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Maths Assessment – 3rd Class Published under license by Prim-Ed Publishing 2004 First published by R.I.C. Publications 2002 Copyright©RIC Publications 2002 ISBN 1 920962 09 3 2431 Titles available in this series: Maths Assessment—1st Class Maths Assessment—2nd Class Maths Assessment—3rd Class Maths Assessment—4th Class Maths Assessment—5th Class

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This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

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Maths Assessment—6th Class

Maths Assessment

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Foreword Maths Assessment - 3rd Class is a comprehensive package of tasks designed to assess 3rd Class mathematics in Irish primary schools. Each book in the series covers the strands of Number, Algebra, Shape and Space, Measures and Data. Through these activities, the skills required by the Skills strand of the mathematics curriculum are also developed. Each assessment task incorporates the necessary elements of an assessment portfolio proforma. Included are: • • • • • •

Curriculum links specific to 3rd Class Relevant tasks for 3rd Class pupils Clearly explained assessment tasks Opportunities for pupil self-assessment Additional activities to introduce or support each task Answers

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Using proformas, Maths Assessment - 3rd Class will assist in the production of an assessment portfolio for each pupil in your class, which clearly communicates assessment across all mathematics strands to pupils, parents and other teachers.

Maths Assessment - 4th Class Maths Assessment - 5th Class Maths Assessment - 6th Class

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Maths Assessment - 1st Class Maths Assessment - 2nd Class Maths Assessment - 3rd Class

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Books in the Maths Assessment series are:

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Contents

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Page

Teachers Notes ............................................................................................................................. iv – v

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Summary of Learning (Proforma) .......................................................................................................... vi Assessment Checklist .................................................................................................................... vii – ix Number ...................................................................................................................................... 2 – 51 Algebra ..................................................................................................................................... 52 – 61 Shape and Space ....................................................................................................................... 62 – 95 Measures ................................................................................................................................ 96 – 129 Data ..................................................................................................................................... 130 – 141

Note to Teachers: • The Skills strand is incorporated into activities addressing objectives in the Number, Algebra, Shape and Space, Measures and Data strands. • Answers and additional activities are provided on the page adjacent to each activity. • Photocopying may distort the lines the pupils are required to measure in some tasks. Teachers may need to allow a slight margin when marking. Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Teachers Notes Maths Assessment - 3rd Class has been written to meet the needs of teachers striving to assess learning experiences in mathematics. The format of each page is ideal for inclusion in pupil portfolios, for reporting purposes, or for collecting assessment data as part of ongoing pupil monitoring. Each curriculum objective has been addressed by assessing concepts in a focused and direct manner, allowing teachers to provide a well explained, logically presented indication of progress to pupils, parents and other teachers. The pupils will have completed that task correctly for the objective to be marked ‘Demonstrated’. Pupils experiencing difficulties completing the task correctly should be marked ‘Needs Further Opportunity’. Teachers are encouraged to annotate samples where special circumstances need to be acknowledged. Using proformas from each of the mathematics strands, teachers can build a comprehensive picture of each pupil’s mathematical progress as he/she works towards achieving the requirements of the 3rd Class mathematics curriculum. The proformas incorporate language which makes task and assessment criteria clear to parents, and provides a meaningful basis for discussion in parent-teacher interviews or three-way conferences.

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Each proforma includes an opportunity for pupils to assess themselves by illustrating a face appropriately to show how successfully they believe they completed the task. This information is vital for both teachers and parents as it provides a platform for directing discussion with pupils which will nurture a positive attitude towards learning mathematics.

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Mathematics

Year

Term

Summary of Lear ning Understanding

Still developing

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A summary proforma on page vi has been included for the teacher to insert into the pupil portfolios with their maths assessment samples. This provides ample space for both the teacher and the pupil to comment on academic progress, reflect upon work habits and address attitude towards mathematics.

Number Algebra

Vi

Shape and Space Measures Data Teacher’s Comments

Pupil Self-assessment

Things I do well.

Maths Assessment

Maths Assessment

iv

Things I need to work at.

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How I feel about mathematics.

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The Irish maths curriculum objective being covered by the assessment activity is listed, as a point of reference for teachers.

Assessme

Number – Third

nt Tasks

Strand Un it: Place value

The child sh explore and

Class

ould be ena

identify pla

bled to

ce value in

Other act

ivities suita

decimal num

bers to one

place of dec

imals

ble for devel

• Represe oping this nt number objective: s concretely • Use num using bas ber expand e ten materia ers to represe ls as parts • Have chil nt decima of 10 to sho dren write l numbers w tenths. decimal poi 17.1. as tenths. nts in num bers as they • Use con are read ora crete materia lly; e.g. 171 ls to represe • Use con when read nt number crete materia as ‘sevente s writ ten ls en and one to determi as decima • Use a calc ne decima ls. tenth’ is ulator to rep l numbers eatedly add of the greates or subtrac t value. t one hundre dth or one tenth and note change s in value.

‘Other activities’ can be used to develop the objective being assessed. These provide activity ideas for the teacher to use either before the assessment task or to consolidate or clarify a concept after assessment.

Answers Task 1 (a) 0.3 (b) 0.9 (c) 0.4 (d) 0.1 Task 2 Teacher che

ck

Task 3 0.3, 0.4,

Maths Ass essment

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to writ s asked

cimal e the de

represen

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8

The child

ted by

(c)

ctions.

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(a)

these fra

(d)

(b)

0.

0.

0. 0.

ked to was as The child parts. l fractiona

represen

t the de

cimals

by shad

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TASK 2

0.8, 0.9

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The task explains the activity and what the pupils were asked to do to complete the tasks and achieve set objectives.

TASK 1

0.6, 0.7,

e

Answers allow the teacher to mark tasks quickly and accurately.

ing the

Objectives are written in language easily understood by parents, pupils and teachers and can be used as a point of reference in parent-teacher interviews and three-way conferences.

(c)

(b)

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(a)

0.8

0.4

0.7

(f)

(e)

(d)

0.3 0.1

0.5

mber lin

in the nu

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After completing the task, pupils can assess themselves and provide feedback to teacher and parents by completing the face to indicate how they felt about the activity. It is important that self-assessment takes place prior to marking by a teacher.

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Numbe

Mathem

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atics

Demons

value Place

in decim ce value ntify pla e and ide cimals • explor ce of de m to one pla -ed.co rim w.p

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Class

ther Needs Fur nity Opportu

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The child

TASK 3

to fill s asked

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essment

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An assessment checklist has been included on pages vii to ix, allowing teachers to keep a record of objectives assessed and those pupils who have been successful in achieving those objectives. This information can then be used to identify those groups requiring further experiences to achieve particular objectives. For those teachers compiling portfolios, the checklist can be used to record whether samples have been collected for each child in each strand and to ensure a reasonable cross-section of concepts has been addressed in the work samples collected. Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Mathematics

Year

Term

Understanding

Still developing

Summary of Learning

Number Algebra

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Shape and Space

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Measures

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Data

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Teacher’s Comments

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Pupil Self-assessment

Things I do well.

Maths Assessment

Things I need to work at.

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How I feel about mathematics.

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Assessment Checklist (Number and Algebra) Pupil

Mathematics Objectives: Number (place value)

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Number

(fractions)

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Number

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(operations)

Number (decimals)

Algebra (patterns)

Algebra (sentences)

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Maths Assessment


Assessment Checklist

(Shape and Space and Measures)

Pupil

Mathematics Objectives: Shape & Space

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(2-D)

Shape & Space

Shape & Space

(lines/angles)

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(symmetry)

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Shape & Space

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(3-D)

Measures

(length)

Measures

(area) Measures

(weight) Measures

(capacity)

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Assessment Checklist (Measures and Data)

Pupil

Mathematics Objectives: Measures

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(time)

Measures

(money)

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Data

Data

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(chance)

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(representing)

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Place value

The child should be enabled to explore and identify place value in whole numbers, 0–999 • grouping and swapping activities involving units, tens, hundreds using concrete materials; e.g. lollipop sticks, abacus, notation boards, base ten materials, money • significance of zero: 208, 420

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Make groups of a given number using concrete materials such as base ten longs and ones. • Record estimations of groups from 20 – 99 and then count to check estimates. • Encourage children to group concrete materials such as lolly sticks into bundles of 10 to assist counting prior to recording in written form.

Answers

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Task 1 (a) 60 (b) 90 (c) 6 (d) 200 (e) 217 (f) 508

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Task 2

(b) 900 + 90 + 8 (c) 600 + 5 (d) 400 + 90

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(a) 300 + 10 + 2

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Task 3

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(a) 60 tens (b) 4 hundreds (c) 7 tens (d) 50 tens

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TASK 1

The child was asked to demonstrate an understanding of place value in the activities below.

Write the place value of the underlined numbers.

Write numbers which fit the given descriptions.

(a) 69

(e) 2 hundreds, one ten, 7 ones

(b) 92 (c) 46

(f)

5 hundreds, 8 ones

(d) 297 TASK 2

e

The child was asked to identify equal amounts.

70

(d)

5 hundreds

4 hundreds

40 hundreds

7 ones

700 ones

7 tens

50 tens

5 tens

105

The child was asked to expand the following numbers.

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TASK 3

50

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(c)

60 hundreds

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40 tens

6 ones

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(b)

60 tens

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600

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(a)

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Circle the amount equal to the amount in the first square.

(a)

312 =

(b)

998 =

(c)

605 =

(d)

490 =

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Place value Demonstrated

• explore and identify place value in whole numbers, 0–999 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Place value

The child should be enabled to read, write and order three-digit numbers • identify and record numbers represented by money and abacus • identify and express numbers in expanded form; 246 = 2 hundreds + 4 tens + 6 units • order numbers on the number line or hundred square; 247: what is the value of 4 in this number? • which digit has the greatest value? • what is the next number after 499?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Play ‘greater than’ where a die is rolled six times and the child must decide whether to place each number rolled in the hundreds, tens or ones columns on either side of a ‘greater than’ symbol. Children aim to finish with a ‘greater than’ statement which is true. • Use number expanders to assist children to break numbers into the appropriate houses. • Draw columns of ‘hundreds’, ‘tens’ and ‘ones’ to differentiate between the values of numerals in numbers to 999.

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• Use concrete materials to demonstrate equivalent ways of expressing a number; e.g. 60 ones is the same as 6 groups of ten.

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Answers (a) 451, 453, 456, 458, 459

(c) 154, 158, 160, 164, 168

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(b) 700, 720, 750, 770, 780, 800

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Task 1

(d) 201, 204, 206, 207, 209, 210

(f) 60, 100, 140, 180

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(e) 200, 400, 700, 800, 1 000

(g) 798, 796, 795, 792

Task 2 (a) 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 55, 75, 95 (b) 100, 200, 400, 500, 600, 700 (c) 302, 304, 321, 335, 356, 378, 399 (d) 120, 312, 437, 488, 567, 690, 981

Task 3 (a) 1 000, 800, 750, 600, 500, 450, 350, 250, 100, 50 (b) 999, 989, 976, 954, 951, 946, 930, 917, 913, 902

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to fill in the missing numbers.

(a) 450,

, 710,

(c) 150, 152,

, 454, 455, , 730, 740,

, 202, 203,

(e) 100,

, 300,

(f)

20, 40,

, 162,

, 166,

, 170

, 205,

,

, 208,

,

, 500, 600,

,

, 900,

,

, 120,

, 797,

,

, 160,

, 790,

, 200

, 794, 793,

, 791

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TASK 2

, 460

,

, 80,

(g) 800, 799,

,

, 760,

, 156,

(d) 200,

, 457,

The child was asked to write the numbers in order from smallest to largest.

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(b)

, 452,

(b) 200, 600, 100, 400, 700, 500,

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(a) 95, 20, 55, 5, 40, 75, 10, 30

(d) 567, 312, 488, 690, 120, 437, 981

TASK 3

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(c) 335, 378, 321, 399, 304, 356, 302

The child was asked to write the numbers in order from largest to smallest.

(a) 50, 350, 600, 1 000, 450, 500, 750, 100, 250, 800

(b) 913, 976, 999, 954, 902, 951, 989, 946, 917, 930

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Place value Demonstrated

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• read, write and order three-digit numbers Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Place value

The child should be enabled to round whole numbers to the nearest ten or hundred • which number is nearer to 40: 29 or 79? • which number is nearer to 500: 432 or 567?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use number lines to support rounding activities. • Determine facts from word problems and estimate the answer, using rounding. Check the answer with a calculator. For example, a farmer had 930 sheep in one paddock and 790 in another. How many sheep does he have altogether?

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• Round items on a simple shopping bill to the nearest euro.

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Answers Task 1

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(a) 60 (b) 40 (c) 50 (d) 90 (e) 60 (f) 30 (g) 80 (h) 80 (i) 20

Task 2

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(a) correct (b) correct (c) incorrect (d) incorrect (e) incorrect

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TASK 1

The child was asked to round the following numbers to the nearest 10.

(a)

(d)

62

(g)

91

(b)

78

(e)

44

(h)

57

(c)

83

(f)

26

15

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49

(i)

TASK 2

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The child was asked to check the following answers by rounding to the nearest 100.

(d)

621 + 120 = 900

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111 + 129 = 200

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(a)

Incorrect

Correct

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Correct

(e)

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(b)

98 + 248 = 300

Correct

Incorrect

152 + 397 = 800 Incorrect

Correct

Incorrect

(c)

345 + 105 = 500 Correct

Incorrect

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Place value Demonstrated

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• round whole numbers to the nearest ten or hundred Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Place value

The child should be enabled to explore and identify place value in decimal numbers to one place of decimals

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Represent numbers concretely using base ten materials as parts of 10 to show tenths. • Use number expanders to represent decimal numbers as tenths. • Have children write decimal points in numbers as they are read orally; e.g. 171 when read as ‘seventeen and one tenth’ is 17.1. • Use concrete materials to represent numbers written as decimals. • Use concrete materials to determine decimal numbers of the greatest value.

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• Use a calculator to repeatedly add or subtract one hundredth or one tenth and note changes in value.

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Answers Task 1

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(a) 0.3 (b) 0.9 (c) 0.4 (d) 0.1

Task 2

Task 3

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0.3, 0.4, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9

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Teacher check

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TASK 1

The child was asked to write the decimal represented by these fractions.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

0.

0.

0.

0.

TASK 2

(c)

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(b)

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(a)

e

The child was asked to represent the decimals by shading the fractional parts.

(e)

0.8

(f)

0.1

0.3

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(d)

0.4

g

0.7

TASK 3

The child was asked to fill in the number line with the missing decimals.

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Place value Demonstrated

• explore and identify place value in decimal numbers to one place of decimals Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Addition and subtraction

The child should be enabled to add and subtract, without and with renaming, within 999 • estimate sums and differences (rounding where necessary) • check estimates • record using horizontal and vertical presentation

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Pick number cards (0 – 9) one at a time from a pile. Place the numbers to make an addition sum, firstly in a line and then progressing to an algorithm. For example, 2 4 + 1 7 = 41; 2 4

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1 7

Task 1

g in

Answers

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Make addition crosswords with ‘across’ and ‘down’ clues that are two- and three-digit additions. Use a number line to determine the difference between two numbers by counting up from the smallest to the largest number. Complete subtraction squares and grids. Solve subtraction crosswords.

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• • • •

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41

Task 2

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(a) 47 (b) 29 (c) 95 (d) 89 (e) 42 (f) 94 (g) 21 (h) 31

(a) 71 (b) 82 (c) 210 (d) 262 (e) 62 (f) 27 (g) 129 (h) 258

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to calculate one- and two- digit addition and subtraction sums without renaming.

(a)

43 + 4 =

(e)

49 – 7 =

(b)

22 + 7 =

(f)

98 – 4 =

(c)

(g)

44

93

+ 51

+ 75

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(h)

14

47

pl

(d)

– 72

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m

– 16

TASK 2

(a)

26

(b)

28 + 54

174

(c)

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+ 45

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The child was asked to calculate one-, two- and three-digit addition and subtraction sums with renaming.

+ 36

(d)

71

(e)

– 9

(f)

219 + 43

86

– 26

(h)

291

– 59

Mathematics

– 33

Number – Third Class

Operations—Addition and subtraction Demonstrated

• add and subtract, without and with renaming, within 999 Prim-Ed Publishing

155

(g)

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Addition and subtraction

The child should be enabled to know and recall addition and subtraction facts

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Use number lines to count on, count back and show number patterns. • Derive quickly, addition doubles such as 19 + 19 = 38. • Play ‘Addition and Subtraction Knock-out’. All children stand up. A pair of children are identified. The pair is given an addition or subtraction sum. The child giving the correct answer remains standing. The other child sits down. Continue until there is only one child left standing. This child is the winner.

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Answers (i) 11 (ii) 110 (iii) 1 100

(b)

(i) 14 (ii) 140 (iii) 1 400

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(a)

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Task 1

Task 2

Task 3 (i) 18 (ii) 120 (iii) 122 (iv) 20

(b)

(i) 79 (ii) 3 (iii) 5 (iv) –

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(a)

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(a) 25 (b) 13 (c) 8 (d) 9

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

(a) (i)

The child was asked to use the first basic number fact to determine other number facts in that family.

5+6=

(b)

(i)

11 + 3 =

(ii) 50 + 60 =

(ii) 110 + 30 =

(iii) 500 + 600 =

(iii) 1 100 + 300 =

TASK 2

The child was asked to use addition and subtraction strategies to determine new number facts.

Addition and subtraction are related. (c) 15 + 8 = 23

therefore

therefore

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(a) 25 + 9 = 34

=9

23 – 15 =

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34 –

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(b) 17 – 4 = 13 therefore = 17

therefore 18 +

TASK 3

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The child was asked to use the strategies of counting on and doubling to determine new number facts.

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(a)

= 27

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4+

(d) 27 – 9 = 18

Doubles and near doubles.

(b) Counting on and counting back.

(i)

9+9=

(i)

(ii)

60 + 60 =

(ii) 58 –

= 55

(iii) 62 + 60 =

(iii) 93 +

= 98

(iv) 9 + 11 =

(iv) 67

Mathematics

75 + 4 =

Number – Third Class

Operations—Addition and subtraction Demonstrated

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• know and recall addition and subtraction facts Prim-Ed Publishing

6 = 61

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Addition and subtraction

The child should be enabled to solve word problems involving addition and subtraction

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Read number stories. From facts, devise the equation in the story. • Write an addition and subtraction equation that has a given answer. • Write a sentence to represent number facts and then, with guidance, expand on the sentence to create a story.

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• Write a number sentence that includes a variable. For example, 13 + = 45. Write a story to represent this equation that leads to discovering the amount of the variable. • Use blocks, number lines, hundred squares and number cards to assist with addition and subtraction. • Solve problems that can be encountered in everyday situations, such as tallying the number of children who play sport, or adding cricket scores.

Answers Task 1

Task 3 Teacher check drawing 32 – 6 = 26

Maths Assessment

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Teacher check

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Task 2

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Teacher check

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TASK 1

The child was asked to write and illustrate an addition number story where ‘36’ is the answer.

Write the story.

TASK 2

+

= 36

Draw a picture for your story.

Draw a picture for your story.

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Write the story.

The child was asked to draw a diagram and construct a number sentence to help solve the following word problem.

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TASK 3

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12 + 20 =

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The child was asked to write and illustrate a story to represent the following number fact.

32 turtles were swimming happily in a pond. Along came a hungry crocodile, who frightened 6 turtles out of the pond. How many turtles were left hiding in the pond? = Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Addition and subtraction Demonstrated

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• solve word problems involving addition and subtraction Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Multiplication

The child should be enabled to develop an understanding of multiplication as repeated addition and vice versa • count sets of objects in twos, threes, fours etc. to tens • count in steps on the number line or hundred square • construct number sentences with concrete materials and record diagrammatically • record number sentences as 6 + 6 + 6 = 3 x 6 = 18

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

sentence to match. 3 x

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Use a hundreds board to experiment with repeated addition. Look at different number groups of people. Observe and write number sentences for how many arms, legs, eyes etc. Look at objects with wheels. How many wheels on 6 cars, 3 bicycles etc. Dice game – Two dice, one with numbers 1 – 6, the other with dots 1 – 6. When the dice are rolled, children make a number

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= 12

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• • • •

Answers Task 1

start 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

g

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

ew

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

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31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

(b) 3 x 11

(c) 4 x 11

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(a) 2 x 11

Task 2 Rule: +3 (a) 9

(b) 18

(c) 12

Task 3 (a) 3 x 5 = 15 (b) 6 x 3 = 18

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to colour numbers on the hundreds board to describe the rule given and create a pattern, then answer the questions.

Rule: +11 start 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Draw lines to match the equivalent sums:

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

(a) 11 + 11

• 4 x 11

(b) 11 + 11 + 11

• 2 x 11

(c) 11 + 11 + 11 + 11 •

• 3 x 11

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

TASK 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

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start

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The child was asked to write an ‘adding’ or ‘subtracting’ rule to describe the following pattern, then answer the sums.

(a)

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21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

3+3+3=

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

(b)

6x3=

g

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

in

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

(c)

3+3+3+3=

ew

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

The child was asked to use the pictures to help him/her complete the number sentences.

Vi

TASK 3 (a)

(b)

x5=

x3=

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Multiplication Demonstrated

• develop an understanding of multiplication as repeated addition and vice versa Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Multiplication

The child should be enabled to explore, understand and apply the zero, commutative and distributive properties of multiplication • use concrete materials, charts and illustrations to establish and record: zero property; e.g. 5 x 0 = 0 and 0 x 7 = 0 commutative property; e.g. 3 x 4 = 4 x 3 distributive property; e.g. 5 x 4 = (3 x 4) + (2 x 4)

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Use concrete materials, charts and illustrations to record zero, commutative and distributive properties of multiplication. • Use number cards to rearrange multiplication problems to demonstrate commutative and distributive properties of multiplication.

m

Answers

Sa

Task 1 (a) 0 (b) 0 (c) 0 (d) 0 (e) 0 (f) 0

g

Task 2

ew

Task 3

in

(a) 15, 3 (b) 24, 4 (c) 18, 9 (d) 24, 3 (e) 28, 7 (f) 30, 6

Vi

(a) 4, 4, 20 (b) 2, 2, 12 (c) 3, 3, 21 (d) 2, 6, 2, 6, 24 (e) 1, 9, 1, 9, 18 (f) 2, 8, 1, 8, 24

Maths Assessment

18

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TASK 1

The child was asked to apply the zero property of multiplication.

(a)

1x

(b)

10 x

(c)

5x

TASK 2

=0 =0 =0

(d)

12 x 0 =

(e)

100 x 0 =

(f)

30 x 0 =

The child was asked to apply the commutative property of multiplication.

(a)

3x5=

=5x

(b)

6x4=

=

(c)

9x2=

=2x

8x3=

=

x8

(e)

7x4=

=4x

pl

e

x6

(d)

TASK 3

=

x5

Sa

The child was asked to apply the distributive property of multiplication.

5 x 4 = (3 x

) + (2 x

)=

(b)

6 x 2 = (4 x 2) + (

(c)

7 x 3 = (3 x

(d)

4x6=(

x

)+(

x

)=

(e)

2x9=(

x

)+(

x

)=

(f)

3x8=(

x

)+(

x

)=

in

g

(a)

)=

) + (4 x

)=

Vi

ew

x

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Multiplication Demonstrated

• explore, understand and apply the zero, commutative and distributive properties of multiplication Prim-Ed Publishing

5x6=

m

(f)

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Multiplication

The child should be enabled to develop and/or recall multiplication facts within 100 • counting in 2, 3, 5 and 10 • doubles, trebles • 2 x 9 = 18, 4 x 9 = 36, 8 x 9 = 72, 3 x 4 = 12, 9 x 4 = 36

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

Sa

m

pl

e

• Practise counting in 2s, 3s, etc. out loud, taking turns in pairs, or as a whole class by rote. • Play ‘buzz’ games, where children count from zero and must substitute the word ‘buzz’ for numbers which are multiples of 2, 5 or 10. • Use a calculator to repeatedly add 10 to any given number and explore the place values which change. • Play ‘Times Tables Knock-out’. All children stand up. A pair of children are identified. The pair is given a times tables sum. The child giving the correct answer remains standing. The other child sits down. Continue until there is only one child left standing. This child is the winner.

Answers (a) 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14

in

(b) 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33

g

Task 1

(c) 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100

Vi

Task 2

ew

(d) 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55

(a) multiples of 2 = 4, 6, 8, 10

(b) multiples of 5 = 10, 15, 20, 30 (c) multiples of 3 = 6, 9, 12, 15

Maths Assessment

20

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TASK 1

The child was asked to skip count from zero in twos, threes, fives or tens to fill in the blanks on the tails of these shooting stars.

(a)

(c)

12

40

14

4

70

90

0

0

100 50

10

8

(b)

(d)

12

25

50

55

e

1

5

m

0

0

3 30

24

pl

21

0 3

33

TASK 2

Sa

The child was asked to circle those numbers which are multiples of the number at the top of each pyramid.

(b)

(c)

in

g

(a)

Vi

7

ew

2

3

19

5

3

30

15

20

8

4

11

6 9 10

51

15

10

Mathematics

6

9

10

12 6

Number – Third Class

Operations—Multiplication Demonstrated

• develop and/or recall multiplication facts within 100 Prim-Ed Publishing

13

5

2

4

www.prim-ed.com

21

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Se

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Multiplication

The child should be enabled to multiply a one-digit or two-digit number by 0–10 • use rounding to estimate products • rounding up/down; e.g. 6 x 28 is near to 6 x 30 • represent in horizontal and vertical form • establish effect of multiplication by 1 and by 10; e.g. 1 x 17 = 17, 10 x 53 = 530

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

• Use hundreds charts to show patterns when multiplying by 0, 2, 3, 4 and so on.

e

• Use place value cards to show how place value changes when multiplying by 10.

m

Answers (a) 30, 180 (b) 10, 400 (c) 40, 120 (d) 10, 200

g

Task 2

Sa

Task 1

in

(a) 91 (b) 120 (c) 72 (d) 87 (e) 287 (f) 144

Task 3

ew

(g) 42 (h) 125 (i) 111 (j) 288 (k) 72 (l) 270

Vi

(a) 36 (b) 360 (c) 55 (d) 550 (e) 63 (f) 630

Maths Assessment

22

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TASK 1

The child was asked to use rounding to estimate products.

(a)

6 x 28 is near to 6 x

(b)

9 x 40 is near to

(c)

3 x 37 is near to 3 x

(d)

8 x 20 is near to

TASK 2

= x 40 = = x 20 =

36 x 2 =

(b)

24 x 5 =

(d)

(g)

14 x 3

(i)

(h)

25 x 5

e

(c)

41 x 7 =

29 x 3 =

(f)

18 x 8 =

37 x 3

(k)

36 x 2

48 x 6

(l)

54 x 5

in

g

m

13 x 7 =

pl

(e)

Sa

(a)

ew

The child was asked to multiply a two-digit number by 0–10 in horizontal and vertical form.

Vi

(j)

TASK 3

The child was asked to show the effect of multiplying by 1 and by 10.

(a)

1 x 36 =

(c)

1 x 55 =

(e)

1 x 63 =

(b)

10 x 36 =

(d)

10 x 55 =

(f)

10 x 63 =

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Multiplication Demonstrated

Se

• multiply a one-digit or two-digit number by 0–10 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Multiplication

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving multiplication of whole numbers • how many days in 9 full weeks?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Work in small groups to find solutions to word problems. Use concrete materials for support. • Read number stories. From facts, devise the equation in the story. Write the equation with the answer. • Write and illustrate number stories for multiplication facts.

pl

Answers

m

(a) 7 x €5 = €35

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

(b) 9 x 4 = 36

Maths Assessment

24

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

(a)

The child was asked to illustrate and solve the following multiplication word problems.

Seven children raised €5 each in a walkathon. When they put their money together, they found they had raised quite a lot.

pl

e

How much money did they raise?

=

ew

in

g

Sa

m

x

Vi

(b)

x

How many books did they read?

=

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Multiplication Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving multiplication of whole numbers Prim-Ed Publishing

Nine children read 4 books each in a readathon. When they put their books together, they found they had read quite a lot of books.

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Division

The child should be enabled to develop an understanding of division as sharing and as repeated subtraction, without and with remainders • share a quantity in equal groups of 2, 3 … • record using number sentences or vertically • 20 – 4 – 4 – 4 – 4 – 4 = 0

Other activities suitable for developing this objective.

pl

e

• Share food (e.g. pizza, fruit etc.) among varying numbers of people. • Share varying numbers of children among different numbers of hoops. How many fit? • Use objects such as beads, buttons or counters to represent a division number story.

m

Answers

Sa

Task 1 (a) 4 (b) 5

Task 2

in ew

Task 3

g

(a) 22c (b) 67c

Vi

Answers will vary but will contain a remainder.

Maths Assessment

26

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TASK 1 (a)

The child was asked to share objects.

Share these balloons between two people.

(b)

Share these sweets among three people.

How many each? TASK 2

The child was asked to share money.

Share the coins equally among three people.

pl

e

(a)

How many each?

Share the coins equally between two people.

g

Sa

(b)

m

How much each?

ew

in

How much each?

TASK 3

Vi

The child was asked to draw and group his/her own picture story for sharing 17 jellybeans equally.

(a) How many people shared the jellybeans? (b) How many each? (c)

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Division Demonstrated

• develop an understanding of division as sharing and as repeated subtraction, without and with remainders Prim-Ed Publishing

How many left?

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Division

The child should be enabled to develop and/or recall division facts within 100 • use inverse of multiplication facts • use halves • 9 is half of 18 (2 x 9 = 18)

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Identify patterns as a whole group on a class hundreds board. Investigate multiples and where they interact. • Find numbers which are multiples of more than one number; e.g. 24 is a multiple of 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8. Experiment with number patterns to find similar cases. • Make arrays using counters to show the relationship between multiplication and division.

Answers

Sa

Task 1

(a) 4 (b) 9 (c) 30 (d) 21, 3 (e) 22, 11, 2 or 22, 2, 11

Vi

ew

(f) 50 (g) 70 (h) 40 (i) 22 (j) 100

in

(a) 9 (b) 20 (c) 30 (d) 7 (e) 14

g

Task 2

Maths Assessment

28

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TASK 1

The child was asked to use the multiplication number facts given to help solve the related division fact.

(a)

4 x 6 = 24, therefore 24 ÷ 6 =

(b)

9 x 8 = 72, therefore 72 ÷

(c)

5 x 6 = 30, therefore

÷5=6

(d)

3 x 7 = 21, therefore

÷7=

(e)

2 x 11 = 22, therefore

÷

m

=

pl

e

=8

Sa

TASK 2

is half of 18

ew

in

(a)

g

The child was asked to use known number facts to help solve the division problems.

10 is half of

(c)

15 is half of

25 is half of

(g)

35 is half of

Vi

(b)

(f)

(h)

is half of 80

is half of 44

(d)

is half of 14

(i)

(e)

is half of 28

(j)

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Division Demonstrated

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• develop and/or recall division facts within 100 Prim-Ed Publishing

50 is half of

29

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Division

The child should be enabled to divide a one-digit or two-digit number by a one-digit number without and with remainders • represent division as repeated subtraction • represent division as number sentences; e.g. 20 ÷ 4 = 5 • record using the division algorithm • use different strategies to estimate quotients and check answers • rounding up or down; e.g. 44 ÷ 12 is about 40 ÷ 10

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

Sa

m

pl

e

• Identify patterns on a hundreds board for times tables. Use knowledge of multiplication patterns to assist in solving reciprocal division problems. • Use arrays to demonstrate division; e.g. 24 ÷ 4 = 6 and 24 ÷ 6 = 4. • Work in small groups to find solutions to word problems. Use concrete materials for support. • Read division number stories. From facts, devise the equation in the story. Write the equation with the answer. • Solve simple division sums using repeated subtraction.

g

Answers

Task 2

ew

(a) 4 (b) 10 (c) 9 (d) 7 (e) 2 (f) 6

in

Task 1

Task 3

Vi

(a) 6 r1 (b) 9 r6 (c) 4 r2 (d) 3 r2 (e) 7 r3 (f) 8 r3

30 ÷ 6 = 5

Maths Assessment

30

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TASK 1

The child was asked to find the answers to division facts expressed as an equation.

(a)

32 ÷ 8 =

(c)

45 ÷ 5 =

(e)

18 ÷ 9 =

(b)

60 ÷ 6 =

(d)

21 ÷ 3 =

(f)

42 ÷ 7 =

TASK 2

The child was asked to answer these short division problems with remainders.

r 6

37

(c)

3

r

14

(e)

5

38

r (d)

87

3

11

m

9

(f)

r 7

59

Sa

(b)

r

pl

e

(a)

r

TASK 3

in

g

The child was asked to illustrate and solve the following division word problem.

Vi

ew

Six hungry children saw 30 biscuits sitting on a plate. They each got the same number of biscuits. How many biscuits did each child get?

÷

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Division Demonstrated

• divide a one-digit or two-digit number by a one-digit number without and with remainders Prim-Ed Publishing

=

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations—Division

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving division of whole numbers • problems based on the environment how many cars are needed to take 27 children to a game if only 4 children are allowed in each car? • estimate, discuss and record

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Use everyday situations as opportunities for children to practise division skills. • Use concrete materials and sharing experiences to answer division word problems. • Write and illustrate division word problems.

m

Answers (b) 50 ÷ 6 = 8 pieces (2 pieces of pizza left over)

Vi

ew

in

g

(c) 100 ÷ 9 = 11 lollies (1 lolly left over)

Sa

(a) 27 ÷ 4 = 7 cars (6 cars with 4 children and 1 car with 3 children)

Maths Assessment

32

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TASK

(a)

The child was asked to solve problems using division of whole numbers.

How many cars are needed to take 27 children to a football match if only four children are allowed in each car? Estimate:

÷

cars

=

cars

Working out:

How many children will be left over?

e

How many pieces of pizza will each person receive if there are six people and 50 pieces of pizza? Estimate:

m

pl

(b)

÷

=

pieces

Sa

pieces

in

g

Working out:

How many lollies can go in each lolly bag if there are 100 lollies and nine lolly bags?

Vi

(c)

ew

How many pieces of pizza will be left over?

Estimate:

÷

lollies

=

lollies

Working out:

How many lollies will be left over? Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Operations—Division Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving division of whole numbers Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to identify fractions and equivalent forms of fractions with denominators 2, 4, 8 and 10 • construct and cut out simple fractions of regular shapes • record using diagrams or fraction charts

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Explore paper-folding activities where children fold paper and colour a given fraction and then continue to fold into smaller and smaller fractions. Use the folds to see the equal proportions. Record these after counting each equivalent common fraction. • Use overhead transparencies to overlay a shape with the same shape broken into different fractions. Use overhead markers to colour a particular fraction on the master sheet. Overlay the second sheet to reveal the equivalent fraction.

m

Answers

Sa

Task 1 (a) 2/4 (b) 2/8 (c) 4/8

g

Task 2

Vi

(b)

ew

in

(a)

(c)

Maths Assessment

34

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to colour sections of the diagrams to make a fraction equivalent to the first diagram, and record the equivalent common fraction.

(a)

(b)

1

/2

(c)

1 =

TASK 2

1

/4 =

/2 =

pl

e

The child was asked to identify and circle the equivalent fractions.

g

Sa

m

(a)

(c)

Vi

ew

in

(b)

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Fractions Demonstrated

• identify fractions and equivalent forms of fractions with denominators 2, 4, 8 and 10 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to compare and order fractions with appropriate denominators and position on the number line

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use pattern blocks to show equivalent fractions. • Use fraction shapes to show equivalent fractions.

e

• Order cards with fractions written on them from smallest to largest and vice versa.

pl

Answers Task 1

m

(b)

Sa

(a)

(c)

ew

in

g

(d)

Task 2

(b) 1/4, 3/4 (c) 2/8, 3/8, 5/8, 6/8

Vi

(a) 1/2

(d) 1/10, 3/10, 4/10, 6/10, 7/10, 9/10

Maths Assessment

36

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to circle the larger fraction.

(a)

(b)

(c)

e

(d)

TASK 2

m

pl

The child was asked to complete the number lines by filling in the missing fractions.

Sa

(a)

1

g

0

in

(b)

0

Vi

(c)

2/ 4

ew

0

1

4/ 8

1/ 8

7/ 8

1

(d) 0

2/ 10

5/ 10

Mathematics

8/ 10

Number – Third Class

Fractions Demonstrated

• compare and order fractions with appropriate denominators and position on the number line Prim-Ed Publishing

1

www.prim-ed.com

37

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to calculate a fraction of a set using concrete materials

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Explore paper folding activities where children fold paper to represent halves or quarters, colour a given fraction and then continue to fold into smaller and smaller fractions. Use the folds to see the equal proportions. Record these after counting each equivalent common fraction.

e

• Explore parts of a whole by cutting up apples, sandwiches or other foods into halves or quarters.

pl

Answers

m

Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

38

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to colour the fraction stated for each pizza.

(a)

(b)

1

(c)

1

/2

3

/4

TASK 2

/4

e

The child was asked to colour the pictures according to the fraction indicated.

pl

(a)

g

Sa

m

half (1/2)

Vi

ew

quarter (1/4)

in

(b)

(c) eighth (1/8)

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Fractions Demonstrated

Se

• calculate a fraction of a set using concrete materials Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to develop an understanding of the relationship between fractions and division • 1/4 of 32 = 8, 32/4 = 8

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use groups of children in the class to further consolidate the activity. • Children can use coloured beads to practise the concept.

e

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

(a) 8, 8 (b) 5, 5 (c) 18, 18 (d) 9, 9 (e) 25, 25 (f) 8, 8

Maths Assessment

40

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

(a)

The child was asked to use fractions to solve the division problems.

1

/4 of 32 =

1

(d)

/2 of 18 =

32

2

/10 of 25 =

/2 =

5

(e)

200

/8 =

/8 of 40 =

in

g

Sa

m

pl

(b)

18

e

/4 =

50

3

/4 of 24 =

Vi

(c)

ew

/10 =

(f)

4

/10 of 20 =

72

80

/4 =

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Fractions Demonstrated

• develop an understanding of the relationship between fractions and division Prim-Ed Publishing

/10 =

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to calculate a unit fraction of a number and calculate a number, given a unit fraction of the number • what is 1/4 of 12? • 1/8 of a number = 6, find the number

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Have a number of the week where children have to devise their own fraction problems to match the number.

e

• Use concrete materials to solve similar problems.

pl

Answers Task 1

m

(a) 3 (b) 8 (c) 3 (d) 2

Sa

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

(a) 48 (b) 32 (c) 10 (d) 40

Maths Assessment

42

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

(a)

1

The child was asked to calculate the unit fraction of a number.

/4 of 12 =

1

(c)

Working out:

(b)

1

/8 of 24 =

Working out:

/2 of 16 =

1

(d)

Working out:

m

pl

e

Working out:

/10 of 20 =

TASK 2

Sa

1

/8 of a number = 6

/2 of a number = 5

Working out:

(b)

1

Vi

ew

Working out:

1

What is the number?

in

What is the number?

(c)

g

(a)

The child was asked to calculate a number when given a unit fraction of the number.

/4 of a number = 8

(d)

1

/10 of a number = 4

What is the number?

What is the number?

Working out:

Working out:

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Fractions Demonstrated

• calculate a unit fraction of a number and calculate a number, given a unit fraction of the number Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving fractions • what fraction of a chart is coloured yellow/is not green?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Practise breaking groups of objects equally, recording the denominator of common fractions. • Describe common fractions using language such as ‘one out of every two’ to describe half or ‘three out of every four’ to describe three quarters.

e

• Practise breaking collections into equal groups and rejoining some of the equal groups to form fractions of the whole group.

pl

Answers

m

Task 1 (a) 5 pencils

Sa

(b) 12 pencils

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

(a) 1/2 (b) 3/4 (c) 1/2 (d) 1/2

Maths Assessment

44

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to circle the fraction of each group of pencils indicated in the pencil case.

(a)

(b)

1/ 2

TASK 2

3/4

The child was asked to colour the appropriate fraction for each of these situations.

(a)

Jai

(c) 30

km

m

on

Walloon is

tto

1 /4

1 /2

3 /4

way to Hattonvale.

of the

60 70 80

Jai is

3 /4

1 /2

1 /4

of his

g

dad’s weight.

(d)

B

Vi

ew

in

(b)

A

40 50

20 10

pl

Ha

Sa

M

e

al

nv

lo al W

y ar

m

le

va

00

(3

30

60 70 80

e

0k

5 (1

40 50

20 10

)

)

Dad

Jug ‘B’ has

3 /4

1 /2

1 /4

Alice

as

much liquid as jug ‘A’.

Alice has

3 /4

Ben 1 /2

1 /4

of the

amount of money Ben has. Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Fractions Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving fractions Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Decimals

The child should be enabled to identify tenths and express in decimal form • express 1/10 as 0.1 • cut out tenths and/or 0.1 of regular shapes • record using diagrams or charts

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Record tenths or 0.1 using diagrams or charts.

pl

e

• Cut out tenths or 0.1 of regular shapes.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

(a) 0.1 (b) 0.2 (c) 0.4 (d) 0.9 (e) 0.6 (f) 1.0

Task 2

g

(a) 1 ant

(d) 7 bananas (e) 4 cups

Vi

(f) 9 fish

ew

(c) 3 balls

in

(b) 5 apples

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TASK 1

The child was asked to write the fraction as a decimal.

(a)

(c) =

(e)

=

(b)

(d)

=

(f)

=

pl

e

=

=

TASK 2

(a)

1

(b)

0.5

(c)

3

(d)

0.7

(e)

4

(f)

0.9

Sa

m

The child was asked to show 1/10 or 0.1 of the following groups.

in ew

Vi

/10

g

/10

/10

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Decimals Demonstrated

Se

• identify tenths and express in decimal form Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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47

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Maths Assessment


Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Decimals

The child should be enabled to order decimals on the number line • draw a circle around the number with the greatest value: 0.5, 0.1, 0.7, 0.2

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Children make their own decimal number lines. • Children pick up five decimal cards at random. Put them in order, from smallest to largest.

e

Answers

pl

Task 1

m

(a) 0.5 (b) 0.7 (c) 1.52 (d) 1.9 (e) 0.89 (f) 1.71

Sa

Task 2 (a) 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 0.7, 0.89, 1.09 (b) 4.08, 4.09, 4.12, 4.15, 4.36, 4.91

Task 3 (a) 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8

Vi

(b) 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9

ew

in

g

(c) 2.09, 2.18, 2.5, 2.7, 2.76, 2.91

Maths Assessment

48

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TASK 1

The child was asked to compare the pairs of decimals and circle the decimal with the greater value.

(a)

0.5

0.1

(c)

1.25

1.52

(e)

0.89

0.089

(b)

0.7

0.2

(d)

1.09

1.9

(f)

1.17

1.71

TASK 2

The child was asked to write the decimals in order from smallest to largest.

0.1

0.7

0.2

1.09

0.89

(b)

4.91

4.09

4.12

4.36

4.08

(c)

2.76

2.09

2.91

2.18

2.7

4.15

e

0.5

m

pl

(a)

Sa

2.5

TASK 3

0.8

0

(b)

0.4

0.2

0.6

Vi

(a)

ew

in

g

The child was asked to complete the number lines by filling in the missing decimals.

0.7

0

0.9

0.1

1

0.5

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.6

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Decimals Demonstrated

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• order decimals on the number line Prim-Ed Publishing

1

0.8

49

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Number – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Decimals

The child should be enabled to solve problems involving decimals

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Invite children to write their own problems for a partner to solve. • Use practical every day situations to solve decimal problems.

Answers

(c) 30 L – 25.2 L = 4.8 L

m

(d) 35.7 L + 32.1 L + 36.5 L + 35.4 L = 139.7 L

pl

(b) 3.8 L + 2.5 L + 4.7 L + 1.2 L + 5.5 L + 4.2 L + 3.3 L = 25.2 L

e

(a) 9.8 kg + 7.6 kg + 8.25 kg + 7.9 kg + 9 kg = 42.55 kg

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

(e) €28.56 + €25.60 + €29.20 + €28.00 = €111.36

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TASK

The child was asked to solve problems involving decimals.

Problem

Solution

A butcher ordered sausages every day of the week. He ordered 9.8 kg on Monday, 7.6 kg on Tuesday, 8.25 kg on Wednesday, 7.9 kg on Thursday and 9 kg on Friday. How many kilograms of sausages did he order over the week?

(b)

A café owner uses the following amounts of milk over one week: 3.8 L, 2.5 L, 4.7 L, 1.2 L, 5.5 L, 4.2 L and 3.3 L. How much milk is used over the week?

(c)

If the same café owner purchases 30 L of milk to cover the week, how much milk is left over?

(d)

A family go on a 4-day holiday. On the first day they use 35.7 L of petrol, the second day 32.1 L, the third day 36.5 L and on the final day they use 35.4 L. How much petrol is used over the four days?

(e)

The petrol for the family holiday costs €28.56 on the first day, €25.60 on the second day, €29.20 on the third day and €28.00 on the fourth day. How much does the petrol cost for their 4-day family holiday?

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

Mathematics

Number – Third Class

Decimals Demonstrated

Se

• solve problems involving decimals Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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51

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Number patterns and sequences

The child should be enabled to explore, recognise and record patterns in number, 0–999 • group and count in twos, threes, fours … tens on number line and hundred square • recognise number bonds through grouping; e.g. 17 + 3, 27 + 3, 37 + 3 • recognise links within and between multiplication tables (e.g. links between 4 and 8 times tables) • patterns of odd and even numbers

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Use a calculator to repeat addition of twos or fives until the display reads 100. Count aloud with the calculator. Use number lines to count on, count back and show number patterns. Identify patterns as a whole group on a class hundreds board. Investigate multiples and where they interact. Find numbers which are multiples of more than one number; e.g. 24 is a multiple of 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8. Experiment with number patterns to find similar cases.

m

pl

e

• • • •

Sa

Answers Task 1

g

(a) 6, 12, 15, 21

in

(b) 48, 36, 30, 24 (c) 4, 16, 64, 128

ew

(d) 20, 10

Task 2

(i) 15 (i) 150 (iii) 1 500

(b)

(i) 19 (ii) 190 (iii) 1 900

Vi

(a)

Task 3 (a) – (c) 1

2

(d)

x

3

4

x

5

6

7

x

8

x

9

10

x

Any of the following points: • all multiples of 2, 4, and 8 are even numbers; • multiples of 8 are also multiples of 2 and 4

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

x

x

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

x

x

x

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

x

x

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

x

x

x

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

x

x

61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

x

x

x

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

x

x

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

x

x

x

91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 Maths Assessment

52

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TASK 1

The child was asked to continue these number patterns.

(a)

0, 3,

(b)

60, 54,

(c)

2,

(d)

80, 40,

,

, 18,

, 42,

, 8,

TASK 2

,

, 32,

,

,

,5

pl

e

The child was asked to use the first basic number fact to determine other number facts in that family.

7+8=

(b)

TASK 3

(ii) 140 + 50 = (iii) 1400 + 500 =

in

The child was asked to follow the instructions to complete the hundreds square and describe the patterns which formed. 4

5

ew

3

14 + 5 =

g

(iii) 700 + 800 =

2

(i)

Sa

(ii) 70 + 80 =

1

,

m

(a) (i)

, 9,

6

7

8

9

10

Vi

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

(a)

Circle the multiples of 2.

(b)

Cross the multiples of 4.

(c)

Colour the multiples of 8.

(d)

What do you notice about the pattern that has formed?

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 Mathematics

Algebra – Third Class

Number patterns and sequences Demonstrated

• explore, recognise and record patterns in number, 0–999 Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

53

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Number patterns and sequences

The child should be enabled to explore, extend and describe (explain rule for) sequences • patterns or sequences of objects or shapes • whole-number sequences; e.g. 54, 44, 34 or 1, 3, 9, 27

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Search for patterns in everyday situations. • Children create their own number patterns for a partner to solve.

e

• Create and draw shape patterns.

pl

Answers

m

(a) 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2 – taking 2 away each time (b) 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36 – adding 3 each time

Sa

(c) 64, 54, 44, 34, 24, 14, 4 – taking 10 away each time (d) 64, 67, 70, 73, 76, 79, 82, 85 – adding 3 each time

(e) 185, 180, 175, 170, 165, 160, 155 – taking 5 away each time

Vi

ew

in

g

(f) 59, 66, 73, 80, 87, 94, 101, 108 – adding 7 each time

Maths Assessment

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TASK

(a)

The child was asked to complete the patterns and explain the rule.

24, 22, 20, 18,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

Rule:

(b)

3, 6, 9, 12,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

Rule:

,

,

,

,

,

,

e

104, 94, 84, 74,

pl

(c)

52, 55, 58, 61,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

g

(d)

Sa

m

Rule:

205, 200, 195, 190,

,

,

,

,

,

,

Vi

(e)

ew

in

Rule:

Rule:

(f)

31, 38, 45, 52,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

Rule:

Mathematics

Algebra – Third Class

Number patterns and sequences Demonstrated

• explore, extend and describe (explain rule for) sequences Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

55

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Number patterns and sequences

The child should be enabled to use patterns as an aid in the memorisation of number facts • make patterns on the hundred square

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Children can create their own number patterns and show them on a hundreds grid. • Brainstorm how patterns on a hundreds grid can help us learn our tables.

e

Answers

pl

Task 1

m

Teacher check

(a) – (c)

1

2

3

4

5

X6

7

8

9

Sa

Task 2 10

11 12 X 13 14 15 16 17 18X 19 20 21 22 23 24 X 25 26 27 28 29 30 X 31 32 33 34 35 36 X 37 38 39 40

g

41 42 X 43 44 45 46 47 48X 49 50

61 62 63 64 65 66 X 67 68 69 70 71 72 X 73 74 75 76 77 78X 79 80

ew

81 82 83 84 X 85 86 87 88 89 90 X

in

51 52 53 54 X 55 56 57 58 59 60 X

91 92 93 94 95 96 X 97 98 99 100

(d)

(i) 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42, 48, 54, 60, 66, 72, 78, 84, 90, 96

Vi

(ii) 9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90, 99

Maths Assessment

56

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TASK 1

1

2

3

The child was asked to colour the odd and even numbers on the hundred grid.

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

(a)

Colour the even numbers red.

(b)

Colour the odd numbers blue.

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

e

91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

Colour the multiples of 3 red. Cross the multiples of 6.

(c)

Circle the multiples of 9.

1

g

(b)

m

The child was asked to show the number patterns on the hundred grid.

Sa

(a)

pl

TASK 2

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

in ew

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

List the numbers which are multiples of: (i)

3

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

Vi

(d)

2

3 and 6:

(ii) 3 and 9:

Mathematics

Algebra – Third Class

Number patterns and sequences Demonstrated

• use patterns as an aid in the memorisation of number facts Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Number sentences

The child should be enabled to translate an addition or subtraction number sentence with a frame into a word problem (frame not in initial position) • 3+7=

; Mary has three sweets, she gets seven more, how many has she now?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use blocks, number lines, hundred squares and number cards to assist with addition and subtraction. • Solve problems that can be encountered in everyday situations such as the number of children who play sport, or adding cricket scores. • Read number stories. From facts, devise the equation in the story.

pl

e

• Write an addition, subtraction and multiplication equation that all result in the same answer.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

(a) 20 – 8 = 12, Teacher check (b) 24 + 22 = 46, Teacher check

in Vi

ew

Answers will vary

g

Task 2

Maths Assessment

58

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TASK 1 (a)

The child was asked to draw diagrams and construct number sentences to help him/her solve the following word problems.

(b)

Sam had 20 balloons at his party. If he gave 8 to his friends, how many balloons did he have left?

3rd Class went on a trip to the beach. They had 24 children in their class. The next week, 22 4th Class children went on a trip to the beach as well. How many children went on a trip to the beach altogether?

=

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

=

TASK 2

Draw a picture for your story.

Vi

Write the story.

ew

The child was asked to make up an addition number story where ‘36’ is the answer.

+

= 36

Mathematics

Algebra – Third Class

Number sentences Demonstrated

• translate an addition or subtraction number sentence with a frame into a word problem (frame not in initial position) Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

59

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Number sentences

The child should be enabled to solve one-step number sentences • 400 –

= 350; 810 + 23 =

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Count backwards and forwards along a number line. • Using a calculator, give children a number and a target number. Ask, ‘How much has to be added to reach the target?’. • Use place value charts to count forwards and backwards.

pl

e

Answers (i) Answers will vary

(b) 7

(f) 11

(j) Answers will vary

(c) 6

(g) 8

(k) Answers will vary

(d) 13 (h) 9

(l) Answers will vary

Sa

(a) 32 (e) 6

m

Task 1

in Vi

ew

28 – 9 = 19

g

Task 2

Maths Assessment

60

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TASK 1

The child was asked to find the missing element or elements in each of the following number sentences.

(a) 12 + 20 =

(e) 15 –

=9

(i)

+

= 15

= 25

(j)

= 15

+ 15 =

(b) 11 –

=4

(f)

(c) 17 +

= 23

(g) 14 –

=6

(k)

(h) 28 –

= 19

(l)

= 21

15 –

=

pl

e

(d) 8 +

14 +

TASK 2

Sa

m

The child was asked to generate an equation to describe the following story and solve the equation.

Vi

ew

in

g

A girl was sitting in the park eating her chips. She counted her chips and found she had 28 left to eat. Some cheeky seagulls swooped and snatched the chips from the girl. They feasted on the chips but dropped some on the ground. The girl counted the remaining chips on the ground and found there were 9 chips left. How many chips did the seagulls eat?

= Mathematics

Algebra – Third Class

Number sentences Demonstrated

Se

• solve one-step number sentences Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

61

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2-D shapes

The child should be enabled to identify, describe and classify 2-D shapes: square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, circle, semicircle, oval and irregular shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Begin to formally name and display groups of 2-D shapes such as polygons and quadrilaterals. • Use cut-out 2-D shapes to make a picture or scene (e.g. a city, robot, flowers, alien). • Sort 2–D shapes according to different criteria.

Task 1

m

(a) circle (b) square (c) semicircle (d) hexagon (e) triangle (f) rectangle

pl

e

Answers

Sa

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

62

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TASK 1

The child was asked to write the names of the following 2-D shapes.

(a)

(c)

(e)

(b)

(d)

(f)

TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to choose, sort and name a selection of 2-D shapes in groups of his/her own choice.

Describe how you sorted your shapes.

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

2-D shapes Demonstrated

• identify, describe and classify 2-D shapes: square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, circle, semicircle, oval and irregular shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

63

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2-D shapes

The child should be enabled to explore, describe and compare the properties (sides, angles, parallel and non-parallel lines) of 2-D shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Identify and compare ‘sharp’ and ‘blunt’ angles in shapes constructed on geoboards. • Investigate plane shapes with equal and unequal ‘corners’. • Identify angles inside and outside 2-D shapes.

e

Answers

pl

(a) equilateral triangle (b) rectangle or parallelogram

m

(c) square or rectangle

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

(d) answers will vary

Maths Assessment

64

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TASK

The child was asked to construct 2-D shapes to meet the criteria given.

Draw a 2-D shape with three equal edges and three corners.

(b)

Draw a 2-D shape with two parallel lines and four sides.

(c)

Draw a 2-D shape with four right angles.

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

Draw a 2-D shape with four angles and no parallel lines.

Vi

ew

in

g

(d)

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

2-D shapes Demonstrated

• explore, describe and compare the properties (sides, angles, parallel and non-parallel lines) of 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

65

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2-D shapes

The child should be enabled to construct and draw 2-D shapes • use templates, stencils, geostrips, geoboards

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Cut fabric into 2-D shapes; glue and label for display. • Cut shapes from potatoes. Dip in paint and stamp onto paper. Label. • Cut shapes from large pieces of paper; place the shapes in different positions to show they don’t change.

(c)

(b)

(d)

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

(a)

pl

Answers

Maths Assessment

66

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TASK

The child was asked to draw each of the following shapes using a ruler.

(c)

m

pl

e

(a)

square

Sa

triangle

(d)

Vi

ew

in

g

(b)

rectangle

Mathematics

hexagon

Shape and space – Third Class

2-D shapes Demonstrated

Se

• construct and draw 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

67

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2-D shapes

The child should be enabled to combine, tessellate and make patterns with 2-D shapes • cover surfaces with 2-D shapes that tessellate or do not tessellate • identify properties that facilitate or hinder tessellation • combine shapes to make patterns

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

Sa

m

pl

e

• Encourage children to explore how a piece of paper can be divided into equal sized shapes. Have children cut out their congruent shapes and construct patterns or pictures with them. • Use pattern blocks to investigate pattern making without leaving spaces. • Explore the attributes of shapes which tessellate and those which do not by attempting to cover a child’s desk with paper cutouts. • Investigate turning, flipping or sliding as a means of making shapes tessellate. • Use pattern blocks to cover designated areas such as books, whiteboard erasers or the surfaces of large 3-D objects. • Experiment with different shapes such as circles, hexagons and pentagons to determine why some shapes tessellate and others do not.

g

Answers

Triangle, rectangle

Task 3

ew

Task 2

Vi

Teacher check

in

Task 1

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

68

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The child was asked to construct a pattern by flipping, sliding or turning this shape.

TASK 2

The child was asked to colour the shapes that will tessellate.

TASK 3

The child was asked to use different colours to draw a tessellating pattern.

(b)

Vi

(a)

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

2-D shapes Demonstrated

Se

• combine, tessellate and make patterns with 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

69

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2-D shapes

The child should be enabled to identify the use of 2-D shapes in the environment • buildings, road signs, printing, household objects

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Children create their own shape pictures using 2-D shapes. • List all the 2–D shapes they can see in their classroom.

e

• Complete a ‘Shape Trail’ around the school grounds or local area. How many 2–D shapes were spotted?

pl

Answers (a) rectangles

m

(b) circle, rectangle, triangles

Sa

(c) rectangles, circles (d) triangle, rectangles, circles (e) triangle, rectangles, circles

Vi

ew

in

g

(f) squares, rectangles, triangle

Maths Assessment

70

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TASK

The child was asked to identify the 2-D shapes in the pictures below.

(a)

(d)

(e)

Sa

m

pl

(b)

shapes used:

e

shapes used:

shapes used:

ew

in

g

shapes used:

(f)

Vi

(c)

shapes used:

Mathematics

shapes used:

Shape and space – Third Class

2-D shapes Demonstrated

Se

• identify the use of 2-D shapes in the environment Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

71

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2-D shapes

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Use pattern blocks to cover designated areas such as books, whiteboard erasers or the surfaces of large 3-D objects. • Experiment with different shapes such as circles, hexagons and pentagons to determine why some shapes tessellate and others do not. • Use tangram pieces to construct a variety of pre-designed shapes and invented objects. Children can then ask their classmates to try to copy the shape they have made.

pl

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

Teacher check

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72

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TASK

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to cut out and assemble the shapes to construct the picture.

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

2-D shapes Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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73

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3-D shapes

The child should be enabled to identify, describe and classify 3-D shapes, including cube, cuboid, cylinder, cone, sphere, triangular prism, pyramid

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Create a ‘futuristic’ city of 3-D shapes, allowing the children to add objects with similar characteristics to the display. • Make 3-D shapes using construction materials, noting the net of the shape when dismantled. • Use dot paper to draw nets the children predict will form a recognisable 3-D object. Allow the children to test their predictions.

Task 1

m

pl

(a) cube (b) sphere (c) cone (d) cylinder (e) pyramid (f) triangular prism

e

Answers

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

Answers will vary

Maths Assessment

74

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to write the names of the following 3-D objects.

(d)

(b)

(e)

(c)

(f)

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

TASK 2

The child was asked to draw and name a prism of his/her choice.

My prism is a

Vi

ew

in

g

Draw

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

3-D shapes Demonstrated

• identify, describe and classify 3-D shapes, including cube, cuboid, cylinder, cone, sphere, triangular prism, pyramid Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

75

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3-D shapes

The child should be enabled to explore, describe and compare the properties of 3-D shapes • number and shape of faces, number of edges and corners, ability to roll, slide or stack

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Children can use paint or water on concrete to make prints of the bases and faces of cylinders, prisms and pyramids. • Encourage children to construct prisms, cylinders and pyramids by using construction materials which emphasise edges or faces.

pl

e

• Sort 3–D shapes according to their ability to roll, slide or stack.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

(a) 6, 12, 8 (b) 1, 0, 0 (c) 3, 2, 0

g

(d) 6, 12, 8

Vi

(b) should be coloured

ew

Task 2

in

(e) 4, 6, 4

Maths Assessment

76

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to count the number of faces, edges and corners on each 3-D shape and record his/her findings in the table.

Number of faces

Number of edges

Number of corners

(a)

(b)

(c)

pl

e

(d)

g

Sa

m

(e)

TASK 2

ew

in

The child was asked to colour the object which best fits the description given.

(a)

Vi

The object has one long cylinder joined to four thin cylinders. (b)

Mathematics

(c)

Shape and space – Third Class

3-D shapes Demonstrated

• explore, describe and compare the properties of 3-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

77

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3-D shapes

The child should be enabled to explore and describe the relationship of 3-D shapes with constituent 2-D shapes • identify constituent 2-D shapes by observation and deconstruction and compile a table of results

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Provide the children with 3-D shape nets and encourage them to discover, through folding, the 3-D shape they can form. • Print faces and bases of a variety of 3-D objects. • Model 3-D objects from clay and use fishing line to cut various cross-sections. Encourage children to investigate how cutting 3-D objects at different angles alters the shape of the cross-section.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

(a) rectangle (b) square (c) triangle (d) circle

Task 2

Vi

ew

(a) rectangle (b) triangle (c) circle

in

Task 3

g

(a) circle (b) square (c) rectangle

Maths Assessment

78

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to match each 2-D face to its position on a 3-D shape.

(a)

(c)

(b)

(d)

TASK 2

The child was asked to colour the correct 2-D shape to show the crosssection of the 3-D shapes.

m

pl

e

(a)

g

Sa

(b)

TASK 3

Vi

ew

in

(c)

(a)

The child was asked to colour the shape of the cross-section for each 3-D shape.

(b)

Mathematics

(c)

Shape and space – Third Class

3-D shapes Demonstrated

• explore and describe the relationship of 3-D shapes with constituent 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

79

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3-D shapes

The child should be enabled to construct 3-D shapes • trace around nets and cut out; use straws or pipe cleaners

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

Provide the children with 3-D shape nets and encourage them to discover which 3-D shapes they can form by folding. Print faces and bases of a variety of 3-D objects to make nets. Trace the faces of 3-D objects. Use toothpicks, pipe cleaners, straws and other objects to construct the ‘skeletons’ of 3-D shapes. Ask children to draw simple 3-D models from different viewpoints. Challenge children to build a 3-D shape from a net which meets given specifications; for example, construct a 3-D shape with eight faces.

m

pl

• • • • • •

Sa

Answers

Task 2 Teacher check

Maths Assessment

Vi

ew

in

g

Task 1

80

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Prim-Ed Publishing


The child was asked to match each net to its 3-D shape.

TASK 2

The child was asked to construct a 3-D model. He/She was asked to record his/her model by drawing a picture of the object and its net.

m

pl

e

TASK 1

The net I used to create my 3-D model.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

The 3-D model I created.

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

3-D shapes Demonstrated

Se

• construct 3-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

81

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3-D shapes

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D and 3-D shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Construct various models using 2-D and 3-D shapes. • Build a garage suitable for a toy car.

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

82

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to trace, then draw these 3-D shapes.

(b)

pl

e

(a)

TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

The child was asked to use the above 3-D shapes to draw a house made up of a cube and a square-based pyramid.

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

3-D shapes Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D and 3-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

83

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Symmetry

The child should be enabled to identify line symmetry in the environment

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use mirrors to place against pictures in magazines and investigate how an image alters by moving the axis of symmetry. • Have children write their names along the folded edge of a piece of paper. Children can turn over the paper and hold it up against a window to trace the mirror image of their name. When opened, their ‘symmetrical name’ can be turned on end and decorated as their personal totem pole.

e

Answers

m

pl

Task 1

Task 2

Vi

Teacher check

ew

in

g

Sa

10:00

Maths Assessment

84

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to draw the line of symmetry in the following objects.

(a)

(c)

(e)

10:00

(d)

(f)

pl

e

(b)

TASK 2

m

The child was asked to finish the symmetrical pictures.

(c)

(b)

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

(a)

Mathematics

(d)

Shape and space – Third Class

Symmetry Demonstrated

Se

• identify line symmetry in the environment Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

85

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Symmetry

The child should be enabled to identify and draw lines of symmetry in two-dimensional shapes • fold paper shapes or use a mirror to identify lines of symmetry • use fold lines to draw and record lines of symmetry • classify 2-D shapes according to their number of lines of symmetry

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Challenge the children to construct shapes from concrete materials or paper with many lines of symmetry. • Discuss symmetry in circles and oval shapes. • Experiment with shapes that have turning symmetry, such as propellers.

m

Answers

Vi

ew

Teacher check

(c) Two

g

Task 2

(b) Six

in

(a) Four

Sa

Task 1

Maths Assessment

86

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to draw and state the number of lines of symmetry in the following shapes.

(a)

(b)

(c)

lines of symmetry TASK 2

lines of symmetry

lines of symmetry

The child was asked to complete and draw symmetrical patterns.

(d)

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

(e)

in

g

(b)

Vi

ew

(c)

(f)

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

Symmetry Demonstrated

• identify and draw lines of symmetry in two-dimensional shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

Draw your own symmetrical pattern on the back of this sheet.

www.prim-ed.com

87

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Lines and angles

The child should be enabled to identify, describe and classify vertical, horizontal and parallel lines • discuss and describe lines in the environment • draw and label lines • use geostrips to construct vertical and horizontal lines

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Investigate places in the environment where horizontal, vertical, curved and parallel lines can be found. • Use geostrips to construct horizontal and vertical lines.

Answers

m

Task 1

Task 2

(a)

(c)

Sa

Teacher check (e)

(d)

(f)

(h)

Vi

ew

(b)

in

g

(g)

Maths Assessment

88

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to identify horizontal, vertical, curved and diagonal lines on the playground equipment illustrated.

Trace the curved lines in yellow.

• Trace the vertical lines in red.

Trace the diagonal lines green.

m

pl

e

• Trace the horizontal lines in blue.

TASK 2

Sa

The child was asked to draw lines parallel to the following.

(c)

(e)

in

g

(a)

(b)

Vi

ew

(g)

(d)

(f)

(h)

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

Lines and angles Demonstrated

• identify, describe and classify vertical, horizontal and parallel lines Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

89

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Lines and angles

The child should be enabled to recognise an angle in terms of a rotation • form angles by opening books and doors, by rotating clock hands and geostrip arms, by physically turning (clockwise/ anti-clockwise), or on computer

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Form angles by opening books and doors. • Rotate clock hands to form angles.

pl

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

Teacher check to ensure children make the angles correctly, then tick yes or no to show accuracy of angles made.

Maths Assessment

90

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to copy and form the angles using the strips of paper.

(a)

(g)

(d) yes yes

no

no

yes

(e)

(b)

no

(h) no

pl

e

yes

(f)

m

no

Sa

yes

no

no

(i)

(c)

no

Vi

yes

ew

in

g

yes

yes

Mathematics

yes

Shape and space – Third Class

Lines and angles Demonstrated

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• recognise an angle in terms of a rotation Prim-Ed Publishing

no

91

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Lines and angles

The child should be enabled to classify angles as greater than, less than or equal to a right angle • construct and use a right-angle measure to identify right angles in the environment and in 2-D and 3-D shapes • classify and record angles as >,< or = to a right angle

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Make a set angle using lolly sticks glued at one end. Use the angle to test objects around the room and make comparisons. • Investigate angles using terms such as right angle, acute angle and straight angle. • Make two paper circles in different coloured paper with a radius cut into each. Interlock the circles at the radii and slide in a circular motion to create different angles.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

92

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to construct angles which were more or less than the angles given.

More than

Less than

(a)

pl

e

(b)

TASK 2

Smaller

Larger

Vi

ew

in

door desk

Same

g

Object Measured

Sa

m

The child was asked to use a ‘right angle tester’ to measure angles of objects and to record the answers in the table.

Mathematics

Shape and space – Third Class

Lines and angles Demonstrated

• classify angles as greater than, less than or equal to a right angle Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

93

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Lines and angles

The child should be enabled to solve problems involving lines and angles

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Draw pictures using lines and angles. • Make up their own clues for a friend to solve. • Sort shapes according to the number/type of lines and the number of angles.

e

Answers

pl

(a) square (b) hexagon

m

(c) rectangle

Sa

(d) pentagon (e) circle

Vi

ew

in

g

(f) triangle

Maths Assessment

94

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to draw the 2-D shapes from the descriptions given.

2-D Shape

I have four equal sides with two pairs of parallel lines and four equal angles.

(b)

I have six equal sides with three pairs of parallel lines and six equal angles.

(c)

I have four sides. Two sides are equal and parallel and the other two sides are also equal and parallel. I have four equal angles.

(d)

I have five equal sides and five equal angles.

(e)

I have one curved line and no angles.

(f)

I have three equal sides and three equal angles.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

(a)

e

Description

Mathematics

Shape and space â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Lines and angles Demonstrated

Se

â&#x20AC;˘ solve problems involving lines and angles Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

95

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare, measure and record lengths of a wide variety of objects using appropriate metric units (m, cm) • everyday objects, furniture, heights of children • estimate length and height without and with unit of measurement present measure to check estimates

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Explore the length of one metre by finding the number of foot lengths, finger lengths and hand spans that are equivalent. • Explore the concept of conservation by comparing the lengths of strings which have been bent or curved to 1 metre. • Make a 1-metre streamer length as a personalised metre ruler, marking each 10-centimetre length.

Answers

m

Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

96

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to find the objects, estimate and measure them with centimetre cubes and a centimetre ruler and then record any difference in the measurements.

Object

Cubes

Difference

Ruler

(a) estimate

estimate

measured

measured

estimate

estimate

measured

measured

estimate

estimate

measured

measured

estimate

estimate

(b)

pl

e

(c)

TASK 2

measured

Sa

measured

m

(d)

Measured

Vi

(a)

(b)

Estimate

ew

Object

in

g

The child was asked to estimate then measure these objects using a metre ruler. The child worked with a partner to measure the objects.

(c)

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Length Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ estimate, compare, measure and record lengths of a wide variety of objects using appropriate metric units (m, cm) Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

97

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to rename units of length in m and cm • 125 cm = 1 m 25 cm

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Record measures in measuring activities as m and cm. • Measure heights of children and record as m and cm. • Convert measurements in m and cm to just metres or just centimetres.

pl

Answers

m

Task 1 (a) 1 m 20 cm

Sa

(b) 1 m 33 cm (c) 1 m 27 cm (d) 1 m 42 cm

in

g

(e) 1 m 35 cm

Task 2

(c) 5 m 6 cm (d) 1 m 12 cm (e) 3 m (f) 4 m 8 cm

Maths Assessment

ew

(b) 75 cm

(g) 3 m 76 cm

(h) 2 m 13 cm

(i) 4 m 90 cm

(j) 9 m 9 cm

Vi

(a) 1 m 25 cm

(k) 7 m 16 cm (i) 7 m

98

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to record the lengths shown in the diagrams.

(a) 1-metre ruler

m

cm

1-metre ruler

m

cm

1-metre ruler

m

cm

m

cm

m

cm

(b)

e

(c)

pl

(d)

Sa

m

1-metre ruler

(e)

g

1-metre ruler

TASK 2

ew

in

The child was asked to rename units of length in metres and centimetres.

125 cm =

m

(g)

376 cm =

m

cm

(b)

75 cm =

(h)

213 cm =

m

cm

(c)

506 cm =

m

cm

(i)

490 cm =

m

cm

(d)

112 cm =

m

cm

(j)

909 cm =

m

cm

(e)

300 cm =

m

cm

(k)

716 cm =

m

cm

(f)

408 cm =

m

cm

(l)

700 cm =

m

cm

Vi

(a)

m

cm cm

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Length Demonstrated

Se

â&#x20AC;˘ rename units of length in m and cm Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

99

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving the addition and subtraction of units of length (m, cm) • confine to totals that can be readily checked by measuring

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Measure heights, arm spans, length of strides of children and add lengths together. • Calculate how many of each measure children would need to make 100 metres.

e

Answers

pl

Task 1

m

(a) 5 cm (b) 9 cm

Sa

(c) 13 cm (d) 2 cm (e) 7 cm

(b) 13 + 11 = 24 cm (c) 9 + 7 = 16 cm (d) 11 – 5 = 6 cm (e) 9 – 2 = 7 cm

ew

(a) 5 + 2 = 7 cm

Vi

Task 2

in

g

(f) 11 cm

(f) 13 – 7 = 6 cm

Task 3 (a) 50 (b) 20

Maths Assessment

100

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to measure the lines and record in centimetres.

cm

(b)

cm

(c)

cm

(d)

cm

(e)

cm

(f)

cm

e

(a)

TASK 2

line (c) + line (f) =

(c)

line (b) + line (e) =

(d)

line (f) – line (a) =

(e) (f)

line (c) – line (e) =

=

Sa

(b)

+

cm

+

=

cm

+

=

cm

g

line (a) + line (d) =

=

cm

line (b) – line (d) =

=

cm

=

cm

ew

Vi

in

(a)

m

pl

The child was asked to add or subtract units of length.

TASK 3

The child was asked to calculate how many smaller lines he/she would need to make one metre.

(a)

How many of line (d) would you need to make one metre?

(b)

How many of line (a) would you need to make one metre?

Mathematics

Measures – Third Class

Length Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving the addition and subtraction of units of length (m, cm) Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

101

Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Area

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare and measure the area of regular and irregular shapes • counting non-standard square units

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Children can find shapes which fit together with and without leaving gaps by attempting to cover a desk top using objects such as lids, tiles and maths resources. • Children can use a variety of tessellating grids on overhead transparencies to count and compare the number of units of different shapes and sizes used to cover their footprint. • Use measuring tapes or trundle wheels to measure the sides of a large area. Use these measurements to construct a scale drawing of the area on squared paper and determine the area in metres squared. • Construct square metres from newspaper or art paper, cut the squares into pieces and reassemble into a different shape. Discuss that although the shape has changed, the area has remained the same.

Sa

Answers Task 1

Vi

ew

Teacher check

in

Task 2

g

mat (b) should be coloured with an area of 18 m2

Maths Assessment

102

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to colour the mat which would cover the most floor area.

5m

6m

(a)

(b) 2m 3m

2m (c)

10 m

2m (d)

TASK 2

1m

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to trace his/her hand on the grid below and calculate the approximate area by counting the whole squares.

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Area Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ estimate, compare and measure the area of regular and irregular shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

103

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Weight

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare, measure and record the weight of a wide variety of objects using appropriate metric units (kg, g) • everyday objects, books, piles of copybooks lighter and heavier than 1 kg • objects showing that there is no constant relationship between weight and size • handle and compare objects as an aid to estimation

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Ask children to find objects at home which weigh approximately one kilogram. • Visit a supermarket and note what kinds of items are sold in kilograms. • Children create their own one-kilogram weight by filling a container with sand and adding or taking a small amount to find an exact kilogram using scales. • Handle a range of objects and estimate their weight in relation to a kilogram. • Provide children with a range of objects to order by weight, using balance scales. • Attempt to create an exact kilogram from a number of different materials such as sand, marbles or clay. Use kitchen scales to illustrate the need for grams (a unit smaller than a kilogram) in determining a more accurate weight.

g

Sa

• Allow children to attempt to estimate, by hefting, weights that are more than, less than or about one kilogram.

Task 2 Teacher check

Maths Assessment

ew

Teacher check

Vi

Task 1

in

Answers

104

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to predict whether a range of objects would be closer to half a kilogram or one kilogram and then check his/her predictions by hefting and comparing each to a one-kilogram weight.

duster

more than one half a kilogram kilogram one kilogram

Yes

No

(b)

bucket of blocks

more than one half a kilogram kilogram one kilogram

Yes

No

(c)

school bag

more than one half a kilogram kilogram one kilogram

Yes

No

(d)

saucepan

more than one half a kilogram kilogram one kilogram

Yes

No

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

TASK 2

(a) (b)

Actual measure

less than Estimate 1 kg (less, more, equal)

Vi

Object

ew

in

g

The child was asked to complete the table by estimating and measuring the mass of objects to be less than, more than or about one kilogram.

about 1 kg

more than 1 kg

schoolbag

drink bottle

(c)

pair of shoes

(d)

book

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Weight Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ estimate, compare, measure and record the weight of a wide variety of objects using appropriate metric units (kg, g) Prim-Ed Publishing

How close was my estimate? 'spot 'way 'close' on' out' 'spot 'way 'close' on' out' 'spot 'way 'close' on' out' 'spot 'way 'close' out' on'

www.prim-ed.com

105

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Weight

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving the addition and subtraction of units of weight (kg and g) • confine to totals which can be readily checked by weighing

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Weigh children’s school bags, pencil cases or lunch boxes and add the measures together. • Work out a recipe for 8 people or 2 people by doubling or halving quantities in a simple recipe for 4 people.

e

Answers

pl

Task 1

m

Teacher check

Sa

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

106

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1 (a)

The child was asked to weigh the following items.

school bag

TASK 2

(b)

drink bottle

(c)

pair of shoes

(d)

book

The child was asked to solve problems using the units of weight from Task 1.

(b)

school bag + book =

(c)

school bag + shoes =

(d)

drink bottle + book =

(e)

drink bottle + shoes =

(f)

shoes + book =

+

=

pl

school bag + drink bottle =

=

Sa

+

m

(a)

e

How much would the following items weigh together?

+

=

=

+

+

= =

Vi

ew

in

g

+

What is the difference in weight between the following items? (g)

the shoes and the drink bottle

=

(h)

the book and the school bag

=

(i)

the drink bottle and the book

=

(j)

the shoes and the school bag

=

Mathematics

Measures – Third Class

Weight Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving the addition and subtraction of units of weight (kg and g) Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

107

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Capacity

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare, measure and record the capacity of a wide variety of objects using appropriate metric units (l, ml) • use cartons, spoons, cups, jugs, plastic bottles and other common containers • use litre, 250 ml and 500 ml measuring containers • use tall, low, wide and narrow containers

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Experiment with different-sized containers as a ‘unit’ to fill a larger container. • Provide opportunities for children to investigate 1 litre in real-life situations; e.g. use a watering can to sprinkle 1 litre of water or drink 1 litre of water.

Answers

Sa

Task 1 Answers will vary

Task 3

red

green

blue

blue

Vi

green

ew

in

g

Task 2

Answers will vary, teacher check

Maths Assessment

108

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to find and record the capacity of objects using cubes as a measure.

Estimate (a)

your hand

(b)

a cup

(c)

a small plastic bowl

(d)

an ice-cream container

TASK 2

The child was asked to colour the following household items which hold about one litre, more than one litre and less than one litre.

pl

e

Colour red the containers holding about one litre. Colour blue the containers holding more than one litre. Colour green the containers holding less than one litre.

in

g

Sa

m

(a) (b) (c)

Measure

TASK 3

Litres

14 12 10 8 litres

bucket

Estimate

Vi

Container

ew

The child was asked to use a litre measure to fill containers with water and complete the table and graph below with his or her results.

saucepan

6 4

bowl

2

kettle

0

bucket

Mathematics

saucepan

kettle

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Capacity Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ estimate, compare, measure and record the capacity of a wide variety of objects using appropriate metric units (l, ml) Prim-Ed Publishing

bowl

www.prim-ed.com

109

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Capacity

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving the addition and subtraction of units of capacity (l, ml) • confine to totals that can be readily checked by measuring

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Measure capacity of drink containers, add together to gain a total. • Solve word problems involving the addition and subtraction of litres and millilitres.

e

Answers

pl

Task 1

m

(a) 2 l (b) 500 ml (c) 375 ml (d) 750 ml (e) 1 l

Sa

Task 2 (c), (b), (d), (e), (a)

g

Task 3

(b) 750 ml + 2 l = 2 l 750 ml or 2.75 l

ew

(c) 1 l + 500 ml = 1 l 500 ml or 1.5 l

in

(a) 500 ml + 375 ml = 875 ml

(d) 2 l – 500 ml = 1 l 500 ml or 1.5 l

(e) 2 l – 375 ml = 1 l 625 ml or 1.625 l

Vi

(f) 2 l – 750 ml = 1 l 250 ml or 1.25 l

(g) 750 ml + 500 ml = 1 l 250 ml or 1.25 l (h) 750 ml – 500 ml = 250 ml or 0.25 l

Maths Assessment

110

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to record the capacity of these containers in litres and millilitres.

(a)

(b)

TASK 2

(c)

(d)

(e)

The child was asked to order the containers from Task 1 from smallest to largest.

largest

m

pl

e

smallest

TASK 3

Sa

The child was asked to add and subtract the measures from Task 1.

juice + beans =

+

(b)

pop + ice-cream =

(c)

milk + juice =

(d)

ice-cream – juice =

(e)

ice-cream – beans =

(f)

ice-cream – pop =

(g)

pop + juice =

+

=

(h)

pop – juice =

=

=

in

g

(a)

ew

+

Vi

+

= =

= –

=

=

Mathematics

Measures – Third Class

Capacity Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving the addition and subtraction of units of capacity (l, ml) Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

111

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to consolidate and develop further a sense of time passing • place daily, weekly, monthly and annual events in sequence • discuss movement of hands of clock or sand in hourglass as indicating passing of time • refine and develop vocabulary of time: before/after, a long time ago, last year, last month, yesterday, immediately, soon, tomorrow, in a week’s time, for a short/ long time

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Create a daily planner with clock faces for children to enter the time they will be taking each lesson. • Play ‘What time is it?’ following the rules of ‘Who am I?’; for example, ‘I am at school, I am playing football, my tummy is full— what time is it?’.

Sa

m

• Follow the path of a shadow, recording a child’s changing shadow height at regular intervals throughout a day.

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

112

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to draw a time in each clock face to indicate the approximate time of day for each of the following events. The child orally explained his/her choices.

(a)

(b)

10 9 8

7 6 5

1112 1

2 3 4

10 9 8

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

(e)

(f)

7 6 5

10 9 8

g

2 3 4

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

ew

10 9 8

1112 1

in

1112 1

Sa

m

pl

(d)

7 6 5

1112 1

e

1112 1

(c)

(h)

Vi

(g)

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

Mathematics

2 3 4

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Time Demonstrated

Se

â&#x20AC;˘ consolidate and develop further a sense of time passing Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

113

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to read time in five-minute intervals on analogue and digital clock (12-hour) • count in fives up and down number line, hundred square and clock face • construct simple clock face and relate intervals 1

/4 hour = 15 min = 3 x 5 min

• discuss and record times of a variety of common events, school and home activities, television programmes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

• Make individual digital clock faces to practise writing digital times.

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

8:45

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

5:05

9:20

in

2:15

2 3 4

g

1112 1 10 9 8

Sa

Answers Task 1

pl

e

• Develop a class chart showing the relationship between units of time; e.g. 60 seconds = one hour; 24 hours = one day; seven days = one week; 52 weeks = one year; 100 years = one century etc. • Practise making times given orally, in written form or in digital form on clock faces made by the children.

ew

Task 2

Vi

(a) 9:15 (b) 10:10 (c) 12:55 (d) 11:25

Task 3

(a) 24 (b) 7 (c) 60 (d) 365

Task 4 1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

Maths Assessment

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

114

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1 (a)

The child was asked to draw hands to show times on an analogue clock.

1112 1 10 9 8

(b)

1112 1

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2:15 TASK 2

(c)

(d) 2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

8:45

1112 1

2 3 4

7 6 5

5:05

9:20

The child was asked to write the digital times for these analogue times.

(b)

(c)

(d)

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

TASK 3

2 3 4

1112 1

10 9 8

m

10 9 8

1112 1

Sa

1112 1

pl

e

(a)

7 6 5

1112 1

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

7 6 5

in

g

The child was asked to complete the time sentences.

hours

1 day =

(b)

1 week =

ew

(a)

minutes

(d)

1 year =

days

The child was asked to draw red hands for new times on the analogue clocks.

1112 1 10 9 8

1 hour =

Vi

TASK 4 (a)

days

(c)

7 6 5

(b) 2 3 4

one hour on

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

(c) 2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

10 minutes on

7 6 5

(d) 2 3 4

20 minutes before

Mathematics

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

15 minutes before

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Time â&#x20AC;˘ read time in five-minute intervals on analogue and digital clock (12-hour) Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Se

115

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to record time in analogue and digital forms

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Make individual clock faces for children to practise making given times onto. • Play games which involve clockwise rotation, or create an ‘events’ wheel with twelve sectors. • Use digital and analogue flashcards for sight recognition or matching games.

e

Answers

pl

Task 1

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

eleven o'clock 1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

seven-thirty

Sa

1112 1 10 9 8

quarter past two

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

g

half past ten

Task 3

Vi

ew

(a) 9:30 (b) 5:15 (c) 3:45 (d) 12:00

in

Task 2

m

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

116

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

When you wake up.

(b)

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

(c) 2 3 4

10 9 8

TASK 2

7 6 5

(d)

7 6 5

2 3 4

When school finishes. 1112 1 10 9 8

2 3 4

7 6 5

2 3 4

The child was asked to match the times to the analogue clocks. (Use a different colour for each match.)

half past ten

TASK 3

Sa

10 9 8

(d)

eleven o'clock

2 3 4

10 9 8

g

2 3 4

11 12 1

in

7 6 5

quarter past two

7 6 5

ew

11 12 1

(c)

pl

(b)

seven-thirty

m

(a)

10 9 8

1112 1 10 9 8

When it is morning break. 1112 1

When school starts.

e

(a)

The child was asked to show appropriate times on an analogue clock.

11 12 1

11 12 1 2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

7 6 5

Vi

The child was asked to write the times on the digital clocks.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

DIGITAL TIMER

DIGITAL TIMER

DIGITAL TIMER

DIGITAL TIMER

:

:

:

:

nine-thirty

quarter past five

quarter to four

twelve o'clock

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Time Demonstrated

Se

â&#x20AC;˘ record time in analogue and digital forms Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

117

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to read and interpret simple timetables • school, bus, train, television schedules

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Collect various timetables for children to view and discuss. • Children bring in a timetable and write questions of his/her own to give to a partner.

e

• Children write a timetable for the ‘perfect’ school day.

pl

Answers (a) 5 films

m

(b) 10 hours

Sa

(c) Saturday (d) 2 hours (e) 12.00

Vi

ew

in

g

(f) Answers will vary

Maths Assessment

118

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to read the timetable and answer the questions.

2.00

(c)

Which day of the week is this TV programme schedule for?

(d)

g

9.00

in

(e)

How many hours of news and current affairs shows are on television?

What time does Music TV finish?

Vi

ew

11.00 11.30 1.30 (f)

How many hours of viewing time do the films take?

Sa

4.00 4.30 5.00 6.00 6.30 7.00

(b)

pl

News Cartoon Connection Music TV FILM: Donkey goes to Hollywood FILM: Tina the Ballerina Travel Europe The Garden Show Sports Update News Current Affairs FILM: The Clown Dog FILM: Thriller on X Street World News FILM: Pirates on the High Sea Close

How many films are on television on this day?

m

5.30 6.00 10.00 12.00

(a)

e

Saturday

If you were only allowed to watch 4 hours of television on this day, what would you watch? Explain why.

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Time Demonstrated

Se

â&#x20AC;˘ read and interpret simple timetables Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity

119

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to rename minutes as hours and hours as minutes • confine work to five-minute intervals; e.g. 70 min = 1 hour 10 min, 11/2 hour = 1 hour 30 min = 90 min

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Children calculate different time periods of the school day and record as minutes and hours and minutes. • Calculate how many minutes it takes to complete a task; e.g. brushing teeth. Multiply it over how many times children would do the task in a week, month, year. Record as minutes and hours and minutes.

pl

Answers Task 1

m

(a) 30 minutes

Sa

(b) 15 minutes (c) 60 minutes (d) 45 minutes

ew

(b) 80 minutes; 1 hour 20 minutes

in

(a) 70 minutes; 1 hour 10 minutes

g

Task 2

(c) 105 minutes; 1 hour 45 minutes

(d) 350 minutes; 5 hours 50 minutes

Vi

(e) 315 minutes; 5 hours 15 minutes (f) 295 minutes; 4 hours 55 minutes

Maths Assessment

120

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to complete the time sentences.

(a)

1

/2 hour =

minutes

(c)

1 hour =

(b)

1

/4 hour =

minutes

(d)

3

TASK 2

(a)

/4 hour =

minutes

The child was asked to calculate time passed and record as minutes and hours and minutes.

1112 1

7 6 5

1112 1

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

(d) 2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

pl

e

10 9 8

minutes

hrs

m

minutes mins

hrs

mins

(e)

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

10 9 8

in

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1

minutes

Vi

hrs

(c)

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

10 9 8

2 3 4

7 6 5

mins

(f)

7 6 5

1112 1

2 3 4

10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

2 3 4

minutes mins

hrs

Mathematics

mins

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Time Demonstrated

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

â&#x20AC;˘ rename minutes as hours and hours as minutes Prim-Ed Publishing

10 9 8

hrs

minutes hrs

1112 1

minutes

mins

1112 1

2 3 4

2 3 4

7 6 5

ew

10 9 8

1112 1

g

1112 1

Sa

(b)

minutes

121

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to read dates from calendars and express weeks as days and vice versa • collect and record significant personal dates and dates in life of school and family

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Record special events on a class calendar. • Study the layouts and formats of different calendars.

e

• Know own date of birth (day, month, year).

pl

Answers Task 1

m

(a) 42 days

Sa

(b) 26 days (c) 32 days (d) 37 days

g

(e) 7 wks 3 days

Task 2 (a) January (b) 4

ew

(h) 3 wks 2 days

Vi

(g) 9 wks 6 days

in

(f) 5 wks 6 days

(c) 5 days (d) January 4 (e) 5

Maths Assessment

122

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to complete time sentences.

(a)

6 weeks =

(e)

52 days =

wks

days

(b)

3 wks 5 days =

days

(f)

41 days =

wks

days

(c)

4 wks 4 days =

days

(g)

69 days =

wks

days

(d)

5 wks 2 days =

days

(h)

23 days =

wks

days

TASK 2

days

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to look at the calendar and answer the questions.

Which month is being shown on the calendar?

(b)

How many full weeks does this month have?

(c)

How many days between ‘My Birthday!’ and my Aunty Coral’s birthday?

(d)

On which date is the school fete being held?

(e)

How many Fridays are there in this month?

Vi

(a)

Mathematics

Measures – Third Class

Time Demonstrated

• read dates from calendars and express weeks as days and vice versa Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

123

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving times and dates • practical problems that can be readily checked by measurement

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving times and dates related to the child. • Read times, calendars and timetables at regular intervals for a purpose.

7 6 5

pl

1112 1 10 9 8

2 3 4

m

(a)

e

Answers

Sa

(b) June 22 (c) 1 hour 30 minutes (d) 30 minutes x 5 days = 2 hours 30 minutes

g

(e) 5.20

1112 1

7 6 5

2 3 4

1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

; 80 minutes; 1 hour 20 minutes 2 3 4

Vi

10 9 8

ew

(g)

in

(f) February 15

Maths Assessment

124

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to solve the ‘time’ problems.

(a) James has to catch the 7.45 a.m. bus to school.

(e) Sean is going to sports training at 4 o’clock. It lasts for 1 hour and 20 minutes.

Show the time on the clock. 1112 1 10 9 8

7 6 5

What time does Sean’s mum need to pick him up?

2 3 4

(f) (b) Today is June 8. James has a birthday party to go to in two weeks.

Conor and his family are going on holiday in 37 days. Today is January 9. What date does Conor go on holiday?

pl

e

What date will it be?

m

Sa

(c) Monica starts her ballet class at 4.15 p.m. It finishes at 5.45 p.m.

(g) Kathleen wakes up at 6.50 a.m. to get ready for school. She leaves for school at 8.10 a.m. Show the times on the clocks.

g

How long does the ballet class last?

1112 1

in

10 9 8

ew

(d) Monica’s favourite TV show is Cartoon Corner. It runs for 30 minutes every weekday.

2 3 4

7 6 5

1112 1 10 9 8

2 3 4

7 6 5

Vi

How many minutes does she take to get ready?

How many minutes of cartoons does Monica watch in one week?

How many hours and minutes does she take to get ready?

Mathematics

Measures – Third Class

Time Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving times and dates Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

125

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Money

The child should be enabled to rename amounts of euro or cents and record using symbols and decimal point

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Exchange notes for the same value coins. Simulate catching a bus with different priced fares. Child ‘bus drivers’ must give the correct change. Investigate quick ways of adding prices that end in ‘99c’. For example, €1.99 + €2.99 ≈ €5 – 2c = €4.98. Play ‘Snap’ using cards with equivalent amounts of money written on them in euro and cents.

e

• • • •

pl

Answers Task 1

m

Teacher check

Sa

Task 2 (a) €2.20 (b) €3.85 (c) €4.65

in

Vi

ew

(a) €5.00 (b) €1.95 (c) €1.50

g

Task 3

Maths Assessment

126

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to colour the coins to match the amount shown.

(a)

(b)

(c)

€1.30 TASK 2

€3.50

€5.00

(b)

(c)

ew

in

g

Sa

m

(a)

pl

e

The child was asked to write the amount shown in coins as euro and cents.

TASK 3

Vi

The child was asked to calculate the cost to buy groups of items.

3.00

2.00 0.50 1.00

0.25

(a)

a stapler and a notepad

(b)

a pencil, eraser and a pen

1.20

(c) three pencils

Mathematics

Measures – Third Class

Money Demonstrated

• rename amounts of euro or cents and record using symbols and decimal point Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

127

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Maths Assessment


Measures – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Money

The child should be enabled to solve and complete one-step problems and tasks involving the addition and subtraction of money

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Set up a class shop. Integrate the use of money into other curriculum areas. • Use language such as ‘worth’, ‘value’, ‘bought’, ‘sell’ and ‘cost’. • Use calculators to determine amounts of change. Combine appropriate notes and coins for this amount.

e

Answers

pl

(a) €5.50 (b) €1.25

m

(c) €3.80

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

(d) €0.45

Maths Assessment

128

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to calculate the correct change in the money problems.

(a)

(c)

Jack is

Lucy is

using

using

to buy bananas

to buy a ball

for

1.20

e

for

m

pl

4.50

change

Sa

change

(d)

g

(b)

Miles is

in

Madison

using

ew

is using to buy

to buy

Vi

a present

a kite

for

3.75

for

change

change

Mathematics

Measures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Money Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ solve and complete one-step problems and tasks involving the addition and subtraction of money Prim-Ed Publishing

7.05

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

129

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Maths Assessment


Data – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Representing and interpreting data

The child should be enabled to collect, organise and represent data using pictograms, block graphs and bar charts • collect data from the environment and record in tabular form • represent data in appropriate format • discuss strengths and limitations of the format used • use simple scale in block graphs and bar charts • use computer applications if available to organise and represent data

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Construct a ‘concrete’ bar graph to record the probability of different numbers being rolled on a die. Use many dice to create a concrete pictograph of the results. • Survey class members to discover favourite toys. Display the results as a pictogram or a bar chart.

Sa

Answers A Duckling's Weekly Weight Increase

g

30

in ew

20 15 10

Vi

Weight increase in grams

25

5

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Weeks

Maths Assessment

130

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to construct a bar graph from the data to display the duckling’s weight increase over six weeks.

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

10 g

10 g

15 g

25 g

20 g

30 g

e

A Duckling's Weekly Weight Increase

m

pl

30

10

Sa ew

15

in

g

20

Vi

Weight increase in grams

25

5

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

Weeks Mathematics

Data – Third Class

Representing and interpreting data Demonstrated

• collect, organise and represent data using pictograms, block graphs and bar charts Prim-Ed Publishing

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131

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Maths Assessment


Data – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Representing and interpreting data

The child should be enabled to read and interpret tables, pictograms, block graphs and bar charts

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Construct a ‘concrete’ bar graph to record the probability of different numbers being rolled on a die. Use many dice to create a concrete pictograph of the results. • Construct pictograms and bar charts to show the childrens’ favourite foods. Answer questions about the graphs.

e

Answers Cats

Fish

Birds

Other

10

7

4

5

5

Tally

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Total

Task 2 Other

g

Birds Fish Cats Dogs

Task 3

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

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1

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KInds of Pets

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Dogs

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Task 1

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(a) dogs (b) fish (c) birds and other (d) two

Maths Assessment

132

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TASK 1

The child was asked to tally the number of pets in this group.

Dogs

Cats

Fish

Birds

Other

Tally Total

TASK 2

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The child was asked to record the information in a column graph.

m Sa

Birds

g

Fish

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Cats Dogs

TASK 3

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

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1

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KInds of Pets

Other

The child was asked to answer questions related to the column graph.

(a)

Which is the largest group?

(c)

Which have the same amount?

(b)

Which is the smallest group?

(d)

How many more cats than birds?

Mathematics

Data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Representing and interpreting data Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ read and interpret tables, pictograms, block graphs and bar charts Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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133

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Maths Assessment


Data – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Representing and interpreting data

The child should be enabled to use data sets to solve and complete practical tasks and problems • solve simple problems using data collected from own environment

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Encourage children to translate the data in pictographs into quantitative measures. • Investigate situations where one picture or block on a graph may represent more than one object; e.g. one picture of a man equals 10 people. • Follow-up graph construction with discussion to encourage children to analyse the data and suggest possible reasons for these results.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2

g

(a) ants

in

(b) rain drops and bees

Vi

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(c) an apple tree, a bush with flowers, a clump of grass, a palm tree, sun, dog

Maths Assessment

134

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK 1

The child was asked to draw a picture using the data provided.

Plants

Weather

Animals and Insects

5

• An apple tree

Bees

4 3

• A bush with flowers

Birds

2

• A clump of grass

Ants

1

• A palm tree

Rain drops

Clouds

Dogs

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Suns

TASK 2

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The child was asked to use the data to answer the questions.

(a)

Which object did you draw the most?

(b)

Which two objects did you draw five times?

(c)

Name objects you drew once.

Mathematics

Data – Third Class

Representing and interpreting data Demonstrated

• use data sets to solve and complete practical tasks and problems Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

135

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Maths Assessment


Data – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Chance

The child should be enabled to use vocabulary of uncertainty and chance: possible, impossible, might, certain, not sure

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Construct a class list of impossible and possible events which could occur at their school. For example, it is impossible for the playground equipment to become alive and walk around the school, but it is possible that a hailstorm might come and smash some windows. • Investigate possible and impossible events which could occur within a given time.

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(b) Teacher check

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(a) (i) possible (ii) impossible (iii) possible (iv) impossible

e

Answers

Maths Assessment

136

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TASK

The child was asked to determine whether it was possible or impossible for the following buildings to be made using the blocks in the circle.

(a)

(i)

(iii)

(iv)

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Possible Impossible

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Possible Impossible

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Sa

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pl

(ii)

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Possible Impossible

Draw a construction that would be impossible to make using the blocks in the circle.

Vi

(b) Draw a construction that would be possible to make using the blocks in the circle.

Mathematics

Data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Chance Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ use vocabulary of uncertainty and chance: possible, impossible, might, certain, not sure Prim-Ed Publishing

Possible Impossible

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Maths Assessment


Data – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Chance

The child should be enabled to order events in terms of likelihood of occurrence • examine and discuss the likelihood of occurrence of simple events and order from least likely to most likely Our school will be closed next Monday The sun will shine for two hours tomorrow The teacher will fall asleep at 11 o’clock today

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Provide opportunities for children to make educated decisions about the probability of familiar events happening. For example, make future predictions based on graphed data about the weather. • Investigate and record the probability of rolling a particular number on a die.

Answers

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Task 1 (a) Teacher check (b) impossible – (ii), (iv)

most likely – (d)

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least likely – (b)

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Task 2

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(c) most likely – (i), (v), (vi)

Maths Assessment

138

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TASK 1

(a)

The child was asked to colour the jelly babies by following the instructions and make predictions about the likelihood of different coloured jelly babies being retrieved from a mixed bag. The child was asked to orally explain his/her choices.

Colour four yellow. Colour one red. Colour ten black.

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A blindfolded child picked out five jelly babies.

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Colour four green.

Cross out the groups which are impossible.

(c)

Circle the two groups you think are most likely. R-red

B-black

G-green

g

Y-yellow

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(b)

(ii)

Y

Y

(iv) B

G

Y

R

Vi

R

TASK 2

Y

(iii)

G

G

G

G

G

B

B

G

G

Y

(v) B

B

B

B

B

(vi) Y

Y

G

G

R

R

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Y

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(i)

The child was asked to circle the jelly baby which is most likely to be picked out of the bag and cross out the jelly baby which is least likely to be picked out of the bag.

(a)

(b)

(c)

R

G

(d)

Y

Mathematics

Data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Chance Demonstrated

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

â&#x20AC;˘ order events in terms of likelihood of occurrence Prim-Ed Publishing

B

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Maths Assessment


Data – Third Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Chance

The child should be enabled to identify and record outcomes of simple random processes • toss a coin ten or twenty times and record results • draw a cube from a bag containing, for example, 4 blue cubes and 8 red cubes a number of times, replacing the drawn cube each time; discuss results

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Provide children with opportunities to investigate their own predictions as an incidental activity related to other areas of learning; for example, ‘How many children in our class are fit?’. Children can design an investigation and collect data to derive answers. • Create real-life activities where tallying is involved; for example, tallying the number of times a child passes a given point in a walkathon. • Toss a coin ten times and record the results.

Sa

Answers

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Teacher check

Maths Assessment

140

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Prim-Ed Publishing


TASK

The child was asked to predict the six most popular television shows in the class and write them in the television sets. He/She was then asked to test his/her predictions by collecting data and answering the questions.

Tally

Total

Total

Tally

Tally

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Tally

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Total

Tally

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g

Tally

Total

Total

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Total

(a)

Was the television show that you predicted the most popular in the survey?

(b)

Did at least one person like all of the television shows you predicted?

Mathematics

Data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Third Class

Chance Demonstrated

â&#x20AC;˘ identify and record outcomes of simple random processes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

141

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Maths Assessment


2431 Maths Assessments - 3rd Class