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Maths Homework (Book F)

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing® 2009 Copyright© Jenni Harrold 2008 ISBN 978-1-84654-175-9 PR– 6061

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Additional titles available in this series: Maths Homework (Book A) Maths Homework (Book B) Maths Homework (Book C) Maths Homework (Book D) Maths Homework (Book E) Maths Homework (Book G)

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Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

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FOREWORD Maths Homework is a series of books with a back-to-basics approach designed to support the foundations of the maths curriculum. It is a clear and comprehensive resource that covers number, measurement, shape and data concepts for each year level. Although intended as a homework resource, this series is also ideal for: • • • •

teaching a new concept consolidation assessment revision.

Titles in the series are: Maths Homework – Book B Maths Homework – Book D Maths Homework – Book F

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Maths Homework – Book A Maths Homework – Book C Maths Homework – Book E Maths Homework – Book G

Contents

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Teachers notes .........................................................................................................................................................................................iv Curriculum links .........................................................................................................................................................................................v

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Number

Lines and angles........................................................... 46–47 2-D shapes..................................................................... 48–49 3-D shapes..................................................................... 50–51 Perspective and transformations............................... 52–53 Symmetry....................................................................... 54–55 Directions....................................................................... 56–57 Map features and scales............................................. 58–59

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Writing numbers................................................................. 2–3 Place value......................................................................... 4–5 Rounding............................................................................. 6–7 Addition............................................................................... 8–9 Addition problems.......................................................... 10–11 Mental addition.............................................................. 12–13 Subtraction..................................................................... 14–15 Subtraction problems.................................................... 16–17 Mental subtraction........................................................ 18–19 Multiplication.................................................................. 20–21 Multiplication problems................................................ 22–23 Mental multiplication.................................................... 24–25 Division............................................................................ 26–27 Mental division............................................................... 28–29 Fractions.......................................................................... 30–31 Decimals.......................................................................... 32–33 Percentages................................................................... 34–35 Money.............................................................................. 36–37 Mixed problems............................................................. 38–39 Mixed mental.................................................................. 40–41 Number sequences and patterns............................... 42–43 Number sentences........................................................ 44–45

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Shape

Measurement Length............................................................................. 60–61 Perimeter........................................................................ 62–63 Area................................................................................. 64–65 Volume and capacity.................................................... 66–67 Mass............................................................................... 68–69 Temperature................................................................... 70–71 Angles............................................................................. 72–73 Time................................................................................. 74–75 Calendars and timetables............................................ 76–77

Data Chance............................................................................ 78–79 Data................................................................................. 80–81 Diagrams and tables.................................................... 82–83 Graphs............................................................................ 84–85 Averages........................................................................ 86–87

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Maths Homework


TEACHERS NOTES The format of the book Each book contains teachers notes and curriculum links. Four sections are included in each book: • Number

• Shape

• Measurement

• Data

Each section covers a variety of concepts. The number of concepts covered varies from section to section. Each pupil page in the book provides teachers with activities that relate solely to one mathematical concept. The pupil pages are graded, with activities that provide a progressive degree of difficulty. In this way, teachers can use the page to introduce a new concept and then reinforce knowledge and skills. The pupil pages are supported by a corresponding teachers page which includes the following information:

Teachers notes page Objectives show the specific desired outcomes when completing the worksheet.

The name of the concept is given.

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The concepts required for pupils to complete each page are provided.

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The name of the related mathematical area is given.

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Answers are given for all questions on the pupil page.

The name of the related mathematical area is given.

The name of the concept is given.

Questions or activities relating to each concept are given with sufficient space provided for pupils to write answers.

Space is provided for each pupil to write his/her name on each worksheet.

Since this series of books follows a set format, teachers may find it useful to use a preceding title to review a corresponding concept before new skills are introduced. Pupils who need extra assistance may also find this a helpful way to revise material previously taught. Maths Homework

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curriculum links MATHEMATICS, FIFTH CLASS Strand Unit

Objectives

Number

Place value

• read, write and order whole numbers and decimals • identify place value in whole numbers and decimals • round whole numbers and round decimals

Operations

• estimate sums, differences, products and quotients of whole numbers • add and subtract whole numbers and decimals (to three decimal places) without and with a calculator • multiply a decimal (up to three places) by a whole number, without and with a calculator • divide a three-digit number by a two-digit number, without and with a calculator • divide a decimal number by a whole number, without and with a calculator

Fractions

• compare and order fractions and identify equivalent forms of fractions with denominators 2-12 • express improper fractions as mixed numbers and vice versa and position them on the number line • add and subtract simple fractions and simple mixed numbers • multiply a fraction by a whole number • express tenths, hundredths and thousandths in both fractional and decimal form

Decimals and percentages

• develop an understanding of simple percentages and relate them to fractions and decimals • compare and order fractions and decimals • solve problems involving operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals and simple percentages

Number theory

• identify simple prime and composite numbers • identify square and rectangular numbers • identify factors and multiples

Directed numbers

• identify positive and negative numbers in context

Rules and properties

• explore and discuss simple properties and rules about brackets and priority of operation • identify relationships and record verbal and simple symbolic rules for number patterns

Equations

• translate number sentences with a frame into word problems and vice versa • solve one-step number sentences and equations

2-D shapes

• make informal deductions about 2-D shapes and their properties • use angle and line properties to classify and describe triangles and quadrilaterals • identify the properties of the circle • construct a circle of given radius or diameter • tessellate combinations of 2-D shapes • classify 2-D shapes according to their lines of symmetry • use 2-D shapes and properties to solve problems

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Shape and space

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Algebra

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Strand

Measures

Data

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3-D shapes

• identify and examine 3-D shapes and explore relationships, including tetrahedron

Lines and angles

• recognise, classify and describe angles and relate angles to shape and the environment • recognise angles in terms of a rotation • estimate, measure and construct angles in degrees • explore the sum of the angles in a triangle

Length

• select and use appropriate instruments of measurement • estimate and measure length using appropriate metric units • estimate and measure the perimeter of regular and irregular shapes

Area

• discover that the area of a rectangle is length by breadth • estimate and measure the area of regular and irregular 2-D shapes • calculate area using square centimetres and square metres • compare visually square metres and square centimetres

Weight

• select and use appropriate instruments of measurement • estimate and measure weight using appropriate metric units

Time

• read and interpret timetables and the 24-hour clock (digital and analogue)

Money

• compare ‘value for money’ using unitary method

Representing and interpreting

• collect, organise and represent data using pictograms, single and multiple bar charts and simple pie charts • read and interpret pictograms, single and multiple bar charts, and pie charts

Chance

• identify and list all possible outcomes of simple random processes • estimate the likelihood of occurrence of events • construct and use frequency charts and tables

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Maths Homework


WRITING NUMBERS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Reads and writes whole numbers to six digits.

Concepts required Knowledge of numbers to six digits Ordering numbers Understanding of terms: before, after, less than, more than.

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Answers (b) 14 874 (e) 502 502

2. (a) 3848, 3850 (c) 49 098, 49 100 (e) 106 000, 106 002

(b) 21 049, 21 051 (d) 69 999, 70 001 (f) 249 999, 250 001

3. (a) 97 642 (c) 865 431 (e) 998 764

(b) 98 432 (d) 984 210 (f) 886 644

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5. (a) 2740 (d) 52 006

(b) 10 020 (e) 121 499

(c) 15 100 (f) 500 010

(b) 5050 (e) 172 898

(c) 24 900 (f) 499 900

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4. (a) 1235 (d) 99 000

(c) 325 250 (f) 500 000

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1. (a) 2435 (d) 600 011

6. Teacher check – answers depend on current date.

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WRITING NUMBERS NUMBER

1. Write each amount as a numeral. (a) two thousand, four hundred and thirty-five (b) fourteen thousand, eight hundred and seventy-four (c) three hundred and twenty-five thousand, two hundred and fifty (d) six hundred thousand and eleven (e) five hundred and two thousand, five hundred and two (f) half a million

(b)

(c)

49 099

(d)

(e)

106 001

(f)

21 050

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3849

70 000 250 000

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3. With each set of numbers, rearrange them to write the largest possible number. (b) 2,3,8,4,9

(c) 5,4,8,3,6,1

(d) 2,0,9,4,1,8

(e) 8,4,6,9,7,9

(f) 4,6,4,6,8,8

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(a) 4,9,2,7,6

4. Write the number that is 10 more than the written amount.

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2. Write the number that comes before and after each amount.

(a) 1225

(b) 10 010

(c) 15 090

(d) 98 990

(e) 121 489

(f) 500 000

5. Write the number that is 100 less than the written amount. (a) 2840

(b) 5150

(c) 25 000

(d) 52 106

(e) 172 998

(f) 500 000

6. Write down today’s date using six numerals; e.g. 19 01 09 (19 January 2009). (a)

(b) Write the number as an amount.

(c) Write the amount in words. (d) Write the number that comes before

and after.

(e) Make the smallest possible number from the numerals. (f) Make the largest possible number from the numerals. Prim-Ed PublishingÂŽ

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Maths Homework


PLACE VALUE NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Recognises and demonstrates place value. Identifies and represents different forms of the same number.

Concepts required

Calculator

6 x 10 7 x 1000 4 x 1 2 x 10 000 9 x 1000 3 x 100 000 0 x 100 5 x 10 000

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tens thousands ones ten thousands thousands hundred thousands hundreds ten thousands

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(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

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Answers

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Materials needed

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Place value to hundred thousands Expanded notation Ordering numbers Representing numbers as an addition sum

60 7000 4 20 000 9000 300 000 0 50 000

2.

(a) (c) (e) (f)

400, 3 (b) 6000, 20, 8 5454 (d) 10 000, 2000, 20, 1 100 000, 20 000, 200, 50, 7 300 000, 70 000, 5000, 900, 40, 6

3.

(a) (c) (e) (g)

40 400 4000 40 000

(b) (d) (f) (h)

4 400 000 40 000 400

4. (a) Teacher check setting out (b) Teacher check setting out (c) 2 6 5 4 7, 6 6 5 3 1 3

Maths Homework

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PLACE VALUE NUMBER

1. Complete the table.

(a)

8461

(b)

7025

(c)

4114

(d)

24 500

(e)

169 869

(f)

382 406

(g)

250 000

(h)

555 555

Expanded form

Meaning

hundreds

3 x 100

300

(c)

+

(b) 6928 =

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(a) 2403 = 2000 +

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2. Write the missing numbers.

= 5000 + 400 + 50 + 4 +

(d) 12 121 =

+

+

+

+

+ 100 + +

+

+

+

+

+

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(f) 375 946 =

+ 900 +

+ 5000 +

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(e) 125 257 =

3. Write the value of the four (4) in these numbers. (a) 241

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2387

Place value

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Number

(e) 4560

(b) 314

(c) 402

(d) 421 112

(f) 41 231

(g) 541 000

(h) 123 456

4. Set out each set of numbers as an addition sum. Use a calculator to find each total. (a) 92 + 2941 + 108 + 6 + 23 400 (b) 42 307 + 59 + 1050 + 497 + 621 400

(c) Circle the numbers in the ten thousands place value positions. Prim-Ed Publishing速

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Maths Homework


ROUNDING NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Demonstrates rounding whole numbers to the nearest 10, 100, 1000. Demonstrates rounding to the nearest whole number. Demonstrates rounding to one decimal place.

Concepts required

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Numbers ending in 5, 50, 500 are rounded up. Estimations are approximate answers.

(a) (d) (g) (j)

50 50 320 8110

(b) 40 (e) 70 (h) 1450

2.

(a) (d) (g) (j)

200 1400 6600 10 100

(b) 300 (e) 2100 (h) 5500

Maths Homework

(c) 90 (f) 210 (i) 2080

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(c) 700 (f) 7900 (i) 2100

(b) 6000 (e) 10 000 (h) 215 000

(c) 5000 (f) 10 000

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3. (a) 1000 (d) 6000 (g) 46 000

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Answers

4.

(a) (d) (g) (j)

3 23 121 556

(b) 9 (e) 40 (h) 421

(c) 8 (f) 91 (i) 406

5.

(a) (d) (g) (j)

2.4 8.0 10.7 25.6

(b) 9.6 (e) 3.8 (h) 15.6

(c) 9.1 (f) 10.1 (i) 20.1

6. (a) 100 + 200 = 300 (c) 200 + 800 = 1000

(b) 200 + 200 = 400 (d) 1400 + 2500 = 3900

7. (a) 12 + 8 = 20 (c) 100 + 10 = 110

(b) 20 + 25 = 45 (d) 150 + 151 = 301

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ROUNDING NUMBER

1. Round these numbers to the nearest 10. (a) 51

(b) 39

(c) 87

(d) 54

(e) 65

(f) 208

(g) 317

(h) 1451

(i) 2075

(j) 8105

(b) 341

(c) 650

(d) 1401

(e) 2050

(f) 7850

(g) 6555

(h) 5490

(i) 2095

(j) 10 050

3. Round these numbers to the nearest 1000.

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(a) 184

(b) 6050

(c) 4999

(d) 5550

(e) 9909

(f) 10 001

(g) 45 500

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(a) 1203

(h) 215 005

(c) 7.5

(d) 22.9

(g) 121.2

(h) 420.9

(b) 8.9

(e) 39.5

(f) 90.9

(i) 405.5

(j) 555.5

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(a) 3.1

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4. Round these numbers to the nearest whole number.

5. Round these numbers to one decimal place.

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2. Round these numbers to the nearest 100.

(a) 2.41

(b) 9.58

(c) 9.09

(d) 8.01

(e) 3.75

(f) 10.07

(g) 10.71

(h) 15.55

(i) 20.09

(j) 25.56

6. Round each number to the nearest 100 to find the approximate answer; for example

141 + 172,

100 + 200 =

300

(a) 129 + 168,

=

(b) 191 + 198,

(c) 201 + 750,

=

(d) 1404 + 2505,

= =

7. Round each number to the nearest whole number to find the approximate answer. (a) 12.1 + 7.9,

=

(b) 19.5 + 24.8,

(c) 99.5 + 9.5,

=

(d) 150.2 + 150.7,

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7

= = Maths Homework


ADDITION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Understands the role of place value when adding numbers. Calculates addition problems with numbers up to five digits.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

2. (a) 568 (d) 906

(b) 520 (e) 900

3. (a) 663 (d) 906

(b) 725 (e) 863

4. (a) 3803 (d) 10 211

(b) 4521 (e) 16 017

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6. (a) 3386 (d) 64 620

Maths Homework

(c) 773 (c) 967

(c) 7112

(b) 715 (e) 1149

(c) 958

(b) 6774 (e) 71 969

(c) 10 467

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5. (a) 690 (d) 1497

(c) 61

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(b) 93 (e) 93

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1. (a) 73 (d) 73

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Answers

7. (a) 646 + 247 893

(b) 677 + 189 866

(c) 3407 + 1285 4692

(d) 4599 + 3421 8020

(e) 15 42 + 35 92

(f) 408 212 + 165 785

(g) 3602 1111 + 2406 7119

(h) 5999 1060 + 2051 9110

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ADDITION NUMBER

39 (b) + 34

2. (a)

4. (a)

404 (b) 162 + 124

295 (c) 205 + 215

684 209 + 256

2409 (d) 3078 + 4980

8048 + 7969

599 (e) 499 + 399

2158 (c) 2258 + 2358

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1206 (b) 1044 + 1136

628 (d) 155 + 175

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6. (a)

5699 (e) + 4512

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4234 (d) + 2878

465 + 398

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5. (a)

508 (e) + 398

3064 (c) + 1457

608 + 292

799 (d) + 168

2408 (b) + 1395

517 (e) + 389

476 (c) + 249

56 + 37

426 (d) + 347

384 (b) + 279

49 (e) + 24

205 (c) + 315

3. (a)

PUPIL NAME

321 (b) + 247

33 (d) + 28

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68 (c) + 25

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1. (a)

30 450 (e) 21 271 + 12 899

31 045 12 125 + 28 799

7. Find the missing numbers to complete each sum.

6

(a)

+

6

2

4

8

9

3

1

5

(e)

7

(b)

+

(f)

4 +

5 9

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1

7 9

8

6

6

4

0

8

2

1

2

6

5

+ 7

3

(c)

4

+ 4

(g)

3

6

7

2

8

6

9

0

+

5

2

4

(d)

3

5

(h)

9 4

2

1

0

2

0

9

9

1 +

5

9

2

4

0

6

7

1

1

9

+

2

6

0

0

5

1

1

1

0

Maths Homework


ADDITION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves addition word problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve addition problems.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

Answers

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1. Teacher check correct setting (a) 544 (b) 1731

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Calculator

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Materials needed

2. 569 runs 3. 807 km

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4. 615 tickets

(c) 4666

5. 1348 books

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6. 4542 pupils 7. 7593 votes

8. 15 343 people 9. 64 609 people 10. (a)10 453

(b) 6135

11. (a) Teacher check word problem 249 + 251 + 205 = 705 (b) Teacher check word problem 2095 + 8099 = 10 194

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ADDITION PROBLEMS NUMBER

1. Correctly set out the following numbers before adding. (b) 299, 308, 76, 1040, 8

(c)

912, 88, 1000, 265, 2401

3. Mitchell travelled 348 km one day and 459 km the next. How far did he travel?

4. A film screened three times on Tuesday with ticket sales of 242, 154 and 219. How many tickets were sold?

5. A bookshop sold 385 books in May, 465 in June and 498 in July. How many books were sold altogether?

8. There was an attendance of 8058 at a football match on Saturday and 7285 on Sunday. What was the total?

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7. In a phone poll, 4685 voted ‘Yes’ and 2908 voted ‘No’. How many votes were registered?

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6. A total of 3457 pupils attend one high school and 1085 attend another. How many pupils are there altogether?

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2. Australia scored 325 runs and India scored 244. How many runs were scored altogether?

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(a) 20, 107, 9, 360, 48

9. A total of 26 510 people attended a semifinal match and 38 099 attended the grand final. What was the total?

10. Use a calculator to complete the addition problems.

(a) 43 + 546 + 409 + 6821 + 2634 =

(b) 1688 + 3689 + 499 + 233 + 26 =

11. Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem. (a) 249 + 251 + 205

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(b) 2095 + 8099

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Maths Homework


MENTAL ADDITION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Shows proficiency with mental addition facts.

Concept required Mentally adding one and two digits.

Answers C

D

E

20

30

16

21

100

18 21 24 25 26 28

11

14

31

101

17

17 20 23 24 25 27

75

80

25

40

40

20

26

60

53

25

18

12

13

25

20

24

21

50

39

77

18

18

27

29

50

24

16

65

14

13

30

50

28

18

51

20

94

24

16

23

90

0

70

93 99 100 103 105 109

10

45

25

120

70

83 89 90 93 95 99

22

12

41

31

102

80

20

40

20

26

73 79 80 83 85 89

60

83

100

63

24

19

38

19

22

30

12

140

24

49

60

70

40

21

70

5

29

59

100

51

100

15

20

15

14

36

91

62

28

60

51

21

26

37

19

30

37

30

27

47

24

100

41

72

27

99

35

90

50

81

40

Maths Homework

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B

16 19 22 23 24 26

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15 18 21 22 23 25 14 17 20 21 22 24

13 16 19 20 21 23

Sa 48 32

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(a)

A

in

12

(b)

103 109 110 113 115 119

63 69 70 73 75 79 53 59 60 63 65 69

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MENTAL ADDITION NUMBER

C

D

E

15 + 15 =

4 + 12 =

3 + 18 =

90 + 10 =

5+6=

8+6=

11 + 20 =

100 + 1 =

8+9=

71 + 4 =

70 + 10 =

12 + 13 =

10 + 30 =

32 + 8 =

13 + 7 =

22 + 4 =

30 + 30 =

2 + 51 =

15 + 10 =

9+9=

6+6=

5+8=

19 + 6 =

13 + 7 =

12 + 12 =

11 + 10 =

41 + 9 =

32 + 7 =

61 + 16 =

7 + 11 =

3 + 15 =

17 + 10 =

20 + 9 =

3 + 47 =

20 + 4 =

15 + 1 =

55 + 10 =

7+7=

41 + 7 =

13 + 0 =

10 + 20 =

4 + 46 =

14 + 14 =

12 + 20 =

6 + 12 =

50 + 1 =

15 + 5 =

93 + 1 =

16 + 8 =

15 + 1 =

19 + 4 =

80 + 10 =

0+0=

4 + 66 =

4+6=

41 + 4 =

2 + 23 =

60 + 60 =

55 + 15 =

11 + 11 =

5+7=

40 + 1 =

27 + 4 =

1 + 101 =

40 + 40 =

14 + 6 =

3 + 37 =

4 + 16 =

19 + 7 =

55 + 5 =

83 + 0 =

20 + 80 =

31 + 32 =

3 + 21 =

2 + 17 =

32 + 6 =

13 + 6 =

16 + 6 =

17 + 13 =

8+4=

70 + 70 =

19 + 5 =

41 + 8 =

10 + 50 =

60 + 10 =

4 + 36 =

14 + 7 =

15 + 55 =

1+4=

23 + 6 =

50 + 9 =

99 + 1 =

11 + 40 =

93 + 7 =

17 + 3 =

8+7=

5+9=

32 + 4 =

41 + 21 =

23 + 5 =

3 + 57 =

2 + 49 =

20 + 6 =

17 + 20 =

17 + 2 =

16 + 14 =

7 + 23 =

15 + 12 =

41 + 6 =

4 + 20 =

99 + 1 =

11 + 30 =

72 + 0 =

19 + 8 =

99 + 0 =

15 + 20 =

2 + 88 =

10 + 40 =

80 + 1 =

15 + 25 =

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10 + 10 =

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B

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A

3 + 12 = 90 + 1 = 7 + 14 = 32 + 5 =

Complete the addition tables. (a) 16

(b)

100

15

90

14

80

13

70

12

60

11

50

+

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2

5

8

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9

10

+

12

13

3

9

10

13

15

19

Maths Homework


SUBTRACTION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Understands the role of place value when subtracting numbers. Calculates subtraction problems with numbers up to five digits.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

Answers (b) 33 (e) 2122

2. (a) 47 (d) 47

(b) 26 (e) 44

3. (a) 124 (d) 504

(b) 323 (e) 368

4. (a) 368 (d) 267

(b) 256 (e) 253

(c) 263 (f) 205

5. (a) 2027 (d) 4341

(b) 2252 (e) 3189

(c) 3218

(b) 635 (e) 1424

(c) 1542

7. (a)

(c) 58 (f) 23

m

Sa

g in

Vi ew

6. (a) 118 (d) 1264

(c) 211

pl e

1. (a) 32 (d) 301

(c) 314 (f) 746

65 (b) 78 (c) 81 – 23 – 49 – 35 42 29 46

(d) 740 (e) 535 (f) 4284 – 336 – 145 – 1162 404 390 3122 (g) 5240 (h) 8000 –2039 – 2999 3201 5001

Maths Homework

14

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SUBTRACTION NUMBER

78 (b) – 46

2. (a)

72 (b) – 25

251 (b) – 127

86 (d) – 28

732 (c) – 409

542 (d) – 228

534 (c) – 278

861 (d) – 598

4. (a)

624 (b) – 256

5. (a)

3156 (b) – 1129

4841 (c) – 2589

80 (f) – 36

840 (e) – 336

744 (e) – 477

1200 (c) – 565

777 (f) – 409

953 – 207

631 (f) – 378

704 – 499

7430 (e) – 3089

6041 – 2852

3000 (d) – 1458

70 – 47

g

600 (b) – 482

95 (e) – 48

5703 (d) – 2485

4000 (e) – 2736

in

6. (a)

4685 – 2563

Sa

509 (e) – 208

63 (c) – 37

10 000 – 8576

7. Find the missing numbers to complete each problem. (a)

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

3. (a)

425 (d) – 214

pl e

69 (c) – 36

m

1. (a)

6

2 4

(e)

2

3 –

(b)

5

1

4

3

9

(g)

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4

9

2

9

4

0

2

0

3

3

2

0

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9

3

(h)

2

1

8 –

2

6

8

3

0 3

6

0

4

4 2

2

0 9 0

15

7 –

1 3

(d)

1

4

0

8 –

(f)

5

2 –

(c)

8

9 0

1

Maths Homework


SUBTRACTION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves subtraction problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve subtraction problems.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

Answers

893 (c) 2064 (d) 8239 – 87 – 1257 – 6041 806 807 2198

2. 244 children

5. 322 words

Vi ew

6. 2217 adults

in

4. 237 boys

g

3. 536 DVDs

Sa

1. (a) 508 (b) – 192 316

m

Calculator

pl e

Materials needed

7. 376 votes

8. 756 people

9. 28 418 tickets 10. (a) 76 049

(b) 1 102 538 11. (a) Teacher check word problem 352 – 178 = 174 (b) Teacher check word problem 9000 – 2463 = 6537

Maths Homework

16

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SUBTRACTION PROBLEMS NUMBER

1. Correctly set out the following numbers before subtracting. (b) 893, 87

(c) 2064, 1257

(d) 8239, 6041

3. There are 815 DVD covers on the shelf. Of them, 279 have already been rented. How many are still available?

4. From a total of 601 pupils, 364 are girls. How many boys attend the school?

5. Jake has written 678 words of a 1000 word essay. How many words does he still have to write?

m

pl e

2. A total of 352 people went to a family fun day. If there were 108 adults, how many children attended?

g in

8. There was an attendance of 3947 people at one match and 4703 at another. What was the difference?

7. One reality show contestant received 4001 votes and a second received 3625. What was the difference?

Sa

6. A total of 3286 people registered for a fun run. If 1069 were children, how many were adults?

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(a) 508, 192

9. There are 98 000 tickets available for the Grand Final. How many are left if 69 582 have already been sold?

10. Use a calculator to complete each problem. (a) 500 000 – 423 951 =

(b) Subtract 897 462 from 2 million =

11. Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem. (a) 352 – 178

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(b) 9000 – 2463

17

Maths Homework


MENTAL SUBTRACTION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Shows proficiency with mental subtraction facts.

Concept required Mentally subtracting one and two digits with answers less than 100.

Answers B

C

D

E

9

70

10

40

0

17 13 11 10

50

4

6

40

20

16 12 10

9

7

4

4

40

33

2

24

15 11

9

8

6

3

0

16

80

30

98

10

90

7

14

13

14 10

8

7

5

2

17

7

81

30

80

13

7

6

4

1

12

95

0

41

3

0

90

5

40

1

17

40

12

20

Sa

5

0

8

30

15

11

79

71

25

Maths Homework

95 11

14

g 52

90

8

5

pl e

m 12

9

8

6

(b)

88 85 79 75 70 65

36

7

19

78 75 69 65 60 55

6

22

50

68 65 59 55 50 45

49

5

1

99

0

20

30

60

60

58 55 49 45 40 35

30

1

83

9

5

15

71

77

70

20

53

50

15

13

13

60

24

3

21

4

18

8

70

6

58

60

25

10

1

9

5

10

80

60

1

20

70

20

62

31

11

17

51

3

61

10

30

12

6

50

61

4

10

12

10

Vi ew

(a)

A

in

18

48 45 39 35 30 25 38 35 29 25 20 15

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MENTAL SUBTRACTION NUMBER

C

D

E

77 – 7 =

20 – 10 =

44 – 4 =

10 – 10 =

55 – 5 =

8–4=

13 – 7 =

100 – 60 =

22 – 2 =

13 – 9 =

50 – 10 =

66 – 33 =

12 – 10 =

48 – 24 =

20 – 20 =

19 – 3 =

100 – 20 =

35 – 5 =

100 – 2 =

33 – 23 =

95 – 5 =

10 – 3 =

19 – 5 =

21 – 8 =

19 – 2 =

14 – 7 =

90 – 9 =

53 – 23 =

85 – 5 =

24 – 12 =

100 – 5 =

7–7=

41 – 0 =

97 – 2 =

100 – 10 =

13 – 8 =

45 – 5 =

10 – 9 =

20 – 9 =

17 – 0 =

55 – 15 =

21 – 9 =

35 – 15 =

28 – 14 =

12 – 12 =

10 – 2 =

50 – 20 =

56 – 4 =

99 – 9 =

30 – 15 =

22 – 11 =

36 – 0 =

13 – 6 =

20 – 1 =

81 – 2 =

73 – 2 =

12 – 6 =

44 – 22 =

65 – 15 =

50 – 25 =

50 – 1 =

20 – 15 =

21 – 20 =

100 – 1 =

6–6=

43 – 23 =

100 – 70 =

75 – 15 =

66 – 6 =

33 – 3 =

12 – 11 =

85 – 2 =

19 – 10 =

10 – 5 =

20 – 5 =

80 – 9 =

77 – 0 =

75 – 5 =

50 – 30 =

57 – 4 =

55 – 5 =

19 – 4 =

26 – 13 =

19 – 6 =

71 – 11 =

24 – 0 =

10 – 7 =

30 – 9 =

12 – 8 =

21 – 3 =

16 – 8 =

85 – 15 =

25 – 19 =

58 – 0 =

27 – 2 =

19 – 9 =

50 – 49 =

13 – 4 =

13 – 3 =

88 – 8 =

100 – 40 =

20 – 19 =

100 – 30 =

25 – 5 =

62 – 0 =

40 – 9 =

20 – 3 =

60 – 9 =

12 – 9 =

63 – 2 =

50 – 40 =

45 – 15 =

24 – 12 =

10 – 4 =

100 – 50 =

70 – 9 =

10 – 6 =

100 – 90 =

19 – 7 =

15 – 5 =

in

g

Sa

m

10 – 1 =

pl e

B

65 – 5 = 12 – 7 = 100 – 80 = 19 – 8 =

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

A

Complete the subtraction tables. (a)

(b)

20

90

19

80

18

70

17

60

16

50

15

40

Prim-Ed Publishing®

3

7

9

www.prim-ed.com

10

12

15

19

2

5

11

15

20

25

Maths Homework


MULTIPLICATION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Understands the role of place value when multiplying numbers. Calculates multiplication problems with one and two digits.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving

Answers (b) 66 (e) 164

2. (a) 78 (d) 116

(b) 85 (e) 74

3. (a) 105 (d) 380

(b) 230 (e) 414

4. (a) 484 (d) 729

(b) 969 (e) 700

(c) 270 (f) 1048

5. (a) 264 (d) 442

(b) 726 (e) 520

(c) 882 (f) 882

(b) 2511 (e) 5082

(c) 4536 (f) 7682

7. (a)

Maths Homework

206 (b) x 4 824

(c) 84 (f) 90

m

Sa

g in

Vi ew

6. (a) 1484 (d) 1464

(c) 126 (f) 248

pl e

1. (a) 84 (d) 153

(c) 232 (f) 432

125 (c) x 3 375

38 x4 152

(d) 45 (e) 246 (f) x 3 x 4 135 984

62 x 14 248 620 868

20

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MULTIPLICATION NUMBER

42 (b) x 2

2. (a)

26 (b) x 3

3. (a)

35 (b) x 3

242 (b) x 2

5. (a)

17 (c) x 5

28 (d) x 3

46 (c) x 5

58 (d) x 4

323 (c) x 3

135 (d) x 2

33 (c) x 22

42 (d) x 21

51 (e) x 3

41 (f) x 4

29 (e) x 4

37 (f) x 2

76 (e) x 5

69 (f) x 6

243 (e) x 3

350 (f) x 2

34 (e) x 13

62 x4

45 x2

48 x9

262 x4

52 (f) x 10

63 x 14

Sa

m

22 (b) x 12

42 (d) x 3

93 (c) x 27

84 (d) x 54

53 (b) x 28

in

g

6. (a)

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

4. (a)

33 (c) x 2

pl e

1. (a)

122 (e) x 12

242 (f) x 21

334 x 23

7. Find the missing numbers to complete each sum. (a)

0 x 8

(d)

6

(b)

4 2 (e)

4 x

3

1

5

1

5

x

3

3

7

2

4

x 8

(c)

3

8

5

2

x 1 (f)

6

4

x

1

4

4

2

4

8

6

0 6

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Maths Homework


MULTIPLICATION PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates and solves multiplication word problems. Uses place value knowledge to solve multiplication problems.

Concepts required Place value Trading Problem solving Answers

pl e

1. 66 books 2. 252 oranges 3. 64 cm

m

4. 378 days 5. 200 hours

Sa

6. 1062 people 7. 2140 newspapers

10. 192 members 11. 1200 pies

Vi ew

12. 1584 pages

in

9. 780 weeks

g

8. 1825 days

13. (a) Teacher check word problem 150 x 8 = 1200 (b) Teacher check word problem 44 x 14 = 616

Maths Homework

22

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MULTIPLICATION PROBLEMS 2. Four crates each held 63 oranges. How many oranges were there altogether?

3. Each side of a square measures 16 cm. What is the perimeter?

4. How many days are there in 54 weeks?

5. If Lucy works eight hours each day, how many hours would she work in 25 days?

6. If one row seats 118 people, how many people are there in nine rows?

7. Exactly 428 newspapers were sold on each of five days. How many were sold altogether?

8. If there are 365 days in one year, how many days are there in five years?

Sa

m

pl e

1. Thirty-three pupils each have two books. How many books are there altogether?

in

g

9. How many weeks are there in fifteen years?

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

NUMBER

11. Twenty-five stores each ordered 48 pies. How many pies were ordered in total?

10. Twelve football teams each have 16 members. How many members are there altogether?

12. Twelve books each had 132 pages. How many pages were there altogether?

13. Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem. (a) 150 x 8

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(b) 44 x 14

23

Maths Homework


MENTAL MULTIPLICATION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Shows proficiency with mental multiplication facts.

Concept required Mentally multiplying up to and including 11 x table

Answers B

C

D

E

11

18

90

7

9

32

36

6

0

88

55

24

45

40

21

63

15

33

30

70

24

48

24

88

10

56

18

49

10

90

18

60

24

66

22

18

4

36

8

20

81

80

48

12

72

21

20

99

22 55 110 121 132

20

48

33

40

50

20 50 100 110 120

66

22

12

27

42

14

0

25

15

72

18 45 90 99 108

80

16

12

121

0

0

24

50

32

30

14

110

36

0

42

20

6

8

63

55

77

30

64

44

60

48

56

110

35

16

5

27

54

100

24

28

10

40

4

30

36

12

35

84

40

45

8

72

12

16

6

99

96

77

54

70

28

60

44

9

Maths Homework

18 36 54 72 90 14 28 42 56 70 6

12 18 24 30 4

6

m

2

pl e

10 20 30 40 50 8

10

Sa 36

60

g

Vi ew

(a)

A

in

24

(b)

24 60 120 132 144

16 40 80 88 96

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MENTAL MULTIPLICATION NUMBER

C

D

E

6x3=

9 x 10 =

7x1=

9x1=

8x4=

9x4=

3x2=

9x0=

11 x 8 =

5 x 11 =

12 x 2 =

5x9=

8x5=

3x7=

7x9=

5x3=

11 x 3 =

10 x 3 =

7 x 10 =

6x4=

6x8=

4x6=

8 x 11 =

2x5=

8x7=

2x9=

7x7=

5x2=

10 x 9 =

9x2=

10 x 6 =

3x8=

11 x 6 =

2 x 11 =

3x6=

2x2=

3 x 12 =

8x1=

4x9=

10 x 2 =

9x9=

10 x 8 =

12 x 4 =

5 x 12 =

12 x 1 =

6 x 12 =

7x3=

2 x 10 =

9 x 11 =

4x5=

8x6=

3 x 11 =

5x8=

5 x 10 =

6 x 11 =

11 x 2 =

6x2=

9x3=

7x6=

7x2=

12 x 0 =

5x5=

3x5=

8x9=

8 x 10 =

8x2=

2x6=

11 x 11 =

10 x 0 =

11 x 0 =

2 x 12 =

10 x 5 =

4x8=

3 x 10 =

2x7=

10 x 11 =

12 x 3 =

8x0=

6x7=

5x4=

6x1=

2x4=

9x7=

11 x 5 =

11 x 7 =

6x5=

8x8=

4 x 11 =

12 x 5 =

4 x 12 =

7x8=

11 x 10 =

7x5=

4x4=

3x9=

6x9=

10 x 10 =

8x3=

10 x 1 =

4 x 10 =

4x1=

5x6=

3x4=

5x7=

7 x 12 =

10 x 4 =

4x2=

9x8=

4x3=

2x8=

2x3=

11 x 9 =

8 x 12 =

7 x 11 =

9x6=

10 x 7 =

7x4=

6 x 10 =

11 x 4 =

3x3=

in

g

Sa

m

11 x 1 =

pl e

B

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

A

5x1= 4x7= 6x6= 9x5=

Complete the multiplication tables. (a) 9

(b)

12

7

11

5

10

3

9

1

8

x

Prim-Ed Publishing速

2

4

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6

8

10

x

25

2

5

10

11

12

Maths Homework


DIVISION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates division problems of up to three numbers with one divisor. Calculates division problems with remainders. Uses place value knowledge to solve division problems.

Concepts required

Answers

pl e

Place value Trading Remainders Problem solving

(b) 9

2. (a) 24 (d) 302

(b) 32 (e) 32

3. (a) 23 (d) 261

(b) 17 (e) 130

(c) 12

4. (a) 29 r1 (d) 195 r2

(b) 24 r1 (e) 468 r1

(c) 219 r1

Sa

g

Vi ew

6. 122 plums

(c) 241

in

5. 32 players

(c) 10

m

1. (a) 6 (d) 8

7. 42 cm

8. 48 books

9. 226 cartons 10. 155 cm 11. €47

12. 275 L and 2 L remaining 13. (a) Teacher check word problem 564 ÷ 4 = 141 (b) Teacher check word problem 969 ÷ 8 = 121 r1

Maths Homework

26

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DIVISION NUMBER

(b) 72 ÷ 8 =

(c) 100 ÷ 10 =

(d) 56 ÷ 7 =

2. (a) 2 4 8

(b) 3 9 6

(c) 2 4 8 2

(d) 3 9 0 6

(e) 4 1 2 8

3. (a) 4 9 2

(b) 5 8 5

(c) 8 9 6

(d) 3 7 8 3

(e) 5 6 5 0

4. (a) 3 8 8

(b) 4 9 7

(c) 3 6 5 8

(d) 3 5 8 7

(e) 2 9 3 7

6. A total of 488 plums needed to be equally packed into four crates. How many were in each crate?

7. The perimeter of a square is 168 cm. How long is each side?

8. There are 240 books equally arranged on five shelves. How many books are on each shelf?

m Sa g in

9. A total of 904 cartons of soft drink were delivered to four stores. How many cartons went to each store?

pl e

5. Ninety-six players were divided into three groups. How many were in each group?

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

1. (a) 54 ÷ 9 =

11. Six people equally shared a restaurant bill that totalled €282. How much did they each pay?

10. Six children had a combined height of 930 cm. What was their average height?

12. Three trucks equally shared 827 litres of fuel. How many litres did each truck receive?

13. Write your own word problems using the numbers given. Set out and solve each problem.

(a) 564 ÷ 4

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(b) 969 ÷ 8

27

Maths Homework


MENTAL DIVISION NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Shows proficiency with mental division facts.

Concepts required Mentally dividing up to and including by 12 Division wheels

Answers

E

12

5

12

10

3

10

12

6

1

3

12

3

12

4

3

2

4

11

4

7

1

8

10

8

5

11

6

12

9

7

12

12

3

11

11

1

2

8

9

11

3

7

2

1

5

5

Maths Homework

(a)

36

6

pl e

D

1

12

3

6

12

36 ÷

m

C

9

6

3

4

Sa

B

4

9

40

20

12

g

4

9

8

4

8

3

2

11

11

5

9

12

11

1

9

8

7

4

10

11

3

1

5

2

1

2

3

10

8

4

6

2

10

4

5

2

8

11

5

9

7

6

1

10

6

8

2

7

5

9

6

3

9

9

10

6

7

5

7

4

2

7

4

10

10

9

1

1

5

1

6

3

4

7

2

6

8

Vi ew

A

in

28

(b)

1 10

4

2

8

4

3

9

(c)

18 2

18

6 9

54 ÷ 3

5

10

5

27

8

40 ÷

6

1 54

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Prim-Ed Publishing®


MENTAL DIVISION NUMBER

C

D

E

20 ÷ 4 =

72 ÷ 6 =

30 ÷ 3 =

15 ÷ 5 =

60 ÷ 6 =

96 ÷ 8 =

12 ÷ 2 =

7÷7=

9÷3=

48 ÷ 4 =

21 ÷ 7 =

120 ÷ 10 =

32 ÷ 8 =

18 ÷ 6 =

16 ÷ 8 =

12 ÷ 3 =

99 ÷ 9 =

16 ÷ 4 =

49 ÷ 7 =

6÷6=

72 ÷ 9 =

40 ÷ 4 =

80 ÷ 10 =

10 ÷ 2 =

33 ÷ 3 =

66 ÷ 11 =

36 ÷ 3 =

54 ÷ 6 =

54 ÷ 9 =

56 ÷ 8 =

84 ÷ 7 =

132 ÷ 11 =

30 ÷ 10 =

60 ÷ 5 =

77 ÷ 7 =

22 ÷ 2 =

9÷9=

10 ÷ 5 =

44 ÷ 11 =

40 ÷ 5 =

45 ÷ 5 =

55 ÷ 5 =

36 ÷ 4 =

64 ÷ 8 =

12 ÷ 4 =

70 ÷ 10 =

14 ÷ 7 =

48 ÷ 12 =

24 ÷ 3 =

2÷2=

40 ÷ 8 =

6÷2=

12 ÷ 6 =

121 ÷ 11 =

45 ÷ 9 =

66 ÷ 6 =

55 ÷ 11 =

18 ÷ 2 =

108 ÷ 9 =

88 ÷ 8 =

3÷3=

72 ÷ 8 =

56 ÷ 7 =

42 ÷ 6 =

44 ÷ 4 =

33 ÷ 11 =

5÷5=

12 ÷ 12 =

20 ÷ 10 =

36 ÷ 12 =

24 ÷ 6 =

24 ÷ 4 =

4÷2=

60 ÷ 12 =

6÷3=

32 ÷ 4 =

27 ÷ 3 =

63 ÷ 9 =

60 ÷ 10 =

15 ÷ 3 =

18 ÷ 9 =

90 ÷ 9 =

48 ÷ 6 =

50 ÷ 5 =

8÷2=

Sa

110 ÷ 11 =

g

28 ÷ 7 =

m

24 ÷ 2 =

pl e

B

50 ÷ 10 =

11 ÷ 11 =

70 ÷ 7 =

48 ÷ 8 =

88 ÷ 11 =

24 ÷ 12 =

25 ÷ 5 =

63 ÷ 7 =

30 ÷ 5 =

27 ÷ 9 =

81 ÷ 9 =

100 ÷ 10 =

18 ÷ 3 =

77 ÷ 11 =

28 ÷ 4 =

36 ÷ 9 =

22 ÷ 11 =

35 ÷ 5 =

80 ÷ 8 =

20 ÷ 2 =

90 ÷ 10 =

4÷4=

8÷8=

35 ÷ 7 =

10 ÷ 10 =

42 ÷ 7 =

24 ÷ 8 =

20 ÷ 5 =

21 ÷ 3 =

8÷4=

36 ÷ 6 =

16 ÷ 2 =

14 ÷ 2 = 99 ÷ 11 = 30 ÷ 6 = 40 ÷ 10 =

in

110 ÷ 10 =

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PUPIL NAME

A

Complete the division wheels. (a) 1 3

Prim-Ed Publishing®

(c)

6 36 ÷ 12

9

(b)

4

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1 4

2

40 ÷ 5

10

29

18 8

2

6

54 ÷ 3

9

1

Maths Homework


FRACTIONS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and shows knowledge of simple fractions. Writes equivalent fractions. Compares and orders fractions. Adds and subtracts fractions with common denominators.

Concepts required

(b) 3/8 (e) 3/6, 1/2

2. Answers may vary. (a) 1/2 (d) 8/10

(b) 1/3 (e) 6/8

Maths Homework

g

(c) 2/2

(b) 3 (e) 4 (h) 6

(c) 2 (f) 4

5. (a) 4/8 = 1/2 (d) 5/10 = 1/2

(b) 2/4 =1/2 (e) 6/6 = 1

(c) 3/6 = 1/2 (f) 9/12 = 3/4

6. (a) 2/4 = 1/2 (d) 5/10 = 1/2

(b) 4/6 = 2/3 (e) 4/8 = 1/2

(c) 3/9 = 1/3 (f) 2/8 = 1/4

7. (a) 2 (d) 4

(b) 4 (e) 7

(c) 5

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4. (a) 2 (d) 9 (g) 3

(c) 6/8, 3/4 (f) 3/9, 1/3

(b) 2/9, 3/9, 5/9, 6/9, 8/9 (d) 1/4, 4/12, 3/6, 6/8, 1

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3. (a) 1/6, 2/6, 3/6, 5/6, 6/6 (c) 1/5, 3/5, 4/5, 1, 22/5

Sa

1. (a) 5/12 (d) 1/4

m

Answers

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Fractional parts Equivalent fractions Common denominators Ordering Rounding to the nearest whole number

30

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FRACTIONS NUMBER

1. What fraction of each shape is shaded? (a)

(b)

(d)

(e)

(f)

2. Write an equivalent fraction for each.

(b)

2

/6 =

(c) 1 =

(d) 4/5 =

(e) 3/4 =

m

(a) 2/4 =

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3. Order the fractions from smallest to largest. (a) 3/6, 5/6, 6/6, 1/6, 2/6

(b) 3/9, 8/9, 2/9, 5/9, 6/9 (d) 1/4, 3/6, 4/12, 1, 6/8

g

(c) 3/5, 1, 1/5, 22/5, 4/5

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4. Complete the following questions. (a) 1/4 of 8 =

(b) 1/2 of 6 =

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PUPIL NAME

(c)

(e) 2/5 of 10 =

(f) 1/3 of 12 =

(c) 1/5 of 10 =

(d) 3/4 of 12 =

(g) 1/4 of 12 =

(h) 2/3 of 9 =

5. Add each of the following and write the lowest equivalent fraction for each answer. (a) 3/8 + 1/8 =

=

(d) 2/10 + 3/10 =

=

(b) 1/4 + 1/4 =

=

(c) 2/6 + 1/6 =

(e) 4/6 + 2/6 =

=

(f) 5/12 + 4/12 =

= =

6. Subtract each of the following and write the lowest equivalent fraction. (a) 3/4 – 1/4 =

=

(d) 7/10 – 2/10 =

=

(b) 6/6 – 2/6 =

=

(c) 6/9 – 3/9 =

=

(e) 7/8 – 3/8 =

=

(f) 6/8 – 4/8 =

=

7. Round each amount to the nearest whole number. (a) 21/4 = Prim-Ed Publishing®

(b) 33/4 =

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(c) 51/5 = 31

(d) 34/5 =

(e) 63/4 = Maths Homework


DECIMALS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Uses correct knowledge of place value to read and write decimal numbers. Compares and orders decimals to one decimal place. Adds and subtracts decimals to two decimal places.

Concepts required

tens 8

1

2 1

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(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

0 2

• • • • • • • • •

tenths 4 8 0 1 4 9 6 9

hundredths 5 1 8 5 9 5 4 9

2. (a) 4 (d) 8

(b) 4 (e) 12

(c) 6 (f) 91

3. (a) 2.2 (d) 8.9

(b) 4.5 (e) 7.0

(c) 3.6 (f) 10.2

4.

Maths Homework

1

ones 2 0 3 7 0 0 6 3

g

hundreds

in

1.

Sa

Answers

m

pl e

Place value Whole numbers and parts of whole numbers Ordering Rounding to whole numbers and one decimal place Equivalent decimals and fractions Addition and subtraction, with trading

(a) (b) (c) (d)

2.4, 3.7, 4.1, 5.5, 8.1, 8.5, 8.9 7.0, 7.06, 7.1, 7.5, 7.55, 7.6, 7.9 0.08, 0.8, 0.85, 1.08, 1.8, 18.1 12.05, 12.5, 21.0, 21.05, 21.5, 21.95

5. (a) 0.5 (d) 5.4

(b) 0.9 (e) 6.35

(c) 1.5

6. (a) 16.5 (d) 31.09

(b) 1.5 (e) 779.71

(c) 79.01 (f) 229.69

32

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Prim-Ed Publishing®


DECIMALS NUMBER

1. Write each number on the place value chart. tens

ones

• •

(b) 0.81

(c) 3.08

(d) 127.15

(e) 10.49

(f) 0.95

(g) 106.64

(h) 23.99

hundredths

pl e

(a) 82.45

tenths

(e) 11.5

(b) 3.6

(f) 91.09

(c) 5.9

(d) 8.02

Sa

(a) 4.2

m

2. Round these decimals to the nearest whole number.

g

3. Round these numbers to one decimal place.

(b) 4.47

(e) 6.95

(f) 10.19

(c) 3.59

(d) 8.85

in

(a) 2.21

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PUPIL NAME

hundreds

4. Order the decimals from smallest to largest. (a) 4.1, 3.7, 8.9, 8.1, 5.5, 2.4, 8.5 (b) 7.6, 7.06, 7.0, 7.1, 7.5, 7.9, 7.55 (c) 0.8, 1.8, 1.08, 0.08, 18.1, 0.85 (d) 21.5, 12.5, 21.05, 12.05, 21.95, 21.0 5. Write the equivalent decimal for these fractions. (a) 1/2

(b) 9/10

(c) 11/2

(d) 54/10

(e) 635/100

6. Complete the following equations. (a) 7.9 (b) 8.3 (c) 42.55 (d) 58.07 (e) 129.72 (f) 804.31 + 8.6 – 6.8 + 36.46 – 26.98 + 649.99 – 574.62

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Maths Homework


PERCENTAGES NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Represents percentages. Compares, orders and writes percentages relating to decimals and fractions.

Concepts required

Materials needed

Sa

Answers

m

Coloured pencils

pl e

Percentage is part of a hundred Equivalent percentages, fractions and decimals Ordering Reading and solving simple problems

1. Teacher check correct shading.

(b) 25% = 25/100 = 0.25 (d) 30% = 30/100 = 0.30 (f) 5% = 5/100 = 0.05

in

g

2. (a) 50% = 50/100 = 0.50 (c) 10% = 10/100 = 0.10 (e) 9% = 9/100 = 0.09

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3. (a) 100%, 91%, 85%, 70%, 50%, 35%, 20% (b) 100%, 90/100, 75%, 0.50, 40/100, 0.25, 0.10 (c) 100%, 0.45, 44/100, 42%, 40%, 14/100, 4% 4. 75 5. 55

6. (a) €20

Maths Homework

(b) €60

34

(c) €5

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Prim-Ed Publishing®


PERCENTAGES NUMBER

1. Use the 100-block squares to represent the following percentages.

m

pl e

PUPIL NAME

(a) Shade the block 50% green, 25% blue (b) Shade the block 50% blue, 10% yellow, and 25% red. 30% green and 10% red.

(e)

%=

10 100

= 0.

(b) 25% =

g

= 0.

(d)

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(c)

100

in

(a) 50% =

Sa

2. Write the equivalent percentage, fraction and decimal.

%=

100

= 0.09

(f) 5% =

100 %=

= 0.

100

= 0.30

= 0.

100

3. Order the amounts from largest to smallest. (a) 20%, 91%, 85%, 50%, 100%, 35%, 70% (b) 100%, 0.50, 0.25, 40/100, 75%, 90/100, 0.10 (c) 4%, 40%, 0.45, 14/100, 44/100, 100%, 42% 4. Ms Green bought 100 stickers. If she used 25% of them in the first week, how many did she have left? 5. There were 100 cartons of juice. If 20% were mango and 25% were apple, how many were orange? 6. (a) 20% of €100 = Prim-Ed Publishing®

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(b) 60% of €100 = 35

(c) 5% of €100 = Maths Homework


MONEY NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Calculates addition and subtraction problems in a monetary context. Chooses appropriate operations to solve problems in a monetary context.

Concepts required

pl e

Calculating change from given amounts Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division with trading Place value Problem solving

Answers (b) €4.25

2. (a) €50.50 (d) €87.05

(b) €17.05

(c) €78.01

3. (a) €408.35 (d) €1723.97

(b) €574.70

(c) €704.10

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5. (a) €1185.70

(b) €115.95

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4. (a) €321.05 (d) €105.55

(b) €314.30

9. (a) €170.00

(b) €204

6. (a) €76.50

(c) €1.90

m

1. (a) €9.50 (d) €17.55

(c) €235.51

(b) €459.00

7. €85.50

8. €3177.30

Maths Homework

36

(c) €374.00

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MONEY NUMBER

1. Work out the change from €20.00 for each of the amounts spent. (a) €10.50

(b) €15.75

(c) €18.10

(d) €2.45

2. Work out the change from €100.00 for each of the amounts spent. (b) €82.95

(c) €21.99

(d) €12.95

3. (a) €262.85 (b) €366.45 (c) €408.55 (d) + €145.50 + €208.25 + €295.55

€984.99 + €738.98

4. (a) €425.50 (b) €505.90 (c) €525.50 (d) – €104.45 – €389.95 – €289.99

€1000.50 – €894.95

(b) If the goal was to raise €1500 for the charity, how much more money was needed?

(b) How much did the six children earn altogether?

in

g

Sa

m

5. (a) The following amounts were raised for a charity: €250, €425.75 and €509.95. What was the total amount? 6. (a) Six children earned money by washing cars. Each child washed nine cars and received €8.50 for each car. How much did each child earn?

pl e

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PUPIL NAME

(a) €49.50

7. An amount of €427.50 was charged to a credit card for five concert tickets. How much was each ticket?

8. Repayments on a loan were €529.55 per month. How much was paid off after six months?

9. Theme park entry for a day is €42.50 for adults and €25.50 for children. (a) Find the total for four (b) Find the total for eight (c) Find the grand total for adults. children. the 12 people.

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Maths Homework


MIXED PROBLEMS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Selects and uses the appropriate operation required to solve a word problem.

Concepts required

1. 296.8 km

Sa

2. 65.8 kg 3. 8.5 litres

g

4. 643

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7. 20 children

in

5. €85 6. €47.60

m

Answers

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Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers and decimal numbers Place value Problem solving Averages Percentages Fractions

8. 205.3 kg

Maths Homework

9. (a) €18 625

(b) €3725

10. (a) 52.5 metres

(b) €262.50

11. (a) 583.8 cm

(b) 145.95 cm

38

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MIXED PROBLEMS 2. Before starting an exercise programme, Jasmine weighed 74.2 kg. If she lost 8.4 kg, what was her new weight?

3. Twenty-five litres of fuel were needed to fill a petrol tank. How many more litres are needed if there is already 16.5 L in the tank?

4. Four players recorded batting scores of 87, 209, 158 and 189. What was the combined total?

5. Caitlin donated 15% of the €100 prize she won. How much did she keep?

6. How much would it cost to fill a 40 L tank if petrol was €1.19 a litre?

m

pl e

1. Mark travels 42.4 km daily. How far does he travel in one week?

g in

9. (a) Asha decided to buy a €25 000 car. If she paid a deposit of €6375, how much did she owe?

10. (a) One item requires 3.75 m of fabric to make. How much fabric is needed for 14 items? 11. (a) Four people recorded the following heights: 150.5 cm, 145 cm, 147.9 cm and 140.4 cm. What was their combined height? Prim-Ed Publishing®

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8. Four people recorded the following weights: 52 kg, 48.7 kg, 49.9 kg and 54.7 kg. What was their combined weight?

Sa

7. Three-quarters of a group of 80 were adults. How many children were there?

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PUPIL NAME

NUMBER

(b) If she took five years to pay the balance owing, how much did Asha pay each year? (b) If the fabric is €5 per metre, what is the total cost?

(b) What was the average height of the four people?

39

Maths Homework


MIXED MENTAL NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Shows proficiency with mental addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts.

Concepts required

Answers

Maths Homework

D

E

30

90

2

42

27

24

16

88

52

3

60

7

50

5

9

37

50

25

16

22

21

10

99

30

40

98

5

2

11

16

1

30

1

60

21

70

100

10

50

12

9

22

0

12

30

19

28

40

21

40

45

30

1

28

13

10

13

9

4

3

20

16

20

12

31

80

4

14

7

80

90

6

70

26

60

27

4

41

41

51

9

95

54

10

1

6

50

5

1

30

42

11

15

7

21

60

48

8

24

40

18

1

70

65

62

5

12

7

1

11

25

77

24

72

55

0

20

60

13

72

36

100

(a)

10

3

11

9

8

7

5

13

6

6

13

8

11

9

7

10

5

12

4

11

6

9

7

5

8

3

10

m

C

Sa

B

36 11

g

14

(b)

in

A

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Mentally adding one- and two-digit numbers Mentally subtracting one- and two-digit numbers Mentally multiplying to 12 x Mentally dividing by up to 12 x Magic square format

40

(c)

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MIXED MENTAL NUMBER

B

D

E

80 + 10 =

12 – 10 =

7x6=

17 + 10 =

19 + 5 =

4x4=

11 x 8 =

56 – 4 =

12 – 9 =

56 ÷ 8 =

10 + 40 =

30 ÷ 6 =

6x6=

9x1=

17 + 20 =

5 x 10 =

12 + 13 =

33 ÷ 3 =

4 + 12 =

44 – 22 =

30 – 9 =

90 ÷ 9 =

19 – 5 =

9 x 11 =

15 + 15 =

3 + 37 =

100 – 2 =

5x1=

16 ÷ 8 =

110 ÷ 10 =

2x8=

50 – 49 =

3 x 10 =

21 – 20 =

12 x 5 =

11 + 10 =

10 x 7 =

99 + 1 =

50 ÷ 5 =

41 + 9 =

19 – 7 =

19 – 10 =

2 x 11 =

10 x 0 =

6+6=

10 + 20 =

13 + 6 =

4x7=

44 – 4 =

3x7=

100 – 60 =

9x5=

5x6=

8÷8=

23 + 5 =

21 – 8 =

60 ÷ 6 =

5+8=

3x3=

40 ÷ 10 =

12 ÷ 4 =

35 – 15 =

15 + 1 =

15 + 5 =

48 ÷ 4 =

11 + 20 =

85 – 5 =

28 ÷ 7 =

8+6=

25 – 18=

70 + 10 =

10 x 9 =

10 – 4 =

7 x 10 =

22 + 4 =

15 + 12 =

20 ÷ 5 =

41 – 0 =

40 + 1 =

50 + 1 =

99 ÷ 11 =

97 – 2 =

2x5=

2÷2=

2x3=

4 + 46 =

11 ÷ 11 =

53 – 23 =

6x7=

88 ÷ 8 =

13 – 6 =

14 + 7 =

75 – 15 =

4 x 12 =

48 – 24 =

10 x 4 =

3 + 15 =

10 – 9 =

75 – 5 =

55 + 10 =

62 – 0 =

15 ÷ 3 =

24 ÷ 2 =

14 ÷ 2 =

6÷6=

77 ÷ 7 =

2 + 23 =

11 x 7 =

8x3=

8x9=

11 x 5 =

10 – 10 =

22 – 2 =

30 + 30 =

26 – 13 =

72 + 0 =

4x9=

20 + 80 =

45 ÷ 9 = 8+7= 40 ÷ 5 =

Sa g

5 x 12 =

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9x6=

m

35 – 5 =

100 – 40 =

PUPIL NAME

C

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A

Complete the magic squares, making sure that each column, row and diagonal adds up to the same amount. (a) (b) (c) 10 3 11 6 8 6 7 5 Prim-Ed Publishing®

6 www.prim-ed.com

10

5 41

12

8

10 Maths Homework


NUMBER SEQUENCES AND PATTERNS NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Continues and completes number patterns by following set rules. Identifies prime and composite numbers.

Concepts required Rules and patterns Prime numbers Composite numbers

Materials needed

Sa

1. (a) 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512 Rule: double each number

m

Answers

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Calculator

(b) 9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81 Rule: Add on nine

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(c) 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45, 55 Rule: add 2, then 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

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(d) 810, 790, 770, 750, 730, 710, 690, 670 Rule: Subtract 20 (e) 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 Rule: Add 0.5 (f) 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%, 35%, 40%, 45% Rule: Add 5% (g) 5, 10, 9, 18, 17, 34, 33, 66, 65, 130 Rule: Double, then subtract one. (h) 100, 98, 95, 91, 86, 80, 73, 65, 56, 46 Rule: Subtract 2 then 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 2. Answers will vary 3. Prime numbers are: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97. 4. Composite numbers are: 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 60, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 80, 81, 82, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 90, 91,92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 98, 99, 100.

Maths Homework

42

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NUMBER SEQUENCES AND PATTERNS NUMBER

1. Complete these number sequences. Write the rule to match each sequence. (a) 2, 4,

, 27, 36,

,

, 750,

,

, 2.0,

, 36,

,

,

, 690,

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,

, 3.5,

,

Rule: ,

,

56,

,

, 66,

,

,

,

, 45%

,

g

Rule:

m

, 25%,

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,

(h) 100, 98, 95, 91,

,

,

4. List the composite numbers between 1 and 100.

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, 15,

(g) 5, 10, 9, 18,

, 72,

Rule:

(f) 10%,

,

Rule:

(e) 0.5,

,

Rule:

(d) 810,

,

Rule:

(c) 1, 3, 6,

, 128,

Rule:

(b) 9,

,

in

, 16,

3. List the prime numbers between 1 and 100.

Rule:

2. Use a calculator to create four patterns of your own. Write the rule for each. (a)

Rule:

(b)

Rule:

(c)

Rule:

(d)

Rule:

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Maths Homework


NUMBER SENTENCES NUMBER

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Constructs and solves number sentences. Recognises and writes missing components in number sentences.

Concepts required

(b) 8 (e) 24 (h) 12

2. (a) ÷ (d) + (g) x

(b) – (e) x (h) ÷

3. (a) (d) (g) (j)

(b) (e) (h) (k)

4 18 90 50

in

g

13 6 7 40

(c) x (f) + (c) (f) (i) (l)

15 48 0 4

(b) 8 (e) 2

(c) 2 (f) 77

5. (a) < (d) < (g) <

(b) > (e) < (h) <

(c) < (f) <

6. (a) true (d) true

(b) false (e) false

(c) true (f) true

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4. (a) 4 (d) 4

(c) 37 (f) 8

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1. (a) 35 (d) 11 (g) €10

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Answers

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Number sentence structure Use of >, <, =, +, –, x, ÷ signs Completing brackets first in any number sentence Fractions, decimals, percentages

7. Answers will vary­—examples for a; (6 x 3) + 50 = 68 or (50 – 3) + 6 = 53

Maths Homework

44

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NUMBER SENTENCES NUMBER

1. Fill in the missing number to complete the number sentence. (a) 26 + 9 =

(e) 92 –

(b) 72 ÷

= 9

= 68 (f) 9.5 +

(c)

+ 23 = 60

= 17.5 (g)

(d) 12 x

= 132

– €5.10 = €4.90 (h) 120 ÷ 10 =

2. Fill in the missing signs. (a) 55

5 = 11

(e) €20

(b) 10.8

€5 = €100

6.4 = 4.4

(f) 42

58 = 100

(c) 9

9 = 81

(g) 5.1

2 = 10.2

(d) 61

61 = 122

(h) 72

6 = 12

(b) 40 ÷ (2 x 5) =

(e) 15 + (12 – 9) =

(g) (13 + 8) ÷ 3 =

(h) (8 x 8) + 26 =

(f) (7 x 4) + 20 =

(k) (10 x 7) – (4 x 5) =

(i) (64 ÷ 8) – 8 =

(l) (48 ÷ 4) ÷ (12 ÷ 4) =

Sa

(j) (4 x 2) + (8 x 4) =

(c) 4 + (99 ÷ 9) =

m

(d) 36 ÷ (5 + 1) =

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(a) 7 + (3 x 2) =

4. Fill in the missing number to complete the number sentence. (b) (60 ÷ 10) x (24 ÷

(d) (

) = 18 (c) (5 x 10) ÷ (

g

) + (3 + 4) = 14

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(a) (28 ÷

x 9) + (2 x 7) = 50

(e) (20 –

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PUPIL NAME

3. Complete these number sentences.

) – (3 x 6) = 0

(f) (

x 5) = 5

÷ 7) x (10 – 4) = 66

5. Complete the following by using > or <. (a) 40 + 55 (e) 7 x 9

100 (b) 3/4

64

/4

(c) 2.24

22.24

(d) 0.25

8.4 (g) 7071

7171

(h) 81 ÷ 9

1

(f) 2.4 + 2.4

50% 19 – 9

6. Write if each number sentence is true or false. (a) 5 x 8 = 38 + 2

(b) 75% > 3/4

(c) 200 – 150 = 100 – 50 (e) 2 weeks > 20 days

(d) 2 hours < 200 minutes

(f) 7.1 + 7.9 = 45 – 30

7. Use the sets of numbers to write number sentences. Answer each number sentence. (a) 6, 3, 50

(b) 6, 3, 2, 4

(c) 8, 2, 3, 24

(d) 2, 3, 5, 18

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Maths Homework


LINES AND ANGLES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and describes a variety of line types. Identifies and draws a variety of angles.

Concepts required Line types: horizontal, vertical, parallel, perpendicular, diagonal Angles: right, acute, obtuse

Answers

m

Ruler Protractor

pl e

Materials needed

Sa

1. (a) Horizontal lines run in the same direction as the horizon. (b) Vertical lines run up and down.

g

(c) Parallel lines run side by side, always with the same angle so they never meet.

Vi ew

in

(d) Perpendicular lines occur when a horizontal line and a vertical line meet at right angles. (e) Diagonal lines are slanted. 2. Answers will vary

3. Teacher check (a) right angle = 90º (b) acute angle = less than 90º (c) obtuse angle = more than 90º but less than 180˚ 4. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

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LINES AND ANGLES SHAPE

1. Write a description and draw an example of each type of line.

(a) horizontal

(b) vertical

(c) parallel

pl e

(e) diagonal

2. Draw an example of something at home that has the following types of lines. (b) diagonal lines

in

g

Sa

m

(a) parallel lines

3. Use a ruler to draw the following angles. (a) right angle

(b) acute angle

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PUPIL NAME

(d) perpendicular

(c) obtuse angle

4. Draw an example of something at home that has the following types of angles. (a) a right angle

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(b) an acute angle

47

(c) an obtuse angle

Maths Homework


2-D SHAPES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and represents 2-D shapes. Identifies properties of 2-D shapes.

Concepts required

m

pl e

Recognition of 2-D shapes Identifying properties of polygons, quadrilaterals, triangles and circles Recognition of different types of triangle – right-angled, equilateral, isosceles and scalene Use of a compass and set radius to draw circles Knowledge of circle properties – centre, circumference, radius, diameter

Materials needed

g

Sa

Compass Ruler

Answers

Vi ew

in

1. Polygons are shapes which have three or more straight sides. Teacher check 2. (a) Quadrilaterals are 2-D shapes with four straight sides. (b) Teacher check

3. (a) right-angled has one angle of 90º (b) equilateral has three equal sides and angles (c) isosceles has two equal sides and angles (d) scalene has no equal sides or angles 4. Teacher check circles. (Answer is not to scale.) diameter radius centre

circumference

Maths Homework

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2-D SHAPES SHAPE

sides:

sides:

sides:

sides:

angles:

angles:

angles:

angles:

m

pl e

2. (a) What is a quadrilateral? (b) Draw three examples.

Sa

3. Write a description and draw an example of each type of triangle.

in

(b) equilateral

g

(a) right-angled

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PUPIL NAME

1. Draw and label four different polygons. Write the number of sides and angles for each.

(c) isosceles

(d) scalene

4. Use a compass to draw a circle with a 3-cm radius. Label the following.

(a) centre (b) circumference (c) radius (d) diameter

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Maths Homework


3-D SHAPES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and names 3-D shapes. Identifies properties of pyramids and prisms.

Concepts required Recognition of 3-D shapes Properties of 3-D shapes Understanding of nets

No. of faces

2.

Name

triangular prism square prism rectangular prism pentagonal prism hexagonal prism octagonal prism

3. (a)

Maths Homework

No. of edges

No. of vertices

triangle

triangle

4

6

4

square

triangle

5

8

5

rectangle

triangle

5

8

5

pentagon

triangle

6

10

6

Sa

m

Face shape

hexagon

triangle

7

12

7

octagon

triangle

9

16

9

Front/Back shape

Face shape

No. of faces

No. of edges

No. of vertices

triangle

rectangle

5

9

6

square

rectangle

6

12

8

rectangle rectangle

6

12

8

pentagon rectangle

7

15

10

hexagon

rectangle

8

18

12

octagon

rectangle

10

24

16

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triangular pyramid square pyramid rectangular pyramid pentagonal pyramid hexagonal pyramid octagonal pyramid

Base shape

g

Name

in

1.

pl e

Answers

(b)

(c)

50

(d)

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3-D SHAPES SHAPE

1. Describe the following pyramids by completing the table. Base shape

Face shape

Number of Number of Number of faces edges vertices

pl e

Name

2. Describe the following prisms by completing the table. Face shape

m

Front/Back shape

Name

Number of faces

Number of edges

Number of vertices

in

g

Sa

Shape

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Shape

3. Draw the following shapes and their nets. (a) cube (b) triangular pyramid

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(c) cone

(d) cylinder

Maths Homework


PERSPECTIVE AND TRANSFORMATIONS SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Draws tessellating shapes. Draws shapes that reflect, translate and rotate. Draws perspective. Reduces and enlarges images using a grid.

Concepts required

Answers

m

pl e

Identification of tessellations Polygons Changing shapes by reflecting, translating and rotating Bird’s-eye perspective Scale – reducing and enlarging

Vi ew

in

3. (a)

g

2. Teacher check perspective.

Sa

1. Answers will vary A polygon is a shape with three or more sides. Tessellating shapes fit together without any gaps or overlapping.

(b)

(c)

4. Teacher check reduced image. 5. Teacher check enlarged image.

Maths Homework

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PERSPECTIVE AND TRANSFORMATIONS SHAPE

1. Make a tessellating pattern using a polygon. 2. Sketch a bird’s-eye view of your bedroom.

3. Move the position of the following shapes. Reflected

Translated

Rotated 90º anticlockwise

in

g

Sa

m

pl e

PUPIL NAME

Shape

5. Draw an enlarged copy of the picture.

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4. Draw a reduced copy of the picture.

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Maths Homework


SYMMETRY SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies and draws lines of symmetry. Completes pictures to show symmetry.

Concepts required

Ruler

Answers (b) 2

(c) Multiple lines

(e) 4

(f) 5

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(d) 1

in

g

Sa

1. (a) 3

m

Materials needed

pl e

Understands that a line of symmetry divides a shape or object into two halves where one half is an exact mirror image of the other. Understands that there may be one line of symmetry, multiple or no lines of symmetry.

2. Answers will vary 3. Teacher check

Maths Homework

54

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SYMMETRY SHAPE

1. Draw and record the number of lines of symmetry for each shape. (a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

2. Draw two items from home that show: (b) multiple lines of symmetry.

in

g

Sa

m

pl e

PUPIL NAME

(a) no lines of symmetry.

(a)

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3. Complete the pictures to make them symmetrical. Draw your own picture for (d). (b)

(c)

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55

Maths Homework


DIRECTIONS SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Describes direction using conventional locational language. Describes location using compass point directions.

Concepts required Compass directions Locating information on a map

Materials needed

Answers 1.

NE

W

E SE

SW

Seattle Houston Los Angeles east

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3. (a) (c) (e) (g)

(b) west

in

2. (a) east

g

S

Sa

NW

m

N

pl e

Atlas

(b) (d) (f) (h)

Boston, New York north-east St Louis Boston

4. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

56

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DIRECTIONS SHAPE

2. (a) From which direction does the sun rise?

1. Add the direction abbreviations to the compass.

(b) In which direction does the sun set? Seattle

Boston New York

St Louis

Las Vegas Los Angeles

pl e

(a) What city is directly located in the far north-west?

Houston New Orleans

m

Sa

(b) What two cities are located on the east coast?

g

(c) What city is directly west of New Orleans?

in

(d) In which direction is Chicago from Houston? (e) What city is south-west of Las Vegas?

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PUPIL NAME

3. Answer the questions about this map of the United States of America.

Chicago

Salt Lake City

San Francisco

(f) What city is south-west of New York? (g) In which direction is Salt Lake City from San Francisco? (h) What is the most eastern city marked on the map? 4. Use the map of Ireland, an atlas and compass directions to answer the questions. (a) Label the city, town or area where you live. (b) I live

of Dublin.

(c) I am located closest to the

coast.

(d) The Giantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Causeway is to the where I live.

of

(e) The Blarney Stone is located to the

of where I live.

(f) The Irish Sea is located to the Prim-Ed PublishingÂŽ

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of where I live. 57

Maths Homework


MAP FEATURES AND SCALES SHAPE

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Designs a key to represent map features. Uses a scale to interpret distance. Uses compass point directions to describe location.

Concepts required

Materials needed

Sa

Answers 1. Answers will vary

g

(c) 50 km (f) 22.5 km

east/north-east (b) north (c) 600 km 400 km (e) south-west (f) 300 km Shikoku, Kyushu, Hokkaido, Honshu 400 km, 1200 km, 500 km, 500 km; total = 2600 km

Vi ew

3. (a) (d) (g) (h)

(b) 25 km (e) 7.5 km (h) 102.5 km

in

2. (a) 10 km (d) 35 km (g) 75 km

m

Ruler

pl e

A key uses symbols to represent specific features. Scale Compass directions Locating information on a map

Maths Homework

58

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MAP FEATURES AND SCALES SHAPE

park

1. Design a key to suit the features of the town where you live. Use eight different symbols to identify the features you choose; for example,

(a) 2 cm =

km

(b) 5 cm =

(d) 7 cm =

km

(e) 1.5 cm =

(g) 15 cm =

km km

(h) 20.5 cm =

(c) 10 cm =

km

(f) 4.5 cm =

km

km

pl e

km

3. Answer the questions about this map of Japan. (a) In which direction is Tokyo from Kyoto?

(b) In which direction is Otaru from Tokyo?

(c) How many km is it from Osaka to Tokyo?

(d) How many km is it from Nagasaki to Hiroshima?

(e) In which direction is Kagoshima from Shikoku?

(f) How many km long is the island of Shikoku?

(g) List the four islands in order of size from smallest to largest.

in

g

Sa

m

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

2. The scale on a map reads 1 cm = 5 km. Convert these cm to km.

,

,

HOKKAIDO Otaru

Kushiro

,

(h) How many km would you travel if you travel from

Kushiro to Otaru (

km), onto Tokyo (

then Kyoto (

km) and then Hiroshima (

Total km =

km

Hiroshima Nagasaki KYUSHU Kagoshima

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km),

Osaka

SHIKOKU

km?

HONSHU Kyoto

Tokyo N E

W

S Scale 1 cm = 200 km (Scale may not represent actual distances.)

59

Maths Homework


LENGTH MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies formal measurement units. Measures length in centimetres. Finds equivalent measures. Adds and subtracts lengths.

Concepts required

m

pl e

Formal measurement units – mm, cm, km Proficient use of a ruler Equivalent units of length Estimating Adding and subtracting measurements

Materials needed

Sa

Ruler Tape measure

(b) 100 cm

(c) 1000 m

(c) 2000 (f) 450

in

1. (a) 10 mm (d) 1000 mm

g

Answers

Vi ew

2. Answers will vary

(b) 300 (e) 75 (h) 4100

5. (a) 510 cm or 5.1 m (c) 5.5 km or 5500 m

(b) 5.05 m or 505 cm (d) 25 mm or 2.5 cm

6. (a) 1.5 m or 150 cm (c) 730 cm or 7300 mm

(b) 10 m or 1000 cm (d) 6 km or 6000 m

3. (a) 40 (d) 1200 (g) 4200

4. Answers will vary

7. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

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LENGTH MEASUREMENT

1. (a) 1 cm =

mm

(b) 1 m =

cm

(c) 1 km =

m

(d) 1 m =

mm

2. Complete the table by listing four things you could best measure using each unit. Millimetres (mm)

Centimetres (cm)

Metres (m)

Kilometres (km)

mm

(b) 3 m =

cm

(d) 120 cm =

mm

(e) 7.5 cm =

(g) 4.2 km =

m

(h) 410 m =

(c) 2 km =

m

pl e

(a) 4 cm =

mm

(f) 4.5 m =

cm

m

cm

Sa

4. Use a ruler (or tape measure) to measure the length of each item at home. (a) television (b) phone (c) toaster cm length = (e) kitchen table

cm length = (f) window

cm

cm

cm

cm

length =

in

length =

g

length = (d) fridge

length =

5. Add the following lengths.

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PUPIL NAME

3. Complete the conversions.

(a) 10 cm and 5 m =

(c) 3 km and 2500 m =

(d) 20 mm and 0.5 cm =

cm or

m (b) 5 m and 5 cm =

km or

m or

cm

m

mm or

cm

6. Calculate the range of difference between the following lengths. (a) 2 m and 50 cm = (b) 10.8 m and 80 cm = (c) 750 cm and 200 mm = (d) 8.5 km and 2500 m =

m or

cm

m or

cm

cm or

mm

km or

m

7. (a) Estimate the distance from your front door to the road. (b) Estimate the distance from your house to school. Prim-Ed Publishing速

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61

m km Maths Homework


PERIMETER MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Uses a ruler to measure perimeter and draw to scale. Calculates perimeter from given measurements.

Concepts required

Ruler

Answers (b) 95 mm

2. Teacher check 3. (a) (i) 20 cm, (ii) 10 cm

Vi ew

6. 46 cm

(b) 60 cm

in

5. 556 mm

(c) 150 mm

g

4. 15.6 cm

Sa

1. (a) 160 mm

m

Materials needed

pl e

Knowledge that perimeter is the distance around a shape Proficient use of a ruler to measure accurately in mm and cm Addition skills

7. 32 m

8. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

62

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PERIMETER MEASUREMENT

1. Use your ruler to measure the perimeter, in millimetres, of each shape.

(a) P =

mm

(b) P =

mm

(c) P =

mm

2. Draw a shape with a perimeter of:

pl e

(b) 90 mm.

(i)

Sa

m

3. (a) Use the measurements given to determine 6 cm the lengths of sides (i) and (ii). (The shape is not to scale.) (b) What is the perimeter of the shape?

P =

g

cm

6. Find the perimeter of a rectangle if the length is 14 cm and the width is 9 cm. P =

working out

in

4. Find the perimeter of a square if one side measures 3.9 cm.

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(a) 150 mm.

cm

8 cm

(ii) 4 cm 12 cm

5. Find the perimeter of a square if one side measures 139 mm. P =

mm

7. What is the perimeter of an area that is 10.6 m long and 5.4 m wide?

working out

working out

working out

cm P =

m

8. Draw three items from home and use a ruler to measure the sides of each in centimetres. Record the measurements on each diagram and calculate the perimeters. (a) P =

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(b) P =

cm

63

(c) P =

cm

Maths Homework


AREA MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Measures the area of shapes using informal and formal units. Calculates area.

Concepts required Area = length x width Multiplication Use of a calculator

pl e

Materials needed

Answers 20 24 45 16

(b) 44 (e) 40 (h) 29

Sa

1. (a) (d) (g) (j)

(c) 60 (f) 46 (i) 14

(c) 60 cm2

in

Vi ew

4. 25.2 m2

(b) 28 m2 (e) 13.75 m2

g

2. (a) 8 cm2 (d) 21 m2 3. 196 cm2

m

Calculator

5. (a) 95.46 m2 (d) 40 656 mm2

(b) 8800 cm2

(c) 14 896 mm2

6. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

64

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AREA MEASUREMENT

1. Count the squares to find the area of each shape. Write the area inside each shape. (b)

(a)

(e)

(c)

(d)

(g)

(f)

(j)

pl e

(h)

Width = 2 cm

Area =

(b) Length = 7 m

Width = 4 m

Area =

m2

(c) Length = 12 cm

Width = 5 cm

Area =

cm2

(d) Length = 10.5 m

Width = 2 m

Area =

m2

Width = 2.5 m Area =

m2

in

Sa

(a) Length = 4 cm

g

m

2. Calculate the area of the following shapes. (Area = L x W)

(e) Length = 5.5 m

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PUPIL NAME

(i)

3. Find the area of a square with sides of 14 cm. A =

cm2

4. Find the area of a rectangle if the length is 8.4 m and the width is 3 m.

cm2

A =

m2

5. Use a calculator to work out each shape’s area. (a) L = 12.9 m W = 7.4 m A =

m2 (b) L = 275 cm W = 32 cm A =

(c) L = 152 mm

W = 98 mm

A=

mm2

(d) L = 242 mm

W = 168 mm

A=

mm2

cm2

6. Measure the length and width of three items from home. Find the area of each. (a) Item =

L=

W=

A=

(b) Item =

L=

W=

A=

(c) Item =

L=

W=

A=

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Maths Homework


VOLUME AND CAPACITY MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies formal units of volume and capacity. Orders the capacity of items measured in millilitres and litres. Calculates volume.

Concepts required

(b) 2000 (e) 4.5 (h) 2.49

2. Answers will vary

Vi ew

5. 16 cups

Maths Homework

(b) 1.6 L or 1600 mL (d) 7.5 L or 7500 mL

in

4. 9 doses

(c) 5 (f) 4400

g

3. (a) 0.5 L or 500 mL (c) 2.5 L or 2500 mL

Sa

1. (a) 1000 (d) 2500 (g) 6100

m

Answers

pl e

Knowledge of formal measurement units – millilitres and litres Equivalent units of measurement Ordering Subtraction Volume = length x width x height

6. (a) 32 cm3 (d) 11 cm3

(b) 18 cm3 (e) 14 cm3

(c) 34 cm3

7. (a) 4 m3

(b) 18 m3

(c) 100 m3

66

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VOLUME AND CAPACITY MEASUREMENT

1. (a) 1 L =

mL

(b) 2 L =

mL

(c) 5000 mL =

L

(d) 2.5 L =

mL

(e) 4500 mL =

L

(f) 4.4L =

mL

(g) 6.1 L =

mL

(h) 2490 mL =

L

2. Find six items used in your home that are measured in millilitres. Write the items in order of their total capacity. Start with the smallest capacity. Item

Capacity

pl e

mL

m

Largest

Sa

3. Calculate the range of difference between the following measurement of capacity. L or

mL

(b) 2 L and 400 mL =

L or

mL

in

(c) 4 L and 1500 mL =

g

(a) 1 L and 500 mL =

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

Smallest

(d) 10 L and 2500 mL =

L or

mL

L or

mL

4. How many 5 mL doses are in a 45 mL bottle of medicine? 5. How many 250 mL cups of water are needed to fill a 4 L container? 6. Write the volume of these 3-D cube models.

(a) V =

cm3 (b) V =

cm3 (c) V =

cm3 (d) V =

cm3 (e) V =

cm3

7. Find the volume of the following. (Volume = L x W x H) (a) Length = 2 m Width = 1 m Height = 2 m Volume =

m3

(b) Length = 3 m Width = 2 m Height = 3 m Volume =

m3

(c) Length = 5 m Width = 2 m Height = 10 m Volume =

m3

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67

Maths Homework


MASS MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies formal units of measuring mass. Orders the mass of items in grams and kilograms. Calculates equivalent measures.

Concepts required

(b) g (e) kg

Sa

1. (a) kg (d) g 2. Answers will vary

(b) 0.5 (e) 4500

6. (a) 145.4 kg (d) 7.5 kg

Maths Homework

(c) 2.5 (f) 1250

(b) 1.4 kg or 1400 g (d) 7.5 kg or 7500 g

150 g, 200 g, 250 g, 500 g, 750 g, 920 g 4 kg, 9 kg, 14 kg, 21 kg, 50 kg, 75 kg 15.9 kg, 25.5 kg, 50.5 kg, 55.5 kg, 105.5 kg, 155.5 kg 500 g, 750 g, 1000 g, 1.2 kg, 1300 g, 1.5 kg 200 g, 0.25 kg, 0.5 kg, 2000 g, 2.1 kg, 2500 g

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5. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

(c) g (f) kg

in

4. (a) 0.5 kg or 500 g (c) 2.5 kg or 2500 g

g

3. (a) 1000 (d) 0.25

m

Answers

pl e

Knowledge of formal measurement units – grams and kilograms Lighter/Heavier than Equivalent units of measurement Ordering Calculating weight measurements Problem solving

(b) Riley

68

(c) Ben

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MASS MEASUREMENT

1. Write whether you would best measure each of the following in grams (g) or kilograms (kg). (a) yourself

(b) four pencils

(d) an apple

(e) six house bricks

(c) tennis ball (f) your teacher

2. Complete the following statements about weight. (a) A newborn baby is lighter than

(c)

is heavier than

(d)

is lighter than

(a) 1 kg =

g

(b) 500 g =

kg

(e) 4.5 kg =

kg

(c) 2500 g=

kg

g

(f) 1.25 kg =

g

m

(d) 250 g =

pl e

3. Convert the following measurements.

Sa

4. Find the range of difference between each of the following measurements of mass. kg or

g

(b) 2 kg and 600 g =

kg or

g

(d) 10 kg and 2500 g =

kg or

g

in

(c) 4 kg and 1500 g =

g

(a) 1 kg and 500 g =

kg or

g

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(b) My bed is heavier than

5. Order the measurements from lightest to heaviest. (a) 200 g, 920 g, 150 g, 500 g, 250 g, 750 g (b) 4 kg, 21 kg, 14 kg, 75 kg, 9 kg, 50 kg (c) 50.5 kg, 55.5 kg, 15.9 kg, 155.5 kg, 105.5 kg, 25.5 kg (d) 1.5 kg, 1000 g, 750 g, 1.2 kg, 1300 g, 500 g (e) 0.25 kg, 0.5 kg, 200 g, 2000 g, 2.1 kg, 2500 g 6. Quang weighs 49.5 kg, Riley weighs 44.2 kg and Ben weighs 51.7 kg. (a) What is the total mass of the boys?

kg

(b) Who is the lightest? (c) Who is the heaviest?

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(d) What is the difference between the lightest and heaviest?

69

kg Maths Homework


TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Reads, records and orders temperatures in degrees Celsius. Analyses information from a table of data.

Concepts required

Materials needed

pl e

Degrees Celsius ºC Reading and recording thermometers Ordering Extracting information from specific data Sourcing required information

Sa

Answers

m

Newspaper/Television/Internet climatic temperature source

1. Teacher check

2. London, Cardiff, Birmingham, Dublin, Belfast, Edinburgh

g

(b) Berlin (e) 28 ºC (h) Berlin and London

in

3. (a) New Delhi (d) 30 ºC (g) 18 ºC

(c) Bangkok (f) 23 ºC

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4. Teacher check

Maths Homework

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TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

1. Record the temperature of each city on the wall thermometers. (a) Dublin (b) Cardiff (c) London (d) Birmingham (e) Belfast (f) Edinburgh 19 ºC 21 ºC 23 ºC 20 ºC 17 ºC 14 ºC

2. Order the cities above from warmest to coolest. ,

,

,

,

,

(a) Which city had the highest maximum temperature?

m

pl e

3. Use the table, showing the maximum and minimum temperatures (ºC) of cities around the world, to answer the questions.

City

Max.

Min.

Athens

19 ºC

14 ºC

Bangkok

28 ºC

26 ºC

Berlin

14 ºC

1 ºC

Dubai

38 ºC

28 ºC

Dublin

15 ºC

8 ºC

Honolulu

25 ºC

20 ºC

London

21 ºC

8 ºC

Moscow

9 ºC

2 ºC

(f) What is the difference in maximum temperature between Dubai and Dublin?

New Delhi

39 ºC

29 ºC

New York

20 ºC

13 ºC

(g) What is the difference in minimum temperatures between Bangkok and London?

Tokyo

18 ºC

14 ºC

(h) Which two cities recorded the most varying temperatures?

(b) Which city was the coldest overnight?

(c) Which city recorded the least difference between maximum and minimum temperatures?

Sa

(d) What is the difference in temperature between the highest and lowest maximums?

in

g

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(e) What is the difference in temperature between the highest and lowest minimums?

and

4. Use a source to record the following temperatures for your city. Yesterday Max.

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Today Min.

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Max.

Tomorrow Min.

71

Max.

Min.

Maths Homework


ANGLES MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Identifies markings on a protractor. Identifies and measures angles. Uses a protractor to measure and draw specific angles.

Concepts required Familiarity with protractors and how to use them correctly Types of angles — right, acute, obtuse, straight, reflex

Answers

A right angle equals 90º. An acute angle is less than 90º. An obtuse angle is more than 90º and less than 180º. A reflex angle is larger than 180º.

g

(a) (b) (c) (d)

in

2.

Sa

1. Teacher check

m

Coloured pencils Protractor

pl e

Materials needed

Vi ew

3. (a) acute, 40º (d) straight, 180º

(b) right, 90º (e) reflex, 270º

(c) acute, 10º (f) obtuse, 130º

4. Teacher check

Maths Homework

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ANGLES MEASUREMENT

1. (a) Complete the measurements on the protractor. (b) Use different colours to mark: (i) a right angle (ii) an acute angle (iii) an obtuse angle.

90 100

70

180 170 1 60

160

10

40

50

20

0

0

120

2. Write a description for each type of angle. (a) right

pl e

(c) obtuse

m

(d) reflex

º

(b)

º

(c)

(f)

º

in

g

(a)

Sa

3. Identify each type of angle, then measure each with a protractor.

(d)

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(b) acute

º

º

(e)

º

4. Use a protractor to draw the following angles. (a) 20º

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(b) 160º

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(c) 110º

73

Maths Homework


TIME MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Records analogue, digital and 24-hour times. Calculates elapsed time. Solves time-related problems.

Concepts required

Answers (b) 21 past 5, 5.21 (e) 7 past 7, 7.07

2. (a) 1400 (d) 1525 (g) 2148

(b) 2030 (e) 2355 (h) 1705

3. (a) 7.48 am (d) 3.13 am

(b) 3.25 pm

Sa

g

(c) 1815 (f) 1232 (c) 11.15 pm (c) 2 h 30 min

Vi ew

5. 7 h 45 min

(b) 50 min

in

4. (a) 50 min (d) 5 h 25 min

(c) 7 to 4, 3.53 (f) 2 to 5, 4.58

m

1. (a) 17 past 12, 12.17 (d) 12 to 7, 6.48

pl e

Reading and recording of analogue and digital times 24-hour time Calculating elapsed time Problem solving

6. 7.05 am

7. 10 hr 15 min 8. 6 hr 20 min 9. 1 hr 20 min 10. 4.30 pm

Maths Homework

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TIME MEASUREMENT

1. Write the analogue and digital time shown on each clock face. (a) 12

1

10

(b) 11

2

8

6

12

5

1

10

11

2

6

1

8

5

6

(e) 11.55 pm

(f) 12.32 pm

11

2

5

6

12

1

10 8

(c) 6.15 pm

(g) 9.48 pm

2 3

9

m

(b) 8.30 pm

(f)

Sa

(a) 2.00 pm

5

to past . . 2. Change the following to 24-hour times.

7

to .

4 7

4

3

9

4 7

12

2 3

8

5

10

4 7

6

5

to .

(d) 3.25 pm (h) 5.05 pm

3. What time will it be five hours after these times? (b) 10.25 am

(c) 6.15 pm

g

(a) 2.48 am

(d) 10.13 pm

in

4. How much time has passed between the following times? (a) 1.09 am and 1.59 am

(b) 8.35 pm and 9.25 pm

(c) 11.55 pm and 2.25 am

(d) 10.20 am and 3.45 pm

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

8

6

1

9

4 7

12

10

past . (e)

3

9

11

2 3

8

past . (d) 11

(c)

9

4 7

1

10 3

9

12

pl e

11

5. Blake started work at 8.30 am and finished at 4.15 pm. How long did he spend at work? 6. Natalie left home at 6.15 in the morning. If it took her 50 minutes to reach her destination, what time did she arrive? 7. Caitlin went to sleep at 8.55 pm and woke at 7.10 am. How long did she sleep for? 8. The first leg of our trip took three hours and 25 minutes. The second leg took two hours and 55 minutes. How long was the trip in total?

9. Drew arrived at the airport at 11.45 am to catch a flight scheduled to depart at 1.05 pm. How long did he wait? 10. A game is played in 20 minute quarters. There are two 10 minute breaks and one 20 minute break. If a game starts at 2.30 pm, what time will it finish? Prim-Ed Publishing速

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Maths Homework


CALENDARS AND TIMETABLES MEASUREMENT

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Interprets information from calendars and timetables. Organises and records events in a timetable.

Concepts required

Materials needed

Sa

m

Current calendar Current television guide

pl e

Using a calendar Number of days, weeks, months in a year Elapsed time Creating a timetable of activities Reading a television timetable

Answers

in

2. Answers will vary

g

1. Teacher check (a) to (f) (g) Months with 31 days – January, March, May, July, August, October, December

Vi ew

3. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

76

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CALENDARS AND TIMETABLES MEASUREMENT

1. Use a calendar to answer the questions. (a) On what day of the week is your birthday this year? (b) What is the date three weeks before your birthday? (c) What is the date four weeks after your birthday? (d) What will be the date seven weeks and two days from today? (e) What was the date 15 days ago? (f) How many days are there in the current month?

Activity

Time (pm)

Activity

in

g

Sa

m

Time (am)

pl e

2. Write a timetable to show what you did yesterday.

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(g) List all the months that have 31 days.

3. Use today’s TV guide and choose ONE channel’s timetable to answer the questions. (a) What programme begins at 6 pm? (b) How much time is scheduled for:

(i) sport programmes?

(ii) news programmes?

(iii) films?

(iv) game shows? (c) If you had a total of 90 minutes of viewing time, what programmes would you choose to watch? (e) If you turned the TV on right now, what programme would be playing? (d) If you turned the TV on as soon as you woke up this morning, what programme would have been showing? Prim-Ed Publishing®

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Maths Homework


CHANCE DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Identifies and predicts outcomes.

Concepts required Terms – likely, unlikely, possible, impossible, certain Percentage relating to chance Interpreting results from a chance experiment

Coin

m

Answers

pl e

Materials needed

1. Answers will vary

Sa

2. Answers will vary

Vi ew

in

g

3. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

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CHANCE DATA

1. Complete the following statements based on what you think is likely to occur tomorrow. (a) It’s likely (b) It’s impossible (c) It’s very likely (d) It’s possible (e) It’s unlikely (f) It’s certain 2. Complete the following statements.

pl e

(a) 100% chance I will (b) 50% chance I will

m

(c) 25% chance

Sa

(d) 75% chance

3. Flip a coin ten times and record the results. 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

in

g

1

(a) What chance did you have of flipping a head on your first toss?

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

On the weekend, there is a:

(b) What percentage of turns did you flip heads? (c) What percentage of turns did you flip tails?

%

% %

(d) What is the chance of recording the same results if you flipped a coin 10 times? (e) Repeat the experiment. 1

2

3

4

5

6

(f) What percentage of turns did you flip heads? (g) What percentage of turns did you flip tails?

7

8

9

10

% %

(h) Which side came up the most in both experiments? Prim-Ed Publishing®

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Maths Homework


DATA DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Writes survey questions and makes predictions. Uses data to construct and interpret a line graph. Chooses appropriate formats for representing data.

Concepts required

Answers (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

Teacher check line graph. suggested: Maximum temperatures for Spain during one week Sunday Thursday Monday and Friday

Sa

2.

m

1. Answers will vary

pl e

Understanding purpose and construction of surveys Line graphs Interpreting data Different forms of representing data

in

g

3. Suggestions include: questionnaire, table, tally, tree diagram, Venn diagram, bar graph, pictogram, line graph, strip graph, pie graph

Vi ew

4. Answers will vary

Maths Homework

80

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DATA DATA

1. (a) Think of a question to ask your friends to find out what item from a list of choices they use the most. (b) List the six items to include in your survey for others to choose from.

(c) Which item do you think would be the most popular? (d) Which item do you think would be the least popular?

pl e m Sa

in

g

These maximum temperatures were recorded for Spain over the period of one week: Monday 23 ºC Tuesday 25 ºC Wednesday 19 ºC Thursday 18 ºC Friday 23 ºC Saturday 27 ºC Sunday 30 ºC

(b) What title would you give this graph?

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

2. (a) Use the following data to create a line graph.

(c) On what day was the highest maximum temperature recorded? (d) On what day was the lowest maximum temperature recorded? (e) What days recorded the same maximum temperature? 3. List six different forms of representing data.

4. Decide on the most appropriate format of representing the following data. (a) types of food sold at the school canteen (b) possible outcomes of throwing a die 20 times (c) favourite sports played by classmates (d) time spent on daily activities (e) yearly rainfall recorded Prim-Ed Publishing®

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Maths Homework


DIAGRAMS AND TABLES DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Analyses data presented in diagrams and tables.

Concepts required Tree diagram Venn diagram Two-way table Percentage

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

eight Sartorni Gibson, Messino, Knight Anderson, Gibson, Novakoss, Wallace Knight

Sa

2. (a) 20 (b) six (d) Ella, Ben, Chris, Amal (e) 50%

m

1.

pl e

Answers

(c) 10

Vi ew

in

g

3. (a) 10 (b) six (c) Jaxon and Dean (d) 50 % (e) Lucy, Anthony, Peter (f) Answer will vary

Maths Homework

82

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DIAGRAMS AND TABLES DATA

1. This tree diagram shows the results of a tennis tournament. Use it to answer the questions. ANDERSON

(a) How many players started in the tournament?

MESSINO

MESSINO

(b) Who was the eventual winner?

SARTORNI

SARTORNI

(c) Which players did he/she need to beat to win the tournament? SARTORNI (d) Which players were eliminated in the first round?

SARTORNI

GIBSON KNIGHT

KNIGHT

NOVAKOSS

KNIGHT

(e) Who was the winner’s opponent in the final?

XU

pl e

WALLACE

Alex Ella

Zac

Lana

Tess

Tengu

Chris Ben

Rebecca

Amal

Lin

Amanda

in

Logan

Isaac

Lee

Rose

Asha

Lily

(b) How many preferred the USA?

g

Olivia

USA

Sa

Australia

m

2. Use the Venn diagram to answer the questions. (a) How many people were surveyed? Preferred holiday location

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

XU

Dylan

(c) How many preferred Australia? (d) Who liked both destinations? (e) What percentage of people preferred Australia?

3. Use the two-way table to answer the questions. (a) How many people were surveyed? Love coffee Hate coffee Love tea Hate tea Jaxon

Lucy

Fadwa

Jaxon

Fadwa

Anthony

Grace

Anthony

Dean

Peter

Taylor

Lucy

Ismail

Grace

Ismail

Peter

Taylor

Kiara

Dean

Kiara

(d) What percentage of people love tea? (e) Who hates coffee and tea? (f) Add your name to the table.

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(b) How many hate coffee? (c) Who loves coffee but hates tea?

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Maths Homework


GRAPHS DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objectives Analyses data presented in tables and graphs. Uses data to construct a bar graph.

Reading tables Constructing bar graphs Pie graphs Strip graphs Scale Percentage

Sa

Ruler

m

Materials needed

pl e

Concepts required

Answers 1. (a) Teacher check

(b) Answers will vary

eight black and pink white and green blue

Vi ew

3. (a) (c) (e) (g)

in

g

2. (a) peanuts (b) peanuts and pecans or peanuts and macadamias (c) 1/4 (d) 50%

Maths Homework

(b) two (d) blue (f) red, blue and green

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GRAPHS DATA

1. Nick rolled a die 50 times and recorded the following results. Title

(a) Use the information to create a bar graph. Number

Tally

Total

1

7

2

5

3

8

4

10

5

8

6

12

pl e

m

Favourite nuts

2. Use the pie graph to answer the questions.

ac

M

Sa

(a) What was the most popular type of nut?

Cashews

g

s

ia

Peanuts

in

,

am

ad

(b) What two types of nut made up half of the total?

Almonds

(c) What fraction chose almonds or pecans?

Vi ew

PUPIL NAME

(b) Write three questions about the graph.

Pecans

(d) What percentage chose peanuts or macadamias? 3. Twenty people were asked what colour their car is. Use the results from the strip graph to answer questions. (1 cm = 1 car) White

Red

Blue

(a) How many have a white car?

Green

Black

Pink

(b) How many have a green car?

(c) What are the least popular colours? (d) What is the second most popular colour? (e) Which two colours make up 50% of the results? (f) Which three colours make up 50%? (g) Which colour makes up 25%? Prim-Ed Publishing®

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Maths Homework


AVERAGES DATA

TEACHER INFORMATION Objective Calculates the average from a set of data.

Concepts required Interpreting data in different forms Adding and dividing to calculate averages

Answers 1. 4 + 2 + 9 + 8 + 8 + 3 + 1 = 35 mm ÷ 7, Average is 5 mm

pl e

2. 150 + 165 + 142 + 153 +160 = 770 cm ÷ 5, Average is 154 cm 3. 60 + 50 + 65 + 45 + 55 + 55 = 330 kg ÷ 6, Average is 55 kg

4. 27 + 31 + 7 + 25 + 50 + 15 + 0 + 4 + 19 + 1 + 8 = 187 runs ÷ 11,

m

Average is 17 runs

Sa

5. 28.5 + 51.2 + 42.1 + 26.5 + 38 + 62.4 + 12.4 = 261.1 km ÷ 7,

Vi ew

in

g

Average is 37.3 km

Maths Homework

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AVERAGES DATA

Calculate the average for each set of data. 1. Daily rainfall for one week 10

Add

Divide

8 mm

6 4

Average daily rainfall

2 W T Days

F

Name

Height (cm)

Scarlett

150

Matilda

165

Baye

142

Emily

153

Jessica

160

S

mm Divide

Add

Average height =

Add

Body weight of six boys

cm Divide

Sa

3.

=

S

pl e

PUPIL NAME

2.

T

m

M

65 60

45 Nick

Ian

Vi ew

Hussan Sam

in

g

kg 55 50

Glen

Average weight =

Lee Add

4. The school cricket team’s batting card was:

Alex – 27

Luke – 31

Imran – 25

Brett – 50

Josh – 15

Ben – 0

Jay – 4

Chari – 19

Riley – 1

Kane – 8

kg Divide

Brady – 7

Average runs scored =

5.

Day

km travelled

Monday

28.5

Tuesday

51.2

Wednesday

42.1

Thursday

26.5

Friday

38.0

Saturday

62.4

Sunday

12.4

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Add

mm Divide

Average km travelled = 87

km Maths Homework

6061IRE - Maths Homework Book F  
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