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Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 5/P 6) Published by Prim-Ed Publishing® 2009 Copyright© Jenni Harrold 2008 ISBN 978-1-84654-174-2 PR– 6060

Additional titles available in this series: Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 1/P 2) Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 2/P 3) Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 3/P 4) Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 4/P 5) Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 6/P 7) Maths – Back To Basics (Yr 6 Ext/S 1)

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

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In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

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FOREWORD Maths – Back To Basics is a series of books with a back-to-basics approach designed to support the foundations of the maths curriculum. It is a clear and comprehensive resource that covers number, measurement, shape and data concepts for each year level. Although intended as a homework resource, this series is also ideal for: • • • •

teaching a new concept consolidation assessment revision.

Titles in the series are: Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 2/P 3 Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 4/P 5 Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 6/P 7

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Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 1/ P 2 Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 3/P 4 Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 5/P 6 Maths – Back To Basics – Yr 6 Ext/S 1

CONTENTS

Number

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Teachers notes ......................................................................................................................................................................................... iv Curriculum links ................................................................................................................................................................................ v – vii

Lines and angles .......................................................... 2-D shapes .................................................................... 3-D shapes .................................................................... Perspective and transformations .............................. Symmetry ...................................................................... Directions and position ............................................... Maps and keys .............................................................

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Ordering numbers ............................................................ 2–3 Place value ....................................................................... 4–5 Rounding ........................................................................... 6–7 Addition ............................................................................. 8–9 Addition problems ........................................................ 10–11 Subtraction ................................................................... 12–13 Subtraction problems .................................................. 14–15 Mental addition and subtraction ............................... 16–17 Multiplication ................................................................ 18–19 Multiplication problems .............................................. 20–21 Division .......................................................................... 22–23 Division problems ........................................................ 24–25 Mental multiplication and division ............................ 26–27 Fractions ........................................................................ 28–29 Decimals ........................................................................ 30–31 Percentages ................................................................. 32–33 Money ............................................................................ 34–35 Money problems .......................................................... 36–37 Number sentences and patterns .............................. 38–39

Shape 40–41 42–43 44–45 46–47 48–49 50–51 52–53

Measurement

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Length ............................................................................ 54–55 Perimeter ....................................................................... 56–57 Area ................................................................................ 58–59 Volume and capacity ................................................... 60–61 Mass .............................................................................. 62–63 Temperature .................................................................. 64–65 Angles ............................................................................. 66–67 Periods of time ............................................................. 68–69 Time ................................................................................ 70–71 Calendars and timetables ........................................... 72–73

Data Chance and predictions .............................................. Data ................................................................................ Tables ............................................................................. Graphs ...........................................................................

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74–75 76–77 78–79 80–81

Maths – Back To Basics


TEACHERS NOTES The format of the book Each book contains teachers notes and curriculum links. Four sections are included in each book: • Number

• Shape

• Measurement

• Data

Each section covers a variety of concepts. The number of concepts covered varies from section to section. Each pupil page in the book provides teachers with activities that relate solely to one mathematical concept. The pupil pages are graded, with activities that provide a progressive degree of difficulty. In this way, teachers can use the page to introduce a new concept and then reinforce knowledge and skills. The pupil pages are supported by a corresponding teachers page which includes the following information:

Teachers notes page Objectives show the specific desired outcomes when completing the worksheet.

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The name of the concept is given.

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The name of the related mathematical area is given.

The concepts required for pupils to complete each page are provided.

The name of the related mathematical area is given.

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Pupil page

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Answers are given for all questions on the pupil page.

The name of the concept is given.

Questions or activities relating to each concept are given with sufficient space provided for pupils to write answers.

Space is provided for each pupil to write his/her name on each worksheet.

Since this series of books follows a set format, teachers may find it useful to use a preceding title to review a corresponding concept before new skills are introduced. Pupils who need extra assistance may also find this a helpful way to revise material previously taught. Maths – Back To Basics

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CURRICULUM LINKS England, Mathematics, Year Five curriculum objectives: Using and applying mathematics

• solve one-step and two-step problems involving whole numbers and decimals and all four operations • organise and interpret information • explore patterns, properties and relationships involving numbers or shapes • count from any number in whole number steps

Counting and understanding number

• explain what each digit represents in whole numbers and decimals with up to two places • partition, round and order these numbers • find equivalent fractions and relate fractions to their decimal representations • understand percentage as the number of parts in every 100 and express tenths and hundredths as percentages • recall quickly multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 and derive corresponding division facts

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Knowing and using number facts

• identify pairs of factors

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• extend methods for whole-number calculations

• use efficient written methods to add and subtract whole numbers and decimals with up to two places • use understanding of place value to multiply and divide whole numbers and decimals

Calculating

• refine and use efficient written methods to multiply and divide HTU x U, TU x TU and HTU ÷ U

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• use a calculator to solve problems, including those involving decimals • identify, visualise and describe properties of rectangles, triangles, regular polygons and 3-D solids

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• use knowledge of properties to draw 2-D shapes • read and plot coordinates in the first quadrant • recognise parallel and perpendicular lines

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Understanding shape

• complete patterns with up to two lines of symmetry • draw the position of a shape after a reflection or translation • estimate acute and obtuse angles • read, choose, use and record standard metric units to measure length, weight and capacity to a suitable degree of accuracy

Measuring

• convert larger to smaller units using decimals • measure and calculate the perimeter of regular and irregular polygons • describe the occurrence of familiar events using the language of chance or likelihood

Handling data

• answer questions by sorting and organising relevant data • construct pictograms and bar graphs

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Maths – Back To Basics


CURRICULUM LINKS Northern Ireland, Mathematics and Numeracy, Key Stage Two curriculum objectives: • count, read, write and order whole numbers • develop an understanding of place value to include up to two decimal places • estimate and approximate to gain an indication of the size of a solution to a calculation • understand and use decimal fractions and percentages • explore the relationships between fractions, decimal fractions and percentages Number

• follow and devise rules for generating sequences • understand and use multiples and factors and the term prime • develop strategies to add and subtract mentally

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• know the multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 • engage in a range of activities to develop understanding of the four operations of number • add and subtract with up to two decimal places

• develop skills in estimation

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• use operations to solve problems, including involving money

• appreciate important ideas about measurement including the need for appropriate accuracy • understand the relationship between units and convert one metric unit to another • calculate perimeter and area

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Measures

• recognise times on analogue and digital clocks

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• use timetables

• classify 2-D shapes through examination of angles and sides • recognise line symmetry and reflect shapes in a line

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• explore tessellations

• name and describe common 2-D shapes • investigate the number of faces, edges and vertices on 3-D shapes Shape and Space

• name and describe common 3-D shapes • explore the relationship between 2-D and 3-D shapes • recognise right angles • develop language associated with line and angle • recognise properties of acute, obtuse and reflex angles • use co-ordinates to plot and draw shapes in the first quadrant

Handling Data

• record and present data using graphs, tables and diagrams • interpret a wide range of tables, graphs and diagrams

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CURRICULUM LINKS Scotland, Mathematics, Second curriculum objectives: • use knowledge of rounding to estimate the answer to a problem • explore how decimal fractions are constructed and explain the link between a digit, its place and its value • determine which calculations are needed to solve problems involving whole numbers • explore the patterns and relationships in multiplication and division

Number, Money and Measure

• investigate and identify the multiples and factors of numbers • investigate the contexts in which fractions, percentages and decimal fractions are used and carry out calculations to solve related problems • show the equivalent forms of simple fractions, decimal fractions and percentages • understand equivalent fractions and apply knowledge to compare and order common fractions • use and interpret timetables to plan events and make time calculations • use the common units of measure, convert between related units of the metric system and carry out calculations • explain how to find the perimeter and area of a simple 2-D shape • apply knowledge of number facts to solve problems where an unknown value is represented by a symbol • draw 2-D shapes

• investigate angles and classify angles using appropriate mathematical vocabulary • use knowledge of co-ordinate system to plot and describe the location of a point on a grid

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Shape, Position and Movement

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• explore 3-D objects and 2-D shapes and use mathematical language to describe their properties

• apply knowledge of symmetry to create and complete symmetrical pictures and patterns • interpret and draw conclusions from the information displayed • organise and communicate data results in an appropriate way

Information Handling

• display data in a clear way

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• conduct simple experiments involving chance and communicate findings using the vocabulary of probability Wales, Mathematical Development, Key Stage Two curriculum objectives:

• use decimals in the context of money and measures

• use a variety of mental methods of computation

• extend informal written methods to non-calculator methods

• round answers to calculations

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• understand place value in relation to the position of digits

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Number

• count, read, write and order whole numbers

• use the relationships between the four operations • use fractions and percentages to describe and compare proportions of a whole • explore the inverse relationships of addition and subtraction and multiplication and division • choose appropriate standard units of length, mass, capacity, temperature, area and time

Measures and Money

Shape, Position and Movement

• recognise situations to which the four operations apply • explore features of numbers, including factors, multiples, primes and sequences • understand the relationships between units and convert one metric unit to another

• read times on analogue and digital clocks

• use timetables and calculate time differences

• read scales to an increasing degree of accuracy

• draw angles

• find perimeters of simple shapes

• find areas by counting

• know and use the conventional way to record money

• solve problems involving money

• name and classify 2-D shapes according to side and angle properties

• know and use the properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes

• recognise reflective symmetry of 2-D shapes

• use co-ordinates to specify location

• use right angles Handling Data

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• use and present data in a variety of ways including tables, pictograms, charts, bar charts and diagrams • know that the likelihood of an event lies between impossible and certain www.prim-ed.com

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• use everyday language for early ideas of probability

Maths – Back To Basics


ORDERING NUMBERS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and orders whole numbers to 9999. Reads, writes and orders whole numbers up to five digits. Identifies and uses correct terminology to order whole numbers.

Concepts required Before and after Ordering from smallest to largest and largest to smallest. Correct usage of less than (<) and greater than (>) signs.

Answers

(c) 4906, 4908 (f) 6999, 7001 (i) 49 000, 49 002

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

12, 17, 34, 55, 61, 79 409, 419, 429, 449, 490, 499 2000, 2111, 2112, 2121, 2212, 2222 2709, 2719, 2791, 4709, 5709, 7709 9919, 9932, 9939, 9941, 9949, 9991

3.

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

89, 76, 51, 27, 20, 14 383, 343, 333, 330, 313, 303 1111, 1101, 1100, 1010, 1001, 1000 7241, 4712, 4271, 2741, 2714, 1427 8500, 8150, 8105, 8050, 8008, 8005

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2.

4. (a) 9874, 4789 (c) 9621, 1269 5. (a) < (d) <

Maths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back To Basics

(b) 2521, 2523 (e) 8997, 8999 (h) 52 600, 52 602

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1. (a) 848, 850 (b) 5010, 5012 (g) 14 180, 14 182

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Knowledge of numbers to five digits.

(b) 9410, 149 (d) 9854, 4589 (b) > (e) >

(c) < (f) <

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ORDERING NUMBERS NUMBER

1. Write the number that comes before and after. (a)

849

(b)

2522

(c)

4907

(d)

5011

(e)

8998

(f)

7000

(g)

14 181

(h)

52 601

(i)

49 001

2. Order these sets of numbers from smallest to largest. (a) 55, 79, 34, 12, 61, 17

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(c) 2111, 2212, 2112, 2222, 2121, 2000

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(d) 4709, 2709, 7709, 5709, 2719, 2791 (e) 9941, 9932, 9991, 9949, 9939, 9919

3. Order these sets of numbers from largest to smallest.

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(a) 14, 27, 89, 20, 76, 51

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(b) 333, 303, 343, 313, 383, 330

(c) 1001, 1101, 1111, 1010, 1100, 1000 (d) 7241, 2741, 1427, 4271, 2714, 4712

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(b) 490, 409, 419, 449, 499, 429

(e) 8050, 8150, 8005, 8500, 8008, 8105 4. Write the largest and smallest amount possible using each set of numbers; e.g. 2, 4, 6, 8 8642 2468 (a) 7, 4, 9, 8

(b) 1, 0, 4, 9

(c) 6, 2, 1, 9

(d) 5, 4, 9, 8

5. Use > or <. (a) 849

894

(b) 499

409

(d) 1234

1243

(e) 5202

5020

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(c) 717 (f) 12 121

777 21 212 Maths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back To Basics


PLACE VALUE NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Recognises and demonstrates place value. Identifies and represents different forms of the same number.

Concepts required Place value to ten thousands. Expanded notation Representing numbers as an addition sum.

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Materials needed Calculator

1.

Place value

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Answers Expanded form

ones

Meaning

6x1

6

3 x 100

300

tens

5 x 10

50

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hundreds thousands

3 x 1000

3000

hundreds

6 x 100

600

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ten thousands thousands tens

2 x 10 000 5 x 1000 7 x 10

20 000 5000 70

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2. (a) 300, 40 (b) 2000, 3 (d) 600, 40, 4 (e) 9125 (g) 20 000, 1000, 800, 70, 6

(c) 4211 (f) 2000, 400, 2

3. (a) ones (6) (b) hundreds (600) (c) ones (6) (d) tens (60) (e) hundreds (600) (f) thousands (6000) (g) ten thousands (60 000) (h) thousands (6000) 4. (a) 42 (b) 65 7 6465 174 665 47 16 645 + 747 + 6 1017 23 846

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PLACE VALUE NUMBER

1. Complete the table. Number

Place value

Expanded form

Meaning

tens

2 x 10

20

124 (a) 496 (b) 1384 (c) 2652 (d) 3499 (e) 15 679 (f) 24 014

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(h) 77 777

(a) 1342 = 1000 +

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2. Write the missing numbers. +

+ 2

(b) 2583 =

= 4000 + 200 + 10 + 1 (d) 8644 = 8000 +

(e)

= 9000 + 100 + 20 + 5

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(c)

(f) 12 462 = 10 000 +

+

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(g) 21 876 =

+

+ 500 + 80 + +

+

+ 60 +

+

+

+

3. Write the place value of the six (6) in these numbers.

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(g) 25 000

(a) 26

(e) 1611

(b) 621

(c) 306

(d) 564

(f) 6482

(g) 62 541

(h) 36 000

4. Set out these numbers as an addition sum. (a) 42 + 7 + 174 + 47 + 747

(b) 65 + 6465 + 665 + 16 645 + 6

(c) Use a calculator to find each total. (d) Underline the thousands place value number in each answer. Prim-Ed PublishingÂŽ

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ROUNDING NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Demonstrates rounding numbers to the nearest 10, 100, 1000. Demonstrates rounding numbers to the nearest pound and five pence.

Concepts required Numbers ending in 5, 50, 500 are rounded up. Estimation

Answers

2. (a) 400 (d) 400 (g) 2200

(b) 100 (e) 1000 (h) 4600

(c) 4000 (f) 11 000

(b) £2.00 (e) £10.00 (h) £106.00

(c) £3.00 (f) £21.00

(b) 60 – 30 = 30 (d) 60 ÷ 10 = 6 (f) 400 – 250 = 150

6. (a) 80p (d) £4.10 (g) £26.00

(b) £1.25 (e) £8.50 (h) £110.60

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5. (a) 30 + 50 = 80 (c) 50 x 10 = 500 (e) 170 + 130 = 300

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(c) 300 (f) 1000

(b) 2000 (e) 6000 (h) 20 000

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3. (a) 1000 (d) 3000 (g) 15 000 4. (a) £1.00 (d) £6.00 (g) £22.00

(c) 50 (f) 140

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(b) 20 (e) 100 (h) 400

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1. (a) 10 (d) 100 (g) 480

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(c) £2.95 (f) £10.00

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ROUNDING NUMBER

1. Round these numbers to the nearest 10. (a) 7

(b) 18

(c) 45

(d) 98

(e) 102

(f) 141

(g) 475

(h) 397

2. Round these numbers to the nearest 100. (a) 406

(b) 111

(c) 289

(d) 350

(e) 977

(f) 1045

(g) 2222

(h) 4551

(b) 1599

(d) 2701

(e) 6099

(g) 15 050

(c) 3500

(f) 10 500

(c) £2.50

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(a) 1202

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(h) 19 695

4. Round these amounts to the nearest pound.

(d) £5.99

(e) £10.25

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(g) £21.55

(b) £1.85

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(a) 85p

(f) £21.05

(h) £106.49

5. Round each number to the nearest 10 to find the approximate answer; e.g.

22 + 17

20

+

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3. Round these numbers to the nearest 1000.

20

=

40

(a) 32 + 48

+

=

(b) 62 – 29

=

(c) 51 x 8

x

=

(d) 55 ÷ 12

÷

=

(e) 165 + 125

+

=

(f) 401 – 249

=

6. Purchases made at a store are rounded up or down to the nearest five pence. Show the rounded price for each amount. (a) 79p =

(b) £1.24 =

(c) £2.93 =

(d) £4.12 =

(e) £8.49 =

(f) £9.99 =

(g) £25.99 =

(h) £110.59 =

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ADDITION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Uses place value properties to calculate addition facts. Uses knowledge of place value to solve addition problems with two, three and four digits.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

(b) 18 (e) 40 (h) 71

3. (a) 357 (d) 764

(b) 589 (e) 873

(c) 490

4. (a) 615 (d) 833

(b) 810 (e) 4305

(c) 727

(b) 716 (e) 4332

(c) 758

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5. (a) 591 (d) 1021 20

21

22

23

24

7. (a)

19

20

21

22

18

19

20

17

18

16

17

83

94 105

23

51

62

73

84

95

21

22

41

52

63

74

85

19

20

21

31

42

53

64

75

18

19

20

21

32

43

54

65

27

6

9

15

24

3 7

6

(b)

23

19

18

21

15

20

25

18

22

21

17

3 2

4 5

(b)

72

12

8.

(c) 111 (f) 134

61

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(b) 90 (e) 121

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2. (a) 80 (d) 133

Maths – Back To Basics

(c) 37 (f) 60

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1. (a) 15 (d) 33 (g) 60

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Answers

1

8

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ADDITION NUMBER

1. (a) 4 + 11 =

(b) 5 + 13 =

(c) 25 + 12 =

(d) 29 + 4 =

(e) 32 + 8 =

(f) 41 + 19 =

(g) 16 + 44 =

(h) 57 + 14 =

2. (a) 64 (b) 48 (c) 37 (d) 49 (e) 62 (f) 87 + 16 + 42 + 74 + 84 + 59 + 47

3. (a) 123 (b) 302 (c) 252 (d) 455 (e) 604 + 234 + 287 + 238 + 309 + 269

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386 (b) 555 (c) 499 (d) 688 (e) 1708 + 229 + 255 + 228 + 145 + 2597

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4. (a)

5. (a) 142 (b) 206 (c) 314 (d) 802 (e) 1333 304 246 245 140 1444 + 145 + 264 + 199 + 79 + 1555

6. Complete the grids. 9

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(a)

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8 7

(a)

+ (b)

11

12

13

14

15

11

22

33

44

55

6 9

6 5

7. Complete the squares so each row and column adds up to the same number.

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(b)

23

21

15

18

22

21

8. Use the numbers from one (1) to seven (7) so each line adds to 12.

50 40 30 20 10 +

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ADDITION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves addition word problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve addition problems with two, three and four digits.

Concepts required

Answers 1. 80 runs

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2. 57 songs 3. 122 pupils 4. 551 people

7. 978 DVDs

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8. 1513 people

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5. 804 km 6. 747 pupils

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Place value Trading Problem solving

9. 2645 pupils

10. 4630 people

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11. Teacher check word problem 285 + 199 = 484 12. Teacher check word problem 2050 + 1999 = 4049

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ADDITION PROBLEMS 2. Rose downloaded 28 songs and Tess 29. How many songs did they download altogether?

3. If there are 63 pupils in Year 4 and 59 pupils in Year 5, how many are there altogether?

4. There were 266 people in attendance at a football game on Saturday and 285 on Sunday. What was the total?

5. Emily drove 309 km one day and 495 km the next. How far did she travel?

6. School attendance numbers were 266 in week 1, 242 in week 2 and 239 in week 3. What was the total?

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7. There were 324 new release DVDs, 255 three-day hire DVDs and 399 weekly DVDs. How many DVDs were there altogether?

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1. Glen scored 54 runs and Brody scored 26 runs. What was the total of runs scored?

9. The high school has an attendance of 2250 pupils, while 395 attend the primary school. How many pupils are there in total?

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NUMBER

8. There were 508 people at a performance on Friday, 555 attended on Saturday and 450 attended on Sunday. What was the total attendance? 10. In a phone survey, 2345 people voted ‘Yes’ and 2285 voted ‘No’. How many people voted altogether?

Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem. 11. 285 + 199

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Maths – Back To Basics


SUBTRACTION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Uses knowledge of place value to solve subtraction problems with two, three and four digits.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

(b) 7 (e) 30 (h) 50

2. (a) 27 (d) 1

(b) 31 (e) 63

5. (a) 203 (d) 2135

(b) 103 (e) 1115

(c) 641

(b) 24 (e) 109

(c) 4

(b) 247 (e) 2045

(c) 179

17

16

14

12

10

16

15

13

11

15

14

12

14

13

12

(b)

56

54

50

45

40

9

46

44

40

35

30

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6. (a)

(c) 60

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3. (a) 122 (d) 595 4. (a) 17 (d) 116

(c) 10 (f) 25

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1. (a) 3 (d) 7 (g) 99

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Answers

10

8

36

34

30

25

20

11

9

7

26

24

20

15

10

13

10

8

6

16

14

10

5

0

7. (a) 7 0 7 (b) 3 4 2 (c) 4 0 7 (d) 3 4 5 6 – 4 0 7 – 2 3 9 – 2 7 8 – 1 7 8 9 3 0 0 1 0 3 1 2 9 1667

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SUBTRACTION NUMBER

1. (a) 9 – 6 =

(b) 15 – 8 =

(d) 22 – 15 =

(e) 40 – 10 =

(g) 100 – 1 =

(h) 75 – 25 =

2. (a)

(c) 25 – 15 =

(f) 50 – 25 =

69 (b) 74 (c) 88 (d) 65 (e) – 42 – 43 – 28 – 64

87 – 24

3. (a) 245 (b) 456 (c) 848 (d) 999 (e) 2467 – 123 – 353 – 207 – 404 – 1352

43 (b) 62 (c) 72 (d) 145 (e) 267 – 26 – 38 – 68 – 29 – 158

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4. (a)

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5. (a) 342 (b) 425 (c) 408 (d) 2524 (e) 3400 – 139 – 178 – 229 – 389 – 1355

(a)

(b)

in g

6. Complete the grids. 19

17 16

2

3

5

60

40 30

15 –

50

ew

18

Vi

PUPIL NAME

20 7

9

4

6

10

15

20

7. Write the missing numbers. (a)

7 –

0

3

0

0

0

7

1 Prim-Ed Publishing®

(d)

8

2

3 –

4

(c)

(b)

7

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3

3

3

5 7

1 13

9

1

2

4

6

6 9

6 Maths – Back To Basics


SUBTRACTION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves subtraction word problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve subtraction problems with two, three and four digits.

Concepts required

Answers 1. 35 pages

Sa m

2. 28 litres 3. 60 DVDs 4. 207 boys

7. 136 votes

ew

8. 2725 tickets

in g

5. 115 words 6. 178 people

pl e

Place value Trading Problem solving

9. 605 km 10. 375

Vi

11. Teacher check word problem 156 – 66 = 90 12. Teacher check word problem 521 – 379 = 142

Maths – Back To Basics

14

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SUBTRACTION PROBLEMS 2. A tank holds 84 litres of water. How much more water is needed to fill it if it already contains 56 litres?

3. There were 145 DVD covers on the shelf. Only 85 were available to rent. How many were already rented?

4. If there were 474 pupils and 267 were girls, how many were boys?

5. Lucas has a 500-word length story to write. How many words does he have to write if he has already written 385?

6. There was an attendance of 807 at a show on Saturday and 629 on Sunday. What was the amount of the drop in attendance?

ew

Sa m

in g

7. In a two candidate school election, 525 pupils voted. If Xin received 389 of the votes, how many did Grace receive?

pl e

1. Zoe is reading a 98-page length book. She has 63 pages left to read. How many pages has she already read?

9. A family had to travel 1200 km to visit relatives. If they travelled 595 km on the first day, how far did they still have to travel?

Vi

PUPIL NAME

NUMBER

8. There were 8250 tickets available. On the first day, 5525 tickets were sold. How many were left?

10. Subtract 625 from 1000.

Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem. 11. 156 – 66

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12. 521 – 379

15

Maths – Back To Basics


MENTAL ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Shows proficiency with mental addition facts. Shows proficiency with mental subtraction facts.

Concepts required Mentally adding one- and two-digit numbers with addend to 15. Mentally subtracting one- and two-digit numbers with answers less than 20.

C 5 1 3 2 16 14 9 17 9 5 11 26 21 20 3 28 2 4 17 21 22 19 7 6 12

ew Vi Maths – Back To Basics

D 15 19 13 18 4 15 2 19 20 7 7 16 13 5 22 3 18 10 25 6 20 15 3 15 1

Sa m

B 6 8 10 13 7 16 29 2 19 1 23 0 16 27 15 17 14 23 18 4 8 0 12 4 4

in g

A 10 0 18 14 18 10 24 8 11 17 14 3 14 5 2 17 12 24 16 6 5 17 6 20 22

pl e

Answers

16

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MENTAL ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION NUMBER

C

D

10 – 5 =

9+6=

9–9=

12 – 4 =

12 – 11=

10 + 9 =

10 + 8 =

13 – 3 =

11 – 8 =

8+5=

11 + 3 =

10 + 3 =

9–7=

11 + 7 =

9+9=

11 – 4 =

11 + 5 =

10 – 6 =

12 – 2 =

8+8=

10 + 4 =

12 + 3 =

12 + 12 =

15 + 14 =

12 – 3 =

11 – 9 =

11 – 3 =

12 – 10 =

9+8=

12 + 7 =

13 – 2 =

15 + 4 =

13 – 4 =

15 + 5 =

15 + 2 =

9–8=

12 – 7 =

13 – 6 =

12 + 2 =

15 + 8 =

8+3=

9–2=

10 – 7 =

13 – 13 =

15 + 11 =

10 + 6 =

8+6=

12 + 4 =

12 + 9 =

9+4=

9–4=

15 + 12 =

10 + 10 =

11 – 6 =

13 – 11 =

11 + 4 =

12 – 9 =

15 + 7 =

10 + 7 =

15 + 13 =

13 – 10 =

11 + 6 =

Sa m

pl e

9–3=

ew

8+2=

in g

B

Vi

PUPIL NAME

A

10 + 2 =

9+5=

10 – 8 =

12 + 6 =

15 + 9 =

12 + 11 =

13 – 9 =

15 – 5 =

9+7=

15 + 3 =

8+9=

15 + 10 =

11 – 5 =

12 – 8 =

15 + 6 =

12 – 6 =

13 – 8 =

13 – 5 =

12 + 10 =

11 + 9 =

12 + 5 =

10 – 10 =

11 + 8 =

10 + 5 =

10 – 4 =

8+4=

12 – 5 =

9–6=

12 + 8 =

9–5=

13 – 7 =

8+7=

11 + 11 =

11 – 7 =

9+3=

10 – 9 =

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Maths – Back To Basics


MULTIPLICATION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Calculates to solve multiplication problems with two and three digits.

Concepts required Place value Trading Tables

Answers

2. (a) 46 (d) 168

(b) 82 (e) 208

3. (a) 144 (d) 365

ew

6. (a) 252 (d) 410

(b) 330 (e) 272

(c) 336

(b) 268 (e) 1272

(c) 575

(b) 1230 (e) 1156

(c) 1224

(b) 341 (e) 484

(c) 384

7. (a)

(b)

16

24

32

40

48

18

36

54

72

90

14

21

28

35

42

14

28

42

56

70

12

18

24

30

36

10

20

30

40

50

10

15

20

25

30

6

12

18

24

30

8

12

16

20

24

2

4

6

8

10

Vi Maths – Back To Basics

(c) 159

in g

4. (a) 244 (d) 1284 5. (a) 2625 (d) 1071

(c) 81 (f) 54

pl e

(b) 42 (e) 56

Sa m

1. (a) 40 (d) 32

18

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MULTIPLICATION NUMBER

1. (a) 8 x 5 =

(b) 7 x 6 =

(c) 9 x 9 =

(d) 4 x 8 =

(e) 7 x 8 =

(f) 6 x 9 =

2. (a)

23 (b) x 2

36 (b) x 4

55 (c) x 6

84 (d) x 4

52 x 4

7 3 (e) x 5

1 2 2 (b) 1 3 4 (c) 1 1 5 (d) x 2 x 2 x 5

68 x 4

5. (a)

2 1 4 (e) x 6

Sa m

4. (a)

525 (b) 2 4 6 (c) 2 0 4 (d) x 5 x 5 x 6

ew

2 1 (b) 3 1 (c) 3 2 (d) x 1 2 x 1 1 x 1 2

318 x 4

3 5 7 (e) x 3

in g

4 2 (e) x 4

pl e

5 3 (d) x 3

Vi

PUPIL NAME

3. (a)

6. (a)

4 1 (c) x 2

289 x 4

4 1 (e) x 1 0

22 x 22

7. Complete the grids. (a) (b) 8

9

7

7

6

5

5

3

4

1

x Prim-Ed Publishing®

2

3

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4

5

6

x 19

2

4

6

8

10

Maths – Back To Basics


MULTIPLICATION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves multiplication word problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve multiplication problems.

Concepts required

Answers 1. 96 pens

Sa m

2. 208 books 3. 90 balls 4. 280 days

in g

5. 174 km 6. 448 people

pl e

Place value Trading Problem solving Tables

7. 246 messages

ew

8. 972 seedlings 9. 120 months 10. 396 eggs

Vi

11. Teacher check word problem 24 x 3 = 72 12. Teacher check word problem 216 x 7 = 1512

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MULTIPLICATION PROBLEMS 2. Four shelves each hold 52 books. How many books are there altogether?

3. In cricket, there are six balls in each over. How many balls in 15 overs?

4. How many days are there in 40 weeks?

5. Lana rides her bike 29 km every week. How many kilometres would she ride in six weeks?

6. If one row seats 56 people, how many people can eight rows seat?

ew

Sa m

in g

7. Lee and Mandela each sent a total of 123 text messages. What was their combined total?

pl e

1. Thirty-two pupils each have three pens. How many pens are there altogether?

9. How many months are there in ten years?

Vi

PUPIL NAME

NUMBER

8. A total of 162 people each planted six seedlings. How many seedlings were planted altogether?

10. If one carton holds 12 eggs, how many eggs are there in 33 cartons?

Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem. 11. 24 x 3

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Maths – Back To Basics


DIVISION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates division problems. Calculates division problems with remainders.

Concepts required

Answers (b) 3 (e) 2 (h) 5

(c) 7 (f) 5

3. (a) 214 (d) 212

Sa m

1. (a) 3 (d) 5 (g) 4

pl e

Sharing Tables Remainders Division wheel format

(b) 121 (e) 231

(c) 304

4. (a) 13 (d) 38

(b) 16 (e) 15

(c) 24

(b) 224 (e) 141

(c) 328

(b) 233 r1 (e) 122 r5

(c) 123 r1

ew

5. (a) 216 (d) 142

6. (a) 284 r1 (d) 292 r1

(c) 32

(b)

Vi

7. (a)

12

1

2

1 12 12÷ 4 3 6 4 2

(c)

32

6

1

(b) 21 (e) 22

in g

2. (a) 12 (d) 32

3

3

8 4

2 16 32÷ 2 16 32 8 4 1

8

12 8

2

3 24÷ 12 2 4 6 6 4

8. Teacher check. Possible answer.

4 9 9

Maths – Back To Basics

36 1

4 36÷ 18 2 6 12 3 6

22

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DIVISION 1. (a) 12 ÷ 4 =

(b) 15 ÷ 5 =

(c) 14 ÷ 2 =

(d) 20 ÷ 4 =

(e) 16 ÷ 8 =

(f) 25 ÷ 5 =

(g) 24 ÷ 6 =

(h) 50 ÷ 10 =

(b) 4 8 4

(c) 2 6 4

(d) 3 9 6

(e) 4 8 8

3. (a) 2 4 2 8

(b) 3 3 6 3

(c) 2 6 0 8

(d) 4 8 4 8

(e) 3 6 9 3

4. (a) 4 5 2

(b) 3 4 8

(c) 4 9 6

(d) 2 7 6

(e) 5 7 5

5. (a) 2 4 3 2

(b) 4 8 9 6

(c) 3 9 8 4

(d) 3 4 2 6

(e) 4 5 6 4

6. (a) 3 8 5 3

(b) 4 9 3 3

(c) 6 7 3 9

(d) 3 8 7 7

(e) 6 7 3 7

Sa m

pl e

2. (a) 3 3 6

7. Complete these division wheels.

(b)

1

12 ÷ 3

(c)

4

6

8

4

4 32 ÷

16 32

2

8

8. Complete your own division wheel using the number 36.

2 24 ÷

3

1

ew

12

2

in g

(a)

Vi

PUPIL NAME

NUMBER

12

6 36 ÷

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DIVISION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves division word problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve division problems.

Concepts required

pl e

Place value Trading Problem solving Tables Remainders Crossword format

Materials needed

Sa m

Calculator

Answers 2. 21 oranges 3. 14 pupils

ew

4. 17 pieces

in g

1. 13 books

5. 43 pupils

Vi

6. 141 boxes 7. 140 books

8. 21 photographs 9. £58 10. £284

11. Teacher check crossword

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DIVISION PROBLEMS NUMBER

1. Thirty-nine books were shared among three people. How many books were given to each person?

2. Eighty-four oranges needed to be divided among four crates. How many oranges were placed in each crate? 4. A piece of wood is 85 cm long. How many five-cm long pieces can be cut from it?

5. Three buses were needed for 129 pupils. How many pupils were on each bus?

Sa m

pl e

6. Three trucks had a total of 423 boxes loaded equally among them. How many boxes were in each truck?

9. Jake had a total of £232 to spend on a four day holiday. How much did he spend each day?

8. Paige had 147 photographs that she sorted into seven equal piles. How many were in each pile?

in g

7. Four shelves hold a total of 560 books. How many books are on each shelf?

ew

10. After winning the lottery, Riley donated £852 equally to three charities. How much did she give to each charity? 1. Create your own division crossword. Use a calculator to help. 1

Vi

PUPIL NAME

3. Fifty-six pupils were divided into four teams. How many pupils in each team?

1.

1

1

3.

4.

1 5.

2.

2 6.

7. 8.

10.

11.

12.

Prim-Ed Publishing®

9.

Across 1. 24 ÷ 2

8.

1. 333 ÷ 3

7.

2.

11.

2.

8.

4.

12.

3.

9.

5.

13.

4.

10.

6.

11.

13.

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Down

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Maths – Back To Basics


MENTAL MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Shows proficiency with mental multiplication facts. Shows proficiency with mental division facts.

Concepts required Mentally multiplying up to and including nine times table. Mentally dividing up to and including nine times table.

Answers

ew Vi Maths – Back To Basics

D 80 27 7 42 5 35 8 8 12 40 40 6 30 7 72 6 3 30 2 3 54 5 64 3 35

pl e

C 24 9 49 50 8 2 54 8 45 3 90 4 63 16 9 21 5 36 24 7 20 25 7 4 36

Sa m

B 9 12 3 63 10 10 10 28 48 8 16 9 48 9 72 2 18 5 20 60 6 28 5 18 2

in g

A 9 4 56 2 14 42 10 15 10 8 70 10 45 6 7 40 4 36 6 56 24 32 10 81 4

26

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MENTAL MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION NUMBER

B

C

D

81 ÷ 9 =

8x3=

8 x 10 =

36 ÷ 9 =

6x2=

63 ÷ 7 =

9x3=

8x7=

21 ÷ 7 =

7x7=

42 ÷ 6 =

16 ÷ 8 =

9x7=

5 x 10 =

7x6=

7x2=

70 ÷ 7 =

48 ÷ 6 =

45 ÷ 9 =

6x7=

5x2=

14 ÷ 7 =

5x7=

90 ÷ 9 =

80 ÷ 8 =

9x6=

40 ÷ 5 =

5x3=

4x7=

72 ÷ 9 =

64 ÷ 8 =

60 ÷ 6 =

8x6=

5x9=

4x3=

4x2=

56 ÷ 7 =

18 ÷ 6 =

8x5=

7 x 10 =

8x2=

9 x 10 =

4 x 10 =

50 ÷ 5 =

54 ÷ 6 =

24 ÷ 6 =

36 ÷ 6 =

9x5=

6x8=

7x9=

5x6=

30 ÷ 5 =

45 ÷ 5 =

4x4=

35 ÷ 5 =

56 ÷ 8 =

8x9=

9x8=

10 ÷ 5 =

7x3=

42 ÷ 7 =

ew

in g

Sa m

pl e

9x1=

72 ÷ 8 =

28 ÷ 7 =

9x2=

40 ÷ 8 =

24 ÷ 8 =

6x6=

30 ÷ 6 =

4x9=

6x5=

54 ÷ 9 =

5x4=

6x4=

12 ÷ 6 =

7x8=

6 x 10 =

63 ÷ 9 =

15 ÷ 5 =

4x6=

48 ÷ 8 =

4x5=

6x9=

8x4=

7x4=

5x5=

35 ÷ 7 =

40 ÷ 4 =

25 ÷ 5 =

49 ÷ 7 =

8x8=

9x9=

6x3=

32 ÷ 8 =

27 ÷ 9 =

20 ÷ 5 =

18 ÷ 9 =

9x4=

7x5=

5x8=

Vi

PUPIL NAME

A

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FRACTIONS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and shows knowledge of simple fractions. Identifies, compares and orders fractions. Identifies equivalent fractions. Adds and subtracts fractions with common denominators.

Concepts required

Sa m

Answers

pl e

Fractional parts Equivalent fractions Common denominators Ordering Correct usage of greater than (>) and less than (<) signs.

3 5 1. (a) 1/2 (b) /8 (c) /9 3 2 6 (d) /4 (e) /8 (f) /14

in g

2.

1 3. (a) 1 = 2/2 = 3/3 = 4/4 = 5/5 (b) /2 = 2/4 = 4/8 = 5/10 = 6/12 1 2 3 4 1 (c) /3 = /6 = /9 = /12 (d) /4 = 2/8 = 3/12 = 5/20

ew

4. (a) 1 (d) 3/5

2 (b) 3/4 (c) /3

Vi

2 1 5. (a) 2/4 (b) /5 (c) /8 1 (d) /4

6. 1/5, 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 3/4 7. (a) > (d) >

Maths – Back To Basics

(b) <

28

(c) =

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FRACTIONS NUMBER

1. What fraction of each shape is shaded? (a)

(b)

(d)

(e)

(f)

1 1 5 (b) 1/4 (c) /3 (d) /2 (e) /8 (f) 11/14

6

3

=

4

ew

(c) 1/3 =

=

2

in g

3. Write equivalent fractions. (a) 1 =

Sa m

(a) 1

pl e

2. Shade the fraction shown.

=

9

=

12

=

5

(b) 1/2 = (d) 1/4 =

=

4

=

8

8 12

= =

=

10

12

20

4. Add the following fractions.

Vi

PUPIL NAME

(c)

(a) 1/2 + 1/2 =

1 (b) /4 + 2/4 =

1 (c) /3 + 1/3 =

2 (d) /5 + 1/5 =

6 (c) /8 – 5/8 =

(d) 1 – 3/4 =

5. Subtract the following fractions. (a) 3/4 – 1/4 =

4 (b) /5 – 2/5 =

6. Order the fractions from smallest to largest.

1 /2, 3/4, 1/3, 1/5, 1/4, 2/3

7. Write <, > or =. (a) 1/2 Prim-Ed Publishing®

1

1 /4 (b) /3

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3

2 /4 (c) /3

29

4

4 /6 (d) /5

1

/4

Maths – Back To Basics


DECIMALS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Compares and orders decimals to one decimal place. Identifies equivalent fractions and decimals. Adds and subtracts decimals to one decimal place.

Concepts required

Sa m

pl e

Whole numbers and parts of whole numbers. Ordering Correct usage of greater than (>) and less than (<) and equals (=) signs. Rounding Decimals ending in .5 are rounded up. Equivalent decimals and fractions. Addition and subtraction, with trading.

Answers 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.8, 0.9 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 5, 5.5, 9.5 0.4, 1, 1.9, 2.4, 3.4, 4.4 12.1, 12.5, 15.5, 21.5, 25.1, 25.5

2. (a) < (d) < (g) >

in g

1. (a) (b) (c) (d)

(b) < (e) < (h) >

(c) > (f) <

(b) 2 (e) 9 (h) 27

(c) 2 (f) 12 (i) 18

4. (a) 0.5 (d) 0.7 (g) 7.9

(b) 0.9 (e) 1.2 (h) 5.5

(c) 0.2 (f) 4.3

5. (a) 5.9 (d) 38.2

(b) 22.7 (e) 52.8

(c) 14

6. (a) 4.5 (d) 30.6

(b) 3.1 (e) 21.6

(c) 5.3

Vi

ew

3. (a) 1 (d) 3 (g) 23 (j) 50

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DECIMALS NUMBER

1. Order the decimals from smallest to largest. (a) 0.4, 0.8, 0.1, 0.9, 0.5, 0.3 (b) 5.5, 0.5, 2.5, 9.5, 1.5, 5 (c) 2.4, 1, 1.9, 3.4, 4.4, 0.4 (d) 21.5, 12.5, 25.1, 25.5, 15.5, 12.1

(b) 1

(e) 0.8

0.9

(f) 2.2

1.5

(c) 4.4

2.4

pl e

3

2.5

(g) 11.1

1.1

Sa m

(a) 2.5

(d) 3.6

6.3

(h) 3.0

0.3

3. Round the decimals to the nearest whole number. (b) 1.7

(f) 12.2

(g) 23.4

(c) 2.4

(d) 2.5

(e) 8.9

(h) 26.5

(i) 17.9

(j) 49.6

in g

(a) 0.9

(a) 5/10 = (e) 12/10 =

ew

4. Write the equivalent decimal for each fraction. 9 (b) /10 =

2 (c) /10 =

7 (d) /10 =

(f) 43/10 =

79 (g) /10 =

55 (h) /10 =

Vi

PUPIL NAME

2. Write < or >.

5. Add the following decimals. (a)

3 . 4 (b) 1 0 . 2 (c) 7 . 5 (d) 2 1 . 4 (e) 3 0 . 9 + 2 . 5 + 1 2 . 5 + 6 . 5 + 1 6 . 8 +21.9

6. Subtract the following decimals. (a)

7 . 9 (b) 1 4 . 7 (c) 8 . 1 (d) 5 4 . 4 (e) 7 0 . 5 – 3 . 4 – 1 1 . 6 – 2 . 8 – 2 3 . 8 –48.9

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PERCENTAGES NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Represents percentages. Compares, orders and writes percentages relating to decimals and fractions.

Concepts required

Answers

pl e

Place value Equivalent percentages, fractions and decimals. Correct usage of greater than (>), less than (<) and equals (=) signs.

3. (a) > (d) > (g) =

(b) 100% = 100/100 = 1.0 (d) 45% = 45/100 = 0.45 (f) 15% = 15/100 = 0.15

(b) = (e) > (h) =

in g

2. (a) 75% = 75/100 = 0.75 (c) 25% = 25/100 = 0.25 (e) 99% = 99/100 = 0.99

Sa m

1. Teacher check shading of percentage. (a) 50% = 50/100 = 0.50 (b) 10% = 10/100 = 0.10 80 (c) 80% = /100 = 0.80

(c) < (f) < (i) <

Vi

ew

4. (a) 15%, 25%, 55%, 75%, 85%, 100% (b) 2/100, 25/100, 0.5, 60%, 90%, 1.0 (c) 0.1, 15/100, 20%, 30%, 50%, 0.7

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PERCENTAGES NUMBER

1. Shade the base 100 place value block to show the percentage. Write the equivalent fraction and decimal. (a)

50% =

= 0.

100

(c)

10% =

100

= 0.

80% =

100

= 0.

(c)

%=

(e)

%=

25 100 100

3. Write <, > or =.

(d) 75/100

0.5

0.70

(b)

= 0.

= 0.99

(g) 25%

1

%=

(d) 45% = (f)

100

% =

100

= 1.0

= 0. 15 100

= 0.

(b)

40

/100

0.40

(c)

0.50

(e)

85%

15%

(f)

95

/2

(i) 0.11

ew

(a) 90%

Sa m

= 0.

100

in g

(a) 75% =

pl e

2. Write the equivalent percentage, fraction and decimal.

Vi

PUPIL NAME

(b)

50 /4 (h) /100

1

/100

/100

70

1.0 20%

4. Order the amounts from smallest to largest. (a) 85%, 25%, 55%, 15%, 100%, 75% (b) 90%, 2/100, 0.5, 25/100, 1.0, 60% (c) 30%, 0.1, 0.7, 50%, 20%, 15/100

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Maths – Back To Basics


MONEY NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and uses knowledge of coins and currency notes. Calculates addition and subtraction problems in monetary context.

Concepts required Identification of coins and currency notes. Calculating change from given amounts. Addition and subtraction of decimals, with trading.

1. Answers will vary (b) £8.50

3. (a) £45.00 (d) £5.75

(c) £30.80

(b) £1.50

(c) £50.10

(b) £46.05

(c) £61.45

(b) £11.56

(c) £29.45

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6. (a) £2.80 (d) £254.26

(b) £34.00

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4. (a) £25.00 (d) £94.50 5. (a) £26.75 (d) £281.89

(c) £5.05

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2. (a) £9.00 (d) £6.75

pl e

Answers

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7. Answers will vary

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MONEY NUMBER

1. Write two combinations to make the following amounts. (a) £5.50

(b) £24.75

(c) £121.25

2. Work out the change from £10.00. (b) £1.50

(c) £4.95

(d) £3.25

(a) £5.00

pl e

3. Work out the change from £50.00. (b) £16.00

(c) £19.20

(a) £75.00

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4. Work out the change from £100.00. (b) £98.50

5. Add the following amounts.

(c) £49.90

(d) £44.25

(d) £5.50

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(a) £ 1 1 . 5 0 (b) £ 2 5 . 1 0 (c) £ 3 5 . 9 5 (d) £ 1 2 5 . 9 0 + £ 1 5 . 2 5 + £ 2 0 . 9 5 + £ 2 5 . 5 0 +£155.99

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6. Subtract the following amounts. (a) £ 8 . 8 5 (b) £ 2 6 . 5 5 (c) £ 7 5 . 0 0 (d) £ 4 2 5 . 2 5 – £ 6 . 0 5 – £ 1 4 . 9 9 – £ 4 5 . 5 5 – £ 1 7 0 . 9 9

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PUPIL NAME

(a) £1.00

7. Draw an item you might buy if you had the following amounts to spend. (a) £20.00

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(b) £100.00

(c) £500.00

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(d) £1500.00

Maths – Back To Basics


MONEY PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Chooses appropriate operations to solve problems involving money.

Concepts required Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers and decimals with trading. Place value Problem solving

pl e

Answers 1. £46.25 2. £41.95

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3. £125.00 4. £75.00 5. £39.80

7. £972.25 8. £56.25

(b) £2.60 (e) Answers will vary

(c) £21.90

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9. (a) £23.60 (d) £28.10

in g

6. £132.00

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MONEY PROBLEMS 2. Kwan spent £22.95 on a book and £19 on a CD. How much did she spend altogether?

3. Jasmine has a goal to save £500. Her account has £375. How much more does she need to reach her goal?

4. Three children each had £25. How much did they have altogether?

5. Braden bought four tank tops at £9.95 each. What was the total spent?

6. An amount of £396 was shared equally among three people. How much did they each receive?

7. The following amounts were raised: £125.75, £460.95 and £385.55. What was the total amount raised?

8. How much change do I have from £200 if I spend £143.75?

in g

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1. Senja spent £25.50 and Pete spent £20.75. How much did they spend in total?

9. Use the take-away menu to answer the questions.

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Spring rolls (4)......................... £3.40 Satay beef sticks (4)................ £4.40

Fried rice – large..................... £4.90

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PUPIL NAME

NUMBER

Steamed rice – large................ £2.50 Garlic beef.............................. £8.40

Sizzling spicy beef................... £8.90 Honey chicken........................... £8.60

Chicken chow mein.................... £8.40 Chilli seafood..........................£12.60 Sweet and sour pork................. £8.40

Lamb chop suey....................... £11.00

(a) What is the total of the two most expensive dishes? (b) What is the difference in price between the lamb chop suey and the garlic beef? (c) How much would it cost to order fried rice, honey chicken and sweet and sour pork? (d) How much change from £50 would you have if you bought the items in (c)? (e) If you had £25 to spend, what would you order?

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Maths – Back To Basics


NUMBER SENTENCES AND PATTERNS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and applies rules for number sequencing patterns. Constructs and solves number sentences. Recognises and writes missing components in number sentences. Recognises and applies knowledge of prime and composite numbers.

Concepts required

(a) (b) (c) (d)

2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 6, 7, 5, 6, 4, 5, 3, 4

2. (a) 15 (d) 7 (g) 100

(c) 22 (f) 27

(b) + (e) ÷ (h) ÷

(c) – (f) –

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3. (a) ÷ (d) x (g) +

(b) 4 (e) 70 (h) 6

in g

1.

Sa m

Answers

pl e

Number sentence structure Use of >, <, =, +, x, – and ÷ signs. Rules and patterns Understanding of prime and composite numbers.

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4. Answers will vary

5. (a) Prime numbers – 2, 3, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 87, 89, 91, 97 Composite – all other numbers except 1. (b) 17 can only be divided by itself and 1. (c) 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 (d) composite numbers (e) 97

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NUMBER SENTENCES AND PATTERNS NUMBER

1. Complete the number patterns. (a) 2, 4, 8, (c) 3,

, 32,

, 9,

,

, 15,

(b) 5, 8, 11,

,

,

,

, ,

, 26

(d) 6, 7, 5,

, 4,

,

(b) 36 ÷

= 9 (c)

+ 23 = 45 (d)

= 12 (f) 12 +

= 39 (g)

– 49 = 51 (h) 72 ÷

2. Write in the missing numbers. (a) 6 + 9 =

(e) 82 –

x 8 = 56 = 12

4 = 11

8 = 50

10 = 10 (f) 100

(c) 63

13 = 50

1 = 99 (g) 111

(d) 8

8 = 64

222 = 333 (h) 96

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(e) 100

(b) 42

pl e

(a) 44

8 = 12

4. Complete these number sentences. (a) 20 =

x

(h)

(c)

> 75

+

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(g) 7 x 8 >

(e)

in g

(d) 3 + 4 + 5 >

(b) 9 x 3 >

+

< 50

(f) 100 =

=

x

x

5. (a) On the chart, use red to circle the prime numbers and blue to circle the composite numbers.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

(b) Why is 17 a prime number?

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

(c) Write all the factors of 24.

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

(d) Are there more prime or composite numbers?

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99 100

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PUPIL NAME

3. Write the correct sign to complete each equation.

(e) What is the last prime number?

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Maths – Back To Basics


LINES AND ANGLES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Recognises and represents a variety of lines. Recognises, names and describes angles.

Concepts required Identification of different types of lines. Understanding of right, acute and obtuse angles.

Answers

pl e

(c) diagonal (f) intersecting (c) obtuse (c) acute (f) obtuse

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in g

Sa m

1. (a) wavy (b) zigzagged (d) parallel (e) perpendicular 2. Teacher check objects drawn. 3. (a) right (b) acute 4. (a) acute (b) right (d) obtuse (e) right (g) acute (h) obtuse

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LINES AND ANGLES SHAPE

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

pl e

(a)

2. Draw any shape that has:

(b) 2 vertical lines.

(c) 3 horizontal lines.

in g

Sa m

(a) 4 straight lines.

3. (a) A

angle is 90º. (b) An

angle is more than 90º and less than 180º.

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(c) An

angle is less than 90º.

4. Name each angle.

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PUPIL NAME

1. Label each of the different types of lines.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

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Maths – Back To Basics


2-D SHAPES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Recognises, names and represents 2-D shapes. Identifies properties of 2-D shapes. Recognises and draws congruent shapes.

Concepts required

pl e

Recognition of 2-D shapes. Finding sides and corners on 2-D shapes. Knowledge of polygons and quadrilaterals. Congruency

Materials required

Sa m

Ruler

Answers

(c)

3 sides, 3 corners

(d)

4 sides, 4 corners

1 side, 0 corners

(f)

5 sides, 5 corners

6 sides, 6 corners

(h)

8 sides, 8 corners

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(g)

(b)

4 sides, 4 corners

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(e)

1 side, 0 corners

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1. (a)

2. Teacher check – Polygons have three or more straight sides. 3. Teacher check – Quadrilaterals have four straight sides. 4. Teacher check – Congruent is two or more shapes of the same shape and size.

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2-D SHAPES SHAPE

1. Draw the shape named. Write the number of sides and corners. (b) triangle

(c) square

(d) rectangle

sides

sides

sides

sides

corners

corners

corners

corners

(e) oval

(f) pentagon

(g) hexagon

(h) octagon

sides

sides

corners

corners

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pl e

PUPIL NAME

(a) circle

sides

corners

corners

3. Draw and name two quadrilaterals.

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ew

in g

2. Draw and name two polygons.

sides

4. Draw two congruent shapes. (a) squares

(b) triangles

(c) ovals

(d) rectangles

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Maths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back To Basics


3-D SHAPES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Recognises, names and represents 3-D shapes. Identifies properties of 3-D shapes.

Concepts required Recognition of 3-D shapes. Finding edges, vertices and faces on 3-D shapes. Knowledge of prisms and pyramids.

12 edges, 8 vertices, 6 faces

(b)

2 edges, 0 vertices, 3 faces

(c)

1 edge, 1 vertex, 2 faces

(d)

0 edges, 0 vertices, 1 face

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1. (a)

pl e

Answers

6 edges, 4 vertices, 4 faces

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(e) (f)

12 edges, 8 vertices, 6 faces

Vi

2. (a) A prism is named after the shape of its two end faces. Its other faces are always rectangular. (b)

(c)

5 faces, 6 vertices, 9 edges

6 faces, 8 vertices, 12 edges

3. (a) A pyramid is named after the shape of its base. Its other faces are always triangular. (b)

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(c)

5 faces, 5 vertices, 8 edges

44

4 faces, 4 vertices, 6 edges

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3-D SHAPES SHAPE

1. Draw the shape named. Write the number of edges, vertices and faces. (b) cylinder

(c) cone

edges

edges

edges

vertices

vertices

vertices

faces

faces

faces

(d) sphere

(e) triangular pyramid

(f) rectangular prism

edges

edges

edges

vertices

vertices

vertices

faces

faces

faces

in g

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pl e

PUPIL NAME

(a) cube

2. (a) A prism is named after the shape of its two faces are always

.

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faces. Its other

(c) Draw a square prism.

Vi

(b) Draw a triangular prism.

faces

vertices

edges

faces

3. (a) A pyramid is named after the shape of its

always

faces

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edges

. Its other faces are

.

(b) Draw a rectangular pyramid.

vertices

vertices

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(c) Draw a triangular pyramid.

edges

faces 45

vertices

edges Maths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back To Basics


PERSPECTIVE AND TRANSFORMATIONS SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Draws tessellating shapes. Identifies 3-D shapes from different perspectives. Draws shapes that reflect, translate and rotate. Enlarges given shapes using a grid.

Concepts required

pl e

Identification of tessellations. Perspective from top, bottom, front and side. Changing position of shapes by reflecting, translating and rotating. Scale

Materials needed

Sa m

Ruler

Answers

2. (a)

ew

(b)

in g

1. Answers will vary. Tessellating shapes fit together without any gaps or overlapping.

Vi

(c)

3. (a) (b) (c)

4. Teacher check enlarged pictures.

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PERSPECTIVE AND TRANSFORMATIONS SHAPE

1. Draw a tessellating pattern.

2. Draw the different views of each object from the different perspectives. Object

Top

Bottom

Front

Side

(a)

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pl e

(c)

3. Change the position of the shapes. Object

Reflect

Rotate 90º clockwise

in g

(a)

Translate

ew

(b)

(c)

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PUPIL NAME

(b)

4. Enlarge the pictures.

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Maths – Back To Basics


SYMMETRY SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and draws lines of symmetry on 2-D shapes. Draws objects to show symmetry.

Concepts required

pl e

Recognition of 2-D shapes. Understands a line of symmetry divides a shape or object into two equal halves. Understands there may be a horizontal or vertical line of symmetry, multiple lines or no lines of symmetry.

Materials needed

Sa m

Ruler

Answers

(e) 2

No lines – F, G, J, L, N, P, Q, R, S, Z One line – A, B, C, D, E, K, M, T, U, V, W, Y Two lines – H, I, O Multiple lines – X

Vi

2.

(c) 5

ew

(d) 4

(b) 3

in g

1. (a) 4

3. Teacher check

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SYMMETRY SHAPE

1. Draw and record the number of lines of symmetry for each shape. (a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

2. Sort the letters of the alphabet according to the number of lines of symmetry.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST U V W XY Z One line of symmetry

Two lines of symmetry

Multiple lines of symmetry

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pl e

PUPIL NAME

No lines of symmetry

3. Draw an object to show each of the following:

A vertical line of symmetry

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in g

A horizontal line of symmetry

Multiple lines of symmetry

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No lines of symmetry

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Maths – Back To Basics


DIRECTIONS AND POSITION SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Locates or draws objects following locational language. Follows and writes directions.

Concepts required Locational language such as: middle, side, on, right, left, in front of, next to, near.

Materials needed

Answers

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in g

2. Answers will vary.

Sa m

1. Teacher check of completed picture.

pl e

Coloured pencils

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DIRECTIONS AND POSITION SHAPE

(g) Draw a round spa in the bottom right-hand corner.

in g

(a) In the middle, draw a rectangular outdoor table.

Sa m

pl e

PUPIL NAME

1. Follow the directions to complete the picture.

(h) Draw a swing set above and to the left of the table.

(c) Draw an umbrella shade in the middle of the table.

(i) Draw a dog in front of the middle flower pot.

(d) Draw four glasses on the table.

(j) Draw two children next to the large tree.

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(b) Draw one chair at each side of the table.

(e) Along the left side of the frame, draw five large flower pots.

(k) Draw a cat near the spa.

(f) Draw a large tree in the top right-hand corner. 2. Write six directions for others to follow to draw your bedroom. • • • • • • Prim-Ed Publishing®

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Maths – Back To Basics


MAPS AND KEYS SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Recognises and locates key features on a grid map using coordinate points. Uses compass point directions to describe location. Understands symbols used on a key.

Concepts required

Answers

(c) F2, C4, I7 (f) I6

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2. Answers will vary

(b) D8, H4 (e) camping ground (h) boats

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1. (a) I2 (d) B6, I7 (g) E7, F7, G7

pl e

Coordinates Key symbols Compass directions

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MAPS AND KEYS SHAPE

1. Use the map and key to answer the questions. 10 9 Key

7

swimming beach

6

bicycle track

5

camping ground

4

lake

3

houses

pl e

PUPIL NAME

8

1 B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

lighthouse

J

hills river

in g

A

shop

Sa m

2

boats

(a) Where will you find the lighthouse?

ew

(b) Give the two coordinates for the lakes.

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(c) At what three locations would you find a shop? (d) Write the coordinates where the bicycle track starts

and ends

.

(e) What will you find at C6? (f) What is the coordinate for the swimming beach on the east coast? (g) What coordinates does the river run through? (h) What would you find at A1? 2. Add each of these to the map. Draw a symbol and write a coordinate. (a) cave

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(b) waterfall

(c) toilet block

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Maths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back To Basics


LENGTH MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies formal units of measurement. Measures lengths in centimetres and millimetres. Finds equivalent measures. Adds and subtracts lengths.

Concepts required

pl e

Formal measurement units—mm, cm, m and km. Proficient use of a ruler to measure in mm and cm. Equivalent units of length.

Materials needed

1. (a) 10 (d) 5

Sa m

Ruler

(b) 100 (e) 5

(c) 1000 (f) 7

2. (a) 2 (d) 4.48

(b) 8 (e) 1.29

(c) 10 (f) 9.99

(b) 900 (e) 595

(c) 150 (f) 205

5. (a) 2.5 (d) 404

(b) 11

(c) 5.5

6. (a) 50 (d) 10

(b) 5

(c) 423

ew

3. (a) 300 (d) 260

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Answers

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4. Teacher check

7. Answers will vary

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LENGTH MEASUREMENT

1. Convert the measurements of length. (a) 1 cm =

mm

(d) 500 cm =

m

(b) 1 m =

cm

(e) 5000m =

(c) 1 km =

km

(f) 70 mm =

m cm

2. Convert the measurements into metres. (a) 200 cm =

m

(b) 800 cm =

m

(c) 1000 cm =

(d) 448 cm =

m

(e) 129 cm =

m

(f) 999 cm =

m m

cm

(d) 2.6 m =

cm

(b) 9 m =

cm

(e) 5.95 m =

(c) 1.5 m =

cm

pl e

(a) 3 m =

cm

(f) 2.05 m =

cm

Sa m

4. Use a ruler to draw lines that measure each of the following lengths. (a) 7.5 cm

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(b) 52 mm (c) 112 mm

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(d) 12.2 cm

5. Add the following lengths.

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PUPIL NAME

3. Convert the measurements into centimetres.

(a) 2 cm and 5 mm =

(c) 4 km and 1500 m =

cm

(b) 10 mm and 10 cm =

km

cm

(d) 4 m and 4 cm =

cm

6. Find the range of difference between the following lengths. (a) 1 m and 50 cm = (c) 425 cm and 20 mm =

cm cm

(b) 5.4 m and 40 cm =

m

(d) 10 m and 990 cm =

cm

7. Give two examples where kilometres would be used to measure length. (a)

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Maths – Back To Basics


PERIMETER MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Uses a ruler to measure perimeter. Uses a ruler to draw shapes with specified perimeters. Calculates perimeter from given measurements.

Concepts required Knowledge that perimeter is the length of distance of the boundary of a shape.

pl e

Proficient use of a ruler to measure accurately in mm and cm. Basic addition skills

Materials needed

Sa m

Ruler

Answers 1. (a) 9 cm, 90 mm (d) 12 cm, 120 mm

(b) 10 cm, 100 mm (e) 23 cm, 230 mm

(c) 13 cm, 130 mm

3. (a) 12 cm (d) 70 m

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2. Teacher check

(b) 140 mm (e) 32 cm

(c) 36 cm

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4. Answers will vary

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PERIMETER MEASUREMENT

1. Use a ruler to measure the perimeter of each shape. (a)

(b)

P=

cm

P=

cm

P=

cm

P=

mm

P=

mm

P=

mm

(e)

P=

cm

P=

P=

mm

P=

cm

mm

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pl e

(d)

2. Use a ruler to draw shapes with the following perimeters. (b) 7.5 cm

ew

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(a) 80 mm

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PUPIL NAME

(c)

3. Find the perimeter of the rectangles. (a) Length = 4 cm

Width = 2 cm

Perimeter =

cm

(b) Length = 60 mm

Width = 10 mm

Perimeter =

mm

(c) Length = 12 cm

Width = 6 cm

Perimeter =

cm

(d) Length = 25 m

Width = 10 m

Perimeter =

m

(e) Length = 10.5 cm

Width = 5.5 cm

Perimeter =

cm

4. Measure the perimeter of the desktop you are working on. P = Prim-Ed PublishingÂŽ

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P=

cm

P= 57

m Maths â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Back To Basics


AREA MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Measures the area of shapes using square centimetres. Identifies formal units of measurement.

Concepts required Knowledge that area is the amount of space inside a shape. Ordering

Materials needed

1. (a) 10 cm2 (d) 14 cm2 (g) 7 cm2

Sa m

Answers (b) 9 cm2 (e) 17 cm2

2. (c), (g), (b), (a), (f), (d), (e)

(c) 5 cm2 (f) 11 cm2

in g

3. Answers will vary

pl e

Ruler

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4. Teacher check

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AREA MEASUREMENT

1. Count the squares to find the area of each shape. (a)

(b) A=

cm2

A=

(c)

A=

cm2

(f) cm2

pl e

A=

cm2

(g) A=

cm2

Sa m

A=

2. Order the above shapes from smallest to largest area.

3. Write three things that have the following areas.

in g

(a) about one square metre

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(b) less than one square metre

4. On the grid, draw four different shapes that have an area of 12 square units.

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PUPIL NAME

cm2

cm2

(d)

(e)

A=

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VOLUME AND CAPACITY MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies formal measures of volume and capacity. Orders the capacity of items in millilitres and litres. Calculates equivalent measures. Counts to find the volume of 3-D shapes.

Concepts required

Answers 2. Answers will vary 3. Answers will vary

5. 3 serves 6. 17 doses

(b) 3 cups (e) 10 cups

in g

4. (a) 500 mL (d) 8 cups

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1. Answers will vary

(b) 13 cubes

(c) 1 L (f) 5000 mL

(c) 20 cubes

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7. (a) 26 cubes

pl e

Knowledge of formal measurement units—millilitres and litres. Equivalent units of measurement 3-D shapes

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VOLUME AND CAPACITY MEASUREMENT

1. Draw and label five items from home you could use to measure capacity.

2. Name three items at home that are measured in the following units of capacity.

pl e

litres 3. Order the items from Question 2 from smallest to largest.

Sa m

(a)

in g

4. Complete the following conversions—remember, one cup = 250 mL. mL = 2 cups L

(d) 2 L =

ew

(c) 4 cups =

(b) 750 mL =

(e) 2500 mL =

cups

(f)

cups cups

mL = 20 cups

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PUPIL NAME

millilitres

5. How many 200 mL serves of cream are there in a 600 mL container? 6. How many 5 mL doses are in an 85 mL bottle of medicine? 7. Write the volume of these 3-D models. (a)

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(c)

cubes

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MASS MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies formal units of measuring mass. Orders the mass of items in grams and kilograms. Calculates equivalent measures.

Concepts required

Answers 2. Answers will vary 3. (a) 2 (d) 3.55

5. (a) 500 g (d) 1.5 kg

(c) 2.25 (f) 1.005

(b) 4500 (e) 5050

(c) 3400 (f) 10 000

(b) 750 g

(c) 500 g

(b) 500 g (e) 900 g

(c) 1 kg

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ew

6. (a) 0 g (d) 700 g

(b) 1.5 (e) 5.75

in g

4. (a) 3000 (d) 5250

Sa m

1. 1000

pl e

Knowledge of formal measurement units—grams and kilograms. Equivalent units of measurement Ability to read kitchen scales. Ordering

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MASS MEASUREMENT

1. How many grams (g) are in one kilogram (kg)? 2. (a) List five items from home that are measured in grams and five that are measured in kilograms. (b) Write the total weight shown on each item. (c) For each list, order the items from lightest to heaviest. Order

Item

kg

Order

pl e

g

Sa m

3. Convert the following measurements into kilograms. kg

(b) 1500 g =

kg

(c) 2250 g =

kg

(d) 3550 g =

kg

(e) 5750 g =

kg

(f) 1005 g =

kg

in g

(a) 2000 g =

4. Convert the following measurements into grams. g

ew

(a) 3 kg =

(d) 5.25 kg =

(b) 4.5 kg =

g

g (e) 5.05 kg =

g

(c) 3.4 kg =

g

(f) 10 kg =

g

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PUPIL NAME

Item

5. Find the range of difference between the following weights. (a) 500 g and 1 kg

g

(c) 2500 g and 2 kg

g

(b) 1 kg and 250 g

g

(d) 2.5 kg and 1 kg

kg

6. Write the weight shown on these kitchen scales.

0

(a)

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1 kg

0

(b)

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1 kg

0

1 kg

(c)

63

0

(d)

1 kg

0

1 kg

(e)

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TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Reads, records and orders temperature in degrees Celsius.

Concepts required Degrees Celsius (ºC) Reading thermometers Ordering Understands appropriate activities in relation to temperature.

pl e

Materials needed Access to television, newspaper or Internet.

1. (a) 10 ºC (d) 30 ºC

Sa m

Answers (b) 25 ºC

2. Teacher check

(c) 35 ºC

in g

3. 41 ºC, 38 ºC, 35 ºC, 32 ºC, 28 ºC, 24 ºC, 18 ºC, 14 ºC, 11 ºC, 9 ºC

Vi

ew

4. Answers will vary

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TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

1. Record the temperatures shown in degrees Celsius (ºC).

20

20

20

20

15

15

15

15

10

10

10

10

5

5

5

5

0

0

0

0

30 25

25

25

25

0

0

5

5

10

10

15

15

0

0

5

5

10

10

15

15

in g

20

20

20

20

ew

35

30

30

30

Sa m

Tomorrow’s forecast temperatures Min Max 35

35

Today’s temperatures Min Max 35

pl e

2. Watch the news or check the newspaper or Internet to record the maximum and minimum temperatures for your town/city.

3. Order these temperatures from hottest to coldest.

Vi

PUPIL NAME

25

25

25

25

30

30

30

30

35

35

35

35

C (a) (b) (c) (d)

14 ºC, 32 ºC, 11 ºC, 9 ºC, 38 ºC, 41 ºC, 28 ºC, 24 ºC, 18 ºC, 35 ºC 4. Draw something you are likely to do when the temperature is: (a) 8 ºC

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(b) 25 ºC

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(c) 40 ºC

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ANGLES MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies angles in 2-D shapes. Constructs and orders angles.

Concepts required Types of angles—right, acute, obtuse, 180º, 360º Ordering

Materials needed

1. (a) 4 right angles (c) 6 obtuse angles (e) 4 right angles 2. (a)

(b)

right – 3 acute – 1 180º – 5 obtuse – 4 360º – 6 acute – 2

in g

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)

(b) 3 acute angles (d) 1 right angle, 2 acute angles

ew

3.

Sa m

Answers

pl e

Ruler

Vi

4. Answers will vary

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ANGLES MEASUREMENT

1. Highlight, count and name the types of angles in each shape. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

pl e

(b) 360º angle

Sa m

3. Label each angle and then order them from smallest (1) to largest (6). (b)

in g

(a)

(e)

(f)

ew

(d)

(c)

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PUPIL NAME

2. Draw the following angles. (a) 180º angle

4. Draw two objects that have at least one of the following angles. (a) acute angle

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(b) obtuse angle

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PERIODS OF TIME MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Estimates the length of tasks. Identifies times of events according to am, pm, morning, afternoon or evening. Calculates elapsed time.

Identifying time spans am and pm Estimating Calculating hours

1. Answers will vary 2. Answers will vary

(b) am or pm (e) am or pm

(c) pm (f) pm

in g

3. (a) am (d) am

Sa m

Answers

pl e

Concepts required

Vi

ew

4. Answers will vary

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PERIODS OF TIME MEASUREMENT

1. Write three tasks that might take the following periods of time to complete. (a) a few minutes

(b) half an hour

(c) an hour

(d) a few hours

2. List five things you do in the morning, afternoon and evening. Estimate how long each usually takes. Time taken

Afternoon

Time taken

Evening

Time taken

Sa m

pl e

PUPIL NAME

Morning

ew

(a) Eat breakfast

in g

3. Write if each activity occurs in the morning or afternoon and evening. Use either ‘am’ or ‘pm’. (b)

Complete homework

(d)

Arrive at school

(e) Watch TV

(f)

Leave school

Vi

(c) Eat lunch

4. (a) Write down the current exact time. (b) What was the time an hour ago? (c) What will be the time in one hour? (d) What might you be doing two hours from now? (e) What were you doing three hours ago? (f) What might you be doing 12 hours from now? Prim-Ed Publishing®

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TIME MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Reads and records the time on analogue and digital clocks. Calculates elapsed time.

Concepts required Reading analogue and digital times Calculating elapsed time 24-hour time

(b) 4.45 (e) 6.50

2. (a) 0718 (d) 1201

(b) 2345 (e) 1940

3. (a) 11.15 am (d) 2.45 pm

5. (a) 2 h 30 min. (d) 6 h 5 min. (g) 1 h 30 min.

(c) 10.25 pm

(b) 2210

(c) 0215

(b) 3 h 15 min. (e) 2 hrs (h) 2 h 30 min.

(c) 5 h 15 min. (f) 45 min.

ew

6. 6 h 30 min.

(c) 1557 (f) 2210

(b) 3.05 am

in g

4. (a) 1735 (d) 0030

(c) 12.15 (f) 10.40

Sa m

1. (a) 2.30 (d) 4.25

pl e

Answers

Vi

7. 4 h 45 min.

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TIME MEASUREMENT

1. Write the time shown on these clocks. 11

12

1

10 8

6

8

5

(a)

11

2

6

11

2

7

8

(c)

11

2

6

11

2

8

6

1

3 8

5

(e)

2

9

4 7

12

10 3

5

(d)

1

9

4 7

12

10 3

5

6

1

9

4

8

12

10 3

5

(b)

1

9

4 7

12

10 3

9

4 7

1

10 3

9

12

11

2

4 7

6

5

(f)

2. Write the digital 24-hour time on the clock faces.

:

(b) 11.45 pm

(c) 3.57 pm

:

:

:

(e) 7.40 pm

(f) 10.10 pm

Sa m

(d) 12.01 am

3. What time will it be three hours after these times?

(c) 7.25 pm

(b) 12.05 am

(d) 11.45 am

in g

(a) 8.15 am

(a) 1335

ew

4. What time will it be four hours after these times?

(b) 1810

(c) 2215

(d) 2030

5. Work out how much time has passed between the following.

Vi

PUPIL NAME

(a) 7.18 am

:

pl e

:

(a) 7 am and 9.30 am

hrs

min.

(b) 10 am and 1.15 pm

hrs

min.

(c) 5.15 pm and 10.30 pm

hrs

min.

(d) 11.55 pm and 6 am

hrs

min.

(e) 2010 and 2210

hrs

min.

(f) 1445 and 1530

hrs

min.

(g) 1725 and 1855

hrs

min.

(h) 2115 and 2345

hrs

min.

6. How much time is spent at school if you arrive at 8.45 am and leave at 3.15 pm?

7. Sarah left for a destination at 10.00 am and arrived at 2.45 pm. How long did she take to reach her destination?

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CALENDARS AND TIMETABLES MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Interprets information from a calendar. Interprets information from a timetable.

Concepts required

pl e

Using a calendar Number of days, weeks, months Using a television timetable Reading time Calculating elapsed time

Materials needed

Sa m

Current year calendar

Answers

1. Teacher check (g) April, June, September, November

in g

45 min. (b) 10.00 am 2 hrs 30 min. (e) 2 hrs 30 min. Between 6.00 pm and 6.30 pm. Answers will vary

(c) 5.00 pm (f) 90 min.

ew

(a) (d) (g) (h)

Vi

2.

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CALENDARS AND TIMETABLES MEASUREMENT

1. Use this year’s calendar to answer the following questions. (a) Write down today’s day and date. (b) What will be the date in two weeks? (c) What was the date three weeks ago? (d) What months are before and after this month? (e) What will the date be three weeks after your birthday? (f) On what day is Christmas Day this year?

2. Use the television timetable to answer the questions.

Channel 1

pl e

(a) How long does the afternoon children’s show run for?

Sa m

(b) What time does the talk show start?

in g

(c) What time does the quiz show end?

ew

(d) How long does the film screen for?

(e) How much time is scheduled for news in the morning?

Vi

PUPIL NAME

(g) Write the months that have 30 days.

(f) If you watched both episodes of Cooking adventures, how long would it take?

6.00 Cartoons 7.00 News 8.00 World news 9.00 Cooking adventures 9.45 Fitness break 10.00 Talk show 11.00 News 11.30 Creative ideas 12.00 Film 2.30 Cooking adventures 3.15 Totally children 4.00 Quiz show 5.00 News 6.00 Sport and weather 6.30 Current affairs 7.00 The music show 7.30 Football 10.00 News update

(g) When would be the best time to watch TV to see the weather forecast? (h) If you were going to spend 90 minutes watching TV, what programmes might you choose? Prim-Ed Publishing®

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CHANCE AND PREDICTIONS DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies outcomes from chance events. Predicts outcomes of chance events.

Concepts required Understands the terms prediction, definitely, likely, unlikely and impossible.

Answers 1. (a) 1 out of 6

(b) 1 out of 2

pl e

2. Answers will vary 3. Answers will vary

Vi

ew

in g

Sa m

4. Answers will vary

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CHANCE AND PREDICTIONS DATA

(b) What are the chances of producing a tail when you toss a coin?

1. (a) What are the chances of rolling a three when you throw a die?

out of

out of

2. Make predictions to complete the following statements. (a) Tomorrow, the weather will be

.

(b) I’ll go to bed tonight after I have

.

(c) Tomorrow, I will wake up at

.

(e) At school tomorrow, the teacher will

.

for breakfast tomorrow.

Sa m

(f) I’ll have

pl e

to complete.

3. Write ‘definitely’, ‘likely’, ‘unlikely’ or ‘impossible’ next to the events. (a) I’ll eat breakfast in the morning.

in g

(b) It will snow tomorrow.

ew

(c) I’ll use a computer tomorrow.

(d) My favourite sporting team will win on the weekend. (e) I will see the moon in the sky tonight.

Vi

PUPIL NAME

(d) This homework activity will take

(f) I will play sport on the weekend. (g) I will read a book this week. (h) I will eat pizza for dinner tomorrow night. (i) I will watch television some time tomorrow. 4. When I’m 21, I will: (a) definitely

.

(b) probably

.

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DATA DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Categorises given data. Writes questions to decide what data should be collected for a survey. Constructs a Venn diagram using given data.

Concepts required Recognising appropriate categories Understanding of a survey Venn diagrams

pl e

Answers

1. Suggested categories: fruit, vegetables, junk food

3.

Cereal Glenn

Brett

Toast

Alex

Alison

Aymee

Riko

El Hadjii Scott Tane

Oliver

Vi

Carlos

Rose

Lauren

Molly

ew

Natalie

Josh

Lee

in g

Xiuxiu

Lucas

Sa m

2. (a) Answers may include – What is your favourite TV show? (b) Answers will vary

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DATA DATA

pl e

Sa m

2. (a) If you were going to survey your friends to research what is the most popular television show, what question would you ask?

in g

(b) List six television shows you would include in your survey.

ew

3. Use the following data to create a Venn diagram.

Brett, Glen, Lucas, Alison, Xiuxiu, Natalie and Aymee all like cereal for breakfast. Josh, Rose, Lauren, El Hadjii and Scott prefer toast. Alex, Lee and Molly like both cereal and toast. Riko, Carlos, Tane and Oliver like neither cereal or toast.

Vi

PUPIL NAME

1. Group the pictures below into three different categories. Complete the table by writing names for each category and then listing the foods.

Cereal

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Toast

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TABLES DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Analyses data provided in tables. Uses given data to complete a two-way table.

Concepts required Reading tables Correctly displaying data

Answers

Likes summer

Dislikes summer

Likes winter

Dislikes winter

Sa m

2.

(c) 71

pl e

1. (a) Station promotions (b) 7 (d) Household products and supermarket specials

Emily

Xin

Xin

Emily

Cooper

Logan

Logan

Alisha

Dylan

Alisha

Dylan

Isaac

Hannah

Noah

Noah

Ella

Vi

ew

in g

Ella

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TABLES DATA

1. Use the table to answer the questions. Television advertisements Tally

Total 7

Household products

15

Takeaway food

10

Supermarket specials

14

Phone/Computer

8

Station promotions

17

(a) Which types were shown most often?

pl e

Motor vehicles

(b) How many car advertisements were shown?

Sa m

(c) How many advertisements were tallied altogether? (d) Which two types totalled 29?

2. Complete the two-way table using the information provided.

in g

Dislikes summer

Likes winter

Dislikes winter

ew

Likes summer

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PUPIL NAME

Type

Emily likes summer, but not winter. Xin doesn’t like summer, but likes winter. Logan likes winter, but not summer. Cooper likes summer. Dylan likes summer and winter. Alisha dislikes summer and winter. Hannah likes winter. Isaac doesn’t like winter. Noah doesn’t like winter, but likes summer. Ella likes summer and winter.

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GRAPHS DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Displays given data on a strip graph. Displays given data on a pictogram. Analyses data on a bar graph.

Concepts required Knowledge of strip graphs, pictograms and bar graphs. Ranking data

1. Teacher check 2. Teacher check (b) New York

(c) 8 ºC

Sa m

36 ºC 32 ºC 24 ºC 22 ºC 18 ºC 16 ºC 14 ºC 12 ºC

in g

Bangkok Bangkok Sydney Paris Rome London Tokyo Moscow New York

Vi

ew

3. (a) (d)

pl e

Answers

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GRAPHS DATA

1. The hair colour of 20 pupils was recorded. Black – 6 Brown – 5 Blonde – 6

Auburn – 3

Display the results as a strip graph.

Key 1 picture = 2 animals

2. Record the information given on a pictogram.

9 11

6 5

elephants kangaroos

2 8

Sa m

pl e

PUPIL NAME

dogs dolphins

Favourite animals cats 4 lions snakes 2 crocodiles

in g

for eight cities

(b) Which city recorded the lowest maximum temperature?

Moscow

(c) What is the range in maximum temperature between Rome and Moscow? (d) Rank the cities from highest to lowest recorded maximum temperature. Write the temperature for each.

Rome

London

Bangkok

Paris

Tokyo

New York

Vi

ew

40 38 36 34 32 30 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

Sydney

Degrees Celsius ºC

3. Use the bar graph to answer the questions. (a) Which city recorded the highest maximum temperature? Maximum temperatures

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6060UK Maths Back to Basics Yr5/P6  
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