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POETRY SKILLS (Upper)

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing 2007 Copyright© Janna Tiearney 2006 ISBN 978-1-84654-065-3 PR–6276

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Additional titles available in this series:

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POETRY SKILLS (Lower) POETRY SKILLS (Middle)

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In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

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Foreword

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Poetry skills is a fun and innovative series, designed to help pupils learn and practise the English language. It is not a series purely to teach poetry, but rather a means to study language through the medium of poetry. All four strands of the English curriculum have been covered. With the ever-increasing burden placed on them, teachers will find these lessons practical and enjoyable, with structured lessons to include all key areas of the curriculum, and to develop all the necessary skills. Poetry is a child-friendly way to approach the teaching of language through reading, listening to and writing poetry, which will not only benefit the pupil’s language awareness but also increase his/her confidence. There is a selection of humorous and relevant poems on familiar topics. Many different types of poems have been included, which will give pupils the opportunity to experience and explore different types of text and settings. Pupils enjoy poems with rhythm and rhyme and many of the included poems contain these elements. Since poetry requires a certain amount of fluency, pupil’s reading skills will be developed, in a more exciting and interesting way, through reading, practising, reciting and learning poetry. Comprehension skills will also be enhanced. The shorter texts and flexibility of lessons make this book suitable for both mainstream and special needs pupils. The shorter written tasks will prove less daunting and will enable pupils to complete work in which all their learned skills will be utilised. Through studying poetry, pupils will be given the chance to explore feelings—their own and the feelings of others—and will, in turn, be able to express their own feelings on a range of subjects, while drawing on their own personal experiences and their imagination.

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A poem is not a thing we see, but rather a light by which we may see ... and what we see is life. Robert Penn Warren

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Poetry skills – Upper provides activities to cover all the poetry-related English language objectives in all curriculum strands for 5th and 6th Class. The books in this series are: Poetry skills – Lower (1st and 2nd Class) Poetry skills – Middle (3rd and 4th Class) Poetry skills – Upper (5th and 6th Class)

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Poetry skills

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Poetry skills

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Contents Teachers notes ................................................................. vi – vii Developing cognitive abilities through

Receptiveness to language ...................... 2–31 language ............................................... 62–95

Sum it up! ...............................................................................2-3 Power .................................................................................. 62-63

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Ask away!.............................................................................64-65 Popular or not? ...................................................................66-67 Listen up! ............................................................................68-69 False freedom ......................................................................70-71 Learn it ................................................................................ 72-73 Recite a poem .....................................................................74-75 What is your response? .......................................................76-77 My poetry list ....................................................................... 78-79 Let’s go shopping ................................................................80-81 Remember! .........................................................................82-83 Can you read it? ..................................................................84-85 You need evidence...............................................................86-87 Dinnertime..........................................................................88-89 Fact or opinion? ..................................................................90-91 Octopoem ............................................................................92-93 Competence and confidence in using language ............................................... 32–61 Write about it ...................................................................... 94-95 Parts of speech ....................................................................32-33 Emotional and imaginative development Do it! ...................................................................................34-35 through language ............................... 96–129 By yourself........................................................................... 36-37 Speaking up ........................................................................96-97 Poetry book ......................................................................... 38-39 Recipe for life ......................................................................98-99 What interests you? .............................................................40-41 Good friend .....................................................................100-101 Monday blues ......................................................................42-43 Have fun!.........................................................................102-103 Concrete poetry ................................................................... 44-45 ‘Tis the season.................................................................104-105 How are you feeling?...........................................................46-47 At the dinner table ..........................................................106-107 Autobiography .................................................................... 48-49 What’s the difference? .....................................................108-109 Near perfect ......................................................................... 50-51 Respond to it ................................................................... 110-111 Make it better ...................................................................... 52-53 Choose your own ............................................................112-113 Write for younger readers ...................................................54-55 Listen and enjoy.............................................................. 114-115 Help each other ................................................................... 56-57 Special moments ............................................................116-117 Seasoning! ..........................................................................58-59 Problems .........................................................................118-119 Graffiti .................................................................................60-61 Feelings ...........................................................................120-121 Not yet! ............................................................................122-123 Do you agree?..................................................................124-125 Interpret .......................................................................... 126-127 Listen and write ..............................................................128-129 Make sense ..............................................................................4-5 Don’t be boring! ......................................................................6-7 Make a noise ...........................................................................8-9 Uddled mup! .......................................................................10-11 Cheese please ......................................................................12-13 Classroom zoo.....................................................................14-15 Silence .................................................................................16-17 The A-Z of your town ..........................................................18-19 Watch the teacher ............................................................... 20-21 What do you think?.............................................................22-23 Cut it out ............................................................................. 24-25 For someone special ...........................................................26-27 Be positive! ..........................................................................28-29 You can do haiku! ..............................................................30-31

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Teachers notes Teachers page A teachers page accompanies each pupil worksheet. It provides the following information: Strand/Strand unit/Objective/Activities covered All poetry-related strands and strand units of the English curriculum are covered in this book. A list of activities is also included for easy reference.

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Background information for each activity is included for the teacher.

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Before the lesson – the teacher is made aware of what needs to be done before the lesson. Some materials and tasks are required for the lesson to be conducted; others are suggestions that will enrich the lesson.

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The lesson – gives suggested step-by-step instructions for using the worksheet. Often, a list of words contained in a poem that may require clarification is included, as it is important that all words in a poem are understood by the pupils. Answers – for the activities are included. Some answers will need a teacher check, while others may vary depending on personal experiences, opinions or feelings. Additional activities – can be used to further develop the objective of the worksheet. These activities provide ideas to consolidate and clarify the concepts and skills taught in the lesson. Homework suggestions – are included on many teachers pages. The aim of the suggested homework is to provide a link between school and home; therefore, the work often involves elements of the lesson being shared or practised with a family member.

Recommended reading – provides further examples of the type of poetry being studied. Poetry books should be available in the classroom and school library for the pupils to access. It is important for pupils to read, and have read to them, poetry by different authors, as the poems on the worksheets have all been written by the same author. Websites – are suggested on many pages to help teachers and/or pupils find other examples of poetry. Websites were current and appropriate at the time of printing; however, teachers should check before allowing the pupils to use them and refer to their school’s Internet policy.

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• Through the lesson, the pupils will learn that poetry comes in a variety of forms, but always expresses important personal feelings and gives a unique insight into the mind of the creator.

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Poem A poem, usually on a familiar topic, is found on each pupil page. Many different types of poems have been included to give the pupils the opportunity to experience and explore a variety of texts and settings and to motivate them. Poetry forms used include concrete poetry, haiku, cinquain, list, clerihew, sense, sausage, chant and tongue twister. Pupils enjoy rhyming poems with humour and a strong rhythm, and many of the poems in this book contain these elements. The importance of rhyme and rhythm could be emphasised by having the pupils beat out their rhythm by clapping or using musical instruments.

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Teachers notes

• If the poem is to be read aloud, the teacher should use much expression to promote enthusiasm, as some pupils have a negative view of poetry. Activities

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• In the activities, the pupils will be given the chance to explore and express feelings (their own and those of others) on a range of subjects, while drawing on their own experiences and imagination.

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• The activity may: – introduce or reinforce a topic – allow for expression of thoughts, feelings and moods – allow for discussion of personal opinions and interpretations of a poem – promote a love of words. • Discussion is a vital part of lessons and may include class, group or pair work. This will give the pupils the opportunity to share their efforts and experiences together. • Pupils are encouraged on many of the worksheets to check or self-assess their work.

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• Interesting facts, jokes or common sayings have been included on many of the worksheets. Teachers could use these as a springboard for further discussion or writing tasks. Further ideas • It is suggested that the pupils keep a ‘Poetry portfolio’. This will allow the teacher to quickly see what worksheets have been covered. • The pupils’ poetry efforts should be praised and their work displayed on a regular basis in the classroom, around the school, in the school newspaper or in a class anthology. This should occur in an atmosphere where criticism is both positive and constructive, encouraging the pupils to be innovative and to take risks with their writing.

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Sum it up!

Teachers notes

Before the lesson Prepare other examples for the pupils to summarise.

Strand Receptiveness to language

The lesson 1. Read the poem as a class. Discuss some of the more difficult words; e.g. ‘competing’, ‘savouring’, ‘zillion’, ‘mastered’. 2. The pupils answer questions about when time goes quickly/slowly for them. 3. The pupils underline keywords in the poem. 4. The pupils summarise the poem in three sentences. 5. The pupils summarise their day so far. 6. Discuss the poem and all their answers as a class.

Strand unit Oral language – developing receptiveness to oral language

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Background information This lesson should contain much discussion about whether the pupils agree with the poet or not, giving examples to back up their opinions. Pupils should be understanding of the opinions of others and should show tolerance. They should be made aware that we summarise in our everyday lives; e.g. when someone asks us what we did on the weekend, we do not state every single activity but just the most important activities.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a), (b), (c) Teacher check (d) Possible keywords: beach – race, dentist - not case, holidays – zooms, working – last, zillion – get done, marches, people, mastered, few (e) Possible summary: When we are enjoying ourselves time goes quickly. When we are not enjoying ourselves, time drags. Very few people have mastered time. 3. – 4. Teacher check

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Activities covered Reading a poem Discussing a poem Answering questions Summarising a poem Summarising the day

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Objective Listen to expressions, reactions, opinions and interpretations and retell or summarise them

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Summarise the following: poetry with different expressions, newspaper articles, reviews, information in other subjects, letters etc. 2. Retell a heard story or poem. 3. Summarise an episode of a TV programme, or a commercial or a film. Homework suggestion The pupils ask a family member about their views on time. They summarise them and discuss them the following day at school.

Recommended reading

(for retelling) Escape route by Brian Moses A story of snowballs by David Harmer (summarising) Come camping by Daphne Kitching

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Sum it up! In this lesson, you are going to summarise a poem, which means you will shorten it by including the most important information only.

 Read the following poem as a class. Tick tock When we’re on a sandy beach, it’s competing in a race. When we’re lying in the dentist’s chair, this is not the case. When we’re savouring our holidays, it always zooms right past. When we’re chain-locked to our working desk, all it does is last. When we have a zillion things that we have to get done, It doesn’t give an extra second, no, not even one. It marches on regardless, of what we have to do, People who have mastered it, are just but a few.

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Time flies when you’re having fun!

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The most accurate clock is an atomic clock. It is accurate to about one second in 100 000 000 years.

 Answer the questions about the poem. Write another suitable title for the poem.

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(a)

When does time go quickly for you?

(c)

When does time drag for you?

(d)

Underline the keywords or phrases in the poem.

(e)

Summarise what the speaker is saying, using three full sentences only.

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(b)

 Summarise your day so far using two sentences.

 Discuss all your answers and the poem with the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Make sense

Before the lesson Provide an example of how something is described using all the five senses, without making it too obvious.

Activities covered Choosing an object to describe Writing a sense poem about a chosen subject Reading a sense poem to the class Guessing objects in poems Writing and reading out a description of their least favourite food

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. red pen 3. – 5. Teacher check

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Background information In this lesson, the pupils will get practice in describing an object using all their senses. They should try to be original in their descriptions, using as many descriptive words as possible.

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Objective Take part in games in which unseen objects are identified from descriptions given by other pupils

The lesson 1. Have the pupils choose an object in the classroom. They should be given time to quietly look around the classroom and should not choose the most obvious objects. 2. The pupils write a sense poem describing their object. They may have to use their imagination for taste, smell, sound etc. 3. The pupils can take away the ‘I smell’, ‘I taste’ etc. and be left with their own phrases. 4. The pupils read their ‘senses poem’ to the class. The class tries to guess what the object is. 5. The pupils write a good description of their least favourite food and describe it to the person sitting next to them. They can use the senses here, too, to describe it. 6. The pupils can write their poems out neatly and decorate them. These should be displayed in the classroom.

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Strand unit Oral language – developing receptiveness to oral language

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Strand Receptiveness to language

• • • • •

Teachers notes

Homework suggestion The pupils write a poem in the same format describing something in their bedroom.

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Play ‘I spy...’ (using different senses; e.g. ‘I spy with my little eye something that feels cold/smells musty’.) 2. Have ‘feely’ bags with different textured objects. In groups, each pupil can describe an object by feeling it while the group guesses what the object is. This object is then taken out of the bag for confirmation.

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Make sense You are going to describe something using all your senses. Do not make it too easy!

 Choose an object in the classroom. It can be anything!

Insects have taste buds on their feet, antennae and mouthparts!

I choose:

 Describe the object by writing a poem, using the example

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I see............something see-through and red I smell.........trouble if there’s too much of it! I hear.........scratching on paper sounds I feel......... hard plastic, long and thin I taste...... something crunchy which pokes my mouth I think...... my teacher can’t live without it!

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below. (If your object is something you do not eat, imagine what it would taste like!).

This leaf is tasty!

What do you think this poem is about?

 Write your poem. I see

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I smell

I feel

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I taste

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I hear

I think

 Read your poem to the class. They must guess what it is you are thinking of. Yes

No

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Did they guess correctly?

 Write a description of your least favourite type of food. Read it to the person sitting next to you and see if he or she can guess what it is.

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Don’t be boring! Before the lesson Divide the class into groups.

Activities covered Listening to the teacher read a poem Underlining feelings in a poem Practising reading a poem with a group Reading a poem to the class Assessing performance of a group poem Writing more lines for a poem

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. happy, excited, lonely, frightened, joyful, cheerful, sad, surprised, angry, weary 3. – 7. Teacher check

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Background information When reading aloud, the pupils should keep the following in mind: gesture, facial expressions, pronouncing words correctly and reading clearly and loudly enough. The pupils should be told that if they want to be heard in life, they will need to speak clearly, politely and make what they say sound interesting!

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Objective Be continually aware of the importance of gesture, facial expression, audibility and clarity of enunciation in communicating with others

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Feelings’ with no expression and in quite a mumbled voice to the class. 2. Discuss what was wrong with the reading of the poem, as well as the importance of gesture, facial expressions and expression in reading to make the poem more interesting. 3. The pupils read the poem in their groups, and decide how they could make the poem sound more interesting. They can make notes on the poem to remind them. 4. The pupils practise reading their poem in their groups, using expression, facial expressions and gestures to make the different feelings in the poem clear. 5. The groups perform their poems for the class and assess their performances. 6. Still in groups, the pupils write more lines to go with the poem, keeping the style the same. They should be using similes as in the example, but use different feelings; e.g. I’m as bored as …, I’m as mad as … 7. The group reads its poem to the class using expression. 8. All verses can be put together to make a class poem.

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Strand unit Oral language – developing receptiveness to oral language

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Strand Receptiveness to language

• • • • • •

Teachers notes

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Practise using vocal expression when reading from the class reader. 2. Take part in poetry reading competitions. 3. Practise a poem as a class and read it for another class or visitor.

Homework suggestion The pupils concentrate on using expressions, gestures and polite tone of voice all day at home when speaking to their family members. See if their family members notice the difference!

Recommended reading What’s that noise? by Steve Turner Down with flu by Matt Simpson for reading with expression – Life doesn’t frighten me by Maya Angelou

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Don’t be boring! The best way to get someone to listen to you is to speak clearly and with expression!

 The teacher will read this poem without expression or gestures.

Take note of the different feelings in the poem!

Feelings

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 Underline the different feelings in the poem.  In a group, discuss how you can make this

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poem sound interesting.

Consider the following:

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• facial expression • gesture

• audibility (speaking so everyone can hear you) • clarity (speaking clearly and pronouncing words correctly)

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I’m as happy as an elephant, rolling in the mud, I’m as excited as a shark, smelling fishy blood, I’m as lonely as a camel, walking on desert sands, I’m as frightened as a bird, cupped in your hand, I’m as joyful as a bee, on a sweet and pretty flower, I’m as cheerful as a hippo, in a mid-September shower, I’m as sad as a donkey, left in a field alone, I’m as surprised as a puppy, with a giant, juicy bone, I’m as angry as a cat, when the mouse got away, I’m as weary as a fruit bat, who’s upside down all day.

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I have so many feelings, but I think I’ll pick just one, I think I’ll choose the elephant, he’s having the most fun!

• who will read which parts and which parts will be read together You can make notes on the poem to show how you will read it.

 As a group, read the poem to the class, taking all of the above into account.

 Rate how interesting you think your group made the poem sound. sizzling

hot

warm

cold

freezing

 Still in your groups, write more lines for this poem, using similes.

 Read your lines to the class. Use expression when you are reading! Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Always speak to your teacher in your kindest voice! Poetry skills

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Make a noise

Before the lesson Arrange a collection of school musical instruments. These can be shared among the different groups.

Strand unit Oral language – developing receptiveness to oral language Objective Discuss how sound effects enhance the content

Answers 1.–5. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Watch parts of a film or TV programme without sound and then with sound to see the difference. The same can be done with commercials. 2. Add sound effects to parts of the class reader/their own stories/plays etc.

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Background information We are often oblivious to the sound effects being used on television and in films. The lesson is about making the pupils aware of how sound effects add to the mood and atmosphere of a story.

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Activities covered Underlining sounds in groups Adding sound effects to a poem Performing a poem Answering questions Self-assessing a performance of a poem

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘Silence is not golden’’’ in their groups and underline the sounds in the poem. 2. The pupils add sound effects to the poem and practise it. (If possible, they can practise outside.) The pupils can discuss what would make the sounds they require and make use of anything in the classroom or any musical instruments the school has. They should also be making some noises themselves! 3. The pupils perform their poem for the class and then assess it. 4. The pupils answer Questions 4–5. 5. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Strand Receptiveness to language

• • • • •

Teachers notes

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Homework suggestion The pupils choose one advertisement or TV commercial and list the sound effects used. These can be discussed the following day.

Recommended reading

Who’s that on the phone? by Pie Corbett The sound collector by Roger McGough The dragons are back by Nick Toczek

Websites (noise pollution) (for ‘Peter and the Wolf’ Wolf’) <http://library.thinkquest.org/17321/data/pandw.html>

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Make a noise We are surrounded by sounds and noises every day. Hopefully there aren’t too many in your classroom!

 In a group, read the poem below and underline the sound words.

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Silence IS golden.

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Normal talking is about 40 decibels.

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The house is crowded with shattering, crackling, shrieking sounds of children running, talking, whispering, shouting, calling. ‘Bang’ goes the door, feet on the wooden floor. Plates are rattling and glasses tinkling, water running, cutlery clanging, music blaring, TV chatting, drawers are squeaking and skateboards scraping. Soon the windows will shatter with the fullness of it. The noise will go spilling out onto the street. And the house will be quiet, and the comfort, gone.

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Silence is not golden

 Practise reading the poem in your groups and decide what you could use in the classroom to make the sound effects needed. Once you have it practised in your group with all the necessary noises, perform your poem for the class.

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 Rate your group performance with a symbol.  How do sound effects make a difference in a commercial/film?

 Discuss, in your group, what sounds you could use to depict the following. (a)

thunder

(b)

a supermarket

(c)

an amusement park

(d)

a hospital

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Uddled mup! Before the lesson Prepare examples of spoonerism.

Strand unit Reading – developing strategies Objective Achieve proficiency in word identification by refining the different word identification skills

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Activities covered Discussing spoonerism Correcting sentences Correcting a poem Writing and changing a rhyme

The lesson 1. Discuss examples of spoonerism with the pupils. 2. The pupils read the sentences in Question 1 and correct them. 3. The pupils read a four-line poem and rewrite it correctly to answer Questions 2 and 3. 4. The pupils write a nursery rhyme and change some of the initial letters or sounds of words to answer Questions 4 and 5. They then write the new rhyme and read it to themselves. 5. These can be read out to the class or displayed in the classroom.

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Strand Receptiveness to language

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Identify difficult words by finding familiar sounds, sound patterns or letter strings in the word. 2. Identify words by placing them in context and getting clues from the surrounding words. 3. Make up words by splitting words and swapping syllables around. Others can then attempt to read the made-up words. 4. Identify root words.

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Background information The pupils should already have knowledge of certain strategies when reading a difficult word, and should be putting these strategies into practice. They should occasionally be presented with difficult words to read. This lesson requires the pupils to rely on their knowledge of phonics.

Answers 1. (a) I’ve got a cold and a runny nose. (b) The black cat chased the mouse into my bedroom. (c) I have put the muffin in your lunch box. 2. Teacher check 3. There’s an elephant in my sitting room, in a top hat and overcoat, I don’t really mind him being there, but he’s hogging the remote. 4. – 6. Teacher check

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• • • •

Teachers notes

Recommended reading Sunday in the yarm fard by Trevor Millum Frack to bont by Paul Cookson Some favourite words by Richard Edwards Werkling by Spike Milligan

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Uddled mup! Spoonerism is the swapping around of initial letters or sounds in words. For example: ‘Let me sew you to your sheet’ instead of ‘Let me show you to your seat’!

 Some of the first letters or sounds of these words have become muddled up. Read the sentences and correct them.

(b)

The clack bat mased the chouse into by redboom.

(c)

I have put the luffin in your munch box.

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I’ve cot a gold and a nunny rose.

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Fanguage can be lunny!

(a)

 This poem has a few first letters or sounds muddled up too. Read it. There’s an elephant in my ritting soom, in a hop tat and coveroat, I ron’t deally bind him meing there, hut he’s rogging the bemote.

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 Rewrite the poem correctly.

 Write a short nursery rhyme in the space below (on the left).

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 Swap some of the first letters or sounds around. Rewrite the rhyme with the changes.

 Read your changed rhyme to yourself and to the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Cheese please Strand Receptiveness to language

Before the lesson Provide more names of cheeses for the pupils to pronounce.

Objective Improve his/her ability to recognise and understand words by using root words, prefixes, suffixes and syllabification

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) 1 (b) 2 (c) 3 3. – 6. Teacher check

(d) 3

(e) 3

(f) 3

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Add prefixes and suffixes to root words. 2. Identify root words. 3. Break words into syllables and beat out or clap the syllables.

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Background information Pupils should be using different strategies to help them read words they do not know. These strategies include finding the root word, identifying the prefixes and suffixes or breaking words into recognisable parts or syllables. Different reading strategies can be displayed in the classroom.

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Activities covered Reading a poem on own Identifying difficult words Breaking words into syllables Making up dishes, reading them Completing a sentence Discussing answers

The lesson 1. Discuss, as a class, the method of breaking words into syllables. Complete several examples orally. 2. Pupils read the poem ‘Cheese please’ on their own and underline the words they find difficult to read. 3. The pupils break up words from the poem and write how many syllables each contains. 4. The pupils break words up into syllables and read them. 5. Pupils make up cheesy dishes and write the number of syllables in each. 6. Pupils complete the sentence using a word with three or more syllables. 7. All answers can be discussed as a class. Difficult words can be pronounced and the poem can be reread by the class. The pupils can also read out their cheesy dishes.

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Strand unit Reading – developing strategies

• • • • • •

Teachers notes

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Cheese please If you are unable to read a word, try breaking it up into smaller parts.

 Read this poem on your own. Underline the words you find difficult to read. Cheese please

 Break these words into syllables and state how many each word has. rye

(b)

condone

(c)

everything

(d)

Bolognese

(e)

delicious

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(a)

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Cheese is one food that I really adore, Once I get started I just want more. There is Red Leicester, Gouda, Gruyere and Brie, And mild Gorgonzola on rye is for me. Mozzarella is simply nice on its own, While Edam on toast, I can surely condone. Stilton is nice with a bit of a smell, Feta and salad get on really well. Camembert needs to be eaten deep-fried, Bolognese and Parmesan go side by side. Cheddar is tasty, in red or in white, And goat’s cheese on crackers always tastes right. Roquefort I like with my seafood cocktail, And Danish Blue cheese I eat without fail. Yes, cheese is delicious, it has calcium too! Eat it with everything, just like I do!

(f)

calcium

Look them up if you do not know their meaning!

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Someone who loves cheese is called a turophiliac.

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 Break up these words into syllables. Some of the cheeses originate from different countries so they may be hard to pronounce! Gouda

(f)

Parmesan

(b)

Gruyere

(g)

Stilton

(c)

Gorgonzola

(h)

Mascarpone

(d)

Mozzarella

(i)

Ricotta

(e)

Edam

(j)

Monterey Jack

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(a)

Zamorano cheese is a classic Spanish cheese made from sheep’s milk!

 Make up three cheesy dishes. Use the cheeses from Questions 1 and 3; e.g. Stilton sausage, Camembert crisps, Brie and bean burger. Write the number of syllables.

There’s always free cheese in a mousetrap.

 Complete this sentence. Use a word that has three or more syllables. Cheese is

 Discuss all your answers with the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

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Classroom zoo

Before the lesson Provide examples of texts to discuss with the pupils. Teachers may like the pupils to have access to resource materials to answer questions (e.g. dictionaries).

Strand unit Reading – developing strategies Objective Engage with an increasing range of narrative, expository and representational texts

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Activities covered Reading and discussing a poem Answering questions about a poem Writing words with similar meanings Writing a description

The lesson 1. Read ‘‘Primary zoo’ as a class. The poem can then be discussed. 2. The pupils answer Question 2. 3. The pupils decide what animal they are most like and write a reason why to answer Question 3. 4. All other characters in the poem can be discussed; e.g. ‘What type of person do you think the lamb/snake/spider is?’.

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Background information There are many different types of texts that pupils should be reading. Texts for reading should be interesting, sometimes lighthearted, age-appropriate and varied.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) The pupils behave like different animals. (b)bird – parrot, arachnid – spider, rodent – mouse/porcupine, farm animal – lamb/donkey, primate – orangutan, wild animal – lion, reptile – snake (c) Teacher check 3. Teacher check

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• • • •

Teachers notes

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read different types of representational texts; e.g. timetables, menus, charts, graphs, diagrams, food chains, signs, symbols (e.g. trademark, copyright), currencies, plays, dialogues, song words (lyrics), cartoons, brochures, reports, questionnaires, obituaries, game rules. 2. Read poetry that tells a story.

Recommended reading Dooley is a traitor by James Michie The Alice Jean by Robert Graves (story poem) Website www.barkingspiderspoetry.com

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Classroom zoo Is your classroom like a zoo? Let’s hope not.

 Read the poem below.

 Answer these questions. Why do you think this classroom is described as a zoo?

(b)

Name one of each of these mentioned in the poem.

My classroom is just like the zoo, With creatures tame and wild. Some with habits peculiar, And some with manners mild.

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Primary zoo

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(a)

There are the colourful parrots, And all they do is talk. And some rather senseless donkeys, Who don’t know pens from chalk!

Bird:

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Arachnid: Rodent:

Farm animal:

There’s those that strut about like lions, Kings of the jungle are they. And hairy big orangutans, That simply want to play.

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We also have a variety of snakes, Of the venomous sort. And an array of spindly spiders, In whose web you might get caught!

Wild animal: Reptile:

(c)

Write a word that has a similar meaning to these: (i) senseless (ii) strut (iii) array (iv) beasts

 What sort of animal do you think you are most like? Why?

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We have some snobby, snooty cats, Their noses stuck in the air. And prickly, stickly porcupines, Of them you must beware!

Primate:

Gratefully, there are gentle lambs, Who never hurt or shout. And quiet, squeaky little mice, Who live in fear no doubt! Yes, our room is quite noisy, With beasts of every kind. The zookeeper, Miss Krout, says, We drive her out of her mind!

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Animals are such agreeable friends—they ask no questions, pass no criticisms. (George Eliot) Poetry skills

15


Silence

Teachers notes

Before the lesson Make sure the pupils always have reading material with them so that silent reading can be undertaken when the time suits.

Strand unit Reading – developing strategies Objective Become self-reliant, confident, independent readers, having time in class for sustained silent reading

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Answers 1. – 2. Teacher check 3. to bring good luck/good weather 4. as the crow flies – straight distance between two points back to square one – back to the beginning cat’s whiskers – height of perfection die-hard – fierce forty winks – short nap in a pickle – in a difficult situation or in a mess lion’s share – the largest portion spill the beans – reveal information or secret turn over a new leaf – improve one’s conduct (the leaf refers to the leaf in a book and not one on a tree!) well-heeled – wealthy 5. – 6. Teacher check

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Background information There are many pupils who do not read at home; therefore, time must be given during class for the pupils to read quietly to themselves. Ideally, they should be reading something that interests them during this time.

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• • • •

Activities covered Reading a poem on his/her own Answering questions Writing a four-line poem Discussing with the class

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘I would touch wood’. This activity is to be done silently and on their own. 2. The pupils answer Questions 2 and 3 about the poem. 3. The pupils read common expressions and choose one of these to write a fourline poem. The poem does not have to rhyme and can follow any format. 4. The poem and questions can be discussed as a class. Expressions can be used in oral sentences. The pupils read their poems to the class. 5. The teacher can read the poem to the pupils.

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Recommended reading Ten slightly unfamiliar sayings by Tony Bradman On and on by Roger McGough

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read parts of the class reader silently to themselves. 2. Read silently in other areas of the curriculum prior to discussion of a particular topic. 3. Silently read the work of others. 4. Read library books during silent reading time.

Websites <www.gigglepoetry.com> (proverbs) <www.manythings.org/proverbs>

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Silence  You are going to read silently! Concentrate on what you are reading! I would touch wood In the living room, the piano, And Granddad’s walking stick, To the ugly inherited bureau, I gave a gentle kick.

I desperately wanted to swim in the surf, And wiggle my toes in the sand, If touching wood was what it took, The job I’d take in hand.

And so I went on, through the house, There was a lot to do, Cupboards, shelves and skirting boards, And all the loo seats too!

I started my task in the hallway, And touched the wooden stairs, I raced into the kitchen and Laid my hands upon the chairs.

Tables, dressers, lamp stands, bowls, CD racks and doors, Ornaments and pencils, Windowsills and drawers.

I picked up all the wooden spoons, And grabbed the kitchen door, The chopping board, the rolling pin, And stamped the wooden floor.

I even ventured on outside, Touched the kennel for the dog, I hugged each tree that I could see, And every stick and log.

I proceeded to the dining room, And tapped the table there, The large fruit bowl, the candlesticks, Of which we had a pair.

And what did the weather do that day? Well, the skies were azure blue. So if there’s something you want to happen, I’d touch wood if I were you.

I went into my bedroom, Touched my bed and photo frame, My chess set, desk and bookshelf, To my blocks I did the same.

(I hope you don’t live in a log cabin!)

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‘We’ll head down to the beach’, said Mum, ‘If the weather stays this good. Hopefully the rain won’t come, The sun will shine, touch wood.’

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School days are great, touch wood!

 Circle the things you have in your home.

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 Why was the speaker doing these things?  Read these expressions. Tick the ones you know. (a) as the crow flies .......................

(f) in a pickle ................................

(b) back to square one .................

(g) lion’s share ..............................

(c) cat’s whiskers ..........................

(h) spill the beans ..........................

(d) die-hard ...................................

(i) turn over a new leaf ................

(e) forty winks ...............................

(j) well-heeled ..............................

 Choose one of these to write a four-line poem about on a separate sheet of paper.  Now you can talk! Discuss the poem and the expressions with the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

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The A-Z of your town Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write Objective Experience a classroom environment that encourages writing

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The lesson 1. Discuss the city/town/area/village as a class. 2. The pupils think about and discuss their area with their group. 3. The groups brainstorm their ideas and write keywords. These do not have to be used in the poem—the exercise is to focus their attention on the subject. 4. The groups write an acrostic poem using the letters of the alphabet they have been given. They should try and use rhyming couplets if possible. Dictionaries and thesauruses can be used so that pupils can look up words starting with that particular letter. 5. The groups put their poems together so that the end result is a class A – Z poem of their area. 6. The class can read their poem, perhaps with each group reading its parts. The title can be: ‘The A – Z of ’. 7. The entire poem should be submitted to the local newspaper or displayed somewhere where the townspeople can read it.

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Background information This lesson will focus on the city, town, area or village where the pupils live or go to school. Some background information may be needed so the pupils have more ideas with which to work. They need to feel encouraged to write in class, with the knowledge that all attempts will have value.

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Activities covered Discussing own city/town/area/village Brainstorming ideas as a group Writing a poem (acrostic) Putting poems together as a class Displaying or publishing a poem

Before the lesson Provide the pupils with background information about their city/town/area/village. Divide the class into groups. Each group should receive a list of letters of the alphabet in alphabetical order. Each group should get an even number of letters so that rhyming couplets can be used. Each letter of the alphabet should be used, but X, Q and Z should be teamed with easier letters. Dictionaries and thesauruses can be used.

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Strand Receptiveness to language

Teachers notes

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Answers 1. – 6. Teacher check

Recommended reading (similar poems) An alphabet of alphabeastical facts you didn’t know you knew by Paul Cookson

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Poetry skills

Example Lakes, I’m afraid, not even one, Molly’s Diner when the day is done. Naughty children playing in the streets, On to Londis to buy some treats. Please come visit our lovely town, Quit work now and come on down!

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Display their work in the classroom or other areas of the school, or on the school’s website. 2. Compile collections of their work. 3. Make charts and display them. 4. Make posters for the school/local community. 5. Enter writing competitions.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


The A–Z of your town What is great about the city, town, village or area you live in?

 Find a small group to work with. Your group will be given some letters of the alphabet to write a poem about the area you live in.

 Brainstorm ideas in your group. Write keywords that come to mind when you are

thinking about where you live. Think about buildings, roads, shops, people, history, rivers, mountains, things to do, parks, streets, sights, historical aspects etc.

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Keywords

 Write a six-to-eight line poem about your city/town/village/area, starting the sentences with words that start with the letters you have been given.

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Write your letters in order down the lefthand side.

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 Put all your poems together as a class so there is an A-Z poem of your town.  Read the entire poem together as a class.  Submit your poem to your local newspaper or display it somewhere where the townspeople can read it.

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Poetry skills

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Watch the teacher Objective Observe the teacher model a wide variety of writing genres

Answers 1. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Observe the teacher writing other forms of poetry, stories, letters, definitions, directions, invitations, headlines, lists, opinions, reports etc.

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Background information Teachers should constantly model different writing forms. Examples of writing should be left on the board to remind pupils of the format.

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Activities covered Observing the teacher modelling writing Reading format and example Writing a tanka as a class Writing ideas for a poem Writing own tanka

The lesson 1. Show the class how to write a tanka. 2. Read the format and example on the copymaster. 3. Create a tanka as a class and write it on the copymaster. 4. The pupils choose their own topic and write ideas. 5. The pupils write their own tanka, making sure it has 31 syllables. They can then read their poems to the class or display them in the classroom.

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Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write

Before the lesson Provide other examples of a tanka. The teacher will model how a tanka is created so it might be a good idea to have one ready! The pupils will need a knowledge of syllables to complete this lesson.

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Strand Receptiveness to language

Teachers notes

Recommended reading Write a poem about anything by Steve Turner

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Watch the teacher Watch the teacher!

 Watch your teacher write a poem called a TANKA.  Look at the format and example below. Title ..................................... School

Line 2: 7 syllables .............. No time to chat and enjoy

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Line 3: 5 syllables .............. Concentrate too much

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Line 1: 5 syllables .............. Work, work every day

Line 4: 7 syllables .............. Friends become acquaintances

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Line 5: 7 syllables .............. Life rolls on outside these walls

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 Write a tanka together as a class. Write it below.

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 Choose a topic you know something about. Write some ideas below.

Your tanka should have 31 syllables!

 Use your ideas to write your own tanka.

 Read it to yourself! Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

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What do you think?

Teachers notes

Before the lesson Read other poems to the class, who can orally give their reactions.

Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write Objective Express and communicate reactions to reading experiences

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Activities covered • Reading and discussing a poem • Answering questions • Writing sentences

The lesson 1. The teacher reads the poem ‘Take it away’ to the class. The poem can be briefly discussed, and harder words can be clarified, such as: ‘strut’, ‘brag’, ‘gourmet’, ‘prod’. The tone of the poem can also be discussed (slightly mocking or sarcastic). 2. The pupils answer Question 2 using full sentences. 3. The pupils imagine they could talk to the poet and write two sentences to him/her about takeaway meals to answer Question 3.

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Strand Receptiveness to language

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Background information Pupils must get opportunities to communicate their reactions to what they read and should be honest in their opinions. Pupils have different tastes in reading, and by discussing what they do and do not like, they will learn what gives them the most enjoyment.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) Teacher check (b) takeaway meals (c) The poet does not like takeaways. – ‘ a very sad tune’ (d) – (e) Teacher check 3. Teacher check

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Additional activity Pupils can: Express their reactions when reading other poetry, class reader, informational text in other subjects, each other’s work etc.

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Homework suggestion The pupils read menus and comment on them in class the next day. Menus can be from the Internet or a local restaurant or cafe.

Recommended reading

Hot food by Michael Rosen Think of all the poor children by Steve Turner Website www.poetry4kids.com

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Poetry skills

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What do you think? We all have our own reactions to what we read. Be honest about what you think!

 Read the following poem. Take it away

We collect our meal, in a brown paper bag, and strut down the street, as if to brag.

But I think we play a very sad tune, when we prod our dinner, with a plastic spoon.

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Gourmet chefs needn’t have created our meal. We’ll settle for less, and think it’s a deal.

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 Answer these questions.

There is something great, about takeaways for tea. They needn’t be fancy, or have courses of three.

Write full sentences!

What do you think of this poem? Give a reason for your answer.

(b)

What is the subject of the poem?

(c)

What does the poet think of this? Quote from the poem to support your answer.

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(a)

Do you agree? Explain.

(e)

What kind of food might the poet enjoy eating?

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(d)

 Imagine you could speak to this poet. Write two sentences you would say to him/her about takeaways.

McDonalds™ feeds more than 46 million people a day!

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Poetry skills

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Cut it out

Teachers notes

Before the lesson Each pupil will need a newspaper/magazine to cut out words.

Activities covered • Cutting out words • Arranging words to create an abstract poem • Reading a poem to the class Background information This lesson gives pupils the opportunity to create a poem without thinking of the words themselves! They should try to arrange their words into a poem that makes as much sense as possible. All efforts should be praised because it is quite an abstract activity.

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Objective Experience interesting and relevant writing challenges

The lesson 1. Explain what the pupils are about to do and read the example provided. Knowing what they are doing will probably influence the words they choose to cut out, but that’s OK! 2. The pupils then cut out 20–25 words from newspapers/magazines. They should cut out bigger words, not tiny words that can barely be seen. The teacher can decide if the pupils should find fewer words. They should be told that words such as ‘the’, ‘a’, ‘and’ could also be used, as these will help with fitting the poem together. 3. The pupils arrange the words until they have a poem. They can think of an explanation for it. The poem should be given a title. They can stick their words on a separate sheet of paper and display them. 4. The pupils write their poem on the copymaster and state what it is about (if they know!). 5. The pupils assess how easy/difficult the poem was to write. 6. The pupils can read their poems to the class if there is time.

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Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write

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Strand Receptiveness to language

Answers 1. – 7. Teacher check

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Additional activity Pupils can: Write letters to penpals, ghost stories, different forms of poetry, advertisement for their own school, rhymes, tongue twisters, invitations, a treasure map, inventions, ideas for a new board game, tall tales, warning notices, prayers, labels, tips etc.

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Cut it out You are going to cut words out of a magazine/newspaper and then put them together to form a poem!

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 Look at the example below.

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 Get a magazine and newspaper and carefully cut out about 20 – 25 words. Choose any words that jump out at you. You will need a few little words too; e.g. ‘and’, ‘to’, ‘the’.

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 Put your words together to form a six-line poem. Rearrange the words until you are happy with the poem. Of course, it does not need to rhyme! But it should be interesting!

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 Write your poem below.

 What is your poem about?  Read your poem to the class and see if you can explain it!  Rate how easy/difficult the poem was to create. EASY Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

MEDIUM

DIFFICULT Poetry skills

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For someone special

Before the lesson Prepare other examples of cinquains to read to the class.

Activities covered Choosing someone special to write about Answering questions about a special person/pet Writing a cinquain Checking a cinquain

Answers 1. – 7. Teacher check

Example for Question 5 Johnny, Mad, lovable Caring, loving, laughing My own personal protector Brother

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Write a range of texts for different target audiences; e.g. advertisements and bedtime stories for young children. 2. Write cartoons for teenagers, instructions for their parents on how to keep kids happy, excuses to the teacher for work not completed, health slogans aimed at their own age group, definitions of modern gadgets for the older generation and thank you notes for a gift received.

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Background information Pupils should get opportunities to take into account and write for different audiences. This lesson concerns someone who is special in their lives and, because some pupils may be embarrassed to write about someone special (especially boys), they may write about a pet. Should they not have a pet, any character they like from a television programme or film will do!

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Objective Write for an increasingly varied audience

The lesson 1. As a class, discuss what a cinquain is. 2. The pupils choose someone special/a pet and answer questions describing him/her. 3. The pupils write a cinquain, following the format provided. The teacher can go through the format with the class, perhaps modelling an example on the board. Rhyming is not necessary. 4. The pupils check their cinquain and make any necessary adjustments. 5. If applicable, the pupils can read their cinquain to the special person (or pet!).

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Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write

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Strand Receptiveness to language

• • • •

Teachers notes

Recommended reading (friends) Best friends by Adrian Henri

(family) Out of season by Paul Cookson Me and my brother by Michael Rosen The thingy by Lindsay Mac Rae

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For someone special Plan a five-line poem called a ‘cinquain’ for someone special. It can be to a friend, family member or pet!

 Who will the poem be for?  Write down some adjectives to describe him/her.

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 Name some activities this person/pet enjoys doing.

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 What makes this person/pet special?

 Write your cinquain using the format below. (Person’s/pet’s name)

Think about who you are writing it for. If it is a person, write it so he/she will enjoy reading it!

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(Two adjectives describing the person/pet)

(Three action words)

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(A four-word phrase about the person/pet) ,

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(Nickname or noun)

 Read your poem and check it. Improve it if you can.  Give your poem to the special person. If it is for a pet, you may have to read it to him/her!

Families are like fudge … mostly sweet with a few nuts. (Anon)

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Friendship isn’t a big thing— it’s a million little things. (Anon)

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Be positive!

Teachers notes

Before the lesson Divide the class into groups.

Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write Objective Give and receive constructive responses to writing

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Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Give and receive responses to other writing activities, such as projects, stories, poems, posters, artwork.

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Background information In this lesson, the pupils need to comment constructively about the work of others. Pupils must be told to be sensitive to the feelings of others and although they should make suggestions for possible improvements, the idea is to focus on the positive. The type of poem they are writing is quite similar to an apostrophe poem, which does not always consist of only questions. The poem should be between six and 16 lines and rhyming is not necessary. Examples are William Blake’s ‘The Tyger’ and Walt Whitman’s ‘To a locomotive in winter’.

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Activities covered Reading a poetry format Writing a poem to something Reading poem as a group Giving/receiving responses to writing Writing one comment Holding a group vote

The lesson 1. As a class, read the poem ‘To my bed’. 2. Discuss the type of poem the pupils will write. They can address their poem to anything, but it should be something that they want to question. For this lesson, the poem should consist of only questions they could ask the object they have chosen. Rhyming is not necessary. 3. The pupils draft their poems, if necessary, then write them in the space provided. 4. The pupils read their poems to their groups. The group comments on the poem, giving helpful suggestions and positive feedback. 5. The pupils write down one comment they received. 6. The pupils hold a group vote for the best poem. This poem is read out to the class. The pupils can then answer Question 5 (b).

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Poetry skills

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Be positive!  Write your own poem to something. It might

To

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Why are you so hard to get out of, each and every day? Why when I’m trying hard to stay awake, do you always have your way? Why are you always so comfortable, whenever I need a rest? Why when I’m looking for peace and quiet, are you the very best? Why are you always the answer, when I need to feel cosy and warm? Why do I seem to run to you, for safety in a storm? Why are you so inviting, whenever I turn off the light? Why don’t you tell me your secrets, while I’m sleeping tonight?

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To my bed

be to an animal, object or place. Your poem should be made up of questions. It does not have to rhyme. You might like to draft your poem on scrap paper before writing it in the space below.

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 Read the poem below.

Write to something you have strong feelings about!

 Read your poem to a small group. The group should tell you what they think. Be positive and helpful when it is your turn to comment on others’ work!

 Name one comment the group gave you.  (a) (b)

Have a group vote for the ‘best’ poem. Read it to the class. What made it the best poem?

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You can do haiku!

Before the lesson Prepare some additional ideas for haiku topics, perhaps ideas covered in science.

Strand Receptiveness to language

The lesson 1. Explain the format of a haiku to the class. The pupils can then read through the example on the copymaster. 2. The pupils think of a nature topic. It should be something that interests them. 3. The pupils think about their topic and write keywords in the box. This is to get them focused on their topic. There should be silence in the classroom at this time. 4. The pupils write a haiku. 5. The pupils check their haiku and write it out neatly. It should be appropriately decorated. 6. All haikus should be put together in a booklet which could be given a title, perhaps something to do with nature. This should be left in the school where others can read it.

Strand unit Writing – creating and fostering the impulse to write

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Objective See his/her writing valued

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Activities covered Reading haiku Thinking of a topic Writing keywords Writing haiku Making a class booklet of haikus

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• • • • •

Teachers notes

Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Be presented with awards for different aspects of writing. 2. Add to a ‘Writer’s gallery’, where written pieces are frequently changed. 3. Enter pieces of written work in various competitions. 4. Display their written work in the classroom/areas of the school or on the school’s website. 5. Submit their written work to newspapers/magazines. 6. Keep portfolios of all their best work throughout the year. 7. Contribute to class anthologies. Homework suggestion The pupils read their haiku to a family member, explaining its format if the family member does not know.

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Background information Pupils can see their writing valued in many ways—class anthologies, school websites, school newspapers/magazines, writing competitions etc. They should feel their work is of some value if they have tried hard. Less able pupils must get the opportunity to have their work valued as well.

Recommended reading

Icy morning haikus by James Carter Art year haikus by John Kitching Facing the truth – with haikus by Malorie Blackman Websites

<www.shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/types.html > <www.toyomasu.com/haiku>

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You can do haiku! Haiku poems originated in Japan. They are usually about nature and have a set format.

Format: ................................................. Example Title ................................................. Forest Line 1: 5 syllables ................................................. A shady, dark home,

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Line 2: 7 syllables ................................................. Where shy creatures like to hide,

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Line 3: 5 syllables ................................................. And I like to roam.

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A haiku does not need any rhyming words!

 Think about something in nature. It could be a river, lake, mountain, tree, flower, creature, leaf, blossom, insect, cloud, or anything that tickles your fancy!

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What did you choose?

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 Think about your topic carefully and write any keywords that come to mind.

 Use your words to help you write your own haiku. Make sure you have the correct number

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of syllables. Title:

Be descriptive!

5 syllables: 7 syllables: 5 syllables:

 Read your haiku and check it. Write it out neatly and decorate it.  Put all the class’s haikus together in a booklet and give the book a title. Leave it in the school where others can read your poems.

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Parts of speech Strand unit Oral language – developing competence and confidence in using oral language

Activities covered Discussing verbs, nouns, adjectives Writing definitions and examples Identifying parts of speech in sentences Reading a poetry format Writing a poem Reading a poem to the class Discussing answers with the class Writing verbs, nouns and adjectives

Answers 1. (a) A verb is an action or doing word; e.g. laugh. (b) A noun is a naming word; e.g. lunch box. (c) An adjective describes the noun; e.g. silly. 2. (a) verb – took, nouns – teacher, class, beach, day, adjectives – kind, windy (b) verb – chased, nouns – dog, sister, adjectives – furry, grumpy, older (c) verbs – went, is, nouns – brother, concert, adjectives – deaf, loud 3. Teacher check 4. Example: nouns – cereal, tea, toast, jam, milk, butter, plate, spoon verbs – eat, pour, chew, sit, stir, sprinkle, drink adjectives – hot, delicious, sweet, lumpy, chewy, tasty, salty

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Background information Pupils should get a lot of opportunities to practise identifying the different parts of speech, and be aware of them in their own writing. (See also Prim-Ed Publishing: P7013 ‘Introducing parts of speech’ poster set P7014 ‘Understanding parts of speech’ poster set 6953 ‘Introducing parts of speech’ interactive software)

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• • • • • • • •

The lesson 1. Discuss parts of speech with the class, focusing on nouns, verbs and adjectives. The pupils could give many oral examples of each. The teacher can also give words and have the pupils identify what parts of speech they are. 2. The pupils write definitions of a verb, noun and adjective and give an example of each. 3. The pupils identify the nouns, verbs and adjectives in the given sentences to answer Question 2. 4. The pupils read a format of a poem. The teacher can go through the format and example. 5. The pupils write their own poem. They can choose any topic they like. They should use their imagination and not choose obvious words. 6. The pupils discuss all their answers with the class and read their poem aloud. 7. The pupils write three adjectives, nouns and verbs to do with breakfast.

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Objective Understand the functions and know the names of parts of speech

Before the lesson Provide examples of nouns, verbs and adjectives.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Identify different parts of speech in sentences or the class reader. 2. Add adjectives and adverbs to simple sentences to provide more details. 3. Write poems in other formats, using particular parts of speech.

Recommended reading

(verbs) How to successfully persuade your parents to give you more pocket money by Andrea Shavick Sounds in the wind by Kate Williams (identify parts of speech) Who said what? by Gervase Phinn

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Parts of speech Adjective

Noun

Verbs, nouns and adjectives are all parts of speech.

School is super!

 Define each word and give an example of each. (a)

Verb

Verb example:

(b)

Noun example: Adjective

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(c)

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example:

 Read these sentences. Write V above the verbs, N above the nouns and A above the

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adjectives. (a)

The kind teacher took the class to the windy beach for the day.

(b)

The furry, grumpy dog chased my older sister.

(c)

My brother went to a loud concert and now he is deaf. Look at this format and example to write a poem.

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 (a)

Title: Noun ............ Stars

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Line 1: Verb (‘ing’) ............ twinkling,

Line 2: Verb phrase (‘ing’) ............ hanging in black space,

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Line 3: three adjectives describing the noun ............ silent, loyal, still

(b)

Try one yourself! You can choose any topic you like.

Use interesting words!

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Title:

Line 1: Line 2: Line 3:

 Write three nouns, three verbs and three adjectives to do with BREAKFAST. Nouns

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Verbs

Adjectives

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Do it!

Teachers notes

Strand unit Oral language – developing competence and confidence in using oral language

Activities covered Underlining verbs Circling verbs Writing sentences in past tense Writing a verb poem Discussing answers

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Experience the same lesson, but with nouns. The pupils write an occupation poem using nouns, which could be objects that the person uses in his/her line of work. 2. Write given passages in the past tense. 3. Read texts and identify the nouns and verbs. 4. Write all the activities he or she has done in a day (verbs).

Homework suggestion The pupils write all the things they do at home. (verbs)

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Background information This lesson deals only with verbs. The class can either do the whole worksheet together or all answers can be discussed at the end. The pupils should give oral definitions and examples of verbs as well as having practice at changing tenses.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. write, is, wrestle, were, snore, argue, concentrate, sitting, do, breathe, worked, smashed 3. (a) James was fit because he swam, walked, cycled and ran. (b) The family ate dinner and discussed the day’s events. 4. Teacher check

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• • • • •

The lesson 1. Give the pupils oral verb exercises; e.g. pick out the verb in this sentence, use verbs to explain what we do at school. 2. The pupils read the joke on the copymaster and underline the verbs. 3. The pupils read the words and circle the verbs to complete Question 2. 4. The pupils change sentences into the past tense. 5. The pupils write a verb poem, reading the example first. 6. All answers are discussed as a class and poems are read out or displayed.

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Objective Learn about and name the basic properties of verbs and nouns

Before the lesson Prepare oral exercises to do with verbs at the start of the lesson.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Recommended reading Literacy hour by Clare Bevan

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Do it! Can you remember what a verb is?

 Read this joke and underline the verbs. The children were taught in class, to tell the age of a tree. ‘Count the rings in each cross-section, it is a ring for a year, you see!’ Luke went home for afternoon tea, and his mother thought him bold. When he would not eat his Swiss roll, he said, ‘That cake is five years old!’

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 Which of these are verbs? Circle them. write

were

argue

breathe

is

friendly

concentrate

poodle

snore

sitting

worked

hiccup

armchair

do

ice cubes

wrestle

measles

vest

smashed

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cake

 Rewrite these sentences in the past tense.

James is fit because he swims, walks, cycles and runs.

(b)

The family eats dinner and discusses the day’s events.

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(a)

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 Write a verb poem. Choose an occupation and write eight actions this person does in his/ her line of work.

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Follow the example below.

A teacher ...

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teaches, writes, praises, corrects, guides, nurtures, explains and ... yells!

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By yourself

Teachers notes

Strand unit Reading – reading for pleasure and information Objective Read widely as an independent reader from a more challenging range of reading material

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘‘Pea puzzle’. 2. The pupils answer questions on their copymaster and write a two-line ending for the poem. 3. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Activities covered • Reading a poem on own • Answering questions • Writing a suitable ending to a poem

Before the lesson Provide other reading materials for the pupils to read on their own first, and then discuss with the class.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

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Background information Pupils should get the chance to read materials on their own and thereby gain confidence in their own abilities. It is important the pupils are reading materials that are on par with their reading ability and, therefore, differentiation in this area is vital.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) Answers will vary, but should be similar to the following: (i) type of dance (ii) spinning movement of the body made while balanced on one toe or foot (iii) jumped or ran excitedly (iv) eat quickly or greedily (b) Answers should include two of the following: family sat down to dinner/peas began to dance/peas danced off the table/Mum proud (c) the minty peas who had come to life (d) No, the mother thought her son/daughter had eaten all the peas. (e) & (f) Teacher check

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Additional activity Pupils can: Read some of the following types of reading material chosen by them from the library: poetry, nonfiction, magazines, comics, parts of the class reading book, cartoons, recipes, instructions, jokes, questionnaires, song words, brochures, notices.

Recommended reading

(reading cereal box) Breakfast reading by Steve Turner

(challenging) Symphony in yellow by Oscar Wilde The song of the mischievous dog by Dylan Thomas Website <www.childrensbooks.co.uk >

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By yourself  Read the poem below. Pea puzzle

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Then, suddenly, before my eyes, the peas began to dance, it appeared to be the cancan, they must have come from France.

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We all sat down to dinner, and there upon my plate, was a heap of minty peas, a vegetable I hate!

They danced onto the table then, and pirouetted onto the floor, and gracefully the pea-ple then, cavorted out the door.

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Mangetout are a type of pea! Mmm, delicious!

‘You’ve eaten all your peas!’ cried Mum, ‘I’m so proud of you! Next time I’ll give you mushy peas, you’ll gobble those up too!’

What do you think these words mean? (i)

cancan (line 7)

(ii)

pirouetted (line 10)

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(a)

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 Answer these questions by yourself.

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(iii) cavorted (line 12) (iv) gobble (line 16)

Write two events that occurred in the poem. ,

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(b)

(c)

What do you think ‘pea-ple’ are?

(d)

Did the rest of the family realise what was happening? How do you know?

(e)

What kind of food do you wish would dance off your plate? Describe how it would move.

(f)

Write a two-line ending for this poem.

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Poetry book Objective Engage with books in group or in whole class settings Activities covered • Looking at a poetry anthology as a group • Reading poems • Answering questions

The lesson 1. Give each group a poetry anthology. 2. The group can pass the book around for everyone to look at. Each group member chooses a poem and reads it to the group. 3. The pupils answer Questions 3 and 4. 4. Pupils read a few of the poems from the book and answer Question 5.

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Strand unit Reading – reading for pleasure and information

Before the lesson Divide the class into groups. Each group needs to be given a poetry anthology.

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. In groups, read plays, stories, poems, their own writing etc. 2. As a class, read poetry or the class reader. 3. Plan and write group projects.

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Background information Reading as a group or class will allow the pupils to share what they are reading as well as their responses to the reading. Reading in groups also allows pupils to assist each other with difficult words and is not as daunting for a less able reader as reading in front of the whole class.

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Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

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Poetry book  In your group, look through the poetry anthology your teacher has given you. Make sure each group member looks at it.

 Have each group member choose one poem to read to the group.  Write the title of the poem and the name of the poet that you chose.

A fear of poetry is called metrophobia. I hope you don’t have that!

(b)

Who compiled the book?

(c)

Who published the book?

(d)

When was the book first printed?

(e)

Does it contain illustrations?

(f)

If so, who illustrated the book?

(g)

Describe the front cover.

(h)

Tick the features the book contains. table of contents

dedication

information about poets

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index

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What is the title of the book?

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(a)

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 Answer these questions.

How many pages does the book have?

(j)

Name five poets whose poems feature in the book.

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(i)

 (a)

(b)

As a group, choose and read three more poems. Name the title and poet of …

(i) a poem you liked. Why did you like it?

(ii) a poem you disliked. Why did you dislike it?

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What interests you? Strand Competence and confidence in using language Strand unit Reading – reading for pleasure and information

The lesson 1. After researching a topic that interests them, the pupils write facts and ideas in point form to complete Question 2. 2. Read the definition of a sausage poem and the examples to the class. The pupils can then draft their own sausage poem. Emphasise to the pupils that sausage poems are difficult to compose and they may need to ask for assistance and/or use their dictionaries. The pupils should also be told that it may take several drafts to reach a final version. 3. The pupils can rewrite their poems neatly in a sausage shape in the space provided.

Background information Pupils should have many opportunities to read what interests them and not be restricted by the teacher’s choice. Visits to the school/local library should be frequent.

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Activities covered Researching Writing facts/ideas Reading an example of a poem Writing a sausage poem

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• • • •

Before the lesson The pupils will need to have researched a topic that interests them. All pupils must have access to information, via the school library and/or the Internet. A dictionary for each pupil is essential for this lesson.

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Objective Read to satisfy personal interests

Teachers notes

Answers 1. – 3. Teacher check

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Complete projects on topics that interest them; e.g. an animal, country or occupation. 2. Have time allocated in the library to browse through the books. 3. Keep a record of their personal reading. (This list should not only consist of books, but other reading materials too.)

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What interests you? Follow your own interests!

 Research a topic you find interesting. It can be anything!  Write some facts below, in point form.

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My topic:

 Write a sausage poem about your research.

Each new word must start with the last letter of the previous word. Words do not have to rhyme. Write four lines if you can. Look at the examples below.

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It is harder than it looks!

Teachers set tests, studying gets stressful, losing great times, stuck knuckled down.

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Cats sleep plenty yet too often, need dear rats, snoozing gets shelved.

Keep your dictionary close at hand to look up words beginning with the letters you need!

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Draft your poem on scrap paper first, then write a final copy in the space below.

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Monday blues Strand Competence and confidence in using language Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Before the lesson Set a time limit for the pupils to complete their poems. The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Monday muddle’ as a class. 2. The pupils change the given sentences in Question 2. 3. The pupils write their own topsy-turvy poem. They can begin to draft their poems during the lesson. Set a time limit as to when the poem should be complete. It is suggested that a few days is given so the pupils can keep working and improving on it. The poem should be topsy-turvy in that actions etc. are swapped around. 4. The pupils write their finished poems on a separate sheet of paper and then share their poems with the class. Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Write the following types of text over a length of time: stories, plays, projects, longer poems, newspaper articles, songs and questionnaires. Homework suggestion The pupils work on their topsy-turvy poems.

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Background information Sometimes written work should take a few days to complete so that pupils can work on their writing and improve on it. A time limit should always be given. If written work has been completed over a length of time, the work should be mostly free of mistakes and of a higher standard than writing done just during one lesson. This point should be made clear to the pupils.

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Activities covered • Reading a poem • Changing sentences • Writing a poem over a period of time

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Objective Write for a sustained length of time

Teachers notes

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Poetry skills

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Monday blues I hope you are having a good day!

 Read the poem below about someone who is not. Monday muddle

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I combed all my teeth, and ate up my Mam, I washed my toast and strawberry jam.

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I got up this morning, and put gloves on my feet, I brushed both my armpits, and hung up my sheet.

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I read my milk, and dressed the cat, I fed my trousers and drank my hat.

I polished my brother and watered my shoes, I crawled under my bed and went for a snooze.

 Turn these into topsy-turvy sentences.

The cat drank the sour milk and ate spicy chicken.

(b)

My brother tied his shoelaces and washed his hands.

(c)

The teacher wrote on the board and yelled at the naughty pupil.

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(a)

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 Write a topsy-turvy poem using your own sentences. Do your first rough draft below. Cross out as much as you like—it’s only a rough draft!

 Keep working on it and improving on it. This may take a few days!  Share it with the class. Write a final copy on a separate sheet of paper. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Concrete poetry Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Activities covered Reading an example of concrete poetry Discussing favourite things Writing ideas Writing a poem Self-assessing a poem

Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Precede writing activities such as a letter, a story or poetry, with discussion.

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Background information Most lessons contain some oral language. Discussing a topic before the writing process is helpful so that pupils can focus on the topic and get ideas from others in the class.

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• • • • •

The lesson 1. Explain what a concrete poem is and read the example. 2. The class discusses things in life they would not like to be without; i.e. their favourite things. 3. The pupils write their own ideas and others’ ideas to complete Question 2. 4. The pupils choose one item that is special to them. 5. The pupils write a two-line or a four-line poem about their object. Rhyming is not necessary. 6. The pupils make a pencil sketch of their object to write their poem on. All this work should be done lightly so they can change their drawing if they need to. It is not always easy to get the poem to fit! The poem at the end should look like the object they are writing about. 7. The pupils assess their poem to answer Question 5. 8. Poems can be passed around and shared with the class or written neatly or cut out to be displayed in the classroom.

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Objective Experience varied and consistent oral language activity as part of the pre-writing process

Before the lesson Prepare examples of concrete poetry.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

Websites (concrete poetry) <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete_poetry> <http://oregonstate.edu/~smithc/vita/concrpoe.html>

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Concrete poetry A concrete poem is one that takes the shape of the object it describes. For example:

my br

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a imes

day, so it

d o e s n ’t st

i ck

I co

ut

t ty

live witho

e, I

my hair twe n

not d l u

y my side becaus

ush br

h us

’s b . It

ur ike yo up l

s.

 Have a class discussion about things in life you would not like to be without. Maybe it’s

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your teddy, your MP3 player or your schoolbooks!

 List your own ideas and others’ ideas below. Circle one thing you would not like to be without.

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 Write a two-line or four-line poem about it. Your words do not have to rhyme!

 Draw a rough sketch in pencil of the object you chose. It must be big enough to write on! Write your poem on your sketch so that your poem is the same shape as your subject.

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Make sure your readers know where to start reading!

 (a)

How did your poem turn out? Fantastically

(b)

Very Well

OK

Badly

Write a reason for your rating on the back of this sheet.

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How are you feeling? Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Activities covered Writing keywords Reading a sample poem Writing a poem in draft form Typing out a poem Compiling a class booklet

Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Redraft, revise and edit the following: articles for a class newspaper, each other’s work, stories, poems, projects, sentences or any written activities.

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Background information Pupils should get into the habit of writing a draft, checking it and improving it and then writing it neatly or typing it out. The pupils should always be encouraged to read their own work to check for mistakes and to try to improve it. Time can sometimes be set aside purely for pupils to check their work. They should be working on their own in this lesson with no discussion.

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The lesson 1. Explain the process of redrafting and revising work. Some examples can be done together as a class. The activity is not discussed so that the pupils can come up with their own ideas. 2. The pupils think of other ways to say ‘fine’. Keywords are written on the copymaster. Tell the pupils they must use interesting phrases. 3. The pupils read the sample poem and then write a poem in draft form. They then read their draft, correct mistakes and change ideas if necessary. Rhyming is not essential. The pupils use their imaginations and think of descriptive words and phrases. Lines should start with: ‘I am feeling’, ‘I feel’, ‘I am’ etc. Similes can be used. 4. The pupils type out their poems. All poems are put together to form a class booklet entitled, ‘We are feeling fine!’ Some of the poems can be read out to the class. The book should be left on display in the classroom.

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Objective Write independently through a process of drafting, revising, editing and publishing

Before the lesson Prepare examples of how a piece of work is redrafted and revised.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

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Poetry skills

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How are you feeling? When someone asks you how you are feeling, do you just say ‘fine?’ So do most people!

 Think of some more interesting ways to say you are feeling fine. Use your imagination! Write keywords or phrases below.

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Use descriptive words and phrases.

 Read the ‘fine’ poem example below. How are you feeling?

Well, today I’m feeling quite OK, I’m fine, I’m great, I have to say.

 Write your own poem saying how ‘fine’ you feel. Say it in 12 different ways. Start each new idea on a new line.

Rough draft

You could start with: I am feeling … I am … I feel …

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I’m feeling super, in fact, tip-top, I’m smiling now and I just can’t stop.

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I’m feeling marvellous, full of joy, I feel like a child with a brand new toy. I’m feeling elated, quite over the moon, I feel like a hedgehog in the middle of June.

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I’m feeling blissful, ecstatic and glad, There’s not one bit of me feeling sad.

I’m feeling contented, healthy and well, To make things even better, there’s the home-time bell!

 Check your poem carefully and improve it if you can.  Type your poem out. Put all the class’s poems together in a booklet and give it the title ‘We are feeling fine!’

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Autobiography

Objective Write, without redrafting, on a given or chosen topic within specified time constraints Activities covered • Reading a format • Writing about self • Self-assessing a written task

The lesson 1. Explain the lesson, giving pupils their time limit. Read the format with the class. 2. The pupils write their poems. There should be silence in the classroom so they can focus completely on the task at hand. They should be honest about themselves. 3. The pupils answer Question 3.

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Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Before the lesson Decide what time limit the pupils should have to complete the task.

Answers 1. – 3. Teacher check

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Additional activity Pupils can: Write the following texts within time limits: short poems, summaries, articles, written tasks in other subjects, comprehension activities and rough drafts.

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Background information For this lesson, the pupils should be given a strict time limit. Time should be spent focused completely on the lesson; warn the pupils when time is running out. A little pressure can be beneficial! The pupils should not have the time to check through their work.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

Recommended reading The way I am by Gervase Phinn

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Autobiography You are going to write about a very important person—yourself! You have a time limit, so work quickly and carefully. Be as honest as you can about yourself.

 Follow the format below.

We are all special!

Line 1:...... Your name ,

(3 things about your character)

Line 3:...... Brother or sister of

, (or son/daughter of

Line 4:...... Who loves

,

Line 5:...... Who feels

about

Line 6:...... Who needs

and and

,

and

Line 8:...... Who fears

,

and

(3 things you need)

(3 things or objects you share) (3 things you fear)

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Line 7:...... Who gives

Line 10: ... Who dreams of

(people, things or ideas) ( an emotion about 1 thing)

,

Line 9:...... Who’d like to see

)

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Line 2:......

(1 place or person)

(I dream)

Line 11: ... A pupil of

(teacher’s name or school’s name)

Line 12: ... Nickname or repeat name

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Who loves

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 Your turn

Who feels

,

,

,

, and

.

about ,

, and

,

Who gives

,

, and

,

,

, and

,

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Who needs

Who fears

Who’d like to see Who dreams of A pupil of

Don’t let anyone tell you that you have to be a certain way. Be unique. Be what you feel. (Melissa Etheridge)

 Which part of the poem was the most difficult to complete? Place a star next to it. Why was it the most difficult? Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Near perfect Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Activities covered Reading a poem Writing rhyming words Writing a poem Checking a poem

Answers 1. – 4. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Edit the work of others. 2. Complete editing exercises. 3. Refer to a checklist when checking written work.

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Background information Pupils should be in the habit of checking their own work. They should use a checklist which could perhaps be displayed in the classroom. Once they have completed a written exercise, they should automatically read through their own work and check the grammar, punctuation and spelling. Time can be set aside for the checking of their work.

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• • • •

The lesson 1. Discuss with the pupils the process of checking their own work. Explain that the poem they write should have no mistakes! 2. Read the poem ‘‘My friends’ as a class. 3. The pupils write rhyming words for the given names to complete Question 2. They should be reminded not to hurt others’ feelings and should not refer to anyone in the class. 4. The pupils write their own poem in a similar style. The names they use should have rhyming words but a rhyming scheme is not necessary. The poem should consist of at least eight lines. One-syllable names will be easier to rhyme. 5. The pupils read their poems and thoroughly check them for spelling, punctuation and grammar.

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Objective Observe the conventions of grammar, punctuation and spelling in his/her writing

Before the lesson Prepare a checklist that the pupils could use when writing.

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Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

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Poetry skills

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Near perfect  Read the poem below.

 Try to think of rhyming words that go with these

names; e.g. Matt is a brat, Ann loves a flan, Josh acts posh.

My friends

(a) Clare –

There’s Dan the man, and Jane who loves rain, Spacy Tracy, and insane Shane.

(b) Jake – (c) Sean –

e

(d) Rob –

There’s Mandy who’s handy, and Bill who feels ill, Kate wants a date, and Phil’s over the hill.

(g) Joe – (h) Kelly –

 Write your own eight-line poem that consists of

people’s names and something that rhymes with each. Although it is a poem, follow the same punctuation rules as if you were writing sentences.

Be careful not to hurt anyone’s feelings!

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There’s James who loves dames, and Ted who’s well-read, Bob who’s no job, and Fred who likes bed.

(f) Dave –

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There’s Daniel the spaniel, and Brad who’s mad, Liz in a tiz, and poor, sad Chad.

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(e) Sue –

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There’s Paul who is tall, and Pam is a lamb, with all these great friends, how lucky I am!

 Read through your poem and check: Spelling

Punctuation

Grammar

Make sure your poem is perfect! Don’t forget, all names begin with a capital letter! Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

51


Make it better

Teachers notes

Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Before the lesson Make sure each pupil has his/her own dictionary and thesaurus.

Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

The lesson 1. Discuss with the pupils how to improve their writing by using dictionaries and thesauruses. 2. The pupils improve the sentences in Question 1 by changing the words in brackets, using more interesting words. 3. The pupils read the poem ‘The cure’. Harder words can be discussed, such as ‘despair’, ‘prescribe’, ‘ail’, and ‘whodunnit’. 4. The pupils replace the words in brackets with more interesting words. Pupils can change the ‘a’ to ‘an’ or vice versa. 5. The pupils reread the poem and write meanings of words, looking in the dictionary if they are uncertain. The meanings should be in the context of the poem. 6. The pupils look in a thesaurus and write synonyms for the given words in Question 6. 7. The pupils open the dictionary/thesaurus five times, taking an interesting word from each page. 8. The pupils write a four-line poem using all five words. No rhyming is necessary. Answers 1. Answers will vary but could include the following: (a) diminutive, bad-tempered (b) famished, colossal 3. Example (c) pleasant, elegant The cure 2. – 4. Teacher check 5. (a) feel hopeless, lose hope, give up If you’re feeling rather glum, (b) say what should be done, advise, then please do not despair. lay down, specify, stipulate All you need is an enthralling book, (c) feel ill and a very comfy chair. 6. (a) need - require, want If you’re feeling a little ill, (b) tale - story, yarn, report, I’d prescribe an adventurous tale, narrative You’ll get lost in the thickening plot, (c) find - locate, come across, meet, no longer will you ail! spot, encounter, discover 7. – 8. Teacher check If you’re feeling a bit unloved,

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Background information Each pupil should have his/her own dictionary and thesaurus handy when doing writing and reading exercises. The pupils must learn to be comfortable using both and this can only be achieved if they use them often and become familiar with them. They should see a dictionary and thesaurus as being a help when they are reading and writing.

Sa m

Activities covered Improving sentences Improving a poem Reading a poem Finding synonyms Finding words in a dictionary/thesaurus Writing a sentence

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• • • • • •

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Objective Use dictionaries and thesauruses to extend and develop vocabulary and spelling

Websites (online dictionaries) <www.dictionary.com> <www.onelook.com> <http://dictionary.reference.com>

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Poetry skills

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Complete dictionary exercises. 2. Use dictionaries and thesauruses when writing stories, poems etc. 3. Play dictionary games. 4. Replace words in a text (e.g. the class reader) with better words found in a dictionary/thesaurus.

a romance will do the trick. You’ll find hints on how to smooch, and you’ll feel great real quick. If you’re feeling bored and drowsy, I’d suggest a mystery, A really gritty whodunnit, will set your mind quite free. So for almost every ailment, a remedy you will find, between the covers of an honest book, to repair your soul and mind.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Make it better Use a dictionary and a thesaurus to help you complete these questions.

 Improve these sentences by replacing the words in brackets with more interesting synonyms. Do not change the meaning!

The (small) child ran away from the (cross) teacher. The

The (hungry) cat brought in a (big) rat. The

(c)

teacher.

cat brought in a

rat.

The (nice) party was at a (smart) hotel. The

A library is a hospital for the mind.

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(b)

child ran away from the

party was at a

hotel.

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(a)

 Read the poem below.

Sa m

 Replace the words in brackets with better words.

The cure

Write the words on the poem.

If you’re feeling rather (sad), then please do not despair. All you need is an (interesting) book,

 Read the poem again. Did you improve it?

No

 What do these words mean in context of the

and a very (nice) chair.

poem?

despair

I’d prescribe an (exciting) tale,

(b)

prescribe

You’ll get lost in the (exciting) plot,

(c)

ail

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(a)

If you’re feeling a (bit) ill,

Yes

no longer will you ail!

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If you’re feeling (quite) unloved,

 Look in your thesaurus and find synonyms for these words. (a)

need

You’ll find (ideas) on how to smooch,

(b)

tale

and you’ll feel (good) real quick.

(c)

find

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a (love story) will do the trick.

If you’re feeling bored and (tired),

 Open your dictionary/thesaurus five times and write an interesting word from each page.

I’d suggest a mystery, A really (exciting) whodunnit, will set your mind quite free. So for almost every ailment, a (cure) you will find, between the covers of a (good) book, to repair your soul and mind.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

 On a separate sheet of paper, try writing a four-line poem using the words from Question 7. Poetry skills

53


Write for younger readers

• • • •

Activities covered Discussing writing for different audiences Choosing two animals, writing characteristics of each Writing a poem aimed at a target audience Checking and rewriting a poem, adding illustrations

changes or improvements as necessary. 6. The pupils write their poem neatly/type it out and illustrate it. 7. All poems are put together to form a booklet. The booklet can then be given to a class of young pupils.

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Background information The pupils should be aware of their audience when they are writing and should choose their language and content accordingly. In order to target the audience and keep them interested, writing should be aimed at what the particular audience enjoys.

The lesson 1. Discuss the intended writing audience with the class. Mention aspects that need to be kept in mind, such as keeping the language simple, making it funny if possible, using appropriate illustrations. 2. The pupils can look through some books for young children. 3. The pupils choose two animals and write their characteristics. They can then make up an animal by using some characteristics from each of their lists and name and describe it to complete Question 2. The example below is then read and discussed. 4. The pupils write a poem Example about the imaginary animal. They can add in details. The catterfly Each new detail should be on a new line. The poem A catterfly has six furry legs, need not rhyme. and a colourful pair of wings, 5. The pupils read their it flies around looking for food, poems and make sure they made of fish and meaty things. are suitable, making any

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Objective Choose a register of language appropriate to subject and audience

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Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Before the lesson Examples of how language is aimed at a particular audience could be prepared; e.g. books for young children, advertisements aimed at different audiences. Provide several books for young children in the classroom so the pupils can look through them to know what level they are aiming at.

Sa m

Strand Competence and confidence in using language

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Poetry skills

Teachers notes

It has two large antennae, its tail near touches the ground, and when it sees a colourful flower, it makes a moewing sound! Ask pupils if they can guess which two creatures make a catterfly.

Answers 1. – 4. Teacher check Additional activity Pupils can: Write to a visitor to the school, create advertisements aimed at a specific audience or comic strips aimed at their own age group, write definitions of slang words for an older generation, shopping lists for different people – e.g. a hiker, a wildlife enthusiast, a mother.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Write for younger readers Try writing an animal poem suitable for the Infants of your school. When you are writing for younger readers, think about the following: • • • • •

the language you use the type of writing you use the illustrations the way in which you present it the content

 Choose two animals that are completely different from each other. List some of their main

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characteristics; e.g. physical features, typical sounds and movements.

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 Create a creature by combining

Animal 2

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Animal 1

characteristics from both your animals above. You can add in extra details of course!

Describe your creature.

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Give your creature a name.

Start each new idea on a new line.

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Write a poem about the creature below. It does not have to rhyme!

 Read your poem and check it is suitable for the Infant classes. Rewrite it and illustrate it.  Put all the class’s poems together in a booklet and give it to the Infant teacher. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

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Help each other

Activities covered • Reading a poem • Writing a poem (kenning) • Reading and improving poems with a partner

Answers 1. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Complete written tasks in pairs or groups. 2. Check each other’s work whenever possible.

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Background information The pupils need to have the opportunity to work individually, in pairs, in groups and as a class. Working with others should be beneficial in that pupils assist each other and are not solely responsible for a written piece of work. Teachers should change members in pairs and groups so pupils are not always working with the same classmates.

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Objective Help others with editing their writing

The lesson 1. Discuss with the class how to write a kenning. 2. The pupils read the example on the copymaster and complete Question 2 with their partners. 3. The pupils write their own kenning. 4. The pupils read each other’s poems and try to guess the animal or object. 5. Still in pairs, the pupils make sure there are no mistakes in their partner’s poem and that all ideas are clear and able to be understood. They can then make any necessary changes. 6. The finished poems should be displayed or put together as a class booklet.

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Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Before the lesson Divide the class into pairs.

Sa m

Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Teachers notes

Website www.maninthemoon.co.uk/kennings.html

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Poetry skills

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Help each other  The poem on this page is called a

(b)

Who do you think the kenning is about?

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 (a)

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kenning. A kenning is a type of poem that describes a person, an animal or an object, by using 10 pairs of words. The animal or object is not mentioned.

Report writer, Child helper, Classroom walker, Dictionary speaker, Break-time warden, Daydream breaker, Word magician, Poetry lover, Problem solver, Homework giver.

In pairs, write one other pair of words to describe the same person/animal/object.

 On your own, write a kenning about an animal, person or object of your choice.

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Don’t give it a title!

Use your imagination!

 With a partner, read each other’s kennings. Write what you think your partner’s kenning is about. What was it actually about?

 What was your kenning about? What did your partner think it was about?

 Read each other’s kennings again and check for mistakes and possible improvements

you both could make. Discuss each other’s poems and improve them together. Mark any changes on your kenning and then rewrite it on a separate sheet of paper.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

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Seasoning!

Teachers notes

Activities covered • Writing words and ideas • Writing a poem about a season • Putting all poems together, compiling a class anthology

Answers 1. (a) winter (b) spring/summer (c) autumn 2. – 3. Teacher check 5. – 7. Teacher check

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Background information Pupils should sometimes work together, in pairs, groups or as a class. Even when pupils work independently, their work can be put together to form class anthologies or booklets. These can be displayed in the school library or other public areas to allow other pupils in the school to read them.

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Objective Take part in cooperative writing activities

The lesson 1. The pupils read descriptions and write what season they think is being described to complete Question 1. 2. The pupils write the current season and discuss it as a class. 3. The pupils write ideas and words to do with the season. Pupils should write what comes to mind as they think about the season, as well as how this season makes them feel. If possible, they should take a walk outside to note clues that define the season; e.g. crickets chirping, puddles, new shoots on plants and so on. 4. The pupils write a poem with the given format. They should try to use different words in their poems, using dictionaries and thesauruses if necessary. 5. All poems can be put together to form a class anthology using the name of the season as the title. This should be somewhere in the school where other pupils or visitors to the school can read it.

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Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Before the lesson Provide pictures of the current season to help pupils with their ideas. Some pupils may require dictionaries and thesauruses.

Sa m

Strand Competence and confidence in using language

4. Example: Winter, Bleak, stormy, Strangling, grasping, January

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. As a class or in groups, undertake: projects, booklets containing one theme, compilations of poetry and stories, fact files etc. 2. Write and publish a class newspaper.

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Seasoning!  Read these describing words. What season do you think they are referring to? bleak, white

(b)

colourful, blossoming

(c)

golden with a slight hint of coolness

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(a)

The surface of the sun is about 11 000 degrees Fahrenheit.

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 What season are you in now?

Sa m

 Think about what this season brings and how it makes you feel. Write words or phrases in

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the box below that describe this season. Use your imagination! Try to take a walk outside to see what clues you can find about the present season.

 Write a poem about the season you are in. Use the format below. Line 1: Noun ( The season)

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Line 2: Two adjectives that describe it Line 3: Two ‘ing’ words Line 4: A similar noun to line 1

 Read and check your poem and improve it if you can. Rewrite it neatly and decorate it.  Give yourself a score out of 5:

Rain before seven, Fair by eleven

 Put all your poems together to make a booklet on the current season. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

Poetry skills

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Graffiti

Teachers notes

• • • • • •

Activities covered Reading graffiti Giving definitions for slang words Looking at graffiti on the Internet, answering questions Writing a two-line poem for a graffiti wall Typing out a statement Making a graffiti wall

The lesson 1. The pupils read the graffiti wall on the copymaster. 2. Discuss graffiti walls in general. The teacher can point out that it is illegal to write or spraypaint on walls and buildings and graffiti is a form of vandalism. 3. The pupils write the meanings of the slang words. This can be done as a class. 4. The pupils look at graffiti websites. The teacher must check the content of the sites first. If the classroom does not have many computers, the pupils can look at the websites in groups while the rest of the class starts the next activity. 5. The pupils answer questions about the website and look up other information by using a search engine such as Google. (Teachers remind the pupils to type in keywords of what they are looking for.) Pupils should be closely supervised during this activity. 6. The pupils write a two-line poem for the graffiti wall. There should be some rhyme. It can be a statement about themselves or an opinion they have of something. They can use slang (but no swearwords). 7. The pupils type out their rhyming statement, using a graffiti font preferably, and use colour etc. to make it look like graffiti. Some pupils may wish to handwrite their statements. This should be allowed, provided that they do the background on the computer. The pupils will be less likely to write it themselves if there are graffiti fonts on the computer. When the pupils print out their statement the font should be big enough so that it can be seen at a distance. 8. The pupils make a graffiti wall as a class.

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Background information At this age, pupils should be using the computer regularly for a variety of reasons, from researching on the Internet to presenting their work in a professional way. They should know how to look up a given website and also how to use a search engine. The pupils should be familiar with the basics of using word processing programs.

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Objective Develop skills in the use of information technology

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Strand unit Writing – developing competence, confidence and the ability to write independently

Before the lesson The pupils will need to have access to the computer to look up a site on the Internet. The pupils will need to print out their poem. Check websites to make sure that they are suitable. Certain graffiti websites will have unsuitable language and/or illustrations; therefore pupils should be given specific URLs that the teacher has already checked.

Sa m

Strand Competence and confidence in using language

Websites <www.graffitifonts.net> <www.graffiti.org>

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Poetry skills

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) was (b) relax (c) ‘over the top’ items such as heavy gold jewellery (d) playing a concert 3. – 5. Teacher check Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Use the computer to make menus, write letters, make timetables, write picture stories etc. 2. Use the Internet to research a topic, to expand knowledge on a particular skill being covered, look up their own interests, read other children’s work etc. 3. Use online dictionaries and thesauruses.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Graffiti Graffiti is words or drawings scribbled or sprayed on a wall. It is against the law to do such things except in this lesson. You are going to make a graffiti wall in the classroom, only your work will be done on paper and stuck on the wall!

 Read the examples below.

Music ’s my li fe, Met Wish t allica hey’d s rulz, tart g igging it’s s , z c l at h u r o g ols. din r a o b e t ka

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I woz here. My name is Bill, I wish my teacher would learn to chill.

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g, our thin all, no b t o o f o s, n No shade , no bling. plastic

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It’s my life so check it out, If you want me to listen, just don’t shout.

 The following words are slang words. What do they mean? woz

(b)

chill

(c)

bling

(d)

gigging

Teachers rule!

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 Look up a graffiti site on the Internet and answer these questions. What is the title of the web page?

(b)

Name two sections on the home page.

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(a)

Tick if the website has the following: links to other web pages .................

contact details ..................................

photos ................................................

articles ...............................................

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(c)

illustrations .......................................

(d)

artists .................................................

What do you think of the website?

 Use a search engine to find the following. (a)

the penalty you could have to pay for doing graffiti

(b)

a website where you can download graffiti fonts

 Write your own two-line poem for the graffiti wall. It should be a statement about yourself or a statement about something you feel strongly about.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

You can use slang words.

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Power

Teachers notes

Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Oral language – developing cognitive abilities through oral language

The lesson 1. Hold a brief class discussion about electricity. 2. The pupils read the poem ‘‘Powerless’ in their groups The teacher can discuss harder words; e.g. ‘unanimously’, ‘crave’, ‘trendy’, ‘soap watching’, ‘shot’. 3. The pupils answer Question 2 as a group, discussing why and how we could save electricity. 4. The class can then discuss the answers.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) microwave, kettle or coffee machine, hairdryer, karaoke machine, ‘lean’ machine, CD player, dishwasher, laptop, washing machine, computer, water heater, alarm clock, TV (b) – (d) Teacher check (e) Answers will vary, but should indicate that energy supplies are not inexhaustible, we have to look after our environment, switch off lights when not in the room, switch off appliances on standby, use solar heating.

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Background information Pupils need the opportunity now and then to discuss issues in the world that will ultimately affect them, and what they can do to make their futures better. Pupils in fifth and sixth class should be aware of what is going on in the world and there should be set times when different issues are discussed.

Sa m

Activities covered • Reading a poem as a group • Answering and discussing questions

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Objective Discuss issues of main concern

Before the lesson Prepare examples of ways in which we could save electricity. Divide the class into groups.

Homework suggestion The pupils draw a cross-section of a house, showing where we can save electricity.

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Discuss local and national events once a week. 2. Read newspapers and watch the news on TV and report back to the class. 3. Report on TV shows highlighting an issue of concern. 4. Write about various concerns and develop strategies that could help the situation.

Websites <www.42explore.com/electric.htm> <www.irish-energy.ie>

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Poetry skills

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Power We take electricity for granted! Do not leave your appliances on standby!

 Read this poem with a group. Powerless

I can’t listen to CDs, My dishes are piled in the sink. My mini-laptop is idle My clothes are causing a stink!

The scientists got together, And did unanimously decide, That voltage is quite bad for us, ‘Let’s ban it!’ loud they cried.

I can’t read through my emails, My bath water isn’t hot, I can’t wake up in the mornings, My soap-watching is shot!

I can’t eat my TV dinner Without my microwave! I can’t even make a coffee, Or have a decent shave.

No, this simply will not do. I cannot live this way. I’ve had power surging through my life, I need it! Now! Today!

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Everyone was shocked one day, By an announcement on TV: ‘In the interest of health and safety, No more electricity’.

What about my hairdryer, And my karaoke machine? I can’t use my trendy gadget That makes my bacon lean.

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 Answer these in your group.

Name the electrical appliances the speaker has.

(b)

Name some electrical appliances you have in your home.

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(a)

What appliances would you not like to be without?

(d)

How would you briefly describe these items to someone who lived 200 years ago?

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(c)

(e)

(i)

treadmill

(ii)

laptop

(iii)

mobile phone

Why and how should we try to save electricity?

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Ask away!

Teachers notes

Strand unit Oral language – developing cognitive abilities through oral language

Activities covered Reading a poem Naming places Asking questions using given question words Asking a partner questions Writing a summary

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. India, UK (Big Ben), Germany, Italy (Leonardo da Vinci), Rome, America (Elvis’s home – Graceland), Bermuda Triangle, Africa (Big Five), France (frog’s legs), Netherlands, Poland 3. Possible questions: (a) Where did you spot the Big Five? (b) What are Polish meals like? (c) When did you visit Big Ben? (d) Who did you travel with? (e) Why did you visit the Bermuda Triangle? (f) How can you afford to travel so much? 4. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Use the key questions to write a story, poem or report, about an incident or event and so on.

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Background information Pupils are naturally curious and like to ask questions. They should know that whenever they are unsure about something to ask! Remind the pupils what the ‘question’ words are.

Sa m

• • • • •

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Homesick’ as a class. Discuss the poem, including the different places the speaker may have visited. Words that can be discussed: ‘traversed’, ‘sampled’, ‘scrutinised’, ‘brew’, ‘awe’, ‘savoured’. 2. The pupils answer Questions 2 and 3. 3. The pupils use the same words from Question 3 to ask their partner questions. For Question 4 the pupils need to role-play the speaker from the poem. For Question 5, the pupils talk about a place they have visited. 4. The pupils write a summary of the answers given in Question 5.

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Objective Use the basic key questions and checking questions as a means of extending knowledge

Before the lesson Prepare examples of when we need to ask questions. Divide the class into pairs.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Recommended reading (travel) A chance in France by Pie Corbett London to Tokyo by James Kirkup

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Poetry skills

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com


Ask away! If we want more information about something, we should ask questions!

 Read the poem below.

There’s no place like home!

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In one year, passengers on British Airways consume more than 557 507 boxes of chocolate!

I’ve traversed the rough and seven seas, and sampled exotic Indian teas. I’ve scrutinised big Big Ben, and shared some jokes with foreign men. I’ve tasted many a German brew, and seen what Leonardo drew. I’ve studied the rubble and ruins in Rome, and even graced old Elvis’s home. I’ve spotted the Big Five with awe and fear, to the dreaded Triangle, I’ve been near. I’ve eaten frog’s legs, crocs and eels, and savoured Dutch and Polish meals. But, no matter where I happen to land, whether it’s humble, homely or grand, I find myself writing a poem, about simply wanting to be at home.

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Homesick

The Big Five are the animals in Africa who are considered to be the most dangerous – lion, rhino, leopard, buffalo and elephant!

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the speaker visited?

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 This speaker has obviously done some travelling! Which countries or places do you think

 Imagine that you could ask the speaker questions. What would you ask?

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Start your questions as follows. Where

(b)

What

(c)

When

(d)

Who

(e)

Why

(f)

How

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(a)

Don’t forget question marks!

 Find a partner. Ask him/her the questions above. The answers can be made up!  Use the question words to ask each other about a place that you have visited. Write a summary of what you found out.

Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Popular or not? Strand unit Oral language – developing cognitive abilities through oral language

Activities covered Reading a poem Answering questions Writing popular items Discussing with class

Additional activity Pupils can: Discuss peer pressure and the consequences of trying to keep up with peers.

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Background information This lesson focuses on popular ideas. Pupils must learn to accept each other, regardless of clothing, appearance, interests etc. Approach the lesson in a sensitive manner as there is always someone in the class who feels that he/she does not belong and is not ‘fashionable’. Teachers should discuss with the pupils the fact that appearance and latest trends have no bearing on what a person’s character is. Too much money can be spent on trying to keep up with the latest fashions, and although it is not wrong to try to look your best, pupils should accept others who may not have the latest ‘gear’.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) The speaker will wear only well known brand-name clothing. (b) Others will laugh at him/her, he/she would not be accepted (c) ‘I pay well to look this good’ (d) bro’ – brother, meaning friend, ’hood meaning neighbourhood (e) – (f) Teacher check 3. – 4. Teacher check

Sa m

• • • •

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘Branded’. 2. The pupils complete Question 2. They need not write full sentences. 3. The pupils write what is popular or trendy, using the given headings. 4. Discuss all answers with the class, also discussing popular trends and their relevance.

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Objective Discuss the value, truth or relevance of popular ideas, causes and proverbs

Before the lesson Provide other examples of what is popular. (advertisements, magazines)

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Teachers notes

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Recommended reading

(fashion) Fashion by Brian Patten Take off that hat by Ted Scheu You’re not going out like that by Paul Cookson and David Harmer Where shall I have my tattoo? by Redvers Brandling Just look at yourself by Alan Priestey DIY tongue stud by Mike Johnson No earrings allowed by Steven Herrick

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Popular or not? To keep up with trends nowadays is difficult!

Fashions fade, style is eternal. (Yves Saint Laurent)

 Read this poem.

There’s labels on my jumper, my trousers, shirt and scarf, my trainers, wallet and key chain, so others will not laugh.

Adidas™, Reebok™ and Diesel™, Puma™ and Firetrap™, Wrangler™, Levi™ and Calvin Klein™, And Nike™ on my cap.

I’m a walking advertisement, I pay well to look this good, accept me the way I am bro’ and welcome to my ’hood.

You can’t judge a book by its cover.

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 Answer these questions.

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We are the name-brand-culture, this we can’t deny, I only want these labels, there’s nothing else I’ll buy!

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Branded

Sum up in one sentence what the speaker is saying in the first verse.

(b)

What does the speaker think will happen if he/she does not dress in a particular way?

(c)

Quote from the poem to show the speaker spends a lot of money on clothing.

(d)

Explain the following words: (i) bro’

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(a)

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(ii) ’hood

(e)

Do you agree with what the speaker is saying?

Yes

No

Give a reason for your answer. Name another two brands of clothing not mentioned in the poem.

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(f)

 Write what kind of the following is ‘cool’ at the moment. trousers

technology

game

junk food

TV programme

holiday destination

music

sport

film

shoes

 Discuss all your answers with the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Listen up!

Teachers notes

Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

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Activities covered Listening to the teacher Answering questions (from memory) Re-reading a poem Checking answers Writing one wish

Answers 1. Teacher check 2 (a) a trampoline (b) a leopard (c) ice-cream (d) Only boys! (e) pizza (f) by limousine (g) hundred-foot 3. – 4. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Listen to the teacher reading poems. 2. Invite a poet to the school to read and discuss his/her own poetry. 3. Listen to classmates reading their own poetry. 4. Learn a poem off by heart for a school event.

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Background information This lesson focuses on listening. Poems are excellent to develop listening skills because the whole poem can be read and details analysed. Humorous poetry is helpful for these activities as it keeps pupils listening and on task!

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• • • • •

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘Wishing well’ to the class. Copymasters should not be handed out at this time so the pupils can listen to the poem, rather than read it. 2. The copymasters are handed out and the poems are covered, or the page is folded or cut in half so the pupils cannot see the poem. 3. The pupils answer the given questions on their own. Full sentences are not necessary. 4. The pupils read the poem themselves and check their answers. They then give themselves a score out of seven. 5. The pupils write one wish they would make. 6. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Objective Listen to, read, learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry

Before the lesson Prepare poems to read to the pupils just for enjoyment.

Recommended reading

Purple shoes by Irene Rawnsley If I were famous by Steve Turner Website www.poetry4kids.com

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Listen up!  Listen to the teacher while he/she reads the poem below.

 How well did you listen? Answer these questions without looking at the poem. (a)

What giant thing does the speaker wish for?

If I could be granted a wish, I think that it would be, To have a giant trampoline, Just for my friends and me.

(b)

What type of pet would he have?

(c)

Which type of shop would he own?

(d)

What would the plaque on the tree house say?

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I’d have a larder packed with chocolate, And my own designer cook, Who specialised in pizza, And had written his own book.

What type of meals would his cook specialise in?

(f)

How would he get from place to place?

(g)

How big would his TV be?

 Read the poem to yourself and check your answers. Give yourself a score out of 7.

 Imagine you could have one wish. What would it be?

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I think I’d have a playground, And my very own football club, I’d be chauffeured in my limo, Complete with loo and tub.

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(e)

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I’d have a gigantic bedroom, Stuffed with games and toys, A designer wooden tree house, With a plaque saying ‘Only boys!’

Sa m

I’d have a sparkling swimming pool, And a leopard as a pet. I think I’d own an ice-cream shop, And my very own Lear jet.

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Wishing well

I’d have the latest Playstation™, And a hundred-foot TV. And as for quads and go-Karts, Why, I’d have more than three!

But, oops, I’m getting carried away, One wish is not enough! I need a bunch of genies To order all this stuff!

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The word ‘genie’ originated in Arabian folklore. Poetry skills

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False freedom Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘‘False freedom’. 2. The pupils draw a picture to show what the speaker sees. 3. The pupils answer a question about what the speaker is really doing. 4. The pupils write descriptive words that the speaker has used and write their own descriptive words. 5. The pupils replace descriptive words in the poem with descriptive words of their own. 6. The pupils reread the poem and decide which poem sounds better. 7. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Activities covered Reading a poem Drawing a picture Answering questions Writing alternative descriptive words Replacing words in a poem Reading a poem again

Answers 1. – 2. Teacher check 3. No, he is playing a computer game. His mum tells him to switch it off. 4. (a) glossy, Teacher check (b) smooth, Teacher check (c) cool, Teacher check (d) bright, Teacher check (e) whizzing, Teacher check (f) grey, Teacher check (g) grumpy, Teacher check 5. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read different forms of poetry in anthologies. 2. Read each other’s poetry. 3. Look at poetry websites.

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Background information The focus of this lesson is reading. Poems are ideal for developing reading skills because they are often short and a pupil can attain a good level of success in reading them, even if it means practising first. Pupils should have access to poetry anthologies and poetry websites.

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• • • • • •

Before the lesson Provide other poems for the pupils to read—independently or as a class. Make sure the pupils understand what adjectives and adverbs are.

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Objective Listen to, read, learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry

Teachers notes

Website <www.gigglepoetry.com>

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False freedom

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It’s great being a kid, with a skateboard. Skating past glossy ponds, through sunny parks, along smooth footpaths, seeing small squirrels hopping about, waving to my mates, feeling the breeze cool in my face and the sun on my neck. I see families out shopping, bursts of bright flowers, cars whizzing past me, freedom at my toe tips. Moving along grey buildings, and colourful fruit stalls, avoiding grumpy pedestrians, and just sailing through the air. Four wheels and two feet, and the whole world is mine.

sees while he/she is skateboarding.

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False freedom

 Draw a picture that shows what the speaker

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 Read the following poem to yourself.

 Is the speaker really skateboarding? How do

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you know?

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Then Mum says, ‘Switch off that Playstation™ and go and get some fresh air!’

 How does the speaker describe the following? Also write your own descriptive word for each. (a) ponds

(b) footpaths

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(c) breeze

(d) flowers (e) cars

(f) buildings (g) pedestrians

 Underline the descriptive words in the poem (adjectives and adverbs).  Replace the descriptive words in the poem with your own words. Read the poem again! Which sounds better?

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Learn it

Teachers notes

Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

pl

Activities covered Listening to the teacher pronounce words Writing words phonetically Reading a poem as a class Learning a poem and adding actions Writing a poem from memory Performing a poem

Sa m

• • • • • •

The lesson 1. Read the foreign words on the copymaster, and have the pupils write the words phonetically; i.e. as they are said. The teacher will need to read the words slowly and perhaps a few times and also explain to the pupils how to write a word phonetically (see below). The words can then be read and practised as a class. 2. The pupils read the poem on the copymaster. This can be done as a class. 3. The pupils learn the poem by heart and add any appropriate actions. This could be done in pairs. The teacher will need to assist the class with the learning of the poem, perhaps taking it a sentence at a time. 4. The pupils write the poem from memory. (Spelling is not important.) 5. The pupils perform the poem for another class and assess their performance.

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Objective Listen to, read, learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry

Before the lesson Provide more examples of ‘goodbye’ in other languages.

Answers 1. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Learn a poem as a class to perform for a visitor coming to the school. 2. Learn poems written by other pupils and perform them for the class.

Pronunciations arrivederci a – reev – a – dur – chi vaarwel far – vell adios a – dee – os aloha a – low – ha slán slaan au revoir a – rev – wa auf wiedersehen owf – vee – de – zane adieu a – dew ciao chow sayonara sa – yo – na – ra

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Background information This lesson focuses on learning a poem by heart. The poem is short, although there are some foreign words the pupils will need to learn to pronounce first. The pupils should, from time to time, be learning shorter poems by heart and be able to perform them for the class, visitors or other classes.

Recommended reading

(acting) When the aliens came to dinner by Clare Bevan Website <www.fizzyfunnyfuzzy.com>

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Learn it You are going to learn a poem by heart! Don’t worry—it is not long!

 You will need to know how to pronounce some of these words first. The words mean ‘goodbye’. Listen to the teacher pronouncing them and write them phonetically. Arrivederci – (Italian)

(b)

Vaarwel – (Dutch)

(c)

Adios – (Spanish)

(d)

Aloha – (Hawaiian)

(e)

Slán – (Irish)

(f)

Au revoir – (French)

(g)

Auf wiedersehen – (German)

(h)

Adieu – (French)

(i)

Ciao – (Italian)

(j)

Sayonara – (Japanese)

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(a)

 Read this poem. Use expression and

Farewell!

Goodbye in Icelandic is ‘bless’.

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the correct pronunciation.

 Cover the poem and write it from memory.

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Bye-bye, Godspeed, take leave, farewell, Arrivederci and vaarwel, Adios, go forth, sayonara, Aloha, slán, depart, ta-ta.

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Goodbye! Au revoir! Auf Wiedersehen! Adieu and cheerio, don’t come again, See ya later, and so long now, Go well, get lost, toodle-oo and ciao!

 As a group, perform the poem for another class.  Learn this poem by heart. Add

 Rate your performance with a symbol.

actions.

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Recite a poem Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

The lesson 1. Read several poems to the class. 2. The pupils decide, perhaps by class vote, which poem they wish to learn by heart. 3. The pupils write the poem on the copymaster. 4. As a class, decide how the poem should be read. This is done with guidance from the teacher. The pupils make notes on the poem showing the different roles, places to pause, emphasised words and changes in tone of voice that are necessary. 5. The pupils draw pictures and/or words on the copymaster that might help them remember the poem to complete Question 4. 6. As a class, the pupils learn the poem. Assist the class with learning the poem and saying it with expression. 7. The pupils perform their poem for another class or a visitor.

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Activities covered Listening to teacher read poems Choosing a poem as a class Learning a poem Drawing pictures, writing words to help remember a poem Performing a poem as a class

Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Learn their own poems by heart. 2. In groups, learn a verse of one poem. The poem is then put together. 3. Recite choral poetry.

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Background information This lesson focuses on learning a poem by heart. The class will get to decide which poem they want to learn. The poems the teacher reads for the pupils to make their choice should be interesting, relevant and perhaps humorous. Poems that have repeated lines and strong rhythm are good for this exercise.

Sa m

• • • •

Before the lesson Prepare a list of poems, suitable for reciting, to read to the class.

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Objective Listen to, read, learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry

Teachers notes

Recommended reading

(to recite) Freddie Phipps by Charles Causley Look back in wonder by Dick King-Smith Website <www.poetryguy.com>

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Recite a poem To recite a poem means to say a poem aloud from memory.

 As a class, decide which poem you will learn by heart.

 Decide as a class how you will perform the poem. (a)

Write the roles on the poem.

(b)

Underline the emphasised words.

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 Write the poem below.

Make notes of where you need to pause.

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(c)

Make notes on the poem where the tone of voice may change.

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(d)

Poet:

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 Draw any pictures and/or write keywords to help you remember the poem.

 Perform your poem for another class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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What is your response? Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

Before the lesson Prepare other poems to read to the class, to which they give their responses orally. The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Not the whole picture’ as a class, then discuss the poem. 2. Discuss TV watching in general. The pupils can tell about the programmes they enjoy and dislike. 3. The pupils guess what TV programmes the speaker may have flicked to, to answer Question 2. 4. The pupils describe two imaginary TV programmes. 5. All answers are discussed as a class.

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Respond to a poem by drawing a picture that depicts that poem. 2. Act out poems. 3. Write a similar poem to one being read. 4. Write a paragraph/story about the poem. 5. Write a poetry review.

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Background information This lesson focuses on responding to poems. Pupils should always be given the opportunity to respond to the poems being read—through discussion, written activities, drama, artwork or answering questions.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. Answers will vary, but may include weather, news, food, beauty, parenting, sports, educational, documentary, quiz. 3. – 5. Teacher check

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Activities covered • Reading a poem • Responding to a poem by answering questions

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Objective Listen to, read, learn, recite and respond to a challenging range of poetry

Teachers notes

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What is your response? Have you ever flicked through the TV channels, frustrated because you cannot find anything to watch?

 Read the poem below. Not the whole picture

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Flicking the channels, on the TV, Snatches of programmes, is all I see.

think the speaker flicked to.

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‘… and tomorrow the weather will be …’ ‘… this enormous majestic oak tree …’ ‘… was arrested late last night …’ ‘… eating cheddar, red and white …’ ‘… which can make the skin quite spotty …’ ‘… but if you use a smaller potty …’ ‘… and place the contraption on your head …’ ‘… you’ll find yourself way ahead …’ ‘… from watching TV for many an hour… ’ ‘… you’ll gain in wisdom and in power …’

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 Write five types of TV programmes you

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 On one TV below, write the name of an imaginary TV programme you would really like to watch.  Do the same for an imaginary TV programme you would not like to watch.  Underneath, write a description of each. Share your answers to Question 5 with the class.

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Compare your ideas with others’.

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My poetry list Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

The lesson The pupils write poems on their poetry list as they read them. This should be done throughout the year. Additional activity Pupils can: Keep a record of other reading, including novels, nonfiction material, plays, short stories or other material that has been read.

Activities covered • Writing a list of poems read • Rating and commenting on poems

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Background information Pupils should keep a record of their reading as it will give them a sense of accomplishment. These reading lists can be kept in a folder with their copymasters or in their portfolio. This list concerns only poems they have read (not counting the poems on the copymaster) and should be filled in on a continuing basis.

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Objective Continue to keep a record of personal reading in various forms

Before the lesson Pupils should receive a copy of the recording page at the beginning of the school year.

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Teachers notes

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My poetry list I have read these poems: Poet

Star rating (5 is best)

Comment

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Title of poem

Poetry is a deal of joy and pain and wonder, with a dash of the dictionary. (Kahlil Gibran) Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Let’s go shopping Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

Before the lesson The teacher can have examples of local and exotic foods from the supermarket. The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Just milk then’ as a class. The poem can be briefly discussed but not in detail. 2. The pupils answer the questions on the copymaster. Answers should be in full sentences, where appropriate. 3. The poem can be reread and comprehensively discussed. Pupils can evaluate their answers.

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Objective Use comprehension skills

Teachers notes

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Activities covered • Reading a poem • Answering questions • Discussing answers

Sa m

Additional activity Pupils can: Complete comprehension activities with a variety of questions and texts.

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Background information Pupils should be exposed to many different types of questioning, thereby improving their comprehension skills. Understanding what they have read is vitally important and questioning for this level must go beyond the literal. Pupils should be analysing, evaluating and correlating information in order to aid understanding of the text. Practice should also be given in predicting outcomes and problem-solving.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) It is about a person who has gone grocery shopping. (b) The speaker feels very excited while shopping but doubtful at the end. (c) No, the speaker did not realise you could buy these different food items. (d) (i) watermelon chutney (ii) jelly is ready to eat (iii) macaroni is in a can (iv) tomatoes are sun-dried (v) potatoes are from Italy (e) The speaker is concerned about paying for all the items. (f) (i) mousse – frothy, creamy substance, either a pudding or something to put on the hair (ii) pesky – irritating (iii) mash – mashed potatoes (iv) frothy – with a mass of tiny bubbles (g) Teacher check

Recommended reading No bread by Ian McMillan

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Let’s go shopping  Read about this person’s experience.

 Answer these questions. (a) What is the poem about?

Just milk then What a fantastic place! I think I need it all! In this bright supermarket, In a shiny shopping mall.

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(c) Do you think the speaker regularly does this activity? Say why/why not.

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There is canned macaroni, and easy cheesecake kits, watermelon chutney, and mousse for pesky nits. I see sun-dried tomatoes, and jelly ready-to-eat, microwave Irish stew and mash that you can heat. There is lemon-flavoured water, and a hundred types of tea, coffee that is frothy, and can be made by even me. There are spuds who’ve flown from Italy, and oranges from Spain, I see juicy grapes from Africa, where there isn’t that much rain.

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(b) How does the speaker feel about his/her experience?

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Yes, this outdoes the corner shop, my trolley is piled high. I’ve thrown in such delicious things, I thought I couldn’t buy.

This shopping is such super fun, why hadn’t I done it before? Then a nagging doubt creeps in my head, It’s because I am quite poor.

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(d) What is special about these items? (i)

chutney

(ii)

jelly

(iii) macaroni (iv) tomatoes (v)

potatoes

(e) Why does the speaker feel doubt at the end?

(f) What do you think these words mean? (i)

mousse

(ii)

pesky

(iii) mash (iv) frothy (g) Write a short ending to this poem.

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Remember!

Teachers notes

Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

Activities covered Reading a poem Covering a poem and answering questions Assessing study skills Writing a two-line summary

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Background information At this age, pupils should be developing study skills in order to prepare them for secondary school. They should be given exercises in note-taking, skimming and scanning a text for important information and summarising.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) cleaning out schoolbag (b) a bit fearful/nervous (c) underwear (d) since he/she was ten (e) it was furry (f) a pen (g) junk shop (h) to prevent slime and mould 3. – 4. Teacher check

Sa m

• • • •

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘Schoolbag’ with a time limit. 2. The pupils cover the poem and answer the questions. Full sentences are not necessary. If there are answers they do not know, they should guess. 3. The pupils reread the poem, check their answers, and give themselves a score out of 8. 4. The pupils write a two-line summary of the poem. 5. All answers can be discussed as a class and the poem can be reread.

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Objective Develop study skills such as skimming, scanning, notetaking and summarising

Before the lesson Decide on a time limit for the pupils to read the poem. Other poems for the pupils to summarise could be prepared.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Take notes while the teacher is talking; e.g. in another subject. Compare notes afterwards. 2. Write keywords from a passage/poem/story etc. 3. Take notes while other pupils are giving a talk. 4. Scan notes and write the most important points. 5. Summarise notes in other subjects; e.g. for test purposes. 6. Summarise everyday situations; e.g. their day, a holiday, a letter, a message, a TV programme, a film, a school event, a speech.

Homework suggestion The pupils write brief notes for another subject.

Recommended reading (to summarise) Where’s that gorilla? by John Coldwell

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Remember! When reading something, it is often too difficult to remember everything, so try and identify the main facts as you read.

 You have a time limit to read this poem! Try to take in as much information as you can!

 Cover the poem (completely!) and answer these questions. Do not peek at all! (a) What was the speaker doing?

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Go!

Schoolbag

I took out all my schoolbooks, And a clump of someone’s hair, Some dirty crumpled paper, And a piece of underwear.

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Today I cleaned my schoolbag. I hadn’t done it all year. I wondered what lurked at the bottom, And I felt a little fear.

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I found some Lego™ I had lost, And my favourite pen. And there was my toy soldier, I’d had since I was ten.

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I found a furry sandwich, And an old and sticky sweet, There was something I couldn’t identify, Which honked like smelly feet. My bag was like a junk shop, Crammed with the dusty and old. But I think I’ll clean it more often, To prevent the slime and mould.

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(b) How did he/she feel about this?

(c) What piece of clothing did he/she find?

(d) How long had he/she had the toy soldier?

(e) What was wrong with the sandwich?

(f) What favourite thing did he/she find?

(g) What did he/she compare the bag to?

(h) Why will he/she clean it more often?

 Reread the poem and check your answers! Give yourself a score out of 8

 Write a two-line summary of the poem.

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Can you read it? Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

Activities covered Reading a table Reading a poem Answering questions Matching up facts in a table Writing a poem Discussing with class

Answers 1. – 2. Teacher check 3. (a) The table gives more information. (b) There is no air to carry sound. (c) There is no air or water. (d) No, it takes 27.3 days. (e) The moon is compared to a pearl, a traffic light, a pill, a drop of milk and an island. (f) Teacher check 4.

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Background information Pupils can read many different types of text presented in a variety of ways. They should answer questions or hold discussions when analysing these texts to make sure that they have an understanding of the text. Less able readers in particular may find tables, timetables etc. difficult to read.

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• • • • • •

The lesson 1. Show the pupils examples of different ways in which information is presented and discuss. 2. The pupils read the table and the poem about the moon and complete Question 3. 3. The pupils match up facts on a table about the sun. 4. The pupils write a poem about the sun, following the example on the copymaster. Comparisons need to be made in the poem. 5. As a class, discuss when a table/poem might be a more appropriate type of text.

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Objective Retrieve and interpret information presented in a variety of ways

Before the lesson Prepare examples of different ways in which information can be presented; e.g. timetable, diagram. Discuss with the class when a particular type of text might be more appropriate.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Teachers notes

The sun Distance from Earth

150 million km

Temperature at centre

15 million K

Brightness

1 cm square = 232 500 candles

Made up mainly of

hydrogen

What is it?

a star

5. Teacher check Additional activity Pupils can: Read lists, menus, timetables, instructions, recipes, poems, epitaphs, plays, jokes, notices, posters, quizzes, questionnaires, reports, songs, diagrams, etc.

Recommended reading The story of my life by Philip Waddell Bouncy castle by Rita Ray

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Can you read it? Information can be presented in a variety of ways.

 Read this table.

 Read this poem. The moon

What is the moon?

384 000 km

Atmosphere

No

Water

No

Sounds

None (no air to carry sound)

Plant and animal life

None

Craters

Approx. 500 000

Time taken to orbit Earth

27.3 days

 Answer these questions.

It is a large pearl, in a universal oyster, It is a white traffic light, telling comets which way to go, It is a giant pill, making the world feel well, It is a drop of milk, splashed onto a starry countertop, It is mysterious white island, floating in a black cosmos sea.

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Average distance from Earth

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3476 km

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Diameter

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(a) Which text gives more information about the moon?

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(b) Why is there no sound on the moon?

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(c) Why could animals not survive on the moon?

(d) Does it take longer than a month for the moon to go around the Earth?

(e) Name two things the moon is compared to.

(f) Which text did you prefer reading? Give a reason.

 Match up the facts in this table. The sun Distance from Earth

hydrogen

Temperature at centre

1 cm square = 232 500 candles

Brightness

a star

Made up mainly of

150 million km

What is it?

15 million K

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 On a separate sheet of paper, write a

poem similar to the example in Question 2, but called What is the sun? Start each new sentence with ‘It is a …’.

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You need evidence Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘It could be worse’ as a class. The poem and its title can be briefly discussed. 2. Explain to the pupils how to quote from the text to support an answer. A quote need not be a full sentence, it could be a phrase or even just a word. When quoting from a text, quotation marks must always be used, and when appropriate, the author’s name should be included. 3. The pupils answer the questions on the copymaster, quoting from the poem to support their answer. 4. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Objective Support arguments and opinions with evidence from the text

Before the lesson Prepare examples of quotes used in a book/text book etc.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Teachers notes

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. Answers will vary, but may include the following: (a) true – ‘in unfamiliar space’ or ‘in the wrong place’ (b) false – ‘mesmerised by fright’ (c) false – ‘safe havens of fence and ditch’ (d) true – ‘loud familiar cue’ (e) true – ‘brought them in’ 3. Answers will vary, but may include the following: (a) The sheep were lost – ‘floundering’, ‘confusion’ (b) They were looking for their field/pasture – ‘searching for the barriers they knew’ (c) It was autumn – ‘soft September rain’ (d) Yes, ‘food was lush and rich’, ‘to be fattened’

Additional activity Pupils can: Answer comprehension-style questions, quoting from the text to support their answer. Many different types of texts could be used.

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Background information Pupils should learn to back up their answers or opinions using evidence from a text. Quotation marks should be used when quoting. In this lesson, the pupils quote from a poem. The poem is quite a difficult one and it is up to the teacher to decide how much of it to discuss with the class.

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Activities covered • Reading a poem • Answering questions, quoting from poem

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You need evidence  Read the poem below. If you are quoting, you should use quotation marks!

It could be worse They were in the wrong place, In unfamiliar space, Floundering in the middle of the lane.

 Answer true or false. Quote from the

poem each time to support your answer. (a)

The sheep were lost.

There were strange patches of sky, They did not realise why, They were searching for the barriers they knew.

(b)

They were not scared.

Safe havens of fence and ditch, Where food was lush and rich, Then suddenly a loud familiar cue.

(c)

They did not like their home.

The farmer, bless him, brought them in, To pastures free of fear and sin, And closed securely the squeaky iron gate.

(d)

They heard the farmer call them.

Now they were at ease, To be fattened if you please, and be slaughtered without malice was their fate.

(e)

They were brought back home.

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They were turning left and right, They were mesmerised by fright, Confusion in the soft September rain.

When you quote from the poem, it does not have to be full sentences. It can be phrases or words.

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 Answer these questions. Quote from the poem each time to support your answer. (a)

Why were the sheep ‘turning left and right’?

(b)

What were they looking for?

(c)

What time of year was it?

(d)

Were they well fed?

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Dinnertime

Teachers notes

Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

Activities covered Reading a menu Discussing menus Answering questions Designing own menu

Answers 1. (a) fish (b) herb (c) frozen dessert, often made of fruit juice 2. (a) Yes (duck) (b) No (c) Maybe (d) Maybe (e) Yes (prawns and tuna fish) 3. five 4. No 5. prawns, tuna fish, cod 6. – 7. Teacher check

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Background information There are so many different types of reading material the pupils can explore. The teacher should make use of a variety of these so that pupils get used to interpreting different types of text. If reading exercises are varied, it will also provide more interest, as long as the pupils can relate to what they are reading and it is ageappropriate.

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• • • •

The lesson 1. Read the menu ‘‘Posh nosh’. 2. Discuss the menu (i.e. the ingredients required, the variety of ways in which the food is cooked, the cost per person, the choices, food descriptions, decoration etc.). 3. The pupils answer Questions 1 – 6. Dictionaries may be used. Full sentences are not necessary. The teacher can ask extra questions about the menu. 4. The pupils create a menu of their own, first answering Question 7 to get them thinking. They can decide whether to make a fantasy menu or a realistic menu. 5. The pupils can write their menus neatly or print them out and these can be displayed in the classroom.

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Objective Read and interpret different kinds of functional text; e.g. menus

Before the lesson Prepare examples of other menus, perhaps from local restaurants. Prepare a list of other questions based on the menu, which have not been included on the copymaster.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Recommended reading (poems in different forms)

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First stab by Gina Douthwaite Seeing red by Gina Douthwaite Do you know my teacher? by John Rice Hippobotamus by Liz Brownlee The witch, the prince and the girl in the tower by Sue Cowling Tall story by Mike Johnson Volcano by Mary Green Electric guitars by James Carter I’ve eaten many strange and scrumptious dishes by Roald Dahl

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Additional activity Pupils can: Read and interpret train timetables, graphs, flow charts, flyers, programmes for a play, cinema line-ups, classified advertisements, road signs, recipes, instructions, nutritional information on food labels or shopping lists. Homework suggestion The pupils can look at home for written texts other than books. These can be displayed in the classroom with a heading: ‘Things we read’. (These can include cereal boxes, clothing labels, medicine boxes, instruction manuals, recipes, envelopes with addresses, letters, emails, brochures, calendars, cards etc.)

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Dinnertime  What are the following?: (a)

cod

(b)

tarragon

(c)

sorbet

Posh nosh – €45.00 pp

 Answer Yes, No or Maybe. There is poultry on the menu.

(b)

The soup is served hot.

(c)

Carrots are served with the meal.

(d)

Cheddar cheese will be on the cheese board.

(e)

Seafood is available as an appetiser.

Main courses Roasted pork in honey and cloves, Or cod wrapped in parma ham, Or breast of duck with bacon rolls, Or tarragon new spring lamb.

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(a)

Appetisers Chilled melon soup with tiger prawns, Or in soy sauce, tuna fish, Or marinated French frog’s legs, Or a crispy lamb and rosemary dish.

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 How many courses are there on the menu?

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 Is this restaurant suitable for vegetarians?

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 Name the different types of seafood available.

Desserts Orange and passion fruit jelly, Or cake with cinnamon cream, Or lime and minty sorbet, Or caramel crumble supreme.

All served with fresh veg or rice, And sauces that are sure to entice. A board with delectable cheese, Some coffee or tea if you please.

Bon appetit!

 Would you like to eat at this restaurant? No

Say why/why not.

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Yes

 Create your own menu on a separate sheet of paper. Think about these things. (a)

What is your restaurant called?

(b)

What type of food will you serve?

(c)

How much will the meals cost?

(d)

Who will your customers mainly be?

(e)

What pictures will you use?

(f)

Will you have a theme?

(g)

What is special about your menu?

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Fact or opinion? Strand unit Reading – developing interests, attitudes, information retrieval skills and the ability to think

Activities covered Reading a poem – writing fact or opinion Reading sentences – writing fact or opinion Writing facts about school Writing opinions about school Giving own opinion

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read magazine or newspaper articles and try to identify areas which may be opinion rather than fact. 2. Look at bias in magazines, newspapers and other forms of media. 3. Look at advertising and identify the facts about the product versus the promises the advertiser makes (or implies).

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Background information Pupils must have a clear understanding of the difference between fact and opinion for this lesson. Where in life we may encounter facts and opinions— and the importance of being able to tell the difference should also be discussed.

Answers 1. O / F / F / F / O / F / F / O / O/ F / O 2. (a) opinion (b) fact (c) opinion (d) fact 3. – 5. Teacher check

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• • • • •

The lesson 1. Complete oral examples of facts and opinions with the class. 2. Read the poem ‘‘A bee where?’ as a class. The poem can be briefly discussed. 3. The pupils state whether the bracketed lines in the poem are facts or opinions. 4. The pupils read sentences and state whether they are facts or opinions. 5. The pupils write three facts and three opinions about school. They can then write their opinion on homework to complete Question 5.

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Objective Distinguish between fact and opinion, and bias and objectivity, in text and in the media

Before the lesson Prepare examples of fact and opinion to present orally to the pupils.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Teachers notes

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Fact or opinion? A fact is something that is true and correct. An opinion is what someone thinks of something.

 Read this poem and next to each

bracket, write if it is fact (F) or an opinion (O).

 Write FACT or OPINION for these sentences. (a)

Grilled cheese and jam sandwiches are the best.

(b)

Lions are part of the cat family.

(c)

The nicest teachers do not give homework.

His room seems to be tidy, His bed is neatly made. He offers to do the washing up, Without even getting paid.

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My brother has a bee in his bonnet, Don’t know how it came about, He seems to have changed completely, And it’s causing me to doubt.

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A bee where?

In winter it may snow.

 Write three facts about your school. Use full sentences!

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His clothes are matched and clean, His hair’s spiked up with gel, He drowns himself in aftershave, He looks incredibly well.

(d)

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He helps Mum with the chores, While singing a happy song, He talks to me in a nice, kind voice, Something must be wrong!

 Write three opinions you have of school.

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He appears to have a best friend, He bought her a silver ring, Yes, my brother has a bee in his bonnet, I hope it doesn’t sting.

 What do you think of homework? Start your answer with ‘In my opinion …’

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Octopoem

Teachers notes

Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

The lesson 1. Read the prepared example of an ‘octopoem’ with the class. 2. The pupils read the second example on the copymaster and guess who the character might be. 3. The pupils underline the descriptive words/adjectives in both octopoems. 4. The pupils choose a person and write words to describe the person. These are used to write their own octopoem. 5. The pupils read their octopoem to the class, who must guess the person.

Strand unit Writing – clarifying thought through writing

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Objective Write in a variety of genres

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Activities covered Reading an example of an ‘octopoem’ Guessing a character Underlining descriptive words Choosing a person, writing descriptive words Writing an ‘octopoem’ Reading to the class

Additional activity Pupils can: Write stories, poems, instructions, directions, diaries, notes or summaries, reports, letters, forms, recipes, menus, reviews, myths, invitations, advertisements.

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Background information Pupils need a variety of different writing tasks, not just to keep writing more interesting, but also to draw on their different talents. All good efforts should be praised.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. It could be a witch 3. bright, clear, shiny, busy, starched, white, big, wooden, frothy, chargrilled, dark, gloomy, bubbling, cast iron, thick, dense, long, black, gnarled, wooden, crunchy, fat, lightly fried. 4. – 7. Teacher check

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• • • • • •

Before the lesson Prepare another example of an ‘octopoem’ to share with the class.

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Homework suggestion The pupils describe themselves using the same headings. (Being kind to themselves of course!)

Website <www.dreamagic.com/poetry/children.html>

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Octopoem An ‘octopoem’ is eight lines long and describes something or somebody.

 Look at the example below: Person ......................... a chef Season ........................ he is the summer, Weather ..................... on a bright, clear day.

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Object ......................... he is a shiny saucepan,

Clothing ...................... he is a starched white apron, Furniture .................... on a big wooden table.

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Drink........................... he is frothy coffee,

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Place ........................... in a busy kitchen.

Type of food ............... and a chargrilled steak.

 Guess who this might be.

on a dark, gloomy day.

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She is the winter,

 Write words to describe this person.

She is a bubbling cast iron pot,

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in a thick, dense forest.

She is a long, black dress,

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on a gnarled, wooden chair. She is crunchy beetle juice, and a fat toad, lightly fried.

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This could be a

 Underline the descriptive

words (adjectives) in both octopoems.

 Choose a person.

 Use your words to write an octopoem about the person. Season Weather Object Place Clothing Furniture Drink

Use as many adjectives as you can!

Type of food

 Read your poem to the class. They can try to guess the person in your octopoem.

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Write about it Strand unit Writing – clarifying thought through writing Objective Use notes to summarise reading material and write an account from the notes

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Dinner treat’ as a class and discuss. Words that can be clarified: ‘fed up’, ‘ushered’, ‘discarded’, ‘detect’. 2. Remind the pupils what keywords and summaries are. 3. The pupils underline keywords in the poem. 4. The pupils write brief notes, using their keywords to guide them. (The keywords and notes should be very similar, only the notes will contain more.) The brief notes should be comprehensive enough so that if someone were reading them, he/she would have some idea of the story. 5. Using their keywords and brief notes, the pupils write a paragraph about the poem. Full sentences must be used. 6. The pupils count their words and compare it with the original word count. 7. Some pupils can read their summary to the class.

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Answers 1. Teacher check 2. Possible keywords: eat, fed up, restaurant, table, sticky, chips, relax, smell, veg, steak, water, choke, mop, home 3. Possible brief notes: eat out, fed up washing, restaurant, table wobbled, sticky, sauce, leftover chips, ordered, relax, smell, unwell, veg, steak tough, water, black things, choke, waitress, mop, enough, home 4. – 5. Teacher check

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Background information This lesson gives pupils practise in summarising.

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• • • • • •

Activities covered Reading a poem as a class Underlining keywords Writing notes Writing a summary Counting words Reading a summary

Before the lesson Prepare examples of summaries.

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Strand Developing cognitive abilities through language

Teachers notes

Homework suggestion The pupils read and summarise a part of the class reader/newspaper article.

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Write notes and a summary of parts of the class reader. 2. Summarise other poems or texts from topics in other subjects.

Recommended reading (to summarise) What teachers wear in bed by Brian Moses

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Write about it Can you remember what summarising means? It means you should find the most important information in a text.

 Read this poem as a class. Dinner treat

 Underline the keywords in the poem.

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not have to write down full sentences, just the main ideas.

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I sat at the table I was ushered to, But it wobbled when I moved to the right. So I stuck my boot underneath it, To make the legs the same height.

 Write brief notes about the poem. You do

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One night I decided I’d like to eat out, I’d find the money somewhere. I was fed up with cooking and washing, What I needed was restaurant fare.

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The table was sticky and far from clean, And had splodges of something and sauce, A few discarded and greasy chips, And bits of a spicy first course.

 Write a paragraph about what happened in the poem. Use your keywords and notes to help you.

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I ordered my food and tried to relax, But I could detect a funny smell, A mixture of something burnt and old That made me feel unwell.

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You’d think with all the time it took, They’d manage to get it right. But my plate was heaped with unasked veg, And my steak too tough to bite. I reached for my water to take a gulp, But there were black things floating on top, I started to wheeze and splutter and choke, The waitress ran in with a mop. I’d had enough and I was going home, This was not how I wanted to feel. What I needed was something special, But it was just like a home-cooked meal.

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 The poem has 208 words. How many words are there in your summary? Poetry skills

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Speaking up Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language Strand unit Oral language – developing emotional and imaginative life through oral language

The lesson 1. Read ‘Speaking up’ as a class. Harder words can then be discussed, such as ‘boundaries’. 2. The groups read the poem again and discuss it. 3. As a group, the pupils answer the questions on the copymaster. They do not need to write full sentences as the emphasis is on discussion. 4. Each pupil thinks of a time when someone was angry with him/her. He/she tells the group about it. 5. The pupils write other problems children their age may have. 6. All answers and problems in general are discussed as a class.

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Activities covered Reading a poem as a group Answering questions Telling a group about an event Writing other problems

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) Answers will vary, but may include helpless, lonely or scared (b) Answers will vary (c) Answers will vary (d) no, ‘so far is untold’ 3. – 4. Teacher check 5. Possible answers may include bullying, friends, schoolwork, family problems, bereavement or loneliness.

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Background information The lesson should consist mainly of discussion in groups. It is good to have a lesson where pupils can freely discuss problems among themselves. They do not have to discuss their own problems but rather speak about general problems that pupils may have. The lesson should end with a class discussion about problems in general and what they should do if they are particularly concerned about something.

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• • • •

Before the lesson Prepare other examples of problems children may encounter. Divide the class into groups.

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Objective Discuss the concerns of other children

Teachers notes

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read children’s problem pages. 2. Look at advice websites appropriate to the pupils’ age group. 3. Each write a problem anonymously. These are discussed as a class. 4. Become familiar with the numbers to call if they have they have a problem they wish to talk about (e.g. Childline). 5. Read about children in different situations; e.g. children who have no food, running water, electricity, education, children who are sick or whose parents are sick. 6. Look at various charities to see the work done by them for children around the world. 7. Discuss what can be done to help people less fortunate than themselves, not only in other countries, but locally.

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Recommended reading (problems)

The place’s fault by Philip Hosbaum Introducing Dad by Brian Patten Do I have to clean my room? by Jack Prelutsky Websites (bullying)

Homework suggestion The pupils find the toll-free number they can call if they are having a problem.

<www.bullying.co.uk> <www.bbc.co.uk/schools/bullying> < www.ispcc.ie/childline>

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Speaking up We all encounter problems in life, but there is always someone who can help us.

 Find a group to work with. Read the poem below.

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Your anger makes me frightened, Your anger makes me freeze, Your anger makes me someone else, And brings me to my knees.

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Speaking up

You should always control your anger!

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Your anger makes me hate you, Your anger leaves me cold, Your anger has no boundaries, And so far, is untold.

 As a group, answer these questions. How does the speaker feel?

(b)

Who do you think might be causing these feelings?

(c)

What do you think the speaker intends to do?

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(a)

For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

(d)

Do other people know how the speaker is feeling? Support your answer.

 Do you remember a time when someone was angry with you? Who was angry?

(b)

Why were they angry?

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(a)

 Tell the group about it.  Still in your groups, write other problems children your age may have.

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Recipe for life

• • • •

Activities covered Reading a poem Answering questions Writing ingredients Discussing answers

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. It is about the different feelings we experience in life and the different aspects of life. 3. (a) tiredness (b) lump/scoopful (c) worry (d) a bit (e) destiny, what will happen (f) throw (g) deep sorrow 4. Life is quite good. 5. – 6. Teacher check

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Background information Although pupils are answering questions in this lesson, the focus should be the discussion at the end.

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Objective Discuss ideas, concepts and images encountered in literature

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘Life recipe’ and discuss. 2. The pupils answer questions on the copymaster. 3. The pupils write ‘ingredients’ of life, adding a few of their own. 4. All answers are discussed as a class.

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Strand unit Oral language – developing emotional and imaginative development through oral language

Before the lesson Examples of other life ‘ingredients’ could be prepared.

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Teachers notes

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Additional activity Pupils can: Discuss ideas, concepts and images encountered in the class reader, other poetry, newspaper articles, other pupil’s writing, advertisements, eulogies etc.

Website www.gigglepoetry.com

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Recipe for life Life is full of different ingredients!

 Read the poem below.

 What is this poem about?

Life recipe

 What do you think these words mean?

(c)

anxiety

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Mix in disappointment, And a trickle of relief, Toss in some impatience, Some boredom, peace and grief.

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dollop

(d)

smidgin

(e)

fate

(f)

toss

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Throw in jugfuls of love, And just a smidgin of hate. Blend in much uncertainty, And fold in luck and fate.

(b)

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Stir in a dollop of anger, Sift handfuls of frustration, Whisk up strong anxiety, And a lot of irritation.

exhaustion

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Take a little bit of happiness, And a huge heaped spoon of fear. Add a cupful of exhaustion, And some pride if it is near.

(a)

(g)

grief

 What is the speaker referring to when he/she says, ‘it tastes rather nice’?

Now …

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I think you’ve done it properly You’ve taken my advice. It really was a lot of work, But it tastes rather nice.

 Write some ‘ingredients of life’ identified by the

poet in the bowl below. You can add some of your own ingredients!

 Discuss all your answers with the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Good friend

Teachers notes

Before the lesson Prepare other poems to read to the pupils to which they can express their reactions orally.

Strand unit Oral language – developing emotional and imaginative development through oral language

The lesson 1. Share the prepared examples with the class. The pupils can orally give their own responses to the poems. 2. Read the poem ‘I thought you knew!’ as a class. The poem can be briefly discussed but answers to the questions should not be discussed. 3. The pupils answer the questions on their own. 4. The pupils discuss all their answers with the class.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. Possible answers may include: good at mathematics/best reader/can answer all questions/spelling knowledge/languages/general knowledge/neat handwriting 3. Possible answers may include: rude, arrogant, conceited, snobby, thinks he/she is good at everything 4. – 8. Teacher check Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Discuss poems and stories in groups. 2. Write their own interpretations of poems, stories, advertisements etc.

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Background information Pupils should be able to express their own reactions and thoughts about what they are reading. Different interpretations should be totally accepted, provided that pupils can back up what they are saying. With this particular lesson, the tone of the poem is quite tricky. It could be that the speaker is quite silly and does not realise that he/she is being hurtful, or it could be that the speaker is arrogant and insulting, in which case, the poem could be read in quite a sarcastic manner.

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Activities covered • Reading a poem • Answering questions on own • Discussing answers

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Objective Express individual responses to poems and literature and discuss different interpretations

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Recommended reading

People need people by Benjamin Zephaniah I think I could turn and live with animals by Walt Whitman

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Good friend  Read the poem below. What do you think of  Name four things the speaker says he/she the character in it?

can do well.

I thought you knew!

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speaker is? Give reasons for your answer.

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Yes, I always get 100% for my maths tests, And yes, I am the best reader in the class, And the teacher calls confidently on me to answer any question, And I know my spellings forwards and backwards, And I speak two other languages fluently, And I won the general knowledge quiz, And my handwriting is so neat, it looks typed.

 What type of person do you think the

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I thought you knew that I was highly intelligent. I didn’t try to hide it from you. I thought you would notice. It was, after all, blatantly obvious.

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But don’t let it come between us! Just because you’re quite stupid compared to me, doesn’t mean we can’t be friends!

 What do you think the ‘friend’ should say back to this ‘friend’?

 Do you think the speaker would make a good friend? Yes

No

Say why/why not.

 Give the poem another suitable title.  In what kind of tone do you think this poem should be read?

 Write something boastful about yourself. (Even though it is not right to boast!)

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Have fun!

Teachers notes

Strand unit Oral language – developing emotional and imaginative life through oral language

The lesson 1. As a class, the pupils can listen to the prepared examples of poetry/rhymes/ riddles/jokes. 2. In pairs, the pupils read the poem ‘‘Duppy dove’. 3. The pupils underline the nonsense words in the poem. 4. The pupils rewrite the poem using real words that rhyme with the nonsense words. This can be done on a separate sheet of paper or words can be changed on the poem. 5. The pupils tick which poem they prefer and write why. 6. The pupils change a given nursery rhyme by replacing the real words with nonsense words that rhyme. They can change the words on the rhyme and then use the space provided to write it out properly. 7. The pupils change the titles by using real or made-up words that rhyme. 8. All answers can be discussed as a class.

Activities covered • Reading a nonsense poem with a partner • Rewriting a nonsense poem • Writing a nonsense rhyme

Answers 1. – 2. Teacher check 4. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read and discuss jokes, tongue twisters, riddles, humorous poetry, funny stories etc. 2. Play word games; e.g. Balderdash, Pictionary, general knowledge, Scrabble. 3. Look at strange words and use them in oral sentences.

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Background information Pupils sometimes need to be having fun during language time—it need not all be serious! Fun lessons should be enjoyed in a casual and relaxed atmosphere, a time when pupils can simply enjoy working with the language and not have to get too hung up on spelling, grammar etc.

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Objective Experience and enjoy playful aspects of language

Before the lesson Divide the class into pairs. Prepare examples of nonsense and humorous verse, as well as jokes or riddles.

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

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Recommended reading (fun) My dad’s amazing by Ian Souter Gran, can you rap? by Jack Ousbey Wouldn’t it be funny if you didn’t have a nose? by Roger McGough Macavity, the mystery cat by TS Eliot Oh I wish I’d looked after me teeth by Pam Ayres Why you should never play on roads by David Harmer Twong tister by Clive Webster Never seen by Brian Moses The mad gardener’s song by Lewis Carroll

3. My dog and I were playing, Upon the football pitch, He was catching sticks I threw, One landed in a ditch. And there he found a poodle, A pretty, little thing, She sure was glad to see us, And to my hand did cling. Now my dog won’t play with me, He likes the poodle more, And I am left without a friend, While they sit paw-in-paw.

Websites (words) <www.worldwidewords.org> (For teacher) (jokes) <www.humormatters.com/kidsjoke.htm>

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Have fun! Language can be enjoyable and fun!

 Read this nonsense poem with a partner.

 Underline the nonsense words.  Replace the nonsense words with real

Duppy dove

words. The real words should rhyme with the nonsense words.

 Which one do you prefer?

Why?

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And there he found a choodle, A pretty, bittle bling, She sure was blad to kee us, And to my hand did ching.

sense

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nonsense

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My nog and I were flaying, Upon the mootball kitch, He was zatching snicks I threw, One ganded in a fitch.

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Now my nog won’t flay with me, He likes the choodle more, And I am left without a krend, While they sit chaw-in-chaw.

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 Write your own nonsense rhyme by changing some of the words in this rhyme. Try to make your nonsense words rhyme with the real words. Little Miss Muffet

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Sat on her tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey, Along came a spider,

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Who sat down beside her, And frightened Miss Muffet away.

 Change these titles by using made-up or real words that rhyme.

For example, Sleeping Beauty – Peeping Fruitie. Share them with the class. (a)

Puss in boots

(b)

The wizard of Oz

(c)

Snow White

(d)

Beauty and the beast

(e)

Cinderella

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‘Tis the season Strand unit Reading – responding to text

Activities covered Reading a poem as a class Discussing a poem Answering questions Drawing a picture that depicts a poem

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) Teacher check (b) Answers should indicate that the first part of the poem deals with the shopping, mad rushing about trying to get all the presents, and then on Christmas morning, things are much slower with the realisation of what Christmas should be about becomes clear—the joy of sharing, giving and loving. (c) Teacher check (d) Teacher check 3. Teacher check

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Background information There are many ways in which pupils could respond to poetry and they should be given opportunities to explore this. For this lesson, the pupils will be drawing a picture. They should not just draw a picture of the topic but should try to capture the mood of the poem. They need to look beyond the obvious!

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• • • •

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘Season’s great things’ as a class. 2. Discuss the poem as a class, talking about the different moods represented. The pupils should also mention how the speaker feels about Christmas. Words that can be discussed: ‘haunts’, ‘budget’, ‘tempo’, ‘camouflaged’, ‘oblivious’, ‘accompanied’. 3. The pupils answer questions on their copymaster. These should be full sentences. 4. The pupils draw a picture that depicts not only the poem but also the moods of the poem.

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Objective Respond to poetry and fiction through discussion, writing, drama, visual arts and dance

Before the lesson Provide other poems about Christmas. These can be compared with the poem in the lesson.

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Teachers notes

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Recommended reading

(mood) Death in Leamington by John Betjeman (Christmas) Christmas shopping by Louis MacNiece

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Dramatise the given poem or other poems. 2. Read Christmas carols and then sing them. 3. Read other poems and hold group and/or class discussions. 4. Write about poems read. 5. Make up a dance to go with a poem. 6. Create a cartoon strip based on a poem.

Homework suggestion The pupils read a given poem and draw a picture that depicts the poem.

Websites (Christmas traditions in other countries) <www.soon.org.uk/country/christmas.htm> (poetry) <www.poetryzone.ndirect.co.uk>

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‘Tis the season Christmas is a very special time for some people.

 Read this poem as a class.

 Discuss and answer these questions as a class.

(b)

How does the mood of the poem change?

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What is the poem about?

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Christmas shoppers, running in and out of tinselled haunts, clutching secret lists, Wondering how the budget will stretch that far. People, once human, lost in the spirit of reindeer and snowmen. Cheery carols measuring the tempo of their jingle-footed steps. The rain beats down outside, washing away guilt and sense. But inside is warm, and somewhere, well camouflaged in the ribbons, bows and glitter, lurks the real meaning of it all. Only now they are oblivious, and the crazed search continues, every item ticked and wrapped. Until behold, on the morning, each peace-offering is presented, accompanied with a smile and real warmth, the mad dash forgotten and forgiven, and, at last, a prayer whispered.

(a)

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Season’s great things

(c)

Do you think the meaning of special holidays like Christmas can get lost?

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Give a reason for your answer.

(d)

Complete the sentence: Christmas is...

In Brazil, Father Christmas is called Papai Noel.

 Draw a picture that depicts the poem. Make sure it captures the moods.

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At the dinner table Strand unit Reading – responding to text

Activities covered Reading a poem Discussing a poem Discussing own experiences Answering questions Discussing table manners

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Background information Wherever possible, the pupils should be able to relate to what they are reading. This will give the reading more meaning. Pupils should be reading about topics such as school, friends, bullying, teachers, family, pets and hobbies or activities.

Answers 1. – 3. Teacher check 4. Answers may include: Do not put your elbows on the table. Do not stretch across the table. Eat with a knife and fork, not your hands. If you have to get up, ask if you can be excused. Do not slurp! Do not chew with your mouth open. Be polite. Topics of conversation should be appropriate for the dinner table. Thank the host/chef for the meal.

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• • • • •

The lesson 1. Read some poems to the class. These can be briefly discussed. 2. Read ‘‘Almost a family affair’ as a class. The poem is discussed, including the title of the poem and the mum’s feelings. Words that can be discussed: ‘assortment’, ‘trifle’, ‘Yorkshire pudding’, ‘raw deal’. 3. The pupils answer Questions 2–3. 4. Pupils write three dinner table rules. These can be discussed as a class.

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Objective Relate personal experience to the ideas and emotions conveyed in the text

Before the lesson Provide other poems that the pupils will relate to.

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Teachers notes

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Additional activity Pupils can: Compare own experiences with the experiences of others in the class reader, other poetry, newspaper articles etc.

Recommended reading

(experiences) Two lists by Tony Bradman Seven o’clock news by Steve Turner Playing tennis with Justin by David Harmer Website <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_manners>

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At the dinner table Can you remember the last time you sat down and had a meal with friends or family?

 Read about this family. Almost a family affair Now on Sundays, our family sits down to a feast, of an assortment of veges and carved-up roast beast. Jamie loves potatoes all covered in sauce, Josh likes the trifle, with ice-cream of course! Jason wants gravy all over his plate, and beef puts Dad in an excitable state. Luke adores peas though we can’t think of why, and Shaun, Yorkshire pudding, eaten just dry. Spot chews the bone once we’re all done, and Fluffy eats scraps, leaving us none. Yes, we all have a favourite part of the meal, although Mum seems to get a slightly raw deal. I don’t think roast dinner’s Mum’s first choice food, because she doesn’t eat much and seems in a mood! She gets even worse when it’s time to clear away, you’d swear she didn’t enjoy being in the kitchen all day!

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In Japan, it is acceptable to burp after your meal! Remember, you are not in Japan!

Where was it held?

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 Think back to a recent meal you had with friends or family.

What were the main topics of conversation?

(c)

List the items that were on the table.

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(b)

 How would the family dinner in the poem be: (a)

the same as yours?

(b)

different from yours?

 List three rules you should obey when sitting at the dinner table.

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What’s the difference? Strand unit Reading – responding to text

The lesson 1. Discuss the prepared examples of texts, looking at the similarities and differences. 2. Read the two texts, ‘Teatime’ and ‘‘Humpty Dumpty’ as a class and discuss. 3. The pupils answer Questions 2–4. Full sentences should be used. 4. The pupils draw two pictures, one for each text, suitable for small children. 5. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Objective Examine similarities and differences in various types of text

Before the lesson Prepare other texts for the pupils to discuss orally.

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Teachers notes

Background information Pupils need to be able to compare various types of texts by looking at the similarities and differences. They can look at aspects such as content, language usage, font, presentation, format, focus, intended audience, detail and length.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. Similarities – both about Humpty Dumpty, both for children, in both Humpty sits on a wall and has a fall. 3. Differences – titles, length, more detail in the second. 4. Teatime – 5 rhyming couplets, aabbcc etc. Humpty Dumpty – 2 rhyming couplets 5. Teacher check

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Activities covered • Reading two texts • Comparing two texts • Drawing a picture suitable for a text

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read articles on the same topics from different newspapers and compare the versions. 2. Compare different types of poems, children’s magazines, websites dealing with the same topics, books and class readers.

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What’s the difference? These poems are both about poor Humpty Dumpty!

 Read both poems. Teatime

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a big fall, All the king’s horses, And all the king’s men, Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

When Humpty Dumpty climbed the wall, Did his friends shout: ‘Don’t! You’ll fall!’? Did he simply ignore all of their cries, Was he shouting loudly, ‘C’mon guys!’? Was he bragging and boasting all of the way? At the top, did he claim: ‘What a view! I dare say!’? Did he then get silly, and start to do tricks? Did he lose his footing on the uneven bricks? When he fell to the ground, did his friends rush to see, If they would have scrambled or boiled egg for tea?

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Humpty Dumpty

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 Write down two similarities between these texts.

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 Write down two differences between these texts.

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 Comment on the rhyme scheme of each one. Teatime:

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Humpty Dumpty:

It is possible that ‘Humpty Dumpty’ refers to a cannon in the English Civil War (1642-49). It was mounted on a wall in Colchester to defend the city but fell down in 1648.

 Draw a picture for each poem that would be suitable for small children. Humpty Dumpty

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Teatime

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Respond to it

Objective Continue to share responses to an ever-increasing variety of texts with the wider community of readers

Answers 1. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. In groups or pairs, read the following: other poetry, a play, stories, rhymes, articles, websites. 2. Share own writing with others.

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Background information Pupils should get the opportunity to share their reading experiences and responses to it. Pair work and group work are good for this. Texts for sharing should be varied, from parts of the class reader to magazine articles. This kind of activity can be done in 10 or 15 minutes whenever it suits the teacher.

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• • • •

Activities covered Reading a poem as a group Writing a response Discussing a poem and different responses Summarising a group’s responses

The lesson 1. Discuss with the class what a response is. 2. Each group reads the poem ‘‘Anything but this’. Harder words can then be discussed as a class; e.g. ‘sable’, ‘aqua’, ‘trudging’, ‘lurk’, ‘West End’. 3. The pupils answer Questions 2 and 3 individually. 4. The pupils discuss the poem and their own responses in the group. 5. The pupils summarise the group’s responses. All answers to the questions should be full sentences. 6. Each group’s summary can be shared with the class.

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Strand unit Reading – responding to text

Before the lesson Divide the class into groups.

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Respond to it You will have to give your response to a poem. (Response means a reply or reaction.)

 In your group, read this poem aloud

Write full sentences!

together.

 What do you think of this poem? Give

Anything but this

reasons.

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 What would you rather be doing than doing homework?

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I’d rather be swimming in an aqua sea, than sitting here doing these sums. I’d rather be skateboarding in LA where winter never comes.

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I’d rather be skiing on mountain slopes, than working at this table. I’d rather be climbing the Eiffel Tower, or chasing after sable.

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I’d rather be walking in the Amazon jungle, than reading through these poems. I’d rather be meeting ancient tribes and visiting their homes.

about the different responses to Questions 2 and 3.

 Summarise the different responses in your group.

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I’d rather be walking China’s wall, than trudging through this work. I’d rather be diving on a coral reef, where sharks and stonefish lurk.

 Discuss the poem in your group and talk

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I’d rather be sipping Indian tea, than learning all these facts. I’d rather be sitting in the West End, and watching all the acts. I’d rather be doing anything else, I’m sure I know enough. I’ll do my homework later, or not, and that’s just tough.

 Share your responses with the class and discuss.

The Great Wall of China stretches for 3460 km!

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Choose your own Objective Read aloud from a personal choice of texts to entertain and inform an audience

Answers 1. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Read aloud favourite parts of the class reader book, short stories, extracts from a book, information they found interesting or jokes.

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Background information The pupils will need to choose their own favourite poem for this lesson so perhaps it could be completed near the end of the year when more poetry has been covered. The pupils should be writing 10 to 15 lines; hence they can write part of their poem if it is too long, or can write two short poems instead.

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• • • •

Activities covered Choosing a favourite poem Reading a poem to a group Writing comments from group Holding a group vote

The lesson 1. The pupils write their poem/part of their poem on the copymaster. 2. The pupils read their poem to a group. 3. The group discusses each other’s poems. 4. The pupils write comments about the poem they read to the group. 5. Each group holds a vote for the best poem. The pupils write a reason why the poem was chosen.

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Strand unit Reading – responding to text

Before the lesson Pupils will need to have selected a favourite poem. Divide the class into groups.

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Choose your own You will need to choose your own favourite poem for this lesson.

 Copy it below. If it is too long, write only your favourite parts. If it is too short, write

another short one! You should be writing 10 to 15 lines. Write the poet’s name too.

Poet:

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Title:

 Practise reading your poem a few times. Do

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not forget to use expression! Mark on the poem where you can change different aspects of your voice; e.g. pace, volume, pitch.

 Read your poem to a group.

To have great poets there must be great audiences too. (Walt Whitman)

 What did they think of your poem?  (a)

(b)

Have a group vote for the best poem. Write the title and poet below. (If it is yours, put a big star by your poem!)

Write a reason why the group thought it was the best.

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Listen and enjoy

• • • • •

Activities covered Listening to teacher Answering questions Discussing answers and a poem Underlining words to be emphasised in a poem Listening to a poem again, comparing emphasised words

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) robin, bee-eater, vulture, crow, sparrow, owl, thrush, hawk, egret (b) (i) not definite or clear (ii) (in food context) mild flavour (iii) easily frightened (iv) enjoy greatly (v) slang word for eat (c) You eat very little. 3. – 5. Teacher check

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Background information Pupils of all ages enjoy someone reading to them. When there is spare time in the classroom (rare occasions) the teacher should read a short story, poetry, factual information, newspaper article or anything interesting. The reading can be discussed but no work needs to stem from the reading. It is reading that is to be enjoyed for what it is.

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Objective Listen to books or extracts from books and poetry read aloud

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘What species?’ to the class. Use much expression, adding accents to words where required. 2. The pupils answer Question 2. 3. The questions and poem are discussed as a class. 4. The pupils read the same poem to themselves, underlining the words they think need to be emphasised. 5. Read aloud the poem again. The pupils compare their stressed words with the teacher’s to complete Question 5.

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Strand unit Reading – responding to text

Before the lesson Pictures of the birds mentioned in the poem could be shown to the class.

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Teachers notes

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Additional activity Pupils can: Listen to the following being read to them: short stories, poetry, articles, reviews, other children’s work, extracts from different genres such as science fiction, horror, crime, adventure etc, informational material, interesting facts, jokes etc.

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Listen and enjoy  Listen to your teacher read the following

All this work is for the birds!

poem. Follow as he/she reads.

 Answer these questions. (a)

What species of birds are mentioned?

(b)

What do you think these words mean?

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My mother, angry, said to me, ‘You eat just like a bird’. And I said, ‘That’s the vaguest thing I think I’ve ever heard’.

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What sort of bird do I remind you of? Could you be more specific? Why, some have diets that are quite bland, and some are quite horrific!

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What species?

(i) vague

Robins love to feast on worms, and bee-eaters eat bees. A vulture feeds on rotten meat, I’m sure I’m none of these!

(iii) timid

(iv) relish

(v) scoffs

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Crows pick through the garbage, a sparrow will swallow a fly, an owl will hunt a timid mouse, I’m not that sort of guy!

(ii) bland

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A thrush will enjoy a juicy snail, a hawk will relish a rat, an egret scoffs the cattle’s fleas, I know I don’t do that!

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Have you ever seen me lay an egg? Do I sleep in a grassy nest? So, Mum, do you think a feathery creature, Is one that describes me best?

The peregrine falcon is the fastest bird and can reach speeds of 160 km in flight!

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(c)

What does the saying ‘You eat like a bird’ really mean?

 Discuss your answers and the poem with the class.

 Read the poem yourself and underline the words you think need to be stressed. (Not stressed out, but said louder or accented!)

 Listen to the teacher read the poem again. Does the teacher stress exactly the same words as you chose?

Yes

No

What might be some reasons for stressing particular words?

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Special moments

Objective Analyse in writing his/her reactions to personal experiences

Answers 1. – 6. Teacher check

Additional activity Pupils can: Write a picture story, newspaper article or letter/postcard/email about a personal experience.

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Background information Pupils should write about their own personal experiences and, in doing so, express their reactions to their own experiences.

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• • • • •

Activities covered Discussing special moments Writing keywords Reading a format and example Writing a poem Self-assessing a poem

The lesson 1. As a whole class, the pupils discuss special moments they have had. 2. The pupils write the keywords that come to mind. 3. Read the format and example with the pupils. 4. The pupils write their own poem, then read it and assess it. 5. All poems should be displayed in the classroom under the heading ‘Our special moments’.

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Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing

Before the lesson Stimulus pictures or objects such as Christmas or birthday cards, Christmas or birthday wrapping paper, holiday ‘snaps’ or photographs of pupils participating in prior activities could be collected.

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Special moments Oh, what a great day I am having at school!

Think of a special moment in your life. It can be a birthday, a trip, a party or even a day at school!

 What day/moment did you choose?

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 Think back to that special time and write keywords that come to mind.

 Read the poetry format and example below.

Line 1: Who or what is the poem about? ................................. A very special Christmas

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Line 2: What action is happening? ..............................Opening a mysterious, small box Line 3: When does the action take place? (time) ....... On a perfect, snowflake morning

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Line 4: Where does the action take place? (place) .........................Next to a roaring fire

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Line 5: Why is this moment/day special to you? .......................My very first mobile. Yes!

 Write your own poem using the same format. Use your keywords to help you. Line 1: Line 2:

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Line 3:

Use descriptive words!

Line 4: Line 5:

 Read your poem to yourself. What do you think of it? Improve it if you can!

 Display your poems in the classroom under a heading ‘Our special moments’.

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Problems

Teachers notes

Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. Answers may include: His/her friends are no longer speaking, no longer wishing to be friends, ignoring. 3. – 6. Teacher check

Activities covered Reading a poem Writing advice Listing the qualities of a good friend Writing a friendship rules list Discussing answers

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Read poetry about the experiences of others. 2. Read newspaper articles and discuss and write about the effects the events have on those involved. 3. Research famous people, such as pop stars and actors, and discuss and write about the experiences they have being famous. 4. Research famous explorers and discuss and write about their experiences.

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Background information Pupils should read about the experiences of others so that they can learn from those experiences. They should be learning to have empathy and be sensitive and understanding of others’ problems, as well as feeling good when others are doing well or are happy.

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• • • • •

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Discarded’ as a class. The poem can be discussed, as well as harder words such as ‘torture’, ‘dear’ and ‘discarded’. 2. The pupils answer Questions 2 to 5. 3. All answers should be discussed as a class, as well as any other problems pupils might raise.

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Objective Express in writing reactions to the experiences of others

Before the lesson Prepare examples of others’ experiences (good and bad) to read to the class.

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Homework suggestion The pupils ask a family member about an experience he/she has had and write about it, reporting back to the class the following day.

Website <www.susankramer.com/friendshipqualities.html>

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Problems Sometimes we can learn from the experiences of others.

 Read about this person’s problem.

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Try to help others when they have a problem.

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A minute ago, we were friends to the end. Now I seem to be driving you round the bend. What did I do or what did I say? How did I make you feel this way? I told you my secrets, you know it all. I’m there for you always, whenever you call. I don’t understand it—please explain how You can suddenly hate me and torture me now? I’ll be here waiting, interested to hear, Why now I am nothing, when you held me so dear.

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Discarded

 What do you think happened to the speaker?

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 Imagine you were writing to the speaker. What advice would you give?

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 What qualities do you think a good friend should have?

 Make a list of five friendship rules you think friends should stick to.

 Discuss your answers with a group or the class. Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Feelings

Teachers notes

Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) Teacher check (b) Answers may indicate that he/she may feel better when they have written their history test/have found their bus ticket/once the party is over (c) Teacher check 3. – 5. Teacher check Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Write fairytales or change endings to fairytales. 2. Write different types of stories; e.g. ghost, crime, adventure, fantasy, humorous. 3. Write poems using different formats; e.g. kennings, cinquains, haikus, tankas, odes, list poems, free verse, rhymes, limericks, songs. 4. Write a play based on a fairytale or the class reader, and then perform it. 5. Write stories as a group or class. 6. Write stories in the form of a comic strip or picture story. 7. Write short autobiographies or biographies.

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Background information The types of material the pupils can write is endless. Writing stories and poems should be both interesting and stimulating. Teachers should be giving varied written exercises that are age-appropriate, relevant and yet challenging.

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Activities covered Reading a mood poem Answering questions Discussing emotions and feelings with others Writing feelings Writing a mood poem

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Objective Write stories and poems

• • • • •

The lesson 1. The pupils read the example of a mood poem on the copymaster. 2. The pupils answer questions about the poem. 3. The class discusses various feelings and emotions; e.g. what makes them happy, sad, worried, excited. They can then write some feelings on the copymaster. 4. The pupils choose a feeling from Question 3 to write a mood poem about, using the given format. 5. Pupils who wish to can read their mood poems to the class.

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Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing

Before the lesson Prepare an example of a mood poem.

Recommended reading (reading aloud) Todd the backyard king by Clare Bevan Night mail by W H Auden

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Feelings We all experience different feelings during the day. I hope you are feeling good at the moment!

 Read this poem.  Answer these questions. On a scale of 1 to 10, just how nervous do you think the speaker is? not

(b)

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(a)

very

10

Name two things that might make the speaker feel better.

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I’m feeling nervous, Not a giving a speech to thousands nervous, Not doing a first skydive nervous, Not nervous like a man in a hungry lion’s den, But just an uneasy, creeping nervous. Nervous that I have a history test, Nervous that I cannot find my bus ticket, Nervous that I am going to a party tomorrow, Worried. Not confident, Not relaxed, Not sure.

(c)

Give the poem an appropriate title.

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 Brainstorm with the class different feelings a person might have. Write some below.

 Choose one of these feelings.

Check the example!

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 Write a feeling poem using the format below. I’m feeling (feeling) ................................ Not ........................................................... Not ...........................................................

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Not ........................................................... But............................................................ Three reasons for having this feeling ...

Synonym for the feeling ......................... Not ........................................................... Not ........................................................... Not ........................................................... Prim-Ed Publishing ~ www.prim-ed.com

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Not yet!

Teachers notes

Activities covered • Reading a poem • Answering questions • Designing a travel kit

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. frustrated, bored, anxious, irritated, angry, tired etc. 3. Possible answers: ‘wet with sweat’, ‘boring’, ‘crowded’, ‘can’t take much more’, ‘fret’. 4. – 5. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Write letters to characters in stories or poems. 2. Compare own experiences with the experiences of those in a chosen text.

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Background information Pupils should often be reading about ideas, emotions and images that are familiar to them and with which they can identify. They can only express personal reactions to situations they understand or have been through themselves.

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Objective Express a personal reaction to ideas, emotions and images encountered in literature

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘‘Not yet’ as a class. Harder words can be discussed, such as ‘familiar’, ‘blood clots’ and ‘fret’. 2. The pupils answer Questions 2 – 5. 3. All answers can be discussed as a class.

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Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing

Before the lesson Prepare other examples of similar poems to read to the class.

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Recommended reading (trip) The car trip by Michael Rosen

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Not yet! Sometimes a journey seems to take forever!

 Describe how the speaker feels.

 Read the following poem as a class.

Not yet

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 Think back to a time when you went on a long

journey. You might have been in an aeroplane, on a bus, in a train or car or on a bicycle! (a)

Where were you going?

(b)

What were you travelling in or on?

(c)

Describe how you felt, including what your strongest emotion was and what made you feel this way.

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The scenery is boring. Don’t say, ‘Soon, pet!’ I’ve seen too many trees, Are we there yet?

feelings.

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I’ve sat here so long, I am wet with sweat, My trousers are soggy, Are we there yet?

 Circle the words in the poem that show the speaker’s

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We’ve travelled so long, We’re close now I bet, It seems so familiar, Are we there yet?

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This car is so crowded, We should’ve taken a jet, My legs will have blood clots, Are we there yet?

 Design a travel kit to stop you from being bored on a long journey. Use labels to show the items.

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If I shut up now Then what will I get? I’ll twiddle my thumbs, but Are we there yet? I can’t take much more, I’m starting to fret, Are we getting closer, ARE WE THERE YET?

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Do you agree? Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing Objective Express and analyse his/her reactions to poems

The lesson 1. The pupils read the poem ‘Show me how’. The poem is not discussed as a class but can be read together and harder words can be clarified; e.g. ‘grouchy’, ‘advise’, ‘demonstrate’, ‘pine’, ‘ditch’ (verb), ‘syllabus’. 2. The pupils answer Questions 1 to 7. 3. All answers can then be discussed as a class.

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Activities covered • Reading a poem • Answering questions • Writing a timetable

Before the lesson Other poems for the pupils could be provided.

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Teachers notes

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Background information Reactions to poems can be very different, depending on the person who is reading them. Pupils should be able to express their reactions to poetry, giving reasons for their reactions, and backing up their thoughts with ideas from the poem.

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. The speaker does not enjoy school. 3. He/She learns fractions/addition/stories/letters/verse. 4. He/She wants to learn cooking/baking/how to dress properly/how to shop/how to be cautious with money/how to keep a friend/how to keep parents in line/ how not to get homesick/what life is about. 5. Teacher check 6. Teacher check 7. Teacher check

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Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Write a letter or poem to the speaker, responding to the ideas in the poem. 2. Act out poems.

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Do you agree?  Read the poem below.

 How does the speaker feel about school?

Show me how

 Name three things the speaker learns at

All day long in dreadful school, We learn things that are not cool. Fractions coming out our ears, Adding till we are bored to tears. Writing stories, letters, verse, Grouchy teachers make it worse.

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 Name three things he/she would rather learn.

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Teach me how to fry a steak, Or ice a giant chocolate cake. Show me how to style my hair, Or dress so people will not stare.

school.

Advise me how to wisely shop, When I’ve spent enough, how to stop. Demonstrate how to keep a friend, And not drive others round the bend.

 Do you agree with the speaker? Say why/why not.

 Tick the things you would like to learn at school. Add three of your own.

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Tell me how to keep parents in line, When I’m away from home, how not to pine. Educate me on how to stay ahead, When I’m in trouble, to softly tread. Explain to me what life’s about, When I’m unsure, how not to doubt. These are the things I’d rather do, Ditch the syllabus, I beg you!

cooking ................

manners ..............

karate...................

horse riding .........

acting ...................

snooker ................

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dressing up .......... hairdressing ........ drums ..................

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 Fill in one day of a timetable you would like to see at school. Times:

9.30 –

Monday 10.00 – 10.30 – 11.00 – 11.30 – 12.00 – 12.30 –

10.00

10.30

11.00

11.30

12.00

12.30

1.00

1.00 –

2.00 –

2.00

3.00

Subjects:

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Interpret

Teachers notes

Activities covered • Reading a poem • Answering questions • Discussing answers and interpretations with a group and the class

Answers 1. Teacher check 2. (a) The speaker is watching other people walking. (b) They could be going to a friend, to pay a bill, to work, to the shop or to visit a relative. (c) It means titbits of information about other people. (d) They could work at the post office or in an accounts office. (e) He could buy the newspaper. (f) The speaker feels envious. Perhaps the speaker is afraid to go outdoors or perhaps the speaker has nothing important to do. (g) ‘walking’ is repeated (h) It is the speaker who is going nowhere. (i) Teacher check 3. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Write a story or paragraph based on the poem. 2. Paint a picture to go with the poem. 3. Write a character sketch on someone in the poem. 4. Write a poetry review.

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Background information At this age, pupils should be interpreting poems on their own and be able to clarify their thoughts through writing. A pupil’s interpretation of a poem should never be ‘wrong’ as long as he/she can give reasons for the decisions made. Interpreting poetry will require that slightly more difficult poems be used.

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Objective Analyse different interpretations of poems in writing

The lesson 1. Read the poem ‘Going nowhere’ as a class. The poem should not be discussed, although harder words can be dealt with; e.g. ‘eager’, ‘sombre’, ‘malice’, ‘envy’, ‘clearly defined purpose’. 2. The pupils answer the questions on their own. These should be full sentences. 3. The pupils discuss all their answers with the group. They can discuss any different interpretations. 4. The class can discuss the poem as a whole and it can be reread.

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Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing

Before the lesson Divide the class into groups.

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Recommended reading (to interpret) Note to the hurrying man by Brian Patten

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Interpret To ‘interpret’ a poem is to explain what the poem means. That can be tricky sometimes!

 Read this poem.

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I watched them all, walking, walking. Where were they going? To visit a friend, eager for drops of golden gossip? To pay an overdue bill, their fists tightly clenched? To their sombre place of work, to push paper into labelled slots? To the friendly, dirty corner shop, to buy the latest news? To a death-defying relative, a call of dread and duty? Or is one of them simply walking? Can you tell who he might be? Is his expression free of malice? I envy them all, with their clearly defined purpose. As I watch them, walking, walking.

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Going nowhere

Look for your clues in the poem!

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 Answer these questions on your own.

What do you think the speaker is doing?

(b)

According to the poem, where could the walkers be going?

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(a)

What does ‘drops of golden gossip’ mean?

(d)

What could the person who is going to work possibly do for a living?

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(c)

(e)

What will the one walker buy at the shop?

(f)

How does the speaker feel? Make up a reason as to why he/she may feel this way.

(g)

Which word is repeated?

(h)

Comment on the title of the poem.

(i)

What do you think the speaker should do?

 Work in groups. Discuss all your answers with your group. Talk about any different

interpretations of the poem. Listen to what others have to say! Finally, discuss your answers with the whole class.

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Listen and write

• • • •

Activities covered Listening to music Drawing a sketch Writing keywords/phrases Writing free verse

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Objective Express in writing reactions to music, artwork, films and TV programmes

The lesson 1. Explain the lesson to the pupils and what will be expected from them. They need to know they will be writing about the images that come to mind. 2. Play the music. The pupils draw a rough sketch of images that come to mind. 3. The pupils write keywords and/or phrases. The music can be replayed continuously throughout the lesson. 4. The pupils write free verse about the images they have drawn and the words they have written. Free verse has no restrictions so the poem can take any form. Some possible examples could be discussed. The teacher can continue to play the music while the pupils are writing. 5. Poems can be displayed in the classroom or read while the music is playing.

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Strand unit Writing – developing emotional and imaginative life through writing

Before the lesson Bring to class music to play to the pupils.

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Strand Emotional and imaginative development through language

Teachers notes

Answers 1. – 3. Teacher check

Additional activities Pupils can: 1. Listen to different types of music; e.g. popular music, traditional music or music from other countries and write about it. 2. Visit an art gallery and write about a particular piece of artwork. 3. Look at the work of a particular artist and choose one piece to write a story about it. 4. Review films and TV programmes.

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Background information This lesson focuses on writing to music that has been played by the teacher. It is suggested that the teacher plays music that is strong and emotional, preferably classical music. It must evoke some feelings in the pupils. Pupils should be completely quiet while they are listening to the music, perhaps with their eyes closed so that they can absorb the music and allow their imaginations to run free!

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Listen and write Listen carefully to the music the teacher plays to you. Closing your eyes might help!

If music be the food of love, play on. (Shakespeare, ‘Twelfth night’)

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 What does the music make you think of? Draw a sketch of the images that come to mind.

Let your imagination go wild!

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 Write down keywords and phrases the music makes you think of.

‘Free verse’ means you have no restrictions.

 Write a free verse about the images that come to mind.

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6276IRE Poetry Skills - Upper