three 2. Yes – It is a fun place to go and it was during the school holidays. 3. sliding, throwing, climbing, stepping, and swinging 4. Throw balls at one another or bury each other. 5. Yes – They probably climb up stairs or a ladder.

Why do we have toes? .................................... 74–77 Level A 1. yes 2. We could fall over. 3. balance 4. our big toes 5. usually 10

Level B 1. To show that toes are a very big help to us. 2. Possible answers include: Toes are a big help to us. Our toes are important for walking and balance. We use our big toes to push our legs up off the ground. 3. Trim your toenails and buy shoes that fit well. 4. Answers will vary. 5. nonfiction

Level A 1. At school 2. school photos 3. a fly 4. shout 5. They were closed. Level B 1. He saw a terrible photo of himself. 2. His front teeth are missing. 3. He looked like he was ready to sneeze, his front teeth were missing, his eyes were closed and he had a fly on the end of his nose. 4. His mother 5. Possible answers include: he wanted to be rid of it; he didn’t want to look at it; he knew she’d want it. Level C 1. Possible answer: No – The author just wrote it to make the poem funny. 2. Possible answers include: No – She was probably being kind. Yes – Mothers always like photos of their children. 3. Answers will vary. 4. Possible answers include: Put it away with other family photos. Show it to everyone. 5. Possible answers include: ugly, all screwed up, like you’re in pain.

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Level C 1. There are many places to hide. 2. Go to a fun house to play and have fun. 3. Possible answers include: So their toenails don’t puncture the jumping castle. So their feet don’t dirty the materials. So their shoes won’t hurt any other kids; e.g. stepping on their feet. 4. Answers will vary. 5. Possible answers include: Yes – I could play in it all the time. No – I don’t like climbing and sliding.

Level C 1. through the three holes in the bread 2. Answers will vary. 3. Answers will vary. 4. Yes – They contain bread, cheese, lettuce and tomato, which are all good for you. 5. Possible answers include: RED - pepper, beetroot or strawberry jam, YELLOW - pepper, banana or peanut butter, GREEN - pepper or cucumber.

School photo............... 78–81

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Fun House................... 66–69

3. yellow 4. Just watching him 5. Yes – They said, ‘Yeah, cool’.

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4. Possible answers include: No – He won’t chase the rats. Yes – He has many other skills. 5. Possible answers include: small, brown, grey, furry, fast, pesky, dirty, smelly.

Traffic light sandwiches .................................... 70–73 Level A 1. traffic light sandwiches 2. three 3. red, yellow and green 4. tomato 5. to be the green light Level B 1. No – Their dad had to explain what they were. 2. So you could see the sandwich fillings underneath through the holes.

Prim-Ed Publishing® – www.prim-ed.com

Level C 1. We would find it difficult to walk, run or balance. 2. Answers will vary. 3. Answers will vary. 4. An emu has three toes on each foot. A hippopotamus foot has four webbed toes. A snail has one foot and no toes. The three-toed sloth has three toes. 5. Animals use their toes in much the same ways as we use our hands and feet. Chimpanzees grab food and take it to their mouth. Animals dig, hold food down so they can tear bits off, pounce and kick. Some animals even have suction pads on their toes so they can walk upside down on the ceiling.

Prime-time comprehension

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6324 Prime-time Comprehension - Lower