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PRIMARY ART (Book F) This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 2007 Reprinted under licence by Prim-Ed Publishing 2007 Reprinted 2008 Copyright© Dianne Sterrett 2007 ISBN 978-1-84654-133-9 PR–6591

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Titles available in this series: PRIMARY ART (Book A) PRIMARY ART (Book B) PRIMARY ART (Book C) PRIMARY ART (Book D) PRIMARY ART (Book E) PRIMARY ART (Book F) PRIMARY ART (Book G)

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For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase.

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Name of Purchaser:

Date of Purchase:

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Supplier:

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AUSTRALIA: R.I.C. Publications® PO Box 332, Greenwood WA 6924

School Order# (if applicable):

UK: Prim-Ed Publishing PO Box 2840, Coventry CV6 5ZY IRELAND: Prim-Ed Publishing Bosheen, New Ross, Co. Wexford

Offices in: United Kingdom: PO Box 2840, Coventry, CV6 5ZY Email: sales@prim-ed.com Australia: PO Box 332, Greenwood, Western Australia, 6924 Email: mail@ricgroup.com.au Republic of Ireland: Bosheen, New Ross, Co. Wexford, Ireland Email: sales@prim-ed.com R.I.C. Asia: 5th Floor, Gotanda Mikado Building, 2–5–8 Hiratsuka, Shinagawa-Ku Tokyo, Japan 142–0051 Email: elt@ricpublications.com

Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

Website: www.ricpublications.com Email:

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PRIMARY ART Book F

Foreword Primary art is a series of seven books designed to provide teachers with a collection of

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skills, ideas and techniques to support current curriculum requirements in the visual arts learning areas. Titles in this series include: • Primary art – Book A • Primary art – Book B • Primary art – Book C • Primary art – Book D • Primary art – Book E • Primary art – Book F • Primary art – Book G

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Contents Contents .............................................................................. i Teachers notes ............................................................... ii – v The colour wheel ................................................................ vi The colour wheel glossary ................................................. vii

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Saturated colour collage ............................................. 2–5 Spirals of colour leaning board .................................... 6–9 Hanging basket ...................................................... 10–13 Character pirate portrait ......................................... 14–17 Pop stars ................................................................ 18–21 Batik tropical parrot ................................................ 22–25 In-stripes name poster ........................................... 26–29 Coloured paper city view ........................................ 30–33 Chalk pastel flower collage ..................................... 34–37 Printed sea life scene ............................................. 38–41 Watercolour flower greeting card ............................ 42–45 Shirt/Jumper greeting card (Male emphasis) ............. 46–49 Stormy seas pirate ship scene ................................ 50–53 Mini beast menagerie ............................................. 54–57 Polyfish sea scene ................................................. 58–61 Popular pets .......................................................... 62–65 Torn paper mosaic design ....................................... 66–69 Busy pond etching ................................................. 70–73 Terrace city scape .................................................. 74–77 Paper creations....................................................... 78–81

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

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21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31.

Printed flowers ....................................................... 82–85 Smudged colour hibiscus ........................................ 86–89 ‘Afro’-look characters ............................................. 90–93 Many hands make light work .................................. 94–97 ‘The great outdoors’ tissue paper collage .............. 98–101 Musical instruments ........................................... 102–105 Everybody’s going surfing ................................... 106–109 Onion skin overlay fish ....................................... 110–113 Purple haze butterflies ........................................ 114–117 Caught in movement .......................................... 118–121 Designer beach towel ......................................... 122–125

Resources Resource index ................................................................ 126 1. In-stripes name poster ................................................ 127 2. Watercolour flower greeting card – 1 .......................... 128 3. Watercolour flower greeting card – 2 .......................... 129 4. Shirt/Jumper greeting card .......................................... 130 5. Stormy seas pirate ship scene – 1 ............................... 131 6. Stormy seas pirate ship scene – 2 ............................... 132 7. Popular pets .............................................................. 133 8. Everybody’s going surfing ........................................... 134 9. Onion skin overlay fish ............................................... 134 10. Purple haze butterflies ................................................ 135

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Teachers notes From the teacher Within the series, students are given the opportunity to dabble with different media and to experience and build on a broad spectrum of techniques and skills, creating effects that will enhance their artistic work. As the students build on their repertoire of skills, ideas and arts knowledge, they begin to use their ‘mind’s eye’ to plan and create a desired look or effect through experimentation. It is important to understand that the finished product will vary in quality according to the level of skill development. As experience builds, so does the ability of students to use their artwork for purposes other than just the thrill of being creative. Their work becomes meaningful, with a purpose in society.

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Dianne Sterrett

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The activities within Primary art Books A–G, will provide teachers with a series of multiskilled, visual arts lessons and activities for a whole range of topics, themes and special events. Covering all primary year levels, the series equips the busy classroom teacher with a range of lessons from the ‘quick and easy’ to the more sophisticated carrier projects that work over three to five lessons. Each art project is accompanied by easy to use reflection and assessment record sheets, enabling the collection of relevant evidence to record student progress. The reflection sheets provide a thoughtful evaluation of the student’s own performance for each facet of the lesson. Task assessment sheets provide a quick means to identify and record a student’s performance in criteria which assess the given objectives.

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Art project activities

Art doesn’t have to have high preparation requirements if basic supplies are kept well stocked. This can be achieved by enlisting an adult to collect and prepare materials. Lesson preparations throughout the series have been coded to identify the objectives addressed or to indicate the effective use in this series: Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas.

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Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies.

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Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Enlist adult to assist with the preparation of tasks, to help children in managing various tasks, or to mount work or add finishing touches to projects where adult skills are required.

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Teachers notes Making life easy! Setting up Setting up a good resource base is essential for an effective art scheme of work, as having appropriate tools and materials at your fingertips takes the headache out of lesson preparation. Labelled empty photocopy paper boxes or plastic tubs in a central location are very functional. Stack them neatly along a wall. Enlist adult help to set up and maintain your resources.

Basic school supplies

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glitter – variety of colours pipe-cleaners – sparkly feathers lead pencils/erasers glue sticks coloured pencils wax crayons oil pastels permanent black markers (e.g. Artline™ 70) fine black markers (e.g. Artline™ 200) scissors A3 portfolio (optional) craft glue 250 mL (squeeze bottle) watercolour pencils coloured permanent markers

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Useful collectables

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• acrylic paint – standard colours and fluorescent • Edicol™ or vegetable dye • brushes – small, medium and large – glue brushes • cartridge paper – large, approx. 56 cm x 36 cm – medium A3 – small A4 • litho paper – large, approx. 56 cm x 36 cm – medium A3 – small A4 • coloured card for mounting work (including black) • coloured paper squares – glossy, matt and fluorescent • tissue paper • crepe paper • string

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• polystyrene trays to use as paint trays • newspapers • sponge blocks (offcuts available from foam rubber outlets) • fabric scraps (students who do dancing often have an abundance of interesting fabric scraps at home) • cardboard offcuts • corks • cereal boxes (both ends opened, then flattened for easy storage) • utensils – spoons, forks, blunt kitchen knives, whisks • ice-cream containers • takeaway food containers • clay (e.g. Northcote terracotta is very child-friendly) • craft sticks • masking tape • strawboard or thick cardboard • toothpicks • foil • plastic sheeting • overhead transparencies

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• liquid detergent • mineral turpentine (low-smell substitutes are also available) • hot glue gun and glue sticks • wool (variety of colours) • paper cutter • staplers • fishing line • steel wool • washing up sponges • egg cartons • biscuit cutters • greeting cards • Easter egg wrappers • fur offcuts (pref. ‘faux’ fur) • bubble wrap • plastic bottle tops • birthday wrapping paper • curling ribbon • paint samples • coloured cupcake papers

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Teachers notes Each art project is presented over four pages: • teachers page • full-colour photograph of completed art project • student’s reflection page • task assessment

Teachers page Art project title Project theme synopsis Number of lessons included in the art project.

Colour codes identify visual arts objectives addressed in lesson activities (page ii).

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Material requirements appropriate to each lesson. Activities make use of easily accessible resources/ mediums.

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Star code to indicate adult help.

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Simple, multiskilled art activities with effective results.

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Key focus points to promote discussion of theme and for effective lesson preparation.

Art project title

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Completed art project

Clear, full-colour photograph of completed art project.

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Teachers notes Student reflection sheet

Related art project title

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Objective and meaningful lesson reflections. Each provides a selfanalysis of a student’s performance for each key lesson point.

Task assessment sheet Related art project title

Visual arts objectives identified for each art project.

Task identified for assessment for each art project.

Assessment key

Identified task criteria. Task assessment sheets provide a quick means to identify and record a student’s performance in criteria which assess the given objectives.

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The colour wheel

orange

yellow

yellow

red

green

blue

red

blue

yellow/green

yellow/orange

orange

PRIMARY COLOURS

red/orange

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blue/green

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green

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yellow

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purple

blue

red

blue/purple

red/purple purple

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Colour wheel glossary Hues Variety of colours. Primary colours red, yellow and blue These colours may be blended/mixed to make all other colours except white and black. Secondary colours

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Intermediate colours

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orange, green and purple These colours are created when two primary colours are blended/mixed. red + yellow = orange yellow + blue = green blue + red = purple

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These colours are created by mixing one primary and one secondary colour. red–orange yellow–orange yellow–green blue–green blue–purple red–purple

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Tertiary colours

These colours do not appear on the colour wheel and are created when any three primary colours are blended/mixed together in varying quantities. Neutrals

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White, black and grey (White for tints and black for shades.) Tints

Tinting is a process where white is added to a base colour. Colours created are generally known as pastel colours. Large quantities of white are required to change a colour significantly. Shades Shades are created by adding black to a base colour. Only small amounts of black are required to make a base colour darker. Complementary colours These colours are opposites on the colour wheel. They are a strong contrast and stand out when adjacent to each other.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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Saturated colour collage This project was inspired by the theme Colour. The focus was the gradual colour shading from white to purple to make a blended colour sheet. This project involves choosing a regular shape to make a repetitive shape collage. This activity followed a unit in maths, covering regular shapes. It is a very quick and colourful art piece that adds instant brightness to the classroom.

Three-lesson project 4. Add a small amount of colour to the white paint. 5. Mix the paint with the brush and brush paint across both sheets of paper, blending paint from white to colour using long, fluent strokes. (Avoid a distinct line from white to shaded colour, thus blending.) 6. Continue this process, colouring approximately 5-cm widths with each new shade. Set aside to dry. 7. Enlist adult help to mount one painted sheet before Lesson two.

Discussion points

artwork in progress ruler lead pencil scissors glue stick newspaper to protect workspace shapes to trace; e.g. jar lid (optional)

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• • • • • • •

Method

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1. Choose a shape to make a repetitive collage. 2. On the back of one of the painted sheets, draw/rule/trace selected shape. 3. Cut out shapes and arrange them onto the remaining painted sheet to form a collage. 4. Using glue stick, glue shapes into position.

Lesson three

Lesson one

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Materials

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Materials

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Lesson two

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• Can you name the shapes we have covered in maths? (List these on the board.) Shapes covered may include: circle, triangle, square, rhombus, pentagon, hexagon and octagon. • Discuss the characteristics of each in terms of number of sides, vertices/corners. • What does the word ‘hue’ mean? (variety of colours) • Which colours are the primary colours? (red, blue and yellow) • Primary colours can be mixed together to make secondary colours. Which colours are secondary colours? (green, orange, purple) • Which colours make green? (blue and yellow) • Which colours make purple? (red and blue) • Which colours make orange? (yellow and red) • A colour may have many different tones/levels of intensity; therefore, many different hues/variations of colour. By starting with white, any colour may be added with increasing intensity. This is known as ‘saturating colour’. Example shown started with white, to which purple was added. This process of mixing colour into paint is ‘colour blending’.

• A3 cartridge paper (two sheets per child) • white acrylic paint • acrylic paint any colour: dark colours show obvious colour changes in colour tone • paintbrush (medium) • polystyrene trays (for paint) • coloured card for mounting • craft glue for mounting • newspaper to protect workspace

Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Method 1. Following discussion about primary colours, colour hues, colour blending and saturating colour, line up two A3 cartridge sheets next to each other in portrait position. 2. Choose a colour to investigate varied tones/shades/hues (example shown: purple). 3. Starting with white, commence brushing across width of both pages, simultaneously.

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Saturated colour collage

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Name:

Date:

Saturated colour collage Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your saturated colour collage. (List at least six items.)

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2. Which part of the activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

4. Which colour did you investigate?

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3. What does ‘hue’ mean?

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5. Were you satisfied with your colour blending? Give a reason for your answer.

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6. Gradually saturating colour may also be demonstrated by shading from light to dark with coloured pencil. (When colouring lightly, the white paper behind the colour lightens the intensity of the colour.) Using a coloured pencil, demonstrate colour shading.

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:07 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Saturated colour collage Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Assessment key

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Task The students were instructed to gradually saturate white paint with a colour and use the results to make a shape collage using a range of skills, techniques and materials.

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✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

The student is able to:

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participate in class discussion about primary and secondary colours, colour saturation and shapes. demonstrate colour saturation, gradually adding colour to white paint. demonstrate brush painting using long, fluent strokes. demonstrate colour blending by gradually adding increasingly darker tones to painting.

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draw/rule/trace shapes onto the back of a painted sheet of A3 cartridge paper. cut out shapes.

arrange and glue shapes onto painted background in a collage formation. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:54:08 AM


Spirals of colour leaning board This activity was inspired by the theme Colour. The students used free association to build a vocabulary of colour-associated words. This vibrant piece is a quick, easy and effective project which will add colour to the classroom. By using quality paper, it also makes unique wrapping paper.

Two-lesson project Method

Discussion points

1. Following discussion about colours, demonstrate painting a spiral from the centre out. A right-handed person should hold the brush between thumb and fingers of left hand and twist it, while the right hand guides it in a spiral movement. 2. Starting with darkest colour, complete five spirals randomly spaced around page. 3. Continue completing spirals for each colour. (Odd numbers work best.) Ensure edges are covered by completing spirals and painting across newspaper. Set aside to dry. 4. Enlist adult assistance to mount work onto coloured card and laminate.

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• ‘Can you give me some words associated with colour?’ List words on a chart to keep for future reference. These will include the names of colours and adjectives used to describe colour. At a later time, these may be written onto cards and scattered among the display of colourful art. • It has been scientifically proven that bright colours induce a positive, happy frame of mind. • What textures can you make using a paintbrush and paint? Ask children to draw on their experiences and come out to the board to draw ‘brushstrokes’ which create a textured finish. Examples

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Lesson two

Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

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Method

1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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To gain the best texture possible, the paintbrush should be flat with coarse bristles. Between completing spirals for each colour, wash and dry brush thoroughly. (Pat onto hand towel or newspaper).

Lesson one Materials • • • • • • • • •

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A3 cartridge paper trimmed 2 cm along width and length brightly coloured acrylic paint flat wide brush (approximately 2 cm wide) polystyrene trays (for paint) paper towel/newspaper A3 coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace A3 laminating sheets

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Spirals of colour leaning board

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Name:

Date:

Spirals of colour leaning board Reflections 1. List the equipment you used to make this art piece.

2. Did you enjoy this activity? Give a reason for your answer.

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4. List five words (adjectives) to describe bright colours.

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3. What have scientists discovered about how bright colours affect people’s moods?

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5. Write three sentences about colour, using three of the adjectives in your list.

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6. Using pencils, draw and colour a picture which would brighten up a dull room.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Spirals of colour leaning board Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a spiral of colour leaning board using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

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● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about colours and associated adjectives, and how to brush painted textures.

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paint spirals using acrylic paint and a flat brush.

complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions.

work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:54:14 AM


Hanging basket Two-lesson project Dragging cardboard from a centre point in a circular motion.

Lesson one Materials • • • • • • • • • • • •

A4 photocopy paper A3 cartridge paper oil pastels acrylic paint (variety of colours including sky blue) sponges (for painting) flat-bristled paintbrush cereal box card scissors coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace lead pencil

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Printing a curved piece of cardboard at regular intervals.

Method

1. Following discussion about flowering plants, hanging baskets and printing techniques practise printing flowers on A4 photocopy paper. 2. Using lead pencil, lightly draw an outline of a hanging basket on A3 cartridge paper in a portrait position. 3. Using oil pastels, draw stems and leaves of plants using strong, solid colour. 4. Sponge paint background using sponge, blue acrylic paint and ‘pat and lift’ technique. Emphasise no dragging. 5. Using flat-bristled paintbrush, commence painting brown basket weave texture around plant stems to make hanging basket shape. 6. Cut lengths of cereal box and use the edge to print rim and wire supports for hanging basket in black. 7. Using cardboard printing technique and cereal box strips, print blooms onto stems. Set aside to dry. 8. Enlist adult help to mount work.

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If available, stimulus pictures of hanging basket floral arrangements will inspire discussion. • What time of the year do most flowering plants come into bloom? (spring) • Where have you seen hanging baskets? (homes, alfresco areas, balconies etc.) Hanging baskets are a popular alternative to traditional gardens when space is limited in flats, offices etc. • What kinds of plants have you seen in hanging baskets? (Answers will vary from annuals – petunias, pansies etc. – to long-term plants, including fuchsia, begonias etc.) Colours of flowers will vary greatly. Many varieties of the same plant come in a range of colours. • What kinds of plants look attractive in hanging baskets? (A range of plants, including ferns, annuals and plants which tend to drape as they grow.) • Hanging baskets make excellent gifts for people who enjoy gardening. Who do you know who would appreciate receiving a hanging basket in bloom as a gift? (Request reasons for answers.) Demonstrate making a range of flowers using cardboard printing as shown.

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Discussion points

Basket weave painting technique

Lesson two Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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Hanging basket

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Name:

Date:

Hanging basket Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your hanging basket picture. (List a minimum of seven items.)

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2. List three techniques you used to colour your picture.

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3. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

4. Hanging baskets are a decorative garden item. Where might you hang the hanging basket you have designed in your picture?

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5. Hanging baskets make a lovely gift for people who enjoy gardening.

In the box, draw another hanging basket which you could give as a gift to someone you know.

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This hanging basket is for

He/She would like it because

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02/04/2007 10:54:20 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Hanging basket Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a hanging basket picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in discussion about hanging baskets, their appearance and uses, and suitable plants.

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demonstrate strong, solid colouring using oil pastels. demonstrate sponge painting with ‘pat and lift’ technique. demonstrate painting a basket weave texture using flat-bristled brush and acrylic paint. demonstrate printing flowers using cardboard and acrylic paint. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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02/04/2007 10:54:21 AM


Character pirate portrait This project was inspired by the theme Pirates. Following a reading of various pirate stories and several activities using words to describe pirates, the children created a pirate character matching their description of a pirate. Skin tone and black stockings/tights and quilting wadding are required for this activity. Encourage children to bring stockings/tights from home. Generic brand stockings/tights, the less sheer the better, work well. Wadding may be purchased at any fabric store. A piece 22 cm x 22 cm is required for each child. Sewing needles and thread are also necessary. Encourage children to bring in additional effects; e.g: earrings, coloured fabric etc.

Five-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Lesson one Materials

Method 1. Following discussion about pirates, commence drawing a head shape on cereal box card. 2. Cut out head shape. 3. Apply craft glue onto card and press wadding onto glue. Set aside to dry. 4. Trim wadding with scissors to follow head shape. 5. Using lead pencil on A4 photocopy paper, draw a plan/picture of the pirate, shoulders and head. 6. Using coloured pencils, shade drawing to show intended colour use.

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Materials

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Method

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1. Place head shape inside first piece of stocking/tights. 2. Pull ends together firmly on the back and tie a knot. Trim knot ends 3. Repeat this process with second piece of stocking/tights. 4. Draw facial features using fine liner (nose, mouth, eyes, dimples etc.). 5. Using a needle and thread, sew along the lines, going through the cardboard. 6. Using a fine paintbrush and acrylic paint, paint features. Set aside to dry.

Lesson three

• artwork in progress • extras which the children have brought in for their pirate (earrings, jewellery etc.) • craft glue • hot glue gun • newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. Using black stockings, rope, wool or fabric torn into strips, make hair for the pirate. in the example, black tights were cut into short lengths and twisted. 2. Using hot glue gun or craft glue, glue hair into position. Children may choose to make a hat, bandana etc.

Materials

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• cereal box cardboard (20 cm x 20 cm) • quilting wadding (20 cm x 20 cm) • craft glue (squeeze bottle or brushes and polystyrene tray) • A4 photocopying paper • lead pencil • newspaper to protect workspace • coloured pencils • scissors

Lesson four

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• artwork in progress • flesh-coloured stockings/tights; legs cut in half; Two pieces per child • sewing needles • flesh-coloured cotton thread • scissors • acrylic paint • paintbrush (fine) • newspaper to protect workspace • fine black marker

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Materials

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• If we were to describe the appearance of a pirate, what words/adjectives could we use? (Cover the following features, listing adjectives on the board. Examples are given.) hair – blonde, brown, black eyes – blue, brown, dark, sparkling, etc. mouth – crooked, yellow teeth, missing teeth, toothy smile, wicked grin complexion – olive, fair, freckled, scarred Conditions in which pirates lived were harsh/squalid. Healthy food wasn’t readily available. A lack of nutritional food meant that many of them were of poor health and their skin and teeth were badly affected. Personal hygiene was non-existent. They looked like a rough, tough, scary lot.

4. Colour drawing with oil pastels, emphasising strong, solid colour. 5. Paint a dye wash background using brilliant blue Edicol™ or vegetable dye. 6. Set aside to dry. 7. Enlist adult assistance to mount background onto coloured card and hot glue faces into position before Lesson four.

• • • • • •

• • • • •

artwork in progress A3 cartridge paper lead pencil permanent black marker oil pastels brilliant blue Edicol™ or vegetable dye paintbrush (medium) hot glue guns/glue tubes coloured card to mount work craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

Lesson five Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Method

1. Position pirate face onto A3 cartridge paper in a portrait position. 2. Using lead pencil, draw neck and shoulders. 3. Go over drawing with permanent black marker.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:21 AM


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Character pirate portrait

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 15

Primary art

15

02/04/2007 10:54:25 AM


Name:

Date:

Character pirate portrait Reflections

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1. Using lead pencil, draw a picture of your character pirate portrait. Label your drawing with the materials you used to make each part of your portrait. (Remember, glue is a medium.)

2. Did you change your plan as you made your character pirate portrait?

Yes

No

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If you made changes, what were they?

3. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

4. List five adjectives which best describe your pirate.

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6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 16

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:25 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Character pirate portrait Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a picture of a pirate with a 3-D face, using a range of skills, mediums and materials.

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Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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The student is able to:

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Criteria

participate in discussion about pirates and describing words. draw a plan of a pirate portrait.

make a 3-D face using card, wadding and stockings/tights.

Vi

draw facial features with fine liner. demonstrate basic stitching skills.

paint facial features with acrylic paint and a fine brush. draw and colour neck, shoulders and arms. demonstrate strong, solid colouring using oil pastels. demonstrate painting a dye wash. fasten hair to pirate using stockings/tights, wool, string or a material of choice from available resources. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 17

Primary art

17

02/04/2007 10:54:27 AM


Pop stars This project was inspired by the theme Music. The children had been studying different music categories and this project was completed during the topic Pop music.

Three-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Materials A3 cartridge paper A4 photocopy paper lead pencil/eraser permanent black marker wax crayons/oil pastels coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

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• • • • • • • •

Method

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1. Using lead pencil on A4 photocopy paper, draw yourself as a pop star. This is the master drawing for the art piece. 2. When satisfied with the drawing, go over lead pencil with permanent black marker. 3. Using lead pencil, trace the master drawing in the middle of A3 cartridge paper (in landscape position). 4. Using lead pencil, trace the same image several times to form a group of identical pop stars. 5. Trace over the pencil lines with permanent black marker. 6. The clothing will be made from fabric or colourful wrapping paper. Using wax crayons and/or oil pastels, colour remainder of central pop star, emphasising strong, solid colouring. 7. Enlist adult assistance to mount picture onto coloured card.

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6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 18

artwork in progress master drawing pen (any colour) fabric scraps/colourful wrapping paper sequins, beads, ‘crafty bits’ (optional) glitter craft glue paintbrush (fine) lead pencil scissors glue stick newspaper to protect workspace

Method

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• • • • • • • • • • • •

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Lesson one

Materials

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What is a ‘pop star’? What kind of music do pop stars perform? Who is your favourite pop star? What kind of clothes do pop stars wear while they are performing? (Clothes which will help the star to stand out and look attractive.) • What would you wear to make sure you stood out as a pop star? • What is their role in society? (Entertain people, provide music to dance and sing along with.) • Why is it important for a pop star to be a good role model for young people? (Since young people imitate their idols, they have a responsibility to their public audience.)

1. Using the master drawing, cut out clothing and accessory sections. 2. Using a pen, trace these sections onto the back of fabric or colourful wrapping paper. (Right side of pattern to wrong side of fabric.) 3. Cut out clothing and accessories. 4. Using generous swipes of glue stick, glue clothing and accessories into position on central pop star. 5. Decorate with crafty bits—glitter, sequins etc. Glue these into position with craft glue.

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• • • •

Lesson three Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:27 AM


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Pop stars

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 19

Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:54:31 AM


Name:

Date:

Pop stars Reflections 1. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

2. Which part of this activity was most challenging? Why?

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3. Give a reason for your choice of fabric/wrapping paper and accessories.

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4. Why is it important for a pop star to be a good role model?

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5. Using lead pencil, design a poster advertising your up-and-coming performance. Remember to include a date, time and venue. Colour your poster with coloured pencils.

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6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 20

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:31 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Pop stars Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

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Task The students were instructed to make a pop stars picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in discussion about pop stars. using lead pencil, draw a master drawing of himself/herself as a pop star.

Vi

trace a master drawing several times onto A3 cartridge paper to form a group of identical pop stars. demonstrate strong, solid colouring using wax crayons and/or oil pastels. decorate picture with ‘crafty bits’ to enhance pop star glamour. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (02-21).indd 21

Primary art

21

02/04/2007 10:54:32 AM


Batik tropical parrot This activity was inspired by the theme Tropical environments. After studying the topic Wildlife in the tropics, the children drew a colourful parrot using a wax resist outline technique similar to batik.

Three-lesson project Discussion points

Lesson two

Stimulus pictures of colourful parrots typical of tropical regions. Other colourful birds are equally effective (e.g. macaw, toucan). Discuss characteristics of a ‘tropical’ environment. (hot wet conditions, thick vegetation) • Which birds have we studied in the area? (Answers may vary as a one-off art lesson. A few popular parrots may be the focus.) • What is ‘batik’? (a decorative art technique where wax is used to seal sections to resist dye)

Materials • • • • • •

Method 1. Using appropriate paintbrush for each section, paint the sections of the picture with dye.

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2. Enlist adult help to mount work.

Lesson one

Method

Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

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A4 photocopy paper lead pencil A3 cartridge paper white wax crayon newspaper to protect workspace

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Lesson three

Materials • • • • •

artwork in progress Edicol™ or vegetable dye paintbrushes (medium and fine) coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

Method

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1. Following discussion about tropical environments, parrots and batik, and using lead pencil, draw a parrot on A4 photocopy paper. This is a plan and may be erased and changed until the child is satisfied with the results. Include a decorative background (flowers, leaves etc.), emphasising the creation of sections for each colour. 2. Using lead pencil, lightly transfer drawing onto A3 cartridge paper. 3. Using white wax crayon, draw over faint lead pencil lines with strong, solid lines. This forms a resist and enables colours to be kept separate.

1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 22

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:56 AM


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Batik tropical parrot

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 23

Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:54:59 AM


Name:

Date:

Batik tropical parrot Reflections 1. What are the characteristics of a tropical environment?

2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. List two techniques you used to make this project.

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4. How did you ensure a wax resist occurred in your paper ‘batik’ picture?

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5. Many designs may be created using wax resist. Draw another picture showing sections made by using wax as a resist. Colour your drawing with coloured pencils.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 24

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:54:59 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Batik tropical parrot Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Assessment key

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Task The students were instructed to make a batik tropical parrot picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

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✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

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The student is able to:

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participate in discussion about tropical environments, parrots and batik. draw a plan of parrot using sections to separate colours, as well as a decorative background. transfer plan onto A3 cartridge paper.

make a wax resist using strong, solid wax crayon colouring.

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paint sections using dye.

complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 25

Primary art

25

02/04/2007 10:55:00 AM


In-stripes name poster This project was inspired by the theme Colour.

Two-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Lesson one

• • • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress acrylic paint (primary and secondary colours) polystyrene trays (for paint) paintbrushes (medium and fine) newspaper to protect workspace coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

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Method

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1. Demonstrate painting stripes. A steady hand for painting straight lines is best achieved by painting towards you. (And in a vertical situation, painting from top to bottom.) 2. Commence painting in stripes, following the colour pattern on their plan. 3. Enlist adult help to mount work onto coloured card. 4. Students complete reflection activity. 5. Teacher completes assessment record.

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Materials

Materials

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A poster of the colour wheel is a useful teaching resource when discussing primary colours and colour mixing (see page vi). • Which are the three primary colours? (red, blue and yellow) • Which colours blended together make green? (yellow and blue) • Which colours blended together make orange? (yellow and red) • Which colours blended together make purple? (red and blue) Discuss primary and secondary colours. • Why do we have names? (To label us apart from others.) Traditionally, in Christian societies, your first name was called your Christian name and your last name, a family name or surname. • Who chooses your name? (parents)

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• A4 photocopy paper • A3 cartridge paper • overhead transparency of suggested letter shapes (page 127) (optional) • lead pencil • permanent black marker • newspaper to protect workspace • coloured pencils

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Method

1. Following discussion about colours and names, and using lead pencil, practise drawing letters for name on A4 photocopy paper. Experiment with colour patterns using coloured pencils. 2. When satisfied with results, draw name design onto A3 cartridge paper. 3. Go over letter outlines with permanent black marker.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 26

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:01 AM


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In-stripes name poster

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 27

Primary art

27

02/04/2007 10:55:04 AM


Name:

Date:

In-stripes name poster Reflections 1. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

2. What are the three primary colours?

3. What are the three secondary colours?

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4. Painting the lines to form stripes can be very difficult. What is the key to a steady hand?

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5. Many different gift items are made using first names; e.g. a door plaque. Design a gift item using a first name as a focus. Colour your design using coloured pencils.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 28

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:05 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

In-stripes name poster Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a striped first name poster using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

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● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in discussion about primary and secondary colours and first names.

Vi

draw a plan of first name using decorative letter shapes and design a striped colour pattern sequence. transfer design onto A3 cartridge paper. go over letter outlines using permanent black marker. paint striped pattern sequence. demonstrate correct straight line painting technique. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 29

Primary art

29

02/04/2007 10:55:06 AM


Coloured paper city view This lesson was inspired by ‘The city’. Often cities are located beside a river and the city scape can be viewed from the other side of the river. Such areas are popular spots for walkers because the view can be spectacular.

Three-lesson project 3. Commence drawing top layer of building skyline onto coloured paper. 4. Cut skyline shape and glue onto page overlapping sky. 5. Continue this process, including river, foreground buildings and path. 6. Draw foreground features onto the back of scrap coloured paper. 7. Cut out features and, using glue stick, glue them onto foreground. Set aside to dry. 8. Enlist adult assistance to trim and mount finished work onto coloured card. (A slide cutter is excellent for trimming this art piece.)

Materials

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Lesson two

• artwork in progress • materials and tools required from Lesson one to complete unfinished work • craft glue • paintbrush (fine) • glitter • fine black marker • newspaper to protect workspace

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Stimulus pictures of a city will enhance meaningful discussion responses. • What makes up a city? (central business district, tall buildings, offices, theatres, entertainment, shops etc.) List on the board. • What is your first impression of the city? (buildings, sky scrapers—lots of glass windows, traffic.) • What is your favourite part of the city? Why? • Is there a park or landmark near your city where you can relax and view the city scape? (Discuss the landmarks/locations where a good view of the city can be achieved.) • What might you see in the foreground location? (people walking, dogs, cats, children playing, skateboarders etc.) Scenic photos of the city skyline are often used to advertise in tourism literature to entice people to visit a city. • The city view you are going to make may be used as an advertising picture to attract tourists to your city. What features would attract you to the city? (Answers will vary depending upon likes and dislikes.)

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Discussion points

Lesson one Materials

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• A3 cartridge paper • A4 photocopy paper • coloured paper squares cut into half-sheet size (variety of colours) (Must be wide enough to cover width of cartridge paper.) • coloured paper scraps from previous lessons • lead pencil • ruler • scissors • glue stick • newspaper to protect workspace • coloured card for mounting • craft glue for mounting

Method 1. Following discussion about the city scape, draw a lead pencil plan of a city scape onto A4 photocopy paper. (Include building layers, emphasising interesting roof styles/ shapes.) 2. With cartridge paper in portrait position, glue sky colour into position.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 30

Method 1. Complete art piece. 2. Use a fine paint brush, craft glue and glitter or fine black marker to add enhancement if desired.

Lesson three Materials • • • • • •

artwork in progress reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil fine black marker ruler coloured pencils

Method 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Complete unfinished artwork. Rule building divisions using fine black marker. Draw detail using fine black marker. Students complete reflection activity. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:06 AM


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Coloured paper city view

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 31

Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:55:10 AM


Name:

Date:

Coloured paper city view Reflections 1. List the tools and materials you used to make your city view picture.

2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. What feature did you include in the foreground of your picture? Explain why you chose this feature.

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4. To create interest in your picture, you designed different roof lines. Using lead pencil, design another city view picture for a postcard. Use coloured pencils to colour your drawing.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 32

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:10 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Coloured paper city view Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a city view picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Sa m

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about the city and attractive views. draw a plan of a city scape and foreground.

Vi

transfer plan of buildings and foreground features onto coloured paper. demonstrate cutting along lines accurately. glue building layers and features onto background. add detail using fine liner pen and other mediums. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 33

Primary art

33

02/04/2007 10:55:11 AM


Chalk pastel flower collage This project was inspired by the theme The seasons and the topic Spring.

Two-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method

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1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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What are the four seasons? In which season do flowers blossom? What colours have you noticed in your garden? Do you have flowering plants at home? Can you name some flowering plants? What do plants need to grow? (good soil and water) What is it about flowers that people like? (look beautiful; have sweet perfumes) • Why do we cut flowers? (transfer them from the garden; to brighten and decorate another area/ place) • Where do we put them to admire? (to decorate our home, in a vase) • Who likes to receive flowers as a gift? (Mum, Nana, Grandma, Aunty etc.) • Flowers are given as gifts for many reasons. What are some of the reasons we give gifts of appreciation? (To say we love someone; to say thank you; to say congratulations; to celebrate an occasion; e.g. birthday.) This collage of flowers may be completed using wax crayons or oil pastels as an alternative to chalk pastels.

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Lesson one Materials

A3 cartridge paper chalk pastels hair spray (to reduce smudging) craft glue for mounting coloured card for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

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• • • • • • •

Method

1. Following discussion about the seasons and tokens of appreciation, and using chalk pastels, draw five flower shapes on A3 cartridge paper. (Some flowers may only be partly on the page.) 2. Add colour by drawing lines inside each petal as shown in the example. 3. Using green tones, draw leaves in the background. 4. Fill in spaces by drawing concentric lines with different colours. 5. Enlist adult help to spray completed pictures with hair spray. (This will reduce smudging.) 6. Mount work onto coloured card.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 34

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:12 AM


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Chalk pastel ower collage

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 35

Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:55:16 AM


Name:

Date:

Chalk pastel ower collage Reflections

1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your chalk pastel flower collage.

2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

3. In which season are we most likely to see flowers in the garden?

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4. Flowers are often given as gifts. List three occasions when flowers may be given as gifts.

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5. Many different gift items could be decorated with your flower collage. Draw two gift items which you would like to decorate with your flower collage. Colour your drawings with coloured pencils.

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6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 36

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:16 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Chalk pastel flower collage Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

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Task The students were instructed to make and draw a flower collage using chalk pastels.

Sa m

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

participate in discussion about spring, flowers and gifts. demonstrate drawing with chalk pastels.

demonstrate colouring with chalk pastels.

Vi

complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 37

Primary art

37

02/04/2007 10:55:17 AM


Printed sea life scene This is a simple and effective printed art piece. It inspires creative thinking to develop an inquisitive mind. You may be very surprised at what the children come up with, in terms of tools and sea life shapes. The backing can determine its purpose: mounted picture, greeting card, background in a diorama etc.

Two-lesson project Method

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1. Following discussion about tropical fish, crustaceans and their environment, and the use of different arbitrary tools for printing, paint a yellow dye seabed along the bottom of the blue card. 2. Dip a medium brush into green dye and press onto yellow seabed. Hold page vertically, upside down, and allow dye to run to form seaweed. Repeat this process. Set aside to dry. 3. Demonstrate ‘paint printing’ techniques using acrylic paint and the edge of strawboard, paintbrush handle end, fingerprint etc. Tails and legs are achieved by folding/ bending small pieces of card. Children are instructed to use a minimum of three arbitrary tools to print their sea scene. Emphasise printing one layer only. Eyes may be completed in following lesson. 4. Encourage children to experiment with sea life prints on A4 photocopy paper. Commence printing sea life scene on blue background. Set aside to dry. 5. Enlist adult assistance to mount work onto coloured card.

Sa m

Stimulus pictures of colourful tropical fish and crustaceans would be helpful. • What have you noticed about the colours of tropical fish? • Why do you think tropical fish and crustaceans have bright colours? (camouflage to live among the bright coral) • What is a habitat? (the natural environment of a plant or animal) Lots of people enjoy looking at tropical fish and crustaceans. Popular reefs which form the habitat for beautiful sea life are being spoiled by humans. • What can we do to prevent their environment from being spoiled? (don’t leave rubbish when we go to the beach; when boating, make sure no rubbish goes overboard) If we visit areas to go snorkelling or reef walking we must obey the rules which help keep the habitat safe from damage. • Different shaped objects may be used to make printed shapes. What objects could you use to print fish shapes? (Answers will vary: corks, pieces of strawboard, pieces of cereal box, bottle caps/lids, fingerprint etc.) Demonstrate print shapes on board.)

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Discussion points

Lesson two

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Materials

Lesson one • • • •

• • • • • •

38

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Materials

blue card cut to size (28 cm x 21 cm) Edicol™ or vegetable dye (yellow and green) paintbrush (medium) arbitrary printing tools – bottle corks of varying sizes – paintbrush (medium) – pencil with flat end – paintbrush handle ends – strawboard offcuts – cereal box offcuts acrylic paint (variety of colours) polystyrene trays (for paint) A4 photocopy paper newspaper to protect workspace coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting

Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 38

• • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress acrylic paint (white and black) paintbrush (fine handle end) pencil with a flat end polystyrene trays (for paint) newspaper to protect workspace reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

Method 1. Using pencil with a flat end and acrylic paint, print eyes. 2. Using the handle end of a fine paintbrush, print the pupils. Set aside to dry. 3. Students complete reflection activity. 4. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:17 AM


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Printed sea life scene

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 39

Primary art

39

02/04/2007 10:55:21 AM


Name:

Date:

Printed sea life scene Reflections

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1. Using lead pencil, draw a picture of the printed sea life scene you made. Label your drawing with the mediums, materials and tools you used to make each part.

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2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

3. What is a habitat?

4. Why is it important to protect the habitat of our sea life?

5. List two ways we can help protect the habitat of sea life.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 40

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:21 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Printed sea life scene Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

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Task The students were instructed to make a printed sea life scene using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about sea life, habitat and different arbitrary tools used for printing. paint a seabed and seaweed background using a brush and dye.

Vi

experiment with printing with arbitrary tools and acrylic paint. demonstrate using a minimum of three arbitrary tools to print a sea life scene. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (22-41).indd 41

Primary art

41

02/04/2007 10:55:22 AM


Watercolour flower greeting card This card is simple and effective and may be used for any occasion; e.g. Mother’s Day, birthday, thank you, get well card.

Two-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Lesson one

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Method

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1. Fold coloured card in half. 2. Using glue stick, glue flower picture onto the front of coloured card. 3. Using fine black marker, gel pens or metallic pens, write message on the right-hand side, inside card. 4. Outline flower picture with fine black liner. 5. Write cover message using glitter glue, gel pen etc. 6. Students complete reflection activity. 7. Teacher completes assessment record.

overhead transparency of flowers (pages 128–129) A5 photocopy paper cartridge paper cut to size (15 cm x 21 cm) lead pencil/eraser permanent black marker watercolour pencils water containers newspaper to protect workspace

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• • • • • • • •

• artwork in progress • equipment from Lesson one required to finish colouring task • coloured card cut to size (32 cm x 22 cm) • glue stick • glitter glue, gel pen, metallic pens etc. • fine black marker • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

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Materials

Materials

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Flowers can be related to a wide range of themes; e.g. celebrations, seasons, insects. • What colours have you noticed in your garden? • What parts does a flowering plant have? (stem, leaves, petals, stamens) • What insects have you noticed in your garden? (bees, mosquitoes, dragonflies, flies, wasps, butterflies) Discuss the colours of these. • What can we use flowers for? (to enjoy in the garden; gifts; to decorate homes/workplaces, celebration venues, churches etc.; dried and pressed flowers are kept as keepsakes and to decorate scrapbooks) • What coloured flower blossoms have you noticed? (full spectrum of colours) • Do petals have colour variations? Using flower shapes (pages 128–129) on an overhead transparency, discuss flower characteristics.

Vi

Method

1. Following discussion about flowering plants and components, and using an overhead transparency, choose one flower and, with lead pencil, draw it onto A5 paper. 2. When satisfied with results, draw over lines with permanent black marker. 3. Using lead pencil, trace flower drawing onto cartridge paper. 4. Using watercolour pencils, colour flowers. Encourage colour blending on flowers and leaves. 5. Colour background using two contrasting colours and crosshatching technique.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 42

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:45 AM


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Sa m

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Watercolour ower greeting card

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 43

Primary art

43

02/04/2007 10:55:48 AM


Name:

Date:

Watercolour ower greeting card Reflections 1. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? (Give a reason for your answer.)

Yes

No

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2. Were you able to achieve the blended colour effect on the flowers and leaves? Describe the technique you used to (try to) achieve this.

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3. This blending technique could be used to enhance the colour of many things/objects. Describe a design/picture which could be enhanced this way.

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Draw and colour what you have in mind, using coloured pencils.

4. List four occasions on which you could use your greeting card.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 44

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:49 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Watercolour flower greeting card Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a watercolour flower greeting card using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in discussion about flowers—parts, colours, uses. draw a flower.

Vi

trace flower design onto cartridge paper. colour flower using watercolour pencils and colour blending technique. write an appropriate message in the greeting card. write an appropriate cover message. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 45

Primary art

45

02/04/2007 10:55:50 AM


Shirt/Jumper greeting card (male emphasis) This card is simple and effective. It may be used for any occasion; e.g. Father’s Day, birthday, thank you, get well. By changing the front neckline it can be made into a ‘formal’ shirt and tie, a T-shirt or football jersey. The examples shown were made for Father’s Day.

Two-lesson project Method

Discussion points

1. Following discussion about greeting cards and Dad’s favourite shirt, make a design plan of the shirt/jumper to be made. (Include all detail.) 2. Fold card in half. 3. Using lead pencil, trace shirt shape onto folded card, lining up left edge of shirt sleeve with the fold of the card. 4. Transfer plan to greeting card. 5. Add colour and detail using the materials/resources available. 6. Avoiding the fold, cut around the shirt shape. Don’t cut the back neckline. See diagrams below for different necklines.

What is a greeting card? Have you ever received a greeting card? Why were you given a greeting card? Have you ever given someone a greeting card? (List reasons why we have given or received greeting cards.) • What type of clothes does your dad like wearing best? (casual, work, sport) On the board, draw the basic shirt shape as shown on page 130. • What does Dad’s favourite shirt/top/jumper have on it? (Discuss the markings required for a business shirt and tie, T-shirt, sport jumper/shirt; e.g. football jersey.)

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Lesson one Formal shirt and tie

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Materials

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• • • •

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• A wide range of colouring mediums/materials may be used for this activity, subject to availability. • design plan photocopy (page 130) • prepared template: basic shirt shape (page 130) • coloured card (31 cm x 18 cm) • lead pencil • wrapping paper • fine black marker • glue stick • scissors • newspaper to protect workspace

Football jersey

Materials • • • • • • • • • •

46

design plan photocopy (page 130) prepared template: basic shirt shape (page 130) white card cut to size (31 cm x 18 cm) lead pencil ruler permanent black marker fine black marker oil pastels and/or coloured permanent markers scissors newspaper to protect workspace

Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 46

Lesson two

Materials • • • • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress coloured card (6 cm x 3 cm) scissors craft glue paper punch ribbon, cotton or wool (for fastening swing tag) fine black marker gel pens, metallic pens etc. (optional) reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

Method 1. To make swing tag, punch a hole in the end of cut, coloured card. 2. Thread ribbon, wool etc. through the hole and tie ends together in a knot. 3. Using any decorative writing implements available, write, ‘Happy Father’s Day’ or an appropriate message on the swing tag. 4. Using craft glue, fasten ribbon, cotton etc. to back neckline of shirt. Set aside to dry. 5. Students complete reflection activity. 6. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:51 AM


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Shirt/Jumper greeting card (male emphasis)

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 47

Primary art

47

02/04/2007 10:55:55 AM


Name:

Date:

Shirt/Jumper greeting card (male emphasis) Reflections 1. What type of shirt/jumper did you design on your card? Give a reason for your choice.

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2. What materials did you use to colour and add detail to your project?

Yes

No

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3. Was drawing your plan useful for making the final card? Why/Why not?

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4. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? (Give a reason for your answer.)

Vi

5. Using the shirt/jumper shape, design a ‘Thank you’ card for a person who helped you complete a school project. (Keep in mind the style of dress this person prefers.) You may choose any materials and mediums to complete the card. Label the materials on your design, showing what you would use to create the finished card.

6. Write the message you could write in this card.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 48

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:56 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Shirt/Jumper greeting card (male emphasis) Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a shirt/jumper greeting card using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials. Assessment key

Sa m

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

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participate in discussion about greeting cards and male clothing. make a design plan of a shirt/jumper. fold card in half.

Vi

trace prepared template onto card. cut out shirt/jumper tracing. draw shirt/jumper detail onto card.

colour card, selecting from a range of mediums and materials. write a message in the greeting card (right-hand side). write a heading on the front of the card. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 49

Primary art

49

02/04/2007 10:55:57 AM


Stormy seas pirate ship scene This lesson was inspired by the theme The sea. The topic of pirates was covered throughout the theme. Due to the nature of this project, which uses scrap paper, recycling was also a focus. The children had been exposed to different methods of recycling to reduce wastage of precious natural resources. As a culmination of the recycling learning activities, this art piece was completed using paper offcuts saved from previous lessons.

Three-lesson project 4. Add colour detail using oil pastels and/or wax crayons. Emphasise strong, solid colouring. 5. Sponge paint two-thirds of the A3 cartridge paper in portrait position with sky blue acrylic paint. Lightly sponge dark clouds, using black paint to create a stormy effect. Emphasise on ‘pat and lift’ technique. Use smaller sponges to paint between ship detail.

Discussion points

Lesson two

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Materials

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• artwork in progress • blue paper scraps to complete torn paper sea effect (blue coloured paper, corrugated card, metallic crepe paper etc.) • glue stick • coloured card for mounting • craft glue for mounting • newspaper to protect workspace

Sa m

• What is a pirate? (a person who robs and commits acts of violence on the sea or on the shore) • Why do pirates make interesting characters in stories? (The characters usually have adventures at sea, which interests most people as it inspires the imagination.) • In reality, are pirates nice people? (No, they are lawbreakers and don’t hesitate to hurt anyone who gets in the way of a mission.) In children’s stories, pirate characters are often friendly and for this reason pirates seem to be nice people. • What do pirates use to travel aboard? (In most stories, the pirates travel on old fashioned pirate ships; old wooden sailing ships.) • What is recycling? (reusing products, especially natural resources, by repeated use or reprocessing) • What can we do to recycle at home? (ensure that we correctly dispose of recyclable materials; e.g. in recycling bins and outlets wherever possible; return organic materials to the earth; e.g. turning vegetable matter into compost; avoid wasting paper.) Recycling paper products to make art projects is a very effective way to recycle.

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Method

Lesson one • • • • • • • • •

Vi

Materials

A3 cartridge paper A4 photocopy paper overhead transparency of pirate ships (pages 131–132) lead pencil permanent black marker oil pastels and/or wax crayons acrylic paint—sky blue and black sponges (block—small and medium size) newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. Following discussion about the sea, pirates and recycling, draw a pirate ship on A4 paper (see pages 131–132 for examples). This may be made into an overhead transparency as a guide for the students. 2. When satisfied with ship design, draw over lines with permanent black marker. 3. Trace picture onto A3 cartridge in portrait position.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 50

1. Tear paper scraps into small, thin pieces. Thin, long pieces will accentuate the wave effect. 2. Using glue stick, glue paper pieces into position. (As shown in example.) Set aside to dry. 3. When dry, enlist adult assistance to trim and mount artwork onto coloured card before Lesson three.

Lesson three Materials • • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils glitter-gold, silver, blue craft glue polystyrene tray (for glue) paintbrush (fine) newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. To enhance detail, using a fine paintbrush, paint craft glue and sprinkle with glitter to highlight water at the bow of the ship. Create a stormy effect by painting zigzag lightning bolts and sprinkling them with gold glitter. To avoid mixing excess glitter colours, use one colour at a time. 2. Students complete reflection activity. 3. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:55:57 AM


Vi

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Sa m

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Stormy seas pirate ship scene

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 51

Primary art

51

02/04/2007 10:56:01 AM


Name:

Date:

Stormy seas pirate ship scene Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your stormy seas pirate ship scene.

pl

Sa m

3. What is recycling and why is it important?

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2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

g

4. What can we do to recycle at home?

Vi

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5. Using lead pencil, draw another sea scene, using the same background but with a different feature. Colour the picture using coloured pencils.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 52

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:56:02 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Stormy seas pirate ship scene Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a torn paper stormy sea scene picture, featuring a pirate ship and using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about pirates, pirate ships and recycling. draw a draft pirate ship.

Vi

transfer ship design to cartridge paper (in portrait position). demonstrate strong, solid colouring using wax crayons and/or oil pastels. sponge paint sky background using ‘pat and lift’ technique. make a torn paper overlay sea. add glitter detail. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 53

Primary art

53

02/04/2007 10:56:03 AM


Mini beast menagerie This art lesson was inspired by the theme Environments. The topic Mini beasts had been covered extensively in the science learning area. The environment of mini beasts was a main focus of the topic.

Three-lesson project 2. Using oil pastels, transfer plan design onto A4 cartridge paper. Draw leaf base for minibeasts. Use dark green to draw vein markings on the leaf. Emphasise strong, solid colour. 3. Paint around leaf using blue dye. 4. Set aside to dry. 5. Enlist adult help to mount work onto coloured card and glue metallic corrugated card framing strips onto art piece. Place a book on top of stacked art pieces to ensure corrugated card stays flat while drying. These should be ready before Lesson two.

Discussion points

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Lesson one

Materials • • • • • • • • • •

A4 cartridge paper A4 photocopy paper oil pastels blue Edicol™ or vegetable dye paintbrush (medium) lead pencil metallic corrugated card cut into strips (21 cm x 3.5 cm) card for mounting craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. Following discussion about mini beasts, their environment and how to make/represent them, and using lead pencil, create a plan of a scene showing mini beasts in a live vegetation environment on A4 photocopy paper. (A large leaf provides a good area for a range of mini beasts.)

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 54

artwork in progress cartridge paper scraps lead pencil wax crayons and/or oil pastels permanent black marker scissors craft glue (squeeze bottles or brush and polystyrene trays) arbitrary tools for printing (flat-ended pencil, matchstick, fine paintbrush end) silver glitter glue stick newspaper to protect workspace

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• • • • • • •

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Materials

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Lesson two

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• What is a mini beast? (any small/miniature creature) Discuss the mini beasts located in surrounding locality. Draw on children’s local knowledge • Where do we find most mini beasts? (Leaf litter, natural plant compost, under rocks in mulch-type material) • Compost is a perfect medium for many mini beasts to live in. What role do they play while helping to create compost? Some mini beasts dwell on living vegetation; i.e. trees and bushes. • Which mini beasts might we find on living vegetation? (spiders, caterpillars, grubs, ants, snails, butterflies etc.) • On living plants, what might constitute the ‘environment’? (leaves, flowers, twigs, seeds, buds etc.) This is the focus of our art project. • What is a menagerie? (a collection of wild or strange animals) • How could we make mini beasts on our picture? 3-D; 2-D; printed with acrylic paint and arbitrary tools; 2-D pictures may be slightly elevated by using a small piece of packaging card to add depth to picture (as shown in example) At least three different techniques should be demonstrated.

• • •

Method 1. Continue following plan to make mini beast scene. 2. Mini beasts may be printed directly onto picture using arbitrary printing tools, drawn directly onto background using oil pastels and/or wax crayons, or made into 3-D pictures by drawing, cutting out and pasting; e.g. flowers. Craft glue may be painted onto background and sprinkled with glitter to make a spider web or snail trail. 3. Using a glue stick and/or craft glue, glue mini beasts onto background. Set aside to dry.

Lesson three Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:56:03 AM


e pl Sa m g ew in Vi

Mini beast menagerie

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 55

Primary art

55

02/04/2007 10:56:08 AM


Name:

Date:

Mini beast menagerie Reflections

1. List the materials, mediums and tools you used to make your mini beast menagerie picture. Write at least six items.

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3. List the mini beasts you included in your picture.

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2. Which part of the activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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4. Choose one of the mini beasts you made. Write a set of instructions on how to make it. You need to include a list of materials and a drawing of the end result.

5. Using lead pencil, draw the mini beast menagerie scene you made and label the parts of the picture, showing the materials, mediums and tools you used for each.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 56

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:56:08 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Mini beast menagerie Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

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Task The students were instructed to make a picture of mini beasts on live vegetation, using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Sa m

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

participate in discussion about mini beasts and their environments and techniques which may be used to make a mini beast scene. demonstrate strong, solid colour using oil pastels and/or wax crayons.

Vi

demonstrate brush painting with dye.

demonstrate a minimum of three techniques to make a mini beast scene. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 57

Primary art

57

02/04/2007 10:56:09 AM


Polyfish sea scene This lesson was inspired by the theme The sea. The topic of tropical fish was covered across the curriculum, incorporating a focus on looking after our sea life environment.

Four-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points Stimulus pictures of colourful tropical fish and crustaceans would be helpful. • What have you noticed about the colours of tropical fish? • Why do you think tropical fish and crustaceans have bright colours? (camouflage to live among the bright coral) • What is a habitat? (the natural environment of a plant or animal) Lots of people enjoy looking at tropical fish and crustaceans. Popular reefs which form the habitat for beautiful sea life are being spoiled by humans. • What can we do to prevent their environment from being spoiled? (don’t leave rubbish when we go to the beach; when boating, make sure no rubbish goes overboard) If we visit areas to go snorkelling or reef walking we must obey the rules which help keep the habitat safe from damage.

Materials

Lesson one

Materials

A3 cartridge paper craft glue—diluted (3/4 glue 1/4 water) polystyrene trays (for craft glue) tissue paper sheets (blues and greens) glue brushes newspaper to protect workspace craft glue (undiluted for mounting) coloured card for mounting

Method

1. Following discussion about tropical fish and their sea life environment, commence tearing tissue into small pieces. 2. Paint glue onto small area of A3 cartridge paper and start overlay by laying a piece of blue tissue paper onto glue and brushing glue over the tissue to smooth it. (Ensure that the edges are flat.) 3. Continue making sea background by overlaying the blue tissue paper. 4. Apply torn green tissue to make weeds. 5. Set aside to dry. 6. When dry, enlist adult help to trim and mount paintings onto coloured card before Lesson two.

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1. Using fine paintbrush and craft glue, paint seaweed detail and sprinkle with green glitter. Set aside to dry. 2. Choose three tissue colours and tear small pieces. 3. Commence tissue overlay on polystyrene balls (1/2 balls) using diluted glue. Ensure edges of tissue paper are smoothed down. Set aside to dry.

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• • • • • • • •

Method

Lesson three

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Materials

• artwork in progress • polystyrene balls cut in half (3 x 1/2 balls per child) (approx. 70 mm and 60 mm size) • diluted craft glue (3/4 glue 1/4 water) • glue brushes • tissue paper (bright colours) • craft glue (undiluted) • paintbrush (fine) • polystyrene trays (for craft glue – diluted and undiluted) • glitter—green • newspaper to protect workspace

• • • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress lead pencil hot glue gun (optional) craft glue coloured card/paper scraps paintbrush (fine) goggle eyes glitter—gold, silver, red newspaper to protect workspace scissors

Method 1. Using lead pencil, draw fish tail and fin shapes for the ‘polyfish’ on coloured card/paper strips. 2. Cut out and fasten onto fish using hot glue gun or craft glue. 3. Using hot glue gun, glue fish into position on background. 4. Using fine paintbrush and craft glue, paint eye surround detail and sprinkle with silver glitter. 5. Using fine paintbrush and craft glue, paint mouth detail and sprinkle with glitter. Attach google eyes. Set aside to dry.

Lesson four Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 58

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:56:10 AM


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PolyďŹ sh sea scene

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 59

Primary art

59

02/04/2007 10:56:13 AM


Name:

Date:

PolyďŹ sh sea scene Reflections 1. Circle the mediums and materials you used to make your polyfish sea scene picture. cartridge paper

paintbrush

glue brush

coloured paper

acrylic paint

tissue paper

craft glue

dye

oil pastels

glitter

glue stick

small shells

at-ended pencil

sponges

permanent black marker

polystyrene balls

goggle eyes

hot glue gun

coloured card

crepe paper

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wax crayons

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3. What is a habitat?

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2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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4. List two things we can do to help prevent sea life from becoming extinct.

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5. Polystyrene balls cut in half may be used as a base for pictures of many things. Using a lead pencil, draw a picture showing polystyrene balls being used as a feature. Colour your picture using coloured pencils.

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Primary art

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 60

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:56:14 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Polyfish sea scene Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

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Task The students were instructed to make a polyfish sea scene using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in discussion about tropical fish, their habitat and care of the sea environment. demonstrate tissue paper overlay by brushing tissue with diluted craft glue and smoothing edges.

Vi

demonstrate drawing, cutting and gluing card/paper fins and tail. glue polyfish into position. add glitter enhancement. glue goggle eyes. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (42-61).indd 61

Primary art

61

02/04/2007 10:56:15 AM


Popular pets This lesson was inspired by the theme Pet care. It involves simple techniques and is an excellent introduction to the technique of clay welding. The finished product makes a lovely ornament, suitable as a gift.

Two-lesson project Discussion points

7. Press head into position. 8. Draw detail using a craft stick, nail and straw. (Gently press straw into clay to make eye circles.) 9. Set aside to air dry for one week. 10. Fire according to firing instructions.

• What pets do you have? (Answers will vary, but dogs and cats usually dominate the list of pets.) • What does your pet require to lead a healthy life? (food, water, care, brushing etc. and attention; at least annual visits to the vet for vaccinations and worming) Pets are a big responsibility and must be cared for consistently. Unless properly looked after, a pet can become a community nuisance. It is important when thinking about buying a pet to consider the unpleasant tasks that might need to be done for that particular animal.

Lesson two Materials

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Method

1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Lesson one

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Materials

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• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

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• terracotta clay (a fist-sized blob per child) • prepared template (page 133) • cereal box cardboard (approximately 6 cm x 6 cm and 18 cm x 5 cm) • lead pencil • newspaper to protect workspace • rolling pin (conduit lengths) • cardboard work surface (this may be cardboard packaging) • nail • toothbrush • craft sticks • drinking straw • scissors • polystyrene tray (to contain a small amount of water and a small blob of clay to mix to a thick, creamy muddy consistency known as ‘slurry’.)

Method

1. Following discussion about pets and pet care, draw a pet face on smaller cereal box cardboard. (See facial feature suggestions on page 133.) Draw body and legs onto larger cereal box cardboard (see page 133). 2. Cut out drawn shapes. 3. On cardboard work surface, roll clay to approximately 3/4 cm thick. 4. Place templates on the clay and trace around each, cutting the clay with a craft stick using a knife cutting action. 5. Using toothbrush, mix a small amount of clay with water to form slurry. 6. Crisscross and rough up the area where the head is to be positioned, using toothbrush slurry and nail. Emphasise that it is important not to wet the clay too much or it will crack while drying out.

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Popular pets

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Name:

Date:

Popular pets Reflections 1. List materials and tools you used to make your popular pets clay ornament.

2. Circle the part of this activity you enjoyed most. drawing pet shape and detail to make template rolling the clay tracing and cutting around the legs, body and face templates

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preparing the area to join the head/face to the body

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pressing the head/face onto the body surface

3. Why did you enjoy this part most?

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etching and pressing the detail on the face using a nail and craft stick

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4. Describe the technique used to join the clay.

5. Where could you display your popular pet ornament?

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6. Using lead pencil, draw another pet you could make from clay. Add colour to your pet with coloured pencils.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Popular pets Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a popular pet ornament using a range of skills and techniques and a modelling medium.

Sa m

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

participate in class discussion about pets and their needs. make a template for pet legs/pet face.

use a rolling pin to roll clay to approximately three-quarters of a centimetre thick.

Vi

trace and cut around body, legs and head template using a craft stick. weld two pieces of clay together using rough etching and pressing with fingertips. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Torn paper mosaic design This project was inspired by the theme Pirates. The students made pictures which would be appropriate to decorate a pirate ship. The example shown is a torn paper mosaic fish design.

Three-lesson project Lesson three

Discussion points Materials • • • • • • • • • •

Lesson one Materials A4 photocopy paper lead pencil cartridge paper 30 cm x 30 cm coloured paper/metallic paper glue sticks newspaper to protect workspace

Method

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1. Using fine paintbrush, paint a craft glue circle larger than the goggle eye. 2. Sprinkle with glitter. 3. Apply glue to the back of goggle eye and gently press onto glitter eye background. 4. Set aside to dry. 5. Students complete reflection activity. 6. Teacher completes assessment record.

Sa m

• • • • • •

artwork in progress glitter craft glue paintbrush (fine) polystyrene tray (for craft glue) large goggle eye newspaper to protect workspace reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

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• What is a pirate ship? (a vessel/ship used by pirates as transport to commit acts of piracy, boarding and plundering other ships) • What designs might suit the decor of a pirate ship? (bearing in mind the likes of a pirate, the sea, rum bottles, battle weapons, booty, prizes etc.)

Method

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1. Following discussion about pirates and appropriate designs to decorate a pirate ship, and using lead pencil on A4 photocopy paper, draw a suitable design to make a torn paper mosaic. 2. Transfer design plan to cartridge paper. Emphasise light pencil drawing. 3. Commence torn paper mosaic, starting with the feature in the picture. Initially tear paper into strips and then strips into pieces. 4. Using glue stick, glue coloured paper pieces into position. Ensure edges are glued down. Set aside to dry.

Lesson two

Vi

Materials

• artwork in progress • materials required from Lesson one to complete art project • scissors/slide cutter • coloured card for mounting • craft glue for mounting • newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. Continue paper mosaic. Set aside to dry. 2. Enlist adult help to trim around the edges and mount work onto coloured card.

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Torn paper mosaic design

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Name:

Date:

Torn paper mosaic design Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your torn paper mosaic design. (Write a minimum of five items.)

2. Which part of the activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. Why did you choose the design you created?

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4. Did your picture turn out as you had planned? Give a reason for your answer.

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5. A torn paper design may be used to make many pictures. Using lead pencil, draw a design suitable for a greeting card to say ‘thank you’ to a parent helper for helping the class with an art activity. Colour your design with coloured pencils.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Torn paper mosaic design Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a torn paper mosaic using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about pirate ships and appropriate picture choice. draw a plan for a picture suitable for torn paper mosaics.

Vi

transfer plan onto cartridge paper. complete a torn paper mosaic.

complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Busy pond etching This technique may be used for patterns and pictures. Colours chosen may be theme-related; e.g. green and red to make a Christmas theme. The example shown is a picture showing the ‘busy’ nature of a pond. A focus on protecting the environment was also incorporated into this lesson.

Three-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Materials

Method

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artwork in progress A4 photocopy paper lead pencil matchstick paperclip scissors newspaper to protect workspace foil board (optional) or coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting

Sa m

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1. Using lead pencil on A4 photocopy paper, draw a busy pond scene. 2. Using arbitrary tools, transfer planned drawing by etching/ scratching black paint with a matchstick and/or paperclip. 3. Enlist adult help to mount work onto foil board and coloured card.

Lesson three

Materials

A4 cartridge paper oil pastels black acrylic paint paintbrushes (medium) polystyrene trays (for paint) newspaper to protect workspace

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

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Lesson one

Materials

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• What is an environment? (everything in one’s surroundings) • What do we find in a pond? (e.g. lily pads, water, tadpoles, frogs, fish) • What are baby frogs called? (tadpoles) • Why do you think many frogs have a greenish colour? (To blend in with their surroundings— camouflage.) • What do frogs eat? (Small fish and insects— mosquitoes, dragonflies etc.) • What noise does a frog make? (croak) Ponds are busy with wildlife—mini beasts buzzing through the air, insects, small fish etc. • What is pollution? (damaging the air, land or water with dangerous substances) • What can we do to stop ponds from becoming polluted? (Put rubbish in the bin; if we see rubbish near a pond, ask Mum or Dad if we can put it in the bin.)

Method

1. Following discussion about busy pond environments and inhabitants and using oil pastels, colour with solid colour in stripes over one side of the A4 cartridge paper. Emphasise solid colouring. 2. Using medium paintbrush and black acrylic paint, paint over coloured page. Set aside to dry.

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Busy pond etching

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Name:

Date:

Busy pond etching Reflections 1. List the materials, mediums and tools you used to make your busy pond etching.

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2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

Sa m

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3. List the living things you included in your busy pond etching.

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4. List the instructions a person would need to be able to complete this activity.

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5. Using lead pencil, draw a scene which you would like to etch into a prepared surface.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Busy pond etching Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make an oil pastel etching featuring a busy pond scene, using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

ew in

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

The student is able to:

Vi

participate in discussion about environments, the inhabitants of ponds and ways to reduce pollution in natural environments. demonstrate colouring with strong, solid colour using oil pastels. demonstrate painting with brush and acrylic paint. draw a plan of a busy pond picture. demonstrate etching using arbitrary tools. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Terrace city scape This project may be incorporated into an environmental theme—in particular, destruction of animal habitats by humans when building homes. Terrace homes take up less space than free-standing homes, so are a more environmentally-friendly design. This project is a good introduction to a 3-D design project about conserving and re-using resources when building houses.

Two-lesson project Discussion points

Lesson two

Materials lead pencil A4 photocopy paper A3 black card metallic acrylic paint (gold, silver, copper) cereal box card flat-ended pencil scissors silver foil board black mounting paper/card craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

Method

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1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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• • • • • • • • • • •

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

g

Lesson one

Materials

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Stimulus pictures of terraced buildings (if available). • What are terraced buildings? (a series of two storey or higher buildings with at least one common wall) Terraced buildings are built to save space. Buildings with several storeys save land space. • What are terraced buildings used for? (offices, housing—flats, townhouses) In many countries there has been a recent increase in inner-city dwelling. By their very design, common-wall dwellings use less land.

Method

Vi

1. Following discussion about terrace buildings, and using lead pencil on A4 photocopy paper in landscape position, draw a plan of a row of terrace buildings. Include a printed pebble footpath and garden. 2. Using the plan as a guide, cut card scrapers from cereal box card to make a picture on A3 black card. 3. Starting with the buildings, commence dipping card edges into metallic paint and dragging the paint across the page. Press lightly to allow some of the paint to remain on the card. Add smaller details like windows and doors using the same techniques. 4. To print pebbled footpath, use the flat end of a pencil. 5. Garden is made by dipping the edge of card into paint and printing stems and leaves. Flowers are printed with the end of a pencil. Set aside to dry. 6. Enlist adult help to mount work.

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Terrace city scape

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Name:

Date:

Terrace city scape Reflections 1. Why are terrace buildings built?

2. Did you follow the plan you made? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? (Give a reason for your answer.)

Give a reason for your answer.

Sa m

4. Were you satisfied with the result you achieved by scraping paint to create a picture of terrace buildings?

Yes

No

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5. Paint scraping can be used to make pictures of a variety of buildings. Using lead pencil, draw a design of a different building which could be made using the paint scraping technique. Use coloured pencils to colour your design.

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02/04/2007 10:56:55 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Terrace city scape Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to create a terrace city scape using a range of skills, techniques and materials.

Sa m

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

participate in class discussion about terrace buildings. draw a plan of terrace buildings.

demonstrate paint scraping with card.

Vi

demonstrate paint printing with arbitrary tools. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Paper creations This project was inspired by the topic Recycling. The children had been exposed to the different forms of recycling and had been investigating ways to reduce wastage of precious natural resources. As the culmination of the recycling learning activities, this art piece was completed using paper offcuts from past lessons, including discarded paintings. The maths areas of measuring and ruling are integrated into this activity. This project is quick, easy and effective and adds instant colour to the classroom.

Two-lesson project Discussion points

Lesson two

Lesson one Materials

Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method

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1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Sa m

• What is recycling? (reusing products, especially natural resources, by repeated use or reprocessing) • What can we do to recycle at home? (Ensure that we correctly dispose of recyclable materials; e.g. recycling bins and outlets; Wherever possible , return organic materials to the earth; e.g. turning vegetable matter into compost; avoid wasting paper.) Recycling paper products to make art projects can be very effective. (Display a paper construction using paper offcuts. See example shown.) Discuss plaids, and horizontal, vertical and diagonal designs. (Demonstrate examples of these.)

Vi

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• A3 black card • coloured card and paper offcuts (may include wrapping paper scraps, corrugated card, metallic paper etc.) • lead pencil • ruler • scissors • glue stick • hot glue gun (optional) • coloured card for mounting • craft glue for mounting • newspaper to protect workspace

Method

1. Following discussion about recycling, demonstrate plaids, diagonals, verticals, folds, loops and circles and how to glue these to flat paper. 2. Children commence their paper creation design/picture by measuring and ruling and cutting strips of paper. Build design/picture as they go. Emphasise measuring and ruling accuracy. 3. Glue stick may be used to fasten 3-D additions onto A3 black card; however, for more durability, use hot glue gun. 4. Trim neatly around the edge of the background. 5. Enlist adult help to assist with hot glue guns if these are available and to mount work onto coloured card.

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Paper creations

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Name:

Date:

Paper creations Reflections 1. Circle the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your paper creations design. wrapping paper

glue stick

corrugated card

coloured paper

scissors

lead pencil

coloured card

discarded painting

metallic paper

coloured pencils Others

Sa m

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2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. List three reasons why it is important to recycle.

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4. List five items you recycle at home.

5. Draw a greeting card featuring a paper creation design. Colour your design with coloured pencils.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Paper creations Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

Assessment key

e

Task The students were instructed to make a paper creation picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Sa m

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

ew in

participate in class discussion about recycling and ways of using paper strips. measure and rule paper strips with accuracy. cut out ruled paper strips with accuracy.

Vi

arrange paper and card strips into stripes, folds and twists on black card background. glue paper and card arrangement into place. trim around the edge of black card background. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

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Printed flowers This lesson was inspired by the theme Spring. Flowers may be related to a wide range of themes; e.g. Celebrations, Seasons and Colour.

Two-lesson project Method

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1. Following discussion about flowers, their characteristics and uses, draw a tulip-like flower shape onto cereal box card or strawboard offcuts. 2. Cut out shape and apply a handle-like blob of poster putty to one side of the card. 3. Experiment with flower printing on A4 photocopy paper. Lightly press cardboard flower shape into paint and press onto page and lift. 4. Using cardboard offcuts, slightly bent, print edges to make stems and leaves of flowers. 5. Cut a cardboard offcut to a suitable size to scrape paint to make a striped vase. Practise scraping using metallic paint (to paint striped vase, see example). 6. Commence printed flower and vase arrangement on coloured card. 7. Set work aside to dry. 8. Enlist adult help to mount background onto coloured card.

Sa m

Photos/posters of flowers will inspire discussion. • In what season of the year do most flowers bloom? (spring) • Where do most plants with flowers grow? (in sunny places) • What flowers have you noticed in gardens? (this will vary, depending on locality.) Some flowers grow directly from seeds, others from bulbs. (Many spring annuals grow from bulbs. These include tulips, daffodils, crocuses, hyacinths and narcissuses, to name a few.) • What colours are the blooms you have seen? • Do petals have colour variations? • What is it about flowers people like? (their beauty, scent, brightly coloured, they attract insects and birds) • What do we use flowers for? (add colour to enhance our surroundings, enjoy in the garden, gifts.) • Why do we cut flowers? • Where do we put them to admire? (to decorate our home, in a vase.) • Who likes to receive flowers as a gift? (Mum, Nana, Grandma, Aunty etc.) Flowers are given as gifts for many reasons. What are some of the reasons we give gifts of appreciation? (To say we love someone; to say thank you; to say congratulations; to celebrate an occasion such as a birthday.)

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Discussion points

Lesson two

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Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Vi

Lesson one

Materials • • • • • • • • • • • • •

82

A3 coloured card A4 photocopy paper cereal box card and/or strawboard offcuts poster putty scissors acrylic paint—variety of colours including black and green metallic acrylic paint (gold, silver, copper) polystyrene tray (for paint) newspaper to protect workspace black card for mounting coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting lead pencil

Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:21 AM


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Printed owers

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Name:

Date:

Printed owers Reflections

Sa m

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1. Using lead pencil, draw a picture of the printed flower arrangement you made. Label your drawing with the mediums, materials and tools you used to make each part.

2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. List three reasons why we cut flowers.

Vi

4. Many flower shapes could be printed using the cardboard shape printing technique. Draw different cardboard shapes you could use to print another arrangement of flowers.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Printed flowers Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Sa m

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a printed flower arrangement using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

g

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about flowers, their beauty and uses. experiment with printing with cardboard offcuts.

Vi

print an arrangement of flowers in a vase using cardboard offcuts. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Smudged colour hibiscus This project was inspired by some hibiscus flowers a child brought in for the teacher. The children drew the flowers and, using oil pastels, true-to-life colour blending was achieved.

Two-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Materials A4 cartridge paper lead pencil eraser oil pastels brilliant blue Edicol™ or vegetable dye paintbrushes (medium and fine) newspaper to protect workspace coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting

artwork in progress fine black marker newspaper to protect workspace reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

Method

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1. Using fine black marker, draw detail: stamen column, anthers and petals, if desired. 2. Students complete reflection activity. 3. Teacher completes assessment record.

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• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

g

Lesson one

Materials

Sa m

Stimulus pictures of colourful hibiscus, or imitation or real hibiscus flowers. • What do you notice about the centres of the flower? (The colours blend from dark to light from the centre to the outer edge of the petals.) • What are the parts of the flower? Discuss various parts, drawing a diagram on the board if desired. (petals/corolla, stamen column, anthers, sepals) Hibiscus flowers are bright and colourful and are seen in many countries as they are very climate-tolerant. • What art pieces could we decorate with hibiscus flowers? (Greeting cards, crockery, as a background for insect pictures, borders, as a hair feature in a portrait etc.)

Method

Vi

1. Following discussion about hibiscus flowers, and using lead pencil, commence step-by-step drawing of a hibiscus flower. 2. Draw two more hibiscus flowers. 3. Erase invalid pencil lines. 4. Commence colouring using oil pastels, shading from the centre outwards (as shown). 5. Gently smudge colour from the centre outwards, using index finger. 6. Using green oil pastels, draw leaves in the background. 7. Colour with strong, solid lines and, using index finger, gently smudge to blend colour tones. 8. Paint blue dye around the petals. Set aside to dry. 9. Enlist adult help to mount work onto coloured card.

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Smudged colour hibiscus

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Name:

Date:

Smudged colour hibiscus Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your smudged colour hibiscus flowers. (Write at least six items.)

2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. Draw a hibiscus flower and label your drawing.

Vi

4. Drawings of hibiscus flowers may be used for decorating a variety of art pieces. List, draw and colour three art pieces which could be decorated with hibiscus flowers.

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02/04/2007 10:57:30 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Smudged colour hibiscus Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

pl

e

Task The students were instructed to make a hibiscus flower picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

Sa m

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

ew in

The student is able to:

g

Criteria

participate in discussion about the hibiscus flower, its characteristics and its decorative possibilities. demonstrate solid colouring using oil pastels.

demonstrate the technique of smudging oil pastels.

Vi

paint with dye.

add detail to finished colouring and painting using fine black marker. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:31 AM


‘Afro’-look characters This project was inspired by a writing activity, Weird and wonderful people. The children were working on descriptions using adjectives which painted an imaginary picture of a character.

Three-lesson project Discussion points

Lesson two

• How do descriptions help us to imagine what a character looks like? (detail, colouring, age etc.) • What might a happy friendly person look like? (smiling, wild colourful hair and clothes) • What might a businessman look like? (a plain coloured suit, neat, normal-coloured hair, a quiet smile) • What might a clever scientist look like? (woolly hair, brightly-coloured glasses, bow tie) Of course, these descriptions are not necessarily accurate! We have a general idea in our mind of what people may look like from movies, books etc. We have formed images in our imagination. It is important to remember that just because a person looks friendly, it doesn’t necessarily mean he/she is. Untrustworthy people don’t necessarily look strange. Over the years, hairstyles and changes in fashion have changed people’s appearances greatly, an example being the era of the ‘afro’. Afro hairstyles were very popular in the 70s. People with tight, curly hair grew it so that their head looked really large, with their hair sticking straight out. Today, few people grow their hair in an afro style.

Materials

Lesson one

Materials

• • • • • • •

artwork in progress acrylic paint polystyrene trays (for paint) paintbrush (fine) flat-ended pencil permanent black marker newspaper to protect workspace

Method Using white acrylic paint, print the eyes with fingerprints. Print iris using flat end of a pencil. Print pupil using the handle end of a fine paintbrush. Nose can be any object (marker pen lid, fingerprint etc.) dipped into acrylic paint and printed on appropriate area. 5. Paint mouth using a fine brush. 6. Ears may be added by dipping 1/2 the end of a permanent black marker in the paint and printing a semicircle. 7. Detail may be added using a fine paintbrush; e.g. beard, eyebrows, glasses. Set aside to dry.

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1. 2. 3. 4.

A3 cartridge paper acrylic paints (variety of colours including a flesh colour) teaspoons large round potatoes (cut in half) matchsticks polystyrene trays (for paint) newspaper to protect workspace craft glue for mounting card for mounting

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• • • • • • • • •

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Materials

Lesson three

Method

• • • • • •

artwork in progress oil pastels newspaper to protect workspace reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

Method 1. Using oil pastels, add colour to background by colouring solid lines in one direction. 2. Students complete reflection activity. 3. Teacher completes assessment record.

1. Following discussion about descriptions of people, potato print five flesh-coloured faces (spaced out) on A3 cartridge paper in landscape position. 2. Using squeeze bottles or a spoon, drop small blobs of paint along hairline (three colours in a row). 3. Using a matchstick, drag paint in an outward direction. Set aside to dry. 4. Enlist adult help to mount work before Lesson two.

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02/04/2007 10:57:32 AM


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‘Afro’-look characters

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

6591RB Prim Art F (82-101).indd 91

Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:36 AM


Name:

Date:

‘Afro’-look characters Reflections 1. Using lead pencil, draw one of the afrolook characters you painted. Next to each detail, label your picture with the tools and materials you used to create it.

3. Why is it important to remember not to judge people by their appearance?

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4. Using lead pencil, draw yourself with an afro hairdo. Colour your drawing with coloured pencils. Write a sentence, using three adjectives, to describe your new look afro hairstyle.

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2. Which part of the activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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02/04/2007 10:57:36 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

‘Afro’-look characters Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a picture of ‘afro’-look characters using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

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Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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The student is able to:

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Criteria

participate in class discussion about character descriptions, afro hairstyles and stranger danger. use acrylic paint to paint five potato shapes onto cartridge paper. demonstrate paint dragging using blobs of coloured acrylic paint and a matchstick.

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demonstrate paint printing using arbitrary tools. demonstrate strong, solid colouring using oil pastels. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:38 AM


Many hands make light work This activity was inspired by a saying used to encourage children to help with the more arduous chores associated with life in the classroom; e.g. handing out worksheets, collecting dictionaries, emptying bins etc. A focus was placed on recycling and reusing discarded art pieces and left over wrapping and metallic paper. The children had been exposed to the different methods of recycling available to reduce wastage of precious natural resources.

Two-lesson project Discussion points

Method

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1. Following discussion about ‘Many hands make light work’ and recycling, commence tracing hands onto the back of available paper. (Seven hands work well on A3 mounted paper.) 2. Arrange hands into position and, using glue stick generously, glue into place. (Bend hands slightly to create a 3-D effect.) 3. Set aside to dry.

Lesson two

Materials

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During the week leading up to this lesson, children were encouraged to bring in scrap wrapping paper from home. • What does the saying ‘many hands make light work’ mean? (When lots of people help to complete a task—e.g. cleaning up at the end of an art lesson—we share the workload.) We use our hands to express ourselves in many ways. Can you name examples? (waving hello, goodbye and to gain someone’s attention, to sign unspoken language, to give and receive, to show animation when telling a story or talking to someone, to hold someone—hug, stroke etc.) • What is recycling? (Reusing products, especially natural resources, by repeated use or reprocessing.) • What can we do to recycle at home? (Ensure that we correctly dispose of recyclable materials; e.g. recycling bins and outlets. Wherever possible, return organic material to the earth; e.g. turning vegetable matter into compost. Avoid wasting paper.) Reusing paper products to make art projects can be a very effective method of recycling.

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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Method

Lesson one

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Before commencement of lesson, enlist adult assistance to mount A3 black card onto foil board and coloured card.

Materials • • • • • • • • • • •

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A3 black card foil card and coloured card for mounting work craft glue for mounting coloured paper wrapping paper metallic paper painted paper—discarded artwork, if available glue stick lead pencil scissors newspaper to protect workspace

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:57:38 AM


e pl Sa m g ew in Vi

Many hands make light work

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:42 AM


Name:

Date:

Many hands make light work Reflections 1. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. List the types of paper you used for this project.

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2. In your own words, describe the meaning of the saying: ‘Many hands make light work’.

4. We use our hands to express ourself in many different ways.

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Using lead pencil, draw a picture of you using your hands to express yourself in some way. Colour your drawing with coloured pencils.

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Describe what you are doing in your drawing.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:57:42 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Many hands make light work Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a 3-D hands scene using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

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Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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The student is able to:

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Criteria

participate in discussion about the saying ‘Many hands make light work’, how we express ourself with our hands and recycling. trace hands onto the back of available paper.

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cut out hand shapes along traced outlines. arrange paper and shapes onto background. glue paper hand shapes into position on the background. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:43 AM


‘The great outdoors’ tissue paper collage This lesson can be related to any theme—the guidelines change according to the topic. The theme for the example shown was The great outdoors. The children chose to create pictures of their favourite outdoor places. Some children chose the beach, others chose their garden. The example shown is ‘The beach’.

Two-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points

Lesson one Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method

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1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

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A4 photocopy paper A3 cartridge paper craft glue diluted 3/4 glue to 1/4 water polystyrene trays (for craft glue) tissue paper sheets (variety of colours) glue brushes lead pencil newspaper to protect workspace craft glue (not diluted) for mounting coloured card for mounting cutter or scissors for trimming the edges of work in readiness for mounting.

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• • • • • • • • • • •

Materials

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• Where is your favourite outdoor place? (list places on board.) • What things can you see at these places? (trees, the beach, flowers etc; go through examples discussing characteristics of each) Think about the colours you will need to make your picture. • How can we protect/look after our favourite outdoor place to prevent people damaging the area? (Depending on location, answers will vary; however all will have a similar message: The less impact humans have on the environment, the better for that environment.)

Method

1. Following discussion about favourite outdoor places, and prevention of negative human impact on them, children decide on a scene to create using torn tissue collage. 2. With lead pencil, draw a plan on A4 photocopy paper of the scene to be made from torn tissue paper. 3. Brush paint diluted glue onto a small area of A3 cartridge paper. Tear tissue and commence overlay by laying a piece of tissue onto painted glue and brushing over the tissue to smooth it. Emphasise smooth edges. Continue making picture by overlaying more torn tissue paper. 4. Set aside to dry. 5. Enlist adult help to trim and mount pictures onto coloured card.

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:57:44 AM


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‘The great outdoors’ tissue paper collage

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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Name:

Date:

‘The great outdoors’ tissue paper collage Reflections 1. Which part of the activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

2. List the tools and materials you used for this project.

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3. What place did you feature in your great outdoors tissue collage? Give a reason for your choice.

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4. List three things visitors to your favourite outdoor place could do to prevent a negative human impact on the environment.

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5. Tissue paper collage can be used to create a variety of pictures. Using lead pencil, draw another scene which could be created using tissue paper collage. Colour the drawing to indicate your colour choices.

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:57:48 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

‘The great outdoors’ tissue paper collage Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Assessment key

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Task The students were instructed to make a great outdoors tissue paper collage using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

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✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

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The student is able to:

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participate in class discussion about a favourite place outdoors and how to prevent negative human impact on the environment. draw a plan of a favourite outdoor place.

demonstrate brushing edges down while making a tissue overlay.

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complete making a tissue paper overlay picture. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:57:49 AM


Musical instruments This project was inspired by the theme Music. The children had been studying different music categories and were asked to bring in any instruments they played. A range of instruments is often available from the music room in most schools or may be borrowed from a local secondary school.

Four-lesson project • lead pencil • permanent black marker • newspaper to protect workspace

Discussion points

Lesson one

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• A4 cartridge paper • minimum of three instruments (woodwind, percussion, brass etc.) • lead pencil/eraser • permanent black marker • fine black marker • newspaper to protect workspace

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Method

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1. Make a black frame by gluing the ends of the paper strips to form a square (as shown in example). 2. Move the frame around on the drawn picture to locate a favourite part of the picture. This is called ‘sectioning’. 3. Using lead pencil, draw only the framed section on A3 cartridge paper, enlarging all detail. 4. Trace with permanent black marker. 5. Detail is to be added with fine black marker when the picture is painted and dried.

Lesson three

Materials • • • • • •

1. Before lesson commences, arrange instruments in the middle of the room so that when the children are seated, everyone can see the arrangement of instruments. (If room is a problem, clear the area of furniture; the instruments can be arranged on the floor and the children can sit in a circle on the floor around them.) 2. Following discussion about instruments and using lead pencil, children are to draw what they can see on A4 cartridge paper. 3. Go over drawing with a permanent black marker and/or fine black marker.

Lesson two

artwork in progress acrylic paint paintbrushes (fine and medium) coloured card to mount work craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace

Method

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Materials

Method

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Actual musical instruments are required as the objects children will be drawing. These will also inspire meaningful discussion. • What classes of musical instruments are there? (percussion, woodwind, string, brass) • Which instruments will we find in the brass section? (trumpet, saxophone, tuba, bugle, trombone, French horn) • Which instruments will we find in the percussion section? (drums, xylophone, bongos, castanets, tambourine, triangle, bells, cymbals, piano, washboard) • Which instruments will we find in the woodwind section? (clarinet, bass clarinet, flute, piccolo, oboe, bassoon, cor anglais) • What kind of music have you heard these instruments play? (classical, jazz, rock and roll etc.)

1. Paint picture using acrylic paint. 2. Set work aside to dry. 3. Enlist adult help to mount pictures.

Lesson four Materials • • • • • •

artwork in progress fine black maker permanent black marker reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

Method 1. Using thick and fine black markers, go over detail on painted picture as required. 2. Students complete reflection activity. 3. Teacher completes assessment record.

Materials • • • •

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artwork in progress A3 cartridge paper black paper strips, 4 per child (2 cm x 10 cm) glue stick

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:09 AM


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Musical instruments

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Name:

Date:

Musical instruments Reflections 1. List the tools and materials you used to make this sectioned drawing project.

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2. List four categories of instruments.

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3. Which instruments are the main focus in your drawing/picture? Next to each instrument, list the category from which it comes; e.g. woodwind.

4. Are you pleased with your finished picture?

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Give a reason for your answer.

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5. Design a CD cover/jacket for music being played on your favourite instrument using a different section of your drawing as the focus.

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:17 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Musical instruments Task assessment

Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a ‘sectioned musical instrument’ drawing/picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials

Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

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● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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Criteria

The student is able to:

participate in class discussion about musical instruments. draw an arrangement of musical instruments.

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trace over drawing using thick and fine black markers. make a cardboard frame. use the cardboard frame to section a favourite part of their drawing. enlarge the sectioned part of their picture onto A3 cartridge paper. trace drawing using permanent black marker. paint enlarged drawing using acrylic paint. go over detail using permanent and fine black markers. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:58:18 AM


Everybody’s going surfing This project was inspired by the theme The beach. Sun safety was incorporated into the discussion, relating to good health practices. Any version of the song ‘Surfin’ safari’ is a great inspiration for this project. Drama was included in preparation for drawing as a focus is placed on the body movement required for each beach activity.

Three-lesson project Discussion points

Lesson two

Lesson one

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• A4 photocopy paper • A3 cartridge paper • acrylic paint (light and dark blue, white, black and orange) • sponges • paintbrushes (flat, coarse-bristled and fine) • polystyrene trays (for paint) • lead pencil • newspaper to protect workspace • coloured card for mounting • craft glue for mounting

Method

1. Following discussion about summer, the beach and beach activities, and using lead pencil on A4 paper, draw a plan of the beach scene students wish to make. (Include a sketch of the sea and the techniques they will use to make it, as well as people featured surfing, bodyboarding, playing with a ball etc.) 2. With A3 cartridge paper in landscape position, commence sponge painting the sky and foreground sea, using ‘pat and lift’ technique. 3. Using paintbrush, brush waves using a curved movement to create a texture which looks like a wave in motion. 4. Using a fine paintbrush, paint seagulls in flight. 5. Lightly sponge white sea foam where the waves are breaking. Set aside to dry. 6. Enlist adult assistance to mount work before Lesson two.

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artwork in progress cartridge paper scraps prepared surfboard template (if desired) (page 134) lead pencil wax crayons oil pastels fine black marker polystyrene trays for surfboards and bodyboards scissors glue stick hot glue gun packaging card craft glue paintbrush (fine) glitter (blue) newspaper to protect workspace

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Method

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Materials

Materials

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• In which season are we most likely to go to the beach? (summer) • What do you do at the beach? (swim, play games, play with a ball, make sandcastles, ride a bodyboard, surf etc.) • What actions are needed to do the variety of beach activities discussed? Ask children to pose in different positions to demonstrate stances for different movements. (Note position of arms, legs, feet etc.) • What should we wear while we are at the beach—or anywhere when we are in the sun? (Sun-protective clothing, sunscreen, sunglasses and a hat.) When planning your picture, plan to use at least three colouring mediums and techniques. Demonstrate painting textures, sponging—for the sky and foreground of the sea—brush strokes to create a wavelike texture. A flat brush with coarse bristles works best for this texture.

1. On cartridge paper scraps, and using lead pencil, draw people participating in various activities at the beach (depicting various stances). 2. Colour people with wax crayons and/or oil pastels, using strong, solid colour. 3. Draw in detail using fine black marker. Cut out figures. 4. Draw surfboards and bodyboards on polystyrene tray and cut out. (These may be traced using a prepared template page 134.) 5. Using hot glue gun, glue polystyrene boards into position on background. 6. Cut small pieces of packaging card, and hot glue these to the back of people riding the boards. 7. Position people and hot glue packaging card onto background, so that the people are lifted from the page in a 3-D effect. 8. If a beach ball is required, repeat the process so that the ball is lifted from the page. 9. Enhance detail by painting craft glue with a fine brush and sprinkling with blue glitter (water ripple and splashing detail). 10. Using glue stick, glue people standing in the water onto background.

Lesson three Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

Method 1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record. R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:18 AM


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Everybody’s going surfing

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02/04/2007 10:58:22 AM


Name:

Date:

Everybody’s going surfing Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your seaside picture.

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2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. List four items which may help to protect you from the sun.

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4. List three techniques you used to make your ‘Everybody’s going surfing’ picture.

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5. Using lead pencil, draw yourself wearing sun-protective clothing at the beach. Colour your picture with coloured pencils. Label everything you are wearing for sun protection.

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6. List two things you can do to reduce the negative impact humans can have on a beach environment. �

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02/04/2007 10:58:23 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Everybody’s going surfing Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a beach and surfing scene using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

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Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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The student is able to:

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Criteria

participate in class discussion about the beach, beach activities and sun safety. draw a plan of a surfing scene.

demonstrate sponge painting using ‘pat and lift’ technique.

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demonstrate painting with a brush to create a curved, textured, wave-like appearance. demonstrate painting with a fine brush. add detail to a picture using a range of colouring mediums and techniques. build a picture by positioning and gluing figures and shapes. enhance detail by painting craft glue and sprinkling glitter. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Primary art

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02/04/2007 10:58:24 AM


Onion skin overlay fish This activity was inspired by the theme Recycling. The use of onion skins as a decorative colouring material encouraged children to look for other recyclable materials in their homes, which could be used for various activities. In the example shown, a wine bottle cork has been used for the eye.

Three-lesson project Lesson two

Discussion points Materials

Materials

Method

1. Turn fish over and trim rough edges around the fish shape. 2. Cut green card into long, thin triangles. 3. Using glue stick, glue these onto backing card, to represent seaweed. 4. Using permanent black marker, draw eye detail on cork. 5. Using craft glue, glue eye into position. Set aside to dry.

Lesson three

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1. Following discussion about fish—scales, tails and colours—trace prepared fish template onto cereal box card. 2. Using scissors, cut out the shape. 3. Commence tearing pieces of onion skin. 4. Starting at the base of the tail and working towards the head, brush the fish shape liberally with craft glue and press a piece of onion skin into position. Brush craft glue onto adhered skin and continue layers (include fins). 5. Tear longer pieces of skin for the tail. 6. Set aside to dry.

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Method

enlist adult assistance to mount card before Lesson one dark blue card (16 cm x 16 cm) gold card (17 cm x 17 cm) black card (21 cm x 21 cm) cereal box card (15 cm x 15 cm) collected onion skins craft glue paintbrush (fine) newspaper to protect workspace prepared fish template (page 134) scissors lead pencil

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• • • • • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress scissors glue stick craft glue paintbrush (fine) craft knife wine bottle cork (sliced 5 mm thick, one piece per child) permanent black marker newspaper to protect workspace green card

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Lesson one

• • • • • • • • • •

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In the weeks leading up to this lesson, encourage children to bring in onion skins. Stimulus pictures of goldfish, if available, will be an asset. • What covers a goldfish? (scales) • What do you notice about the scales? (bright and colourful, shimmering) • What do you notice about the tail? (it doesn’t have scales; long and flowing.) • What covers an onion? (gold/bronze, flaky skin) • We are going to use onion to represent the scales on a fish. What could we recycle to make an eye? (Discuss suggestions and include slice from a wine bottle cork.)

Materials • • • • • • •

artwork in progress craft glue paintbrush (fine) glitter (silver and blue) reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils

Method 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Using craft glue and fine brush, paint bubbles onto page. Sprinkle with silver glitter. Paint eye pupil with craft glue. Sprinkle with blue glitter. Set aside to dry. Students complete reflection activity. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:24 AM


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Onion skin overlay ďŹ sh

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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02/04/2007 10:58:27 AM


Name:

Date:

Onion skin overlay ďŹ sh Reflections 1. Which part of the activity did you enjoy most? Give a reason for your answer.

2. Circle the equipment you used to make your onion skin overlay fish picture. oil pastels

glue stick

paintbrushes

wax crayons

coloured card

craft glue

lead pencil

permanent black marker

feathers

onion skin

metallic paper

glitter

coloured paper

cork

dye a coin

ďŹ sh template

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wool

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scissors

chalk pastels

cereal box card

3. Which materials were recycled in this project?

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4. Name two other living things which could be covered with onion skins to make an effective scale representation.

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5. Using lead pencil, draw the two animals. Colour your pictures with coloured pencils.

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02/04/2007 10:58:28 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Onion skin overlay fish Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

Assessment key

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Task The students were instructed to make a picture of a fish with onion skin scales, using a wide range of skills, techniques and materials.

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

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✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

The student is able to:

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participate in class discussion about goldfish and their characteristics, and recycling.

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trace a fish template onto cereal box card. cut out traced fish shape.

tear onion skin into workable pieces.

position and glue onion skin in an overlay formation onto fish-shaped card.

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trim the rough edges around the fish.

cut long, thin card triangles to make card seaweed. glue seaweed onto background card. glue fish into position on background card. draw eye detail onto cork using permanent black marker. glue eye into position on fish. add glitter enhancement with craft glue, fine brush and glitter. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

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Purple haze butterflies This activity was inspired by the theme Colour, with a focus on ‘textures’. A single colour was chosen and an illusion of textures was created through a range of painting techniques. Any colour may be chosen and any design repeated in a variety of sizes. Two-dimensional designs also look effective.

Three-lesson project

Lesson one Materials

Method 1. Following discussion about colours, demonstrate a range of painting techniques which create ‘texture’. Choose a colour and lightly sponge paint background onto A3 cartridge paper. (Emphasise ‘pat and lift’ technique. No dragging.)

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1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Painting techniques Using a flat-bristled paintbrush, paint using short strokes, varying directions.

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Lesson two Materials

• artwork in progress • prepared butterfly templates (page 135) (optional) • lead pencil • glue guns • craft glue • glitter glue, paintbrush (fine) and glitter or fine black marker • newspaper to protect workspace • scissors

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• A3 cartridge paper • A4 cartridge paper (2 sheets per child) • acrylic paint (variety of colours including silver/gold) • sponges (blocks for sponging) • strawboard/cereal box card. (small pieces approx. 8 cm x 8 cm) • paintbrushes (thick, medium, fine and flat-bristled) • polystyrene trays (for paint) • newspaper to protect workspace • black card for mounting • foil board for mounting • craft glue for mounting

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Method

Paint an area of thick colour then scratch/etch into it with the handle of a fine paintbrush.

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The colour wheel showing primary, secondary and tertiary colours is useful to inspire colour choice. • Which colours are the primary colours? (red, blue and yellow) • Which colours are the secondary colours? (purple, orange, green) • Which colours are the tertiary colours? (mixture of primary and secondary colours – red/orange, yellow/orange, yellow/green, blue/green, blue/purple, red/purple. It is important to demonstrate and discuss a range of techniques to create illusions of texture. Draw on the children’s knowledge/ experiences gained during previous art projects. See the sidebar for examples.

• lead pencil • coloured pencils

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2. Using the edge of a piece of cereal box or strawboard print a twig-like design (see example). 3. Lightly sponge with silver or gold. Set aside to dry. 4. Fold both sheets of A4 paper in half width-wise. 5. Using thick paintbrush, paint over the surfaces of the sheets of A4 paper and commence making textures. 6. Continue this process. Use a different texture design on each 1/2 sheet. 7. Set aside to dry. 8. Enlist adult help to mount sponged and printed background onto black card and foil board before Lesson two.

Discussion points

Method Children may draw their own butterfly shapes or use the photocopy of the butterfly shape to make a template (page 135). 1. Using lead pencil, trace butterfly shape onto painted textures. (Trace one size twice to make up five.) 2. Cut out butterfly shapes. Fold in half and position and hot glue butterflies onto background. 3. Draw body and antennae using fine black marker, glitter glue or craft glue, fine paintbrush and glitter. Set aside to dry.

Cut notches into a piece of cereal box or strawboard. Scrape card across a painted area to make lines or curves.

Lesson three Materials • reflection and assessment photocopies R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:30 AM


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Purple haze butteries

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Name:

Date:

Purple haze butterflies Reflections 1. What are tertiary colours?

2. Name three tertiary colours.

Give a reason for your answer.

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3. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most?

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4. List three techniques you used to make ‘texture’ paintings.

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5. Using pencils, draw and colour five different painted textures. Next to each, name and draw the equipment you could use to create the effect.

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Purple haze butterflies Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Task The students were instructed to make a single-colour textured painting picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials.

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Assessment key

✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion) ✘

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown)

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The student is able to:

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Criteria

participate in discussion about colour and texture effects in painting. sponge paint a background.

print detail using the edge of a piece of card and acrylic paint.

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paint textures using at least three techniques. draw or trace butterfly shapes. arrange and glue butterfly shapes onto background. add detail to picture using available resources. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Caught in movement This project was inspired by the theme Sport. Sun safety was incorporated into the discussion, relating to good health practices. Drama was included in preparation for drawing, as a focus is placed on the body movement required for each sports activity.

Three-lesson project Discussion points

Lesson two Materials • • • • • • • • •

artwork in progress (photocopies) oil pastels Edicol™ or vegetable dye (variety of colours) paintbrush (medium) scissors coloured card for mounting craft glue for mounting newspaper to protect workspace A3 cartridge paper

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Method

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1. With A3 cartridge paper in portrait position, to create an illusion of distance, using a single colour, draw oil pastel stripes with a backwards and forwards line colouring technique. Start with widest stripe and gradually decrease the size as you progress to the top of the page. Leave a gap between stripes. Emphasise strong, solid colouring. 2. Choose a contrasting colour of oil pastel and edge stripes by again using the back and forth colouring technique. Widest stripe has widest edging and decrease for each width stripe accordingly. 3. Paint remaining gaps with dye. Set aside to dry. Commence cutting out photocopies of ‘You in motion’. Emphasise very careful cutting out, avoiding cutting off the outline. 4. Enlist adult assistance to mount background onto coloured card before Lesson three.

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• What leisure activities do you participate in which require physical movement? (List sports and leisure activities in which children participate on the board.) • Is your favourite leisure activity seasonal or can you participate all year round? (cricket is a summer sport, dancing and gymnastics run throughout the year, water polo has a summer and winter competition) • What equipment is required to participate in your favourite leisure activity? (tennis racket, football, hockey stick) • What actions are needed to participate in the physical movement activities we have discussed? Ask children to pose in different positions to demonstrate stances for the different movements. (Note position of arms, legs, feet etc.) • Many sporting activities are played outdoors. What should you wear while participating in outdoor leisure activities or anywhere when you are in the sun? (sun-protective clothing, sunscreen, hat, sunglasses) • How can we create depth/distance in a picture? (Make objects in the foreground bigger and increasingly reduce size as objects are further away.) This may be demonstrated with a quick drawing on the board of a basic landscape showing trees in the foreground to be much bigger than trees in the background.

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Lesson one

A photocopier is required to complete this activity.

Materials • • • •

A4 photocopy paper lead pencil/eraser fine black marker newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. Following discussion about leisure activities which require physical movement and sun safety practices, and using lead pencil, draw yourself on A4 paper in an action position which is typical of your favourite physical leisure activity. 2. When satisfied with their drawing, students go over lines with fine black marker. Erase unwanted lines. 3. Enlist adult assistance to photocopy original at full size and then reduce by 20% and then 40% before Lesson two.

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Lesson three Materials • • • • • •

artwork in progress glue stick reflection and assessment photocopies lead pencil coloured pencils newspaper to protect workspace

Method 1. Using glue stick, glue the three different size pictures onto the background, largest to smallest, to create an illusion of distance. 2. Students complete reflection activity. 3. Teacher completes assessment record.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:37 AM


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Caught in movement

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Name:

Date:

Caught in movement Reflections 1. List the mediums, materials and tools you used to make your ‘caught in movement’ picture.

2. Which part of this activity did you enjoy most?

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Give a reason for your answer.

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3. List four items which may help to protect 5. Using lead pencil, draw yourself participating in another physical you from the sun. movement activity. Ensure you are wearing sun-protective clothing. Colour your picture with coloured pencils. Label everything you are wearing for sun protection.

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4. How did you create depth/distance in your picture?

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Name:

Year:

Date:

Caught in movement Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Assessment key

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Task The students were instructed to make a ‘caught in movement’ picture using a range of skills, techniques, mediums and materials

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✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

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The student is able to:

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participate in discussion about physical leisure activities, actions and equipment required to participate and sun safety measures. draw himself/herself in a stance typical of movement in the chosen physical leisure activity. demonstrate back and forth line colouring technique with strong, solid colour.

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achieve depth/distance in his/her drawing by reducing the size of detail. demonstrate painting with dye. complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Designer beach towel This lesson was inspired by the theme Summer. The use of colourful beach towels at the beach and by the pool was discussed when the topic ‘Colours of summer’ was being covered. The students contributed colours inspired by summer fruit, flowers, tropical fish and vivid, brightly coloured summer clothing.

Three-lesson project Discussion points

Method 1. Using a ruler, measure and cut 30-cm lengths of wool. (This length is very generous and the completed fringe will require trimming. A shorter length is difficult to work with.) 2. Double two pieces of wool over and thread the middle through the punched hole and make a slip knot. (There are four strands in each hole.) 3. Repeat, measuring, cutting and threading lengths of wool until all punched holes have a tassel (the fringe of the towel). 4. Trim for desired effect.

• What colours are typical of summer? (bright, cool colours, fluorescent colours) • Where can you see colours which inspire summer designs for clothes, outdoor furnishings, sunsets, and beach gear, including umbrellas, surfboards, inflated swimming toys, beach wear and towels? (summer fruits, flowers, tropical fish etc.) • What colours and designs have you noticed on beach towels? (Answers will vary. Record ideas on board.)

Materials

Materials

• reflection and assessment photocopies • lead pencil • coloured pencils

A3 cartridge paper fluorescent oil pastels A4 photocopy paper lead pencil/eraser newspaper to protect workspace single hole punch

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• • • • • •

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Lesson one

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Lesson three

Method

1. Students complete reflection activity. 2. Teacher completes assessment record.

Method

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1. Following discussion about typical summer colours and designs, commence designing a colourful beach towel using lead pencil on A4 paper. The design may focus on simple stripes and shapes as shown in the example or a typical beach/pool-type theme, such as tropical fish, beach balls or surfboards. Encourage use of arbitrary templates like jar lids, glue stick lids or sharpeners. 2. Mark sections with fluorescent pastels to show colours for design. 3. Commence transferring design from plan onto A3 cartridge paper using fluorescent oil pastels. 4. Colour design with strong, solid colour. 5. Punch holes along both short edges at even intervals. (This may be done as individuals finish or perhaps when other class work is finished early.)

Lesson two Materials • • • • •

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artwork in progress wool/yarn (variety of colours) ruler scissors coloured card and craft glue for mounting if desired (These towels can be effectively displayed without mounting by pegging them on a line.)

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:58:43 AM


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Designer beach towel

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Name:

Date:

Designer beach towel Reflections 5. Your design may be suitable to decorate a range of giftware and household items. Using lead pencil and coloured pencils, draw and colour three items using your beach towel design to enhance their appearance.

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2. List five things which inspire summer colours.

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1. What did you enjoy most about this activity? Give a reason for your answer.

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3. Describe the design you planned for your designer beach towel. Include your colour choices.

4. Why did you choose this design? (Tell what inspired your choice.)

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02/04/2007 10:58:47 AM


Name:

Year:

Date:

Designer beach towel Task assessment Activity objectives Arts ideas: Creates artworks to express ideas. Arts skills and processes: Uses a range of visual arts skills, techniques, procedures, practices and technologies. Arts responses: Uses an aesthetic understanding to acknowledge, reflect on and assess the arts. Arts in society: Demonstrates an understanding of the part that the arts play in society.

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Assessment key

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Task The students were instructed to design and colour a beach towel using a range of skills and techniques.

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✔ yes (has demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

no (has not demonstrated achievement of this criterion)

● inconsistent (some evidence of achievement has been shown) Criteria

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The student is able to:

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participate in discussion about summer colours and summer-related designs. draw a plan of a beach towel design.

transfer beach towel design onto A3 cartridge paper. demonstrate strong, solid colouring using oil pastels.

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punch holes with a single hole punch at regular intervals along each end of the towel. measure wool/yarn in 30-cm lengths. thread wool to make a fringe. cut a wool fringe evenly using scissors.

complete a reflection sheet based on his/her artwork. listen to and follow instructions. work cooperatively in an informal activity-based work environment.

R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

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Resources

Page 127 – In-stripes name poster Pages 128–129 – Watercolour flower greeting card Page 130 – Shirt/Jumper greeting card Page 131–132 – Stormy seas pirate ship scene Page 133 – Popular pets Page 134 – Everybody’s going surfing

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Page 134 – Onion skin overlay fish

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Page 135 – Purple haze butterflies

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Templates should be made from card, such as cereal box/ lightweight strawboard. Adults can help to make templates prior to lessons, depending on the age and ability of students and the difficulty of the art project. Instructions for some templates are given, although teachers may design their own or alter sizes to suit.

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Be environmentally friendly by using household packaging to make sets of reusable templates.

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02/04/2007 10:59:09 AM


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In-stripes name poster

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Watercolour flower greeting card – 1

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Watercolour flower greeting card – 2

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Shirt/Jumper greeting card

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02/04/2007 10:59:11 AM


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Stormy seas pirate ship scene – 1

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Stormy seas pirate ship scene – 2

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:59:11 AM


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Popular pets

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Everybody’s going surfing

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Onion skin overlay fish

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R.I.C. Publications/Prim-Ed Publishing

02/04/2007 10:59:12 AM


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Purple haze butteries

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6591 Primary Art Book F