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Maths Assessment – 1st Class Published under license by Prim-Ed Publishing 2004 First published by R.I.C. Publications 2002 Copyright©RIC Publications 2002 ISBN 1 920962 07 7 2429 Titles available in this series: Maths Assessment—1st Class Maths Assessment—2nd Class Maths Assessment—3rd Class Maths Assessment—4th Class Maths Assessment—5th Class

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This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

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Maths Assessment—6th Class

Maths Assessment

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Foreword Maths Assessment - 1st Class is a comprehensive package of tasks designed to assess 1st Class mathematics in Irish primary schools. Each book in the series covers the strands of Number, Algebra, Shape and Space, Measures and Data. Through these activities, the skills required by the Skills strand of the mathematics curriculum are also developed. Each assessment task incorporates the necessary elements of an assessment portfolio proforma. Included are: • • • • • •

Curriculum links specific to 1st Class Relevant tasks for 1st Class pupils Clearly explained assessment tasks Opportunities for pupil self-assessment Additional activities to introduce or support each task Answers

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Using proformas, Maths Assessment - 1st Class will assist in the production of an assessment portfolio for each pupil in your class, which clearly communicates assessment across all mathematics strands to pupils, parents and other teachers.

Maths Assessment - 4th Class Maths Assessment - 5th Class Maths Assessment - 6th Class

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Maths Assessment - 1st Class Maths Assessment - 2nd Class Maths Assessment - 3rd Class

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Books in the Maths Assessment series are:

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Contents

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Page

Teachers Notes ............................................................................................................................. iv – v

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Summary of Learning (Proforma) .......................................................................................................... vi Assessment Checklist .................................................................................................................. vii – viii Number ...................................................................................................................................... 2 – 43 Algebra ..................................................................................................................................... 44 – 49 Shape and Space ....................................................................................................................... 50 – 71 Measures ................................................................................................................................ 72 – 103 Data ..................................................................................................................................... 104 – 107

Note to Teachers: • The Skills strand is incorporated into activities addressing objectives in the Number, Algebra, Shape and Space, Measures and Data strands. • Answers and additional activities are provided on the page adjacent to each activity. • Photocopying may distort the lines the pupils are required to measure in some tasks. Teachers may need to allow a slight margin when marking. Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Teachers Notes Maths Assessment - 1st Class has been written to meet the needs of teachers striving to assess learning experiences in mathematics. The format of each page is ideal for inclusion in pupil portfolios, for reporting purposes, or for collecting assessment data as part of ongoing pupil monitoring. Each curriculum objective has been addressed by assessing concepts in a focused and direct manner, allowing teachers to provide a well explained, logically presented indication of progress to pupils, parents and other teachers. The pupils will have completed that task correctly for the objective to be marked ‘Demonstrated’. Pupils experiencing difficulties completing the task correctly should be marked ‘Needs Further Opportunity’. Teachers are encouraged to annotate samples where special circumstances need to be acknowledged. Using proformas from each of the mathematics strands, teachers can build a comprehensive picture of each pupil’s mathematical progress as he/she works towards achieving the requirements of the 1st Class mathematics curriculum. The proformas incorporate language which makes task and assessment criteria clear to parents, and provides a meaningful basis for discussion in parent-teacher interviews or three-way conferences.

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Each proforma includes an opportunity for pupils to assess themselves by illustrating a face appropriately to show how successfully they believe they completed the task. This information is vital for both teachers and parents as it provides a platform for directing discussion with pupils which will nurture a positive attitude towards learning mathematics.

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Mathematics

Year

Term

Summary of Lear ning Understanding

Still developing

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A summary proforma on page vi has been included for the teacher to insert into the pupil portfolios with their maths assessment samples. This provides ample space for both the teacher and the pupil to comment on academic progress, reflect upon work habits and address attitude towards mathematics.

Number Algebra

Vi

Shape and Space Measures Data Teacher’s Comments

Pupil Self-assessment

Things I do well.

Maths Assessment

Maths Assessment

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Things I need to work at.

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How I feel about mathematics.

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The Irish maths curriculum objective being covered by the assessment activity is listed, as a point of reference for teachers.

‘Other activities’ can be used to develop the objective being assessed. These provide activity ideas for the teacher to use either before the assessment task or to consolidate or clarify a concept after assessment.

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Answers allow the teacher to mark tasks quickly and accurately.

Objectives are written in language easily understood by parents, pupils and teachers and can be used as a point of reference in parent-teacher interviews and three-way conferences.

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The task explains the activity and what the pupils were asked to do to complete the tasks and achieve set objectives.

After completing the task, pupils can assess themselves and provide feedback to teacher and parents by completing the face to indicate how they felt about the activity. It is important that self-assessment takes place prior to marking by a teacher.

An assessment checklist has been included on pages vii and viii, allowing teachers to keep a record of objectives assessed and those pupils who have been successful in achieving those objectives. This information can then be used to identify those groups requiring further experiences to achieve particular objectives. For those teachers compiling portfolios, the checklist can be used to record whether samples have been collected for each child in each strand and to ensure a reasonable cross-section of concepts has been addressed in the work samples collected. Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Mathematics

Year

Term

Understanding

Still developing

Summary of Learning

Number Algebra

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Shape and Space

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Measures

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Data

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Teacher’s Comments

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Pupil Self-assessment

Things I do well.

Maths Assessment

Things I need to work at.

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How I feel about mathematics.

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Assessment Checklist (Number and Algebra)

Pupil

Mathematics Objectives: Number (counting)

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Number

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(comparing)

Number

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(place value)

Number

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(operations)

Number (fractions)

Algebra (patterns)

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Maths Assessment


Assessment Checklist

(Shape and Space, Measures and Data)

Pupil

Mathematics Objectives: Shape & Space

(spatial) Shape & Space

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(2-D)

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Shape & Space

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(3-D)

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Measures

Measures

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(Weight)

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(Length)

Measures

(Capacity)

Measures

(Time)

Measures

(Money) Data

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Counting and numeration

The child should be enabled to count the number of objects in a set •

count the same set several times, starting with a different object each time (regular and random arrays)

re-count rearranged sets and arrays to determine that number does not change

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Make collections of numbers 1–20 and label for a class display. • Encourage children to make arrays or patterns using groups of objects. • Compile a big book featuring numbers 1–20, for example, thirteen eggs in thirteen nests. Encourage children to read the book, pointing to and counting the objects for each number. • Count groups of objects in the same set several times, starting with a different object each time. Determine that the number (answer) does not change. • Sing songs which are about different numbered groups of objects, using objects or pictures to visualise and count the numbers being sung about. Suitable songs include Ten Green Bottles, Twelve Days of Christmas and Ten in a Bed.

Answers

14 frogs

(c)

17 worms

(d)

Yes

Task 2 (a)

15 flies

(b)

12 mosquitoes

(c)

Yes

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8 butterflies

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Task 1

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TASK 1

The child was asked to count the objects in each set and write the totals.

butterflies.

(b) There are

frogs.

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(a) There are

worms.

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(c) There are

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(d) Count the butterflies again. Do you get the same number? NO

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YES

TASK 2

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The child was asked to colour the flies green and the mosquitoes red, then count the number in each group.

(a) flies (b) mosquitoes

(c) If you counted the mosquitoes and flies again, would the number always be the same? Mathematics

NO

Number – First Class

Counting and numeration Demonstrated

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

• count the number of objects in a set Prim-Ed Publishing

YES

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Counting and numeration

The child should be enabled to read, write and order numerals, 0–99 •

match a numeral to a set and vice versa

write numerals to correspond to sets

count on and back from a given number, using concrete materials, number line and hundred square

state the number that follows or precedes a number

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Write a number to match the number of objects in a set. Practise counting forwards and backwards by rote, counting on or back from a given number. Use 100 square. Count with a partner, calling numbers alternately. Use a number line to 99 and encourage children to follow numbers with their finger when counting. Cover numbers on a number line with counters, to make a number ‘guessing’ game. Use language such as ‘what comes one before?’, or ‘what comes one after?’. • Practise orally counting on and back from a number 0–99, to find the number before or after. • Use two dice to generate 5 numbers – order them from smallest to largest. • Use cards numbered 0–99. Deal five cards to each child – order them from smallest to largest.

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• • • • •

Teacher check

Task 2

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Answers

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• Play number bingo.

Task 3

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TASK 1

The child was asked to say the name of each number as the teacher pointed to it. The teacher has ticked the appropriate box to indicate whether the child has recognised each number.

49

98

17

24

36

60

82

71

53

5

The child was asked to write the missing numbers in the caterpillars.

TASK 3

The child was asked to write the numbers in the plane in order from smallest to largest.

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TASK 2

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Counting and numeration Demonstrated

• read, write and order numerals, 0–99

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Counting and numeration

The child should be enabled to estimate the number of objects in a set 0–20 •

compare a known set with other sets, check by counting

describe different sets of cubes as less than, more than or about the same as the known set

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Play ‘guessing games’ using flash cards or by showing and covering a group rapidly to encourage children to recognise group sizes quickly. • Arrange the same number of counters in a variety of patterns. • Build the same number of blocks into a variety of buildings.

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• Use domino patterns and matching number cards in recognition card games such as concentration and snap.

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Answers

Task 2

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Task 1

about five leaves – (c) less than five leaves – (a) more than ten leaves – (b)

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The child was asked to estimate which tower in each pair used more blocks and circle it. The child checked by counting.

(b)

(c)

(d)

(a)

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The child was asked to colour the plant with about 5 leaves yellow, the plant with less than 5 leaves green and the plant with more than 10 leaves red.

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TASK 1

(b)

(c)

Mathematics

(d)

Number – First Class

Counting and numeration Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• estimate the number of objects in a set 0–20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Comparing and ordering

The child should be enabled to compare equivalent and non-equivalent sets 0–20 •

name the inequality I have 5 more than you; 7 less than 10; 6 is less than 9 by how many?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Draw the child’s attention to the fact that when they share equipment each child should get one, or equal amounts. • Make equal-sized teams for physical education lessons and games. • Use counters or sweets to make sets of ‘one more than’, ‘two more than’, ‘three more than’ and so on.

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• Count cups and saucers (e.g. 5 cups, 3 saucers). Are there more cups than saucers, or the same number?

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Answers

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(a) There are 4 more moons than stars. (b) There are 3 more cars than bicycles.

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(c) There are 5 more bats than balls.

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TASK

The child was asked to draw lines to match the objects in the groups and state how many more there are.

There are

(b)

There are

(c)

There are

more moons than stars.

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(a)

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more cars than bicycles.

more bats than balls.

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Comparing and ordering Demonstrated

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• compare equivalent and non-equivalent sets 0–20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Comparing and ordering

The child should be enabled to order sets of objects by number

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use number cards 1–20. Mix them up and put them in order from smallest to largest. • Complete dot-to-dot pictures, starting with smallest number to largest and vice versa. • Rearrange series of numbers from smallest to largest. e.g. 9, 6, 8, 5, 10, 7

(c) 9/5th

(d) 6/2nd

(e) 8/4th

(f) 5/1st

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(a) 7/3rd (b) 10/6th

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Answers

Maths Assessment

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TASK

The child was asked to count the objects in each row, write the number and order the groups from smallest to largest.

(a)

count

order

(b)

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(e)

(f)

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Comparing and ordering Demonstrated

Se

• order sets of objects by number

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Needs Further Opportunity

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Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Comparing and ordering

The child should be enabled to use the language of ordinal number, first to tenth •

when ordering sets and numbers, describing patterns, taking turns

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Use ordinal numbers to describe events in a sequence such as directions for making jelly or washing hands. • Organise turn-taking by giving each child an ordinal position. • Line ten toys in a row. Question children about each toys’ ordinal position. Give each toy a card which states their ordinal position. Display.

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Answers

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Teacher check

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The child was asked to choose an ordinal number from the box and write it under each snail to show its place in the race.

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5th

10th

1st

7th

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3rd

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6th

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9th

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8th

4th

2nd

TASK

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Comparing and ordering Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• use the language of ordinal number, first to tenth Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Place value

The child should be enabled to explore, identify and record place value 0–99 •

group and count in tens and units using cubes, counters, lollipop sticks and coins (1 cent and 10 cents), base ten materials and notation boards

express groups of counters as units or as tens and units

record pictorially and on the abacus

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Bundle lolly sticks into groups of 10 to create a base 10 system for making numbers greater than 10. • Practise writing numbers to 0–99 in numerals to describe groups made or discussed.

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• Write numbers into columns labelled as tens and units.

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Answers

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Task 1 (a) 24 (b) 19

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(c) 57

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(d) 75

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The child was asked to write the numeral that represents the number shown by the ‘tens’ and ‘ones’ blocks.

TASK 2

The child was asked to colour the ‘tens’ and ‘ones’ blocks to represent the numbers given.

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TASK 1

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Place value Demonstrated

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• explore, identify and record place value 0–99 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

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Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Addition

The child should be enabled to develop an understanding of addition by combining or partitioning sets, use concrete materials 0–20 •

find all the addition combinations to make up a given number: 11 + 1 = 12, 2 + 6 + 4 = 12 …

record addition: orally, pictorially, in number sentences, in jumps on the number line

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Count out 4 cakes. Count out 3 cakes. How many cakes altogether? Count all the cakes. Say together 4 add 3 is 7. • There are 12 cars in a garage. 4 more arrive. How many cars now? Count them. Say together 12 add 4 is 16. • Buy three items in the shop. One item costs 10c, a second costs 3c and the third item costs 4c. How many cents do you give to the shopkeeper? Say together 10 add 3 add 4 is 17.

Answers

10 + 10 = 20

12 + 8 =

15 + 5 = 20

11 + 9 = 20

13 + 7 = 20

14 + 6 = 20

Task 2 (a)

6+7=

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14

15

4 + 11 =

15

5+4=

9

9+7=

16

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9+5=

7+8=

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20

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Task 1

7+6

= 13

9+8

= 17

11 + 7

= 18

(b)

(c)

(d)

14 + 4

Maths Assessment

= 18

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TASK 1

0

1

The child was asked to use the number line to solve the addition problems, then to circle all the aeroplanes that equal 20.

2

3

4

5

7

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9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

12 + 8 =

13 + 7 =

14 + 6 =

15 + 5 =

11 + 9 =

7+8=

5+4=

9+5=

6+7=

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10 + 10 =

20

9+7=

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4 + 11 =

TASK 2

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The child was asked to draw lines to help solve these addition problems.

(b)

=

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9+8

= 13

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7+6

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(a)

(c)

=

11 + 7 (d)

=

14 + 4 Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Addition Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• develop an understanding of addition by combining or

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partitioning sets, use concrete materials 0–20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Addition

The child should be enabled to explore, develop and apply the commutative, associative and zero properties of addition •

commutative property:

6 + 2 = 8; 2 + 6 = 8

associative property:

(2 + 3) + 5 = 10; 2 + (3 + 5) = 10

zero property:

7+0=7

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Combine sets of farmyard animals (e.g. cows and horses) to make a total. Show that 2 cows and 3 horses gives the same total of farmyard animals as 3 cows and 2 horses. 2 + 3 = 5 and 3 + 2 = 5 • Add another set of animals (e.g. pigs). Show that: (2 cows plus 3 horses) plus 4 pigs equals 9 farmyard animals, in the same way that 2 cows plus (3 horses plus 4 pigs) equals 9 farmyard animals. • Do similar activities with fruits (e.g. apples, oranges, bananas).

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• Show that adding zero to a number leaves it unchanged. 5 cows plus 0 cows = 5 cows.

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Answers

9

3+4=

7

8+0=

8

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4+5=

7

5+4=

7

4+3=

6+2=

8

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9 + 1 = 10

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Task 1

7+0=

2+6=

8

1 + 9 = 10

0+8=

8

0+7=

7

Task 2 (a) 9

(d) 10

(b) 9

(e) 10

(c)

(f) 9

7

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to complete the addition ‘clouds’ and colour the ones that are the same in the same colour.

4+3=

5+4=

4+5=

6+2=

7+0=

3+4=

2+6=

1+9=

8+0=

0+8=

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(d) (1 + 6) + 3 =

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(4 + 3) + 2 =

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The child was asked to use counters to solve the addition sums.

(c)

4 + (3 + 2) =

1 + (6 + 3) =

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(b)

0+7=

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TASK 2

(a)

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9+1=

(2 + 2) + 5 =

(e) (8 + 0) + 2 =

2 + (2 + 5) =

8 + (0 + 2) =

(3 + 3) + 1 =

(f) (2 + 1) + 6 =

3 + (3 + 1) =

2 + (1 + 6) =

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Addition Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• explore, develop and apply the commutative, associative and zero properties of addition Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Addition

The child should be enabled to develop and/or recall mental strategies for addition facts within 20 •

use concrete materials to count on using commutative property, zero property, counting in twos, doubles and near doubles

pairs of numbers that total 10 (6 + 4 = 10)

complement numbers to 10 (3 + _ = 10)

orally memorise addition facts using strategies

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Count in twos, threes, fours and fives within 20. Use counters or other concrete materials to group and separate numbers to 10 and 20 and record the combinations. Use a number line to help visualise ‘near 10’ numbers. Build towers from cubes to represent doubles and near doubles by direct comparison. Ask children oral questions, phrased in a variety of ways, that will encourage knowledge of doubles, e.g. double 6, half of 8, two fives, I roll double 2 so what is my score?, how many eyes in seven heads? how many socks in four pairs?, etc. • Play human noughts and crosses, where children need to answer an addition sum within 20 to sit as a nought or cross for their team on a life-size grid.

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• • • • •

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Answers

(b)

15

(c)

9

(d)

11

(e)

19

(f)

12

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(a)

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Task 1

Task 2 (a) 7 + 7 = 14

8 + 8 = 16

9 + 8 = 17

9 + 11 = 20

6 + 5 = 11

11 + 9 = 20

(b) 9 + 3 = 12 11 + 5 = 16

Maths Assessment

9 + 5 = 14 10 + 9 = 19

20

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TASK 1

The child was asked to recall addition facts within 20. The child coloured the cloud with the number he/she used to complete each addition fact.

(a) 4 + 3 =

(d) 9 + 2 =

(b) 5 + 10 =

(e) 16 + 3 =

(c) 1 + 8 =

(f)

8+4=

11

9

12 19

15

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7 TASK 2

m

Hint: Look for doubles or near doubles.

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(a)

The child was asked to solve these addition facts using his/her knowledge of doubles and numbers ‘near to 10’.

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9 + 11 =

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9+8=

8+8=

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7+7=

11 + 9 =

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6+5= (b)

Hint: Look for numbers ‘near to 10’. 9+3=

9+5=

11 + 5 =

10 + 9 =

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Addition Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• recall mental strategies for addition facts within 20 Se

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Addition

The child should be enabled to construct number sentences and number stories; solve problems involving addition within 20 •

construct and tell a number story

record pictorially, as a number sentence or as a written story

solve written problems; pupils can also devise problems for each other

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Provide picture cards of different groups of objects for children to combine and count. Use transparent sheets to demonstrate the joining of groups through layering one group on top of the other. Roll two dice and combine the numbers rolled. Make groups of different coloured beads. Thread them together and count to show the joining of groups. Provide cards with numerals and symbols for ‘add’ and ‘equal to’ as a scaffold for children to create stories using concrete materials. • Use a felt board and felt cut-outs to describe number stories. • Use empty egg cartons and coloured counters, placing one counter in each cavity according to a given number story. For example, ‘Five birds laid one egg each, two more birds laid an egg each. How many eggs are there?’.

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• • • • •

(a)

12 and 5 makes 17

(b)

5 and 3 makes 8

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Task 2

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Task 1

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Answers

11 stars + 3 stars = 14 stars

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TASK 1

The child was asked to join two groups to make one large group and count the number of objects in the new group.

and

and

(b)

and

makes

makes

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(a)

makes

TASK 2

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The child was asked to draw the number story and then write the sum.

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Eleven stars shining in the sky.

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Another three stars came out to shine with them.

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How many stars are shining altogether?

+

=

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Addition Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• construct number sentences and number stories; solve problems involving addition within 20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Addition

The child should be enabled to add numbers without and with renaming within 99 •

estimate sum by adding tens

check estimates using manipulatives

add numbers using concrete materials, notation boards, number lines and hundred squares

use mental calculations

record using number lines, number sentences and algorithm

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

Provide opportunities for oral counting in 10s, forwards and backwards, 0–100 and 100–0. Colour by tens on a 100 square. Use the vocabulary ‘guess how many’, ‘estimate’, ‘nearest’, ‘roughly’, ‘close to’, ‘about the same as’. Estimate a number to about 50, e.g. the number of potatoes in a bag, buttons in a box, coins in a purse.

m

• • • •

Sa

Explain how the estimate was made (groups of 10).

Answers

ew

in

g

Task 1

13

Vi

Task 2

30

89

51

Estimate

Check

+

= 20 25

+

= 60 71

+

= 60 64

Task 3 (a) 20

(b) 16

(c) 31

(d) 30

(e) 37

(f) 38

Maths Assessment

24

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The child was asked to write the number underneath the place value blocks.

TASK 2

The child was asked to estimate the sums by adding the tens and then checking the estimate using the place value blocks.

e

TASK 1

pl

Estimate

Sa

= =

Vi

ew

in

g

+

m

+

Check

TASK 3

+

=

The child was asked to estimate the sums by adding the tens and then checking the estimate by solving the sums using counters.

(a) 12 + 8 =

(b) 12 + 4 =

(c) 13 + 18 =

(d) 16 + 14 =

(e) 23 + 14 =

(f) 25 + 13 =

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Addition Demonstrated

Se

• add numbers with and without renaming within 99

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Addition

The child should be enabled to explore and discuss repeated addition and group counting •

counting in twos, fives, tens

count children in the line, 2, 4, 6, 8 …

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

Use modelling clay for children to make equal groups of ‘eggs in nests’ or ‘snakes in lakes’. Cut pictures from magazines and make equal groups of similar objects. Have children make three equal groups and repeat the activity with different amounts in the groups each time. Make long caterpillars around the classroom walls with missing numbers to encourage counting in 2s, 5s, 10s e.g.

84

88

94

96

g

Sa

80

m

pl

• • • •

There are 4 groups of 5 ants.

Vi

Task 2

ew

Task 1

in

Answers

There are 5 groups of 4 ants.

Maths Assessment

26

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TASK 1

ants.

m

groups of

Sa

There are

pl

e

The child was asked to circle groups of five ants and count how many groups could be made.

TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

g

The child was asked to make five equal groups by drawing four ants on each nest.

There are

groups of

ants.

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Addition Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• explore and discuss repeated addition and group counting

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to develop an understanding of subtraction as deducting, as complementing and as difference 0–20 •

deducting: I had 10 sweets, I ate 3. How many have I left?

complementing: There are 10 stickers in a set. I have 4. How many more do I need to make a full set?

difference: I have 12 crayons. Mary has 6 crayons. How many more have I? How many fewer has Mary?

focus on subtraction as the inverse of addition

record subtraction: concretely, orally, pictorially, in number sentences, in jumps on the number line, and on notation boards

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Use concrete materials such as blocks, number lines and hundreds charts to calculate addition and subtraction problems without trading.

-2

m

-3

pl

• Complete number trails such as:

-4

Sa

-5

20

g

• Generate two-digit numbers using two dice. Children add or subtract numbers as algorithms then check answers with a calculator.

Task 1

4

=

7

and then vertically.

11 -

4 7

Vi

Answers

-

ew

firstly horizontally, 11

in

• Pick two number cards from two piles of cards marked 11–20 and 0–10. Place the numbers to make a subtraction sum,

(a) 4 (b) 2 (c) 3 (d) 12 (e) 11 (f) 13

Task 2 (a) 8 + 4 = 12 or 4 + 8 = 12 (b) 12 + 8 = 20 or 8 + 12 = 20

Task 3 (a) 4 + 6 = 10, 10 – 4 = 6 (b) 13 + 6 = 19, 19 – 13 = 6 (c) 9 + 10 = 19, 19 – 9 = 10 (d) 7 + 3 = 10, 10 – 7 = 3

Maths Assessment

28

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TASK 1

The child was asked to solve these subtraction sums.

(a)

7

(b)

9

–3

13 –1

8

–7

(e)

18 –7

–5

(f)

16 –3

pl

e

(d)

(c)

TASK 2

Sa

m

The child was asked to use the numbers in these subtraction facts to write an addition fact that makes sense.

g

(a) 12 – 8 = 4

in

(b) 20 – 12 = 8 TASK 3

ew

Vi

(a)

The child was asked to draw lines to show the number facts that are related.

4 + 6 = 10

• 19 – 13 = 6

(b) 13 + 6 = 19

• 10 – 7 = 3

(c) 9 + 10 = 19

• 19 – 9 = 10

(d)

• 10 – 4 = 6

7 + 3 = 10

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• develop an understanding of subtraction as deducting, as

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complementing and as difference 0–20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to develop and/or recall mental strategies for subtraction 0–20 •

counting back/on, using doubles/near doubles, using zero, using knowledge of 10 facts, add to check results

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use a number line or number chart to count forwards when solving subtraction problems; for example, 16 – 5: Begin at 5 and count to 16. • Give children 10 subtraction problems with five that are near doubles. Ask them to circle the ‘near doubles’ questions and solve them mentally or using concrete materials.

pl

e

• Use base 10 materials to support children with horizontal subtractions looking for simple subtraction facts.

m

Answers Task 1

g 6

=

9 3

12

-

4

=

8

16

-

5

= 11 8

(d) (e) (f)

15

-

5 3

20

-

13 = 21 7

15

-

=

12

773 =

8

Vi

(c)

-

ew

(b)

9

in

Task 2 (a)

Sa

1. (a) 6 (b) 11 (c) 3 (d) 6 (e) 18 (f) 15 2. (a) 8 (b) 11 (c) 5 (d) 10 (e) 9 (f) 8 3. (a) 6 (b) 3 (c) 11 (d) 12 (e) 1 (f) 8

Maths Assessment

30

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TASK 1 The child was asked to solve these subtraction facts using his/her knowledge of known number facts to 20, doubles and numbers ‘near to 10’.

1. Hint: Look for number facts you know. (a)

10 – 4 =

(d)

9–3=

(b)

20 – 9 =

(e)

20 – 2 =

(c)

10 – 7 =

(f)

20 – 5 =

2. Hint: Look for doubles or near doubles. (d) 16 – 6 =

(b) 20 – 9 =

(e) (f)

14 – 6 =

pl

18 – 9 =

8–3=

m

(c)

e

(a) 16 – 8 =

9–6=

(c)

20 – 9 =

g

(b)

(d) 19 – 7 =

in

11 – 5 =

ew

(a)

Sa

3. Hint: Look for numbers ‘near to 10’.

(e) 20 – 19 = (f)

11 – 3 =

Vi

TASK 2 The child was asked to circle the number he/she would count back from to solve the subtraction number sentences and then solve them.

9

6

=

9

12

4

=

8

16

5

=

8

(a) (b) (c) Mathematics

(d) (e) (f)

5

=

12

20

13 = 21

15

23 =

8

Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

• develop and/or recall mental strategies for subtraction 0–20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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31

Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to construct number sentences and number stories; solve problems involving subtraction 0–20 •

construct and tell a number story; record pictorially, as a number sentence, or as a written story

solve written problems; pupils can also devise problems for each other

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Complete number trails such as:

–5

–6

–2

e

–3

pl

20

m

• In pairs, children take turns to throw a die. The difference between the two numbers is recorded. After 10 turns, the numbers recorded for each player are added with a calculator or by using concrete materials. The higher number wins.

1

6 – 9 = 7 . Ask them to write a number story to represent the

g

• Give children a number sentence such as sentence and illustrate it.

Sa

• Using 20 cubes, place some in one container and the rest in another. Children discuss the difference then make a number sentence using number cards to show the difference.

ew

in

• Make a ‘toy shop’ using play money and items found in the classroom marked with prices under €20.00 (whole numbers). Children purchase items with play money stating ‘I have €20.00. I am going to purchase a pencil case for €5.00. €20.00 take away €5.00 is €15.00’. • Practise writing number stories with a friend.

Answers

=

Vi

e.g. David had eight cars but lost two. How many cars does he have left?

Task 1 (a) 12 – 5 = 7 (b) 15 – 8 = 7 Task 2 Teacher check drawing. 20 – 6 = 14

Maths Assessment

32

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TASK 1

The child was asked to subtract parts of these groups to determine the answer, record the operation in a number sentence and draw the new group.

(a)

take

leaves

take

leaves

(b) leaves

=

Sa

m

pl

e

take

TASK 2

g

The child was asked to draw pictures and write number sentences to illustrate these subtraction stories.

Vi

Draw

ew

in

Mary had 20 collector’s cards. She gave 6 cards to her best friend Callum. How many cards does Mary have left?

Write Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

• construct number sentences and number stories; solve problems involving subtraction 0–20 Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

33

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to estimate differences within 99 •

by subtracting the tens

check estimates using manipulatives

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Use a 100 square to count back when solving subtraction problems. • Revise subtraction vocabulary: minus, take away, subtract, reduce, difference, less than, fewer than.

pl

e

• Record estimates on a number line and find the difference between the estimate and the actual number.

m

Answers Task 1 (b) 13

(c)

37

(b) 22

(c)

22

Task 2

(e) 40

(d) 13

(e) 15

(f) 34

Vi

ew

in

g

(a) 14

(d) 21

Sa

(a) 12

Maths Assessment

34

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TASK 1

The child was asked to estimate the differences by subtracting the tens and then show the answer by crossing off the blocks and cubes.

=

18 - 5 =

=

48 - 11 =

=

36 - 15 =

=

=

g

Sa

m

pl

e

26 - 14 =

TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

78 - 38 =

The child was asked to use tens and units blocks to work out the subtraction problems.

(a) 58 – 44 =

(b) 79 – 57 =

(c) 46 – 24 =

(d) 79 – 66 =

(e) 27 – 12 =

(f) 37 – 3 =

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• estimate differences within 99

Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to subtract numbers without renaming within 99 •

estimate difference

use concrete materials, number lines and hundred squares

use mental calculations

record using number lines, number sentences and algorithms

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Practise subtracting in tens by counting backwards from 100 in tens. • Work out mentally that when two numbers are close together it is easier to find a difference by counting up, not counting back. e.g. 82 – 79 = 3 Explain that counting up from 79 gives three. • Practise mental calculation strategies such as: 58 + 21 = 79 because 58 + 20 = 78 + 1 = 79

Sa

24 – 9 = 15 because 24 – 10 = 14 + 1 = 15

g

Answers (b) 34

(c) 63

(b) 30

(c) 61

Task 2

(e) 12

(f) 91

Vi

(a) 23

(d) 71

ew

(a) 15

in

Task 1

Maths Assessment

36

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TASK 1

The child was asked to complete these subtraction sums using the number lines.

(a) 18 – 3 =

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

(b) 39 – 5 =

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

(c) 67 – 4 =

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

70

(d) 78 – 7 =

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

(e) 18 – 6 =

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

(f) 98 – 7 =

80

81

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

11

12

90

14

15

16

17

18

19

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99 100

20

Sa

m

89

13

e

10

pl

9

TASK 2

in

g

The child was asked to solve the subtraction problems using tens and units blocks.

5

ew Ones

Vi

Tens

(c)

(b)

(a)

3

9 6

Tens

Ones

Tens

Ones

4

0

7

6

1

0

1

5

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

• subtract numbers without renaming within 99

Prim-Ed Publishing

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37

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to use the symbols +, —, = •

formal introduction of the symbols should occur only after sufficient oral and exploratory work has been completed

the meaning of the symbols will have to be discussed frequently

the equals sign does not signal ‘the answer comes next’: equals means ‘the same’ or equivalent

explore using a number balance

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

Use the vocabulary of ‘plus’, ‘minus’ and ‘equals’ regularly. Refer to + as ‘add’, ‘plus’, ‘total’, – as ‘take away’, ‘minus’, ‘subtract’, ‘decrease’, ‘reduce’, = as ‘the same as’, ‘equal to’. Record number sentences and number stories using +, – and =. Respond rapidly to oral and written questions phrased in a variety of ways such as: – 7 take away 3 – take 30 from 70 – 14 subtract 2 – subtract 30 from 70 – 3 less than 7 – what number must I take from 20 to leave 3? – what is the difference between 10 and 18? – how many more is 11 than 3? – 5 taken from a number equals 11. What is the number?

ew

in

g

Sa

• • • •

Vi

– find pairs of numbers with a difference of 10…, with a difference of 9…

Answers Task 1 (a) 9

(b) +

(c) 1

(d) =

(e) 5

(a) +

(b) –

(c) +

(d) +

(e) –

(f) –

(g) –

(h) –

(i) +

(j) +

(f) 5

Task 2

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to fill in the missing number or symbol.

(a)

6

+ 3

=

(b)

4

(c)

5

=

(d)

3

(e)

8

TASK 2

4

= 3

(f)

2

= 6

+ 7

10

3

= 2

7

m

2

= 5

(d)

5

7

= 12

ew

pl

e

The child was asked to complete the sums using the symbols + or –.

= 4

(f)

9

3

= 6

2

= 10

(h)

15

10 = 5

8

= 15

(j)

2

1

(a)

2

4

= 6

(c)

2

8

= 10

(e)

8

(g)

12

(i)

7

in

g

Sa

(b)

Vi

4

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

• use the symbols +, –, =

Prim-Ed Publishing

= 3

39

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Operations – Subtraction

The child should be enabled to solve one-step problems involving addition or subtraction

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Use mental addition or subtraction to solve ‘story’ problems about numbers. Record the story with a number sentence. • Complete one-step operations. e.g. – I think of a number, then add 2. The answer is 7, what was the number? – I think of a number then halve it. The answer is 9, what was the number? • Write simple number stories to illustrate simple addition and subtraction sums,

pl

e.g. 3 + 2 = 5, Karen has 3 apples and Conor has 2 bananas. How many pieces of fruit do they have altogether?

m

Answers (a) 9

Sa

Task 1 (c) €8

(b) 3

(b) 8

12 – 4 = 8

in

8 + 7 = 15

Vi

ew

(a) 15

g

Task 2

Maths Assessment

40

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TASK 1

The child was asked to solve the number problems.

Sarah ate 4 grapes and Simon ate 5. How many grapes did they eat altogether?

pl

e

The dog had 9 biscuits in his bowl. He ate 6. How many biscuits does he have left?

g

Sa

m

Max had €12. He spent €4 on a new toy car. How much money does he have left? TASK 2

ew

in

The child was asked to write the answer to the number problem in the square, colour the square and then colour the correct sum in the same colour as their square.

Number sentence

Vi

Number story

(a) There are 8 girls in Mrs Jones' First Class and 7 girls in Miss Smith's First Class. How many girls are there altogether in First Class? (b) Emily had 12 biscuits. She gave away four. How many biscuits does she have left?

5+4=9

12 – 4 = 8

Mathematics

8 + 7 = 15 Number – First Class

Operations – Subtraction Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• solve one-step problems involving addition or subtraction Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Number – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Fractions

The child should be enabled to establish and identify half of sets to 20 •

share sets of objects equally between two people

record pictorially

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Use cakes that are brought in for birthdays. Divide them in half. Divide the class in half. Send half the class to a task first, then the other half. Practise halving numbers up to 20. Demonstrate sets of objects in hoops, such as bean bags, farm animals, toy bricks. Halve the objects by colour, by animal or by shape. • Begin to position halves on a number line. For example, place 51/2 on a number line and recognise that it lies mid-way between 5 and 6.

m

pl

e

• • • •

Sa

Answers Task 1

Task 2

– 2 party hats – 5 bees – 4 flies

Maths Assessment

Vi

– 3 ice-creams

ew

The following items should be coloured:

in

g

Teacher check

42

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The child was asked to colour one half of each of these shapes.

TASK 2

The child was asked to colour one half of each set of objects.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

Mathematics

Number – First Class

Fractions Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• establish and identify half of sets to 20

Prim-Ed Publishing

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43

Maths Assessment


Algebra – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Extending and using patterns

The child should be enabled to recognise pattern, including odd and even numbers •

count in twos on the number square, colour each number you stop at

construct sets that increment in twos, starting with 0 (0, 2, 4, 6 …), starting with 1 (1, 3, 5, 7 …)

discuss and record pictorially

use two colours to identify odd and even numbers on the hundred square; discuss results

extend activities to group counting with fives and tens

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

Use parts of the body to think in 2s – ears, eyes, feet, hands… Pair socks, gloves etc. – count in twos. Colour a 100 square – count in 2s, 5s and 10s. Use a hundred square – colour the even numbers, colour the odd numbers. Ask the children how old they are, how old siblings are, when their birthday is, what is the date – are the numbers odd or even numbers?

Sa

• • • • •

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Task 1

Task 2 46

68

98

100

74

31

67

85

91

84

30

Task 3 9

Maths Assessment

44

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The child was asked to fill in the missing numbers by counting in 2s and 5s.

TASK 2

The child was asked to circle the even numbers.

68

45

13

98

74

15

37

84

30

7

ew

46

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

Vi

100

TASK 3

The child was asked to circle the odd numbers.

4

9

28

31

44

50

67

70

85

88

91

100

Mathematics

Algebra – First Class

Extending and using patterns Demonstrated

Se

• recognise pattern, including odd and even numbers

Prim-Ed Publishing

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45

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Extending and using patterns

The child should be enabled to explore and use patterns in addition facts •

notice patterns that make up tens (9 + 1 = 10, 2 + 8 = 10, 18 + 2 = 20) and the effect of adding 10 to a given number: 3 + 10 = 13, 13 + 10 = 23

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Find pairs of number cards with a total of 10. • Say how many counters are needed to make 10 altogether. • Make a ‘10 post-box’ for the classroom. Post combinations of cards that total 10.

m

pl

e

• Count forwards and backwards in tens.

Answers 10

10

10

10

7

8

9

g

10

in

10

Sa

Task 1

(b) 12

(d) 14

(e) 15

(g) 17

(h) 18

(j) 20

(k) 21

Maths Assessment

(c) 13 (f) 16 (i) 19

Vi

(a) 11

ew

Task 2

(l) 22

46

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The child was asked to solve the addition sums and colour the clouds that made 10.

TASK 2

The child was asked to add 10 to each number.

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

1 + 10 =

(b)

2 + 10 =

(c)

3 + 10 =

(d)

4 + 10 =

(e)

5 + 10 =

(f)

6 + 10 =

(g)

7 + 10 =

(h)

8 + 10 =

(i)

9 + 10 =

(j)

10 + 10 =

Vi

(a)

(k) 11 + 10 =

Mathematics

(l) 12 + 10 = Algebra – First Class

Extending and using patterns Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• explore and use patterns in addition facts

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Maths Assessment


Algebra – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Extending and using patterns

The child should be enabled to understand the use of a frame to show the presence of an unknown number •

3+5=

2+

=6

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Play ‘missing number’ bingo. • Play games such as 3 children come to the front of the class, two holding a number, one without. Move the 3 children about, finding the missing number as appropriate.

e

• Have a class competition. The first child to hold up the missing number wins.

(g) 7

(j) 4

(h) 8

(k) 2

(i) 5

(l) 10

(m) 9

(p) 8

(n) 11

(q) 10

(o) 9

(r) 11

m

(f) 20

Sa

(c) 20

g

(e) 20

in

(b) 10

ew

(d) 10

Vi

(a) 20

pl

Answers

Maths Assessment

48

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TASK

The child was asked to fill in the frames with the missing numbers.

(a) 17 +

3

=

(d)

2

+

8

=

(b)

1 +

9

=

(e)

6

+ 14

=

(c)

5 + 15

=

(f)

7

+ 13

=

(g)

6 +

= 13

(h)

9 +

= 17

(i)

6 +

= 11

14 +

= 18

m

pl

e

(j)

Sa

(k) 12 + 9 +

= 19

(n)

12

(p)

+

5 = 13

+ 5 =

16

(q)

+

9 = 19

+ 4 =

13

(r)

+

7 = 18

+ 3 =

Vi

(m)

ew

in

g

(l)

= 14

(o)

Mathematics

Algebra – First Class

Extending and using patterns Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• understand the use of a frame to show the presence of

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an unknown number Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Spatial awareness

The child should be enabled to explore, discuss, develop and use the vocabulary of spatial relations •

between, underneath, on top of, around, through, left, right

explore closed shapes (e.g. circle), so that one walks from one point back to the same point without having to turn around

explore open shapes (e.g. V-shape), where one has to turn around to get back to the starting point

make body shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Use everyday language to describe positions e.g. stand in front of, behind, beside, between… • Use everyday language to describe directions – upwards, downwards, away from, across etc. • Talk about a journey e.g. how to get from school to your home.

m

• Use a floor robot and devise instructions for it.

Sa

Answers (a) underneath

g

(b) above

(e) shape 9

Vi

(f) 11, 8, 4

ew

(d) below

in

(c) right

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TASK

The child was asked to use the vocabulary of spatial relations to describe the position of various shapes.

(a) Shape 5 is (between, underneath) Shape 1. (b) Shape 2 is (left of, above) shape 6. (c) Shape 4 is (left, right) of shape 3. (d) Shape 10 is (right of, below) shape 6. (e) Which shape is left of shape 12?

pl

e

(f) Colour the shapes which could be put together to make the same shape as in the box.

2.

3.

4.

in

6.

ew

5.

g

Sa

m

1.

Vi

11. 10.

8. 7.

12. 9.

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

Spatial awareness Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• explore, discuss, develop and use the vocabulary of spatial relations Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Spatial awareness

The child should be enabled to give and follow simple directions within classroom and school settings •

from desk to window

from classroom to school hall

from classroom to school yard

explore and solve practical problems

Other activities suitable for developing this objective. • Play games such as ‘Follow the leader’ and ‘Simon says’. • Follow obstacle courses using language of position and movement.

pl

e

• Give instructions for someone else to follow, to find a route through a simple maze drawn on squared paper.

Answers

m

1. (a) library

Sa

(b) 1st class (c) office

g

(d) 3rd class and 6th class

Vi

ew

3. Teacher check

in

2. Teacher check

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TASK

(a) Which building is to the right of the office?

g

1.

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to use the map of the school to help answer the questions.

in

(b) Which class is to the left of 2nd class? .

ew

(c) The canteen is next to the

2.

.

Vi

(d) The toilets are between (a) Colour the 2nd class red. (b) Colour the office blue. (c) Colour the playing field green. (d) Colour the canteen yellow. 3.

Draw a path from the 2nd class to the library.

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

Spatial awareness Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• give and follow simple directions within classroom and

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school settings Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2–D shapes

The child should be enabled to sort, describe, compare and name 2–D shapes: square, rectangle, triangle, circle, semicircle •

describe shapes, referring to size, corners, number and length of sides

sort shapes: 4-sided/not 4-sided, curved/not curved

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Search for shapes around the classroom or school environment to match particular 2-D shapes. Sort attribute blocks and ask the class to guess the way the blocks have been sorted. As a class form group circles, triangles or squares ready to play games; for example, ‘Duck, Duck, Goose’. Use stimulus pictures or pictures from ‘Big Books’ as a resource for identifying 2-D shapes in pictures. Create a wall story of pictures made by the children and which are comprised of 2-D shapes. Each page should be labelled with the name of the shapes used. • Create a simple grid demonstrating the number of sides of different 2-D shapes. A similar grid can be constructed to explore corners.

Sa

m

pl

e

• • • • •

Answers Task 1

triangle, rectangle, square

(b)

triangles, rectangles, circles

Vi

ew

(a)

in

Task 2

g

Teacher checks colouring of shapes.

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TASK 1

The child was asked to identify and colour different sized shapes according to their attributes.

TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Colour rounded shapes red. • Colour shapes with four corners blue. • Colour shapes with three sides yellow.

The child was asked to identify 2-D shapes in drawings.

(a)

I can see

(b)

I can see

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

2–D shapes Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• sort, describe, compare and name 2–D shapes: square, rectangle, triangle, circle, semicircle Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2–D shapes

The child should be enabled to construct and draw 2–D shapes •

use templates, stencils, geostrips, geoboards

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Display and label 2-D shapes cut from different coloured paper and refer to them to assist in describing the shapes of known objects. • Use pattern blocks to create concrete patterns and pictures.

e

• Provide blocks with faces of a variety of 2-D shapes and paint for children to create pictures by printing.

pl

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

Teacher check

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TASK

The child was asked to draw different 2–D shapes.

square

Sa

m

pl

e

rectangle

Vi

circle

ew

in

g

triangle

semicircle

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

2–D shapes Demonstrated

• construct and draw 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2–D shapes

The child should be enabled to combine and partition 2-D shapes •

combine shapes to make new shapes and patterns

make pictures and mosaic patterns by combining shapes

fit many examples of identical shapes together to cover surface

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Make pictures and patterns using 2-D shapes. Use pipe cleaners, straws, thin plastic shapes, pre-cut sticky shapes, stamping or printing shapes. • Progress to using pinboards and elastic bands, squared paper, etc. • Describe the pictures or patterns made and say what shapes have been used.

m

Answers Task 1: Teacher check

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

Task 2: The following shapes should be coloured: square, triangle, hexagon, rectangle.

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TASK 1

The child was asked to continue the patterns of the shapes.

(a)

(b)

m

pl

e

(c)

ew

in

g

Sa

(d)

TASK 2

Vi

The child was asked to colour the shapes which join without gaps.

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

2–D shapes Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• combine and partition 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2–D shapes

The child should be enabled to identify halves of 2-D shapes •

fold paper shapes in half and cut to make new shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Make halves of paper shapes by folding them. Make them into symmetrical patterns, for example, by ink blot painting. • Cut pictures from magazines into halves and then piece them back together again. • Provide children with one side of a symmetrical pattern. Ask them to create the second half by drawing.

e

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

Teacher check

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TASK

The child was asked to fold and cut selected shapes in half and draw the resulting shape.

• Cut a piece of paper to match each shape. • Fold each shape in half along the dotted line. • Cut along the fold line. • Draw one of the new shapes you have made.

Sa

m

pl

e

square

Vi

triangle

ew

in

g

rectangle

circle

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

2–D shapes Demonstrated

• identify halves of 2-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 2–D shapes

The child should be enabled to identify and discuss the use of 2-D shapes in the environment •

in furniture, classroom objects, own possessions

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Copy, trace and draw a variety of 2-D shapes. • Draw shapes from memory to design a plan for building. • Make shape patterns by cutting, tearing and gluing.

e

• Write a class list of 2-D shapes in the classroom, e.g. circle: clock, pencil pot, plastic coins, etc.

pl

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

Teacher check

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TASK

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to choose the shapes from the box and draw them in the appropriate place, to complete the missing parts of the picture.

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

2–D shapes Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• identify and discuss the use of 2-D shapes in the environment Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3–D shapes

The child should be enabled to describe, compare and name 3-D shapes, including cube, cuboid, cylinder and sphere •

collect, sort and describe shapes, referring to number and shapes of faces, edges, vertices (corners on 3-D shapes)

identify shapes that stack, roll or slide

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Sort objects according to whether they stack or roll. • Use ramps to experiment with a variety of 3-D shapes to determine which shapes roll or slide. • Use balloons to demonstrate the same object in different states. Have the child draw faces on the balloon in felt tip pen and then watch how the face changes as the balloon is blown up or deflated. • Build models using a variety of concrete materials and discuss the stability of different structures; e.g. compare walls built using egg cartons; one built with the cartons stacked on top of each other and the other with them ‘laid’ in an overlapping ‘brick wall’ pattern.

Sa

• Sort 3-D shapes according to the number and shapes of faces, number of edges and number of corners.

Answers

g

Task 1

(a) and (c)

Task 3

ew

Task 2

Vi

Stack: cube, cuboid

in

Roll: cylinder, sphere

Teacher check

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TASK 1

The child was asked to circle the objects which roll and colour the objects which could be stacked.

Can you name each shape?

TASK 2

(c)

(d)

pl

(b)

in

g

Sa

m

(a)

e

The child was asked to circle the models that would stack.

TASK 3

(b)

ew

Colour the faces on the cube different colours.

C

Vi

(a)

The child was asked to follow the instructions for each object.

B A

Tick the corner and trace the edges of these shapes.

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

3–D shapes Demonstrated

• describe, compare and name 3-D shapes, including cube, cuboid, cylinder and sphere Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3–D shapes

The child should be enabled to discuss the use of 3-D shapes in the environment •

boxes, packets, containers, fish-tank

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Children model 3-D shapes using modelling clay. Sort objects into box shapes, roller shapes and ball shapes etc. Make a class booklet of observed or collected items around the school grounds. Discuss what shapes were seen. Sort a variety of objects into groups — e.g. colours and shapes — and have children explain the reasons behind their sorting. • Play simple 2-D/3-D games with jigsaws, attribute blocks, puzzle blocks etc.

pl

e

• • • •

m

• Write a class list of 3-D shapes in the classroom, e.g. cuboid: book, toy box, board rubber, etc.

Sa

Answers Task 1 ice-cream cone

(b)

cereal packet cuboid

(c)

dice cube

in Vi

Teacher check

ew

Task 2

g

(a)

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TASK 1

The child was asked to match real-life objects to shapes with similar attributes.

(a)

(b)

TASK 2

(c)

The child was asked to identify and colour 3-D objects in drawings.

pl

e

Colour the shapes in the picture, using the following colours.

Sa

m

– green

ew

– yellow

in

g

– red

Vi

– blue

– orange

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

3–D shapes Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• discuss the use of 3-D shapes in the environment Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3–D shapes

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D and 3-D shapes •

use boxes, cardboard packs or containers in construction activities

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: Build stacks using 3-D objects such as cans, boxes and other objects and discuss which were the easiest to stack. Have children build walls with blocks and attempt to make windows. Stack objects on a board and tilt the board; noting when the stack topples. Sort objects according to whether they stack or roll. Use materials such as lolly sticks, pipe-cleaners, counters, blocks and leaves to construct a model of a road from home to school.

e

• • • • •

pl

• Use toys from home and school to construct models of a toyshop, car park, farm etc.

m

Answers

Sa

Task 1 Discuss/Teacher check

g

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

Teacher check

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The child was asked to choose and colour the group of objects he/she would use to build a fort to play in. Children were asked to orally explain their choice.

TASK 2

The child was asked to construct and draw a model of a place he/she knows, using materials found around the classroom.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

3–D shapes

Demonstrated

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D and 3-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Shape and space – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: 3–D shapes

The child should be enabled to explore the relationship between 2-D and 3-D shapes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Collect examples of cubes, cuboids, cylinders and spheres. Show the appropriate 2-D shape and match it to the 3-D object. e.g. square–cube, circle–sphere. • Sort flat shapes according to properties such as, the number of corners, the number of sides.

e

• Sort 3-D shapes according to properties. Introduce the term ‘faces’.

pl

Answers

m

Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2 (a) circle

g

(b) square

Vi

ew

in

(c) rectangle

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TASK 1

The child was asked to colour the 2-D shapes red and the 3-D shapes yellow.

(a)

(e)

(f)

(i)

(d)

(c)

(b)

(h)

(g)

(j)

(l)

(m)

m

pl

e

(k)

TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

The child was asked to colour the matching 2-D shape.

Mathematics

Shape and space – First Class

3–D shapes

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• explore the relationship between 2-D and 3-D shapes Prim-Ed Publishing

www.prim-ed.com

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare, measure and record length using non-standard units •

lollipop sticks, pencils, spans, strides

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

m

pl

e

• Provide opportunities for children to visually select the ‘longest’, ‘shortest’ etc. and then check selections by measuring directly side by side. • Allow the children to attempt to line themselves up from shortest to tallest by measuring visually and back to back. • Use body parts as units of measurement to find the lengths of objects in the playground. • Use strides or steps to measure the distance between places in the school. • Find objects in the classroom which are the same length as a particular body part; for example, ‘The duster is the same length as my foot’.

Sa

Answers Task 1

Task 3

Vi

Teacher check

in

Teacher check

ew

Task 2

g

Teacher check

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The child was asked to colour the object which is longer green and the object which is shorter yellow.

TASK 2

The child was asked to colour the short fat snake red and the long thin snake blue.

TASK 3

The child was asked to use his/her hand span to measure the length of his/her desk and compare it to lengths around the classroom.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

The length of my desk is

The door is wider than my desk. The whiteboard is longer than my desk.

hand spans.

The window is wider than my desk.

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Length Demonstrated

• estimate, compare, measure and record length using non-standard units Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to select and use appropriate non-standard measuring units and instruments •

choose a measuring unit from a selection available in the classroom (e.g. selecting either a cube, lollipop stick or stride to measure the room)

discuss which units are best for measuring long objects and which are best for measuring short objects

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

• Use vocabulary such as guess, estimate, roughly, nearly, about, close to. • Suggest suitable units to estimate and measure. e.g. how many paperclips would fit around a book?, how many metre sticks would fit across the hall?

m

pl

• Throw a ball and then measure in strides how far you have thrown.

Answers

Sa

Task 1

Colour the hand, paperclip, tape measure, lolly stick, ruler and foot.

g

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

Teacher check

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TASK 1

The child was asked to colour all the objects that could be used to measure length.

TASK 2

Using paperclips the child was asked to estimate, then measure the objects.

m

pl

e

.

Estimate

paperclips

paperclips

paperclips

paperclips

paperclips

paperclips

paperclips

paperclips

in

ew

(b)

g

(a) Your pencil

Measure

Sa

Object

(c)

Vi

Your rubber

Your desktop

(d) Your hand Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Length Demonstrated

• select and use appropriate non-standard measuring units and instruments Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity

Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to estimate, measure and record length using standard unit (the metre) •

length, width, height, measure, metre, nearly a metre, a bit more/a bit less than a metre

discuss the need for standard units

collect sets of objects longer than, shorter than or the same length as a metre

Other activities suitable for developing these outcomes: • Use informal units such as body parts to make up one metre; e.g. one metre is the same as five foot lengths. • Use a metre length of ribbon as a tester for finding straight and curved lengths about one metre long.

m

pl

e

• Have children draw irregular shapes on plain paper and predict whether the length of the line they have drawn is less than or more than a metre. Use a metre streamer to test their predictions.

Answers

Task 2

Sa

Task 1

More than a metre

(a)

clock

AWV

(b)

around the desktop

AWV

(c)

Teacher check

(d)

Teacher check

(e)

Teacher check

About a metre

Less than a metre

Vi

ew

in

g

Objects

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TASK 1

The child was asked to use a piece of string one metre long to estimate and measure the curved line.

More than Less than one metre one metre

My estimate

(b)

My measure

g

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

TASK 2

ew

in

The child was asked to find and measure objects that are less than, more than or about one metre long, using a metre ruler or string.

More than a metre

(a)

Vi

Objects

(b)

around the desktop

About a metre

Less than a metre

clock

(c) (d) (e) Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Length Demonstrated

• estimate, measure and record length using standard unit (metre) Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Length

The child should be enabled to solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving length •

suggest ways of measuring around a tree-trunk or other irregular object

suggest ways of comparing objects at home – who has the widest gate? Measure with string and bring to school for comparison and discussion

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Compare the lengths of two objects which cannot be moved, using ribbon or string as informal units. • Use string to measure and compare the distance around 3-D shapes.

pl

e

• Make a paper tape measure to measure with.

Answers

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

The straight path will be the shorter, faster way home.

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TASK

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to use a piece of string to compare the lengths of two paths and colour the shorter and faster way home.

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Length

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving length Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Weight

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare, measure and record weight using non-standard units •

heavy, heavier, heaviest; light, lighter, lightest; balance

sort objects into heavy or light by hand

find objects that are lighter or heavier than given object

estimate comparative weight of two objects by sight

compare weights by hand weighing

check using balance

m

pl

Sort a range of objects into ‘heavy’ and ‘light’ groups. Attempt to order the weights of objects by pushing, pulling or ‘hefting’. Experience lifting and handling a wide range of objects to investigate how different weights ‘feel’. Provide a range of objects of different weights for children to heft and compare. Make categories of ‘light’ and ‘heavy’ to describe their findings.

Sa

• • • •

e

Other activities suitable for developing this objective.

g

• Have the child cut pictures from magazines or newspapers of objects which fit in designated categories such as ‘heavy’ or ‘light’.

apple – orange pencil – egg plant – pumpkin

ew

car – boat/elephant

Vi

Task 1

in

Answers

Task 2 elephant

Task 3 balloon

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The child was asked to draw a line from each picture to a picture in a box which weighs ‘about the same’.

TASK 2

The child was asked to circle the heaviest object.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 1

TASK 3

The child was asked to colour the lightest object.

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Weight

Demonstrated

• estimate, compare, measure and record weight using non-standard units Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Weight

The child should be enabled to select and use appropriate non-standard measuring units and instruments •

choose a measuring unit from a selection available in the classroom, e.g. selecting either stones, cubes or beads to weigh a school bag.

discuss which units are best for weighing various objects

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Experiment with balance scales and a range of found objects around the classroom. Informally discuss what the children have discovered about them and how they think balance scales could be used. What do they show us? • Compare objects such as fruit of about the same size and shape using balance scales to test which is heavier. • Use balance scales to compare and arrange three or four objects in order by weighing each against the other to determine their position.

m

Answers

Task 2

TC

in

g

Sa

Task 1

ew

TC

Vi

TC

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to circle the balances that show a correct story.

TASK 2

The child was asked to find objects heavier than, lighter than or that balance the object being weighed. Draw the object on the scale.

I used blocks to balance the apple.

(b)

A is heavier than a ball.

(c)

A is lighter than a book.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

(a)

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Weight

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• select and use appropriate non-standard measuring units and instruments Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Weight

The child should be enabled to estimate, measure and record weight using standard unit (the kilogram) and solve simple problems •

discuss the need for standard units

collect sets of objects lighter than, heavier than or the same weight as a kilogram

find the largest packet and the smallest packet that weighs a kilogram

make two objects (two balls of Plasticine) weigh the same

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

Sa

m

pl

e

• Use a balance with two pans to compare two objects directly. Use items from the class shop and incorporate weighing activities into play sessions. • Weigh each other on bathroom scales. Discuss kilograms – more than, less than, nearly, just over, about. • Find objects around the classroom that might weigh the same. Estimate, then weigh. Which weigh the same? Which are heavier? Which are lighter? Record weights in kilograms. • Find objects that weight less than/more than/about one kilogram.

Answers

g

Task 1

Task 2 Teacher check

Maths Assessment

ew

(c) the same weight

Vi

(b) lighter

in

(a) heavier

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TASK 1

The child was asked to look at the scales and fill in the correct word in the sentence.

heavier

lighter

the same weight

(a)

The pencil case is

than the piece of chalk.

e

(b)

than the book.

pl

The scissors are

Sa

m

(c)

as the banana.

g

The apple is TASK 2

ew

in

The child was asked to estimate the weight of each object and then weigh it using a balance scale.

less 1kg

about 1kg

more than 1kg

Weight

less 1kg

about 1kg

more than 1kg

Estimate

less 1kg

about 1kg

more than 1kg

Weight

less 1kg

about 1kg

more than 1kg

Vi

Estimate

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Weight Demonstrated

• estimate, measure and record weight using standard unit (the kilogram) and solve simple problems Prim-Ed Publishing

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Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Capacity

The child should be enabled to estimate, compare, measure and record capacity using non-standard units •

pour, fill, full, empty, holds more, less or the same amount as

find the capacity of a larger container by using teaspoons, egg cups, cups

find containers that hold more or less than a given container; estimate, and check by measuring

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Experiment with sand and water play, transferring contents from one container to another and noting ‘overflow’.

pl

e

• Decide upon an informal unit of measurement such as ‘cupfuls’ or ‘eggcupfuls’ to measure the capacities of different household containers. Discuss the importance of not spilling anything when measuring and how this might affect the measurements made.

m

• Have children estimate and attempt to justify the number of units they think will be needed to fill a container. Test their predictions and suggest ways they could make more accurate predictions.

Sa

Answers Task 1

Task 3

Task 2

R

Y

AWV

AWV

AWV

AWV

Teacher check Teacher check

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R

in

Y

g

(b)

ew

(a)

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TASK 1

The child was asked to colour the jar with more water in it red and the one with less water in it yellow.

(a)

(b)

The child was asked to circle the object that could hold the most and tick the object that could hold the least.

TASK 3

The child was asked to estimate, measure and record how many cups of water it takes to fill each container. He/She was asked to use two containers of his/her choosing to measure.

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

TASK 2

My guess

My measure (in cups)

ew

Container

Ice-cream container

(b)

Saucepan

Vi

(a)

(c) (d) Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Capacity

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• estimate, compare, measure and record capacity using non-standard units Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Capacity

The child should be enabled to select and use appropriate non-standard measuring units and instruments •

choose a measuring unit from a selection – which container is best for filling the bucket? why?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Suggest measures for:

how many bottles of water would fill the bucket? how many jugs of water are needed to fill the large saucepan?

• Use short, fat containers and tall, thin containers and compare the capacity.

e

• Identify in a collection of different bottles those which hold 1 litre or 2 litres.

pl

Answers

m

Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2

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ew

in

g

The jug kettle, it is the right size and has a spout to pour. Less water would be spilled and therefore it is the best container to use.

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to estimate and then measure how many cups of sand will fit into these containers.

Container

Estimate

Measure

(a) cups of sand

cups of sand

cups of sand

cups of sand

cups of sand

cups of sand

(b)

e

(c)

m

pl

(d)

cups of sand

Sa

cups of sand TASK 2

Vi

ew

in

g

The child was asked to circle the best container for filling the bucket and explain why.

The best container is the because . Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Capacity

Demonstrated

• select and use appropriate non-standard measuring units and instruments Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Capacity

The child should be enabled to estimate, measure and record capacity using standard unit (the litre) and solve simple problems •

discuss need for standard units

collect sets of containers that hold more than, less than or about the same as a litre

collect litre containers of different shapes and sizes; label; check capacity by pouring from one to the other – how many children could have a cup full of water from a litre bottle?

Other activities suitable for developing this objective. • Know that 1 litre = 1000 millilitres • Think about 1 litre. Would a teaspoon hold a litre? Would a milk carton hold a litre?

pl

e

• Work out problems around the class. e.g. A jug holds 6 cups of water, how many cups of water in two full jugs?

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Less than one litre: glass, can, cup, margarine tub

g

Task 2

Task 3

Vi

Teacher check

ew

in

More than one litre: bucket, bin, bath, paddling pool, bowl

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TASK 1

The child was asked to first estimate, and then measure, how many cups would fill a one-litre jug.

Estimate: TASK 2

cups

Measure:

cups

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to colour red the containers that hold less than one litre and colour blue the containers that hold more than one litre.

TASK 3

1.

The child was asked to find and list three containers that hold one litre of water.

2.

3.

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Capacity

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• estimate, measure and record capacity using standard unit (the litre) and solve simple problems Prim-Ed Publishing

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91

Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to use the vocabulary of time to sequence events •

sequence events associated with different times of the day, days of the week, months of the year

discuss characteristics of seasons, of months of the year, day before, day after

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

e

Tell familiar stories out of sequence and ask children to retell them correctly. Rearrange simple comic strips of events in order. Make story cards to represent the events in a story or procedure. Use ‘yesterday’, ‘today’ and ‘tomorrow’ cards to sequence events over more than one day. Create seasonal displays incorporating the names of the months of that season. Look at the class birthday chart to find out who was born in different months of the year.

pl

• • • • •

m

• Sequence the pages from a calendar in the correct order.

Sa

Answers Task 1 (a) midday 2

g

(b) night 4

in

(c) morning 1

Task 2

Vi

Green: February, March, April

ew

(d) afternoon 3

Blue: November, December, January Yellow: May, June, July

Orange: August, September, October

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TASK 1

The child was asked to order familiar events by numbering the boxes and matching them to the time of day each occurs.

(a)

morning (b)

1

m

afternoon

g

Sa

(c)

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e

midday

in

(d)

ew

The child was asked to colour the spring months green, the winter months blue, the summer months yellow and the autumn months orange.

Vi

r

t

Oc

November

April

s gu

September

t

Au

July

May Mathematics

June

Measures – First Class

Time

Demonstrated

www.prim-ed.com

Needs Further Opportunity Se

• use the vocabulary of time to sequence events Prim-Ed Publishing

h

rc Ma

e ob

y

ber

ar

Decem

ru

ar y Janu

Fe b

TASK 2

night

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to read and record time using simple devices •

find how many times sand will pass through an egg-timer while a story is read

use candle clock or water clock to measure amount of time that passes by the end of the class activity, by roll call, by break time, by home time

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

Sa

m

pl

e

• Ask the children to estimate one minute by putting up their hands when they think a minute has elapsed. • Observe the length of a minute as a second hand ticks on an analogue clock. Encourage the children to silently count sixty seconds to this beat to estimate one minute. • Sing simple rhymes about the months of the year and record the name of the month when writing dates. • Watch the second hand of a clock and keep the beat using percussion instruments or body percussion. • Have the children ‘keep time’ in their heads and guess the duration of 10 seconds, 30 seconds or one minute. • Allow children a set time to ‘clean up’ or move from one place to another and count seconds in ones, fives or tens to indicate and model the passing of time.

Answers Task 1

Vi

ew

Task 2

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to do activities while a partner clapped his/her hands.

(a) To jump 10 times.

(c) To write your name.

claps

claps (d) To colour this shape.

e

(b) To draw a fish.

claps

m

pl

claps TASK 2

I can do minute.

jumps in one

in

g

(a)

Sa

The child was asked to perform specific things in one minute and record his/her findings.

times

I can write my name in one minute.

Vi

ew

(b)

(c)

I can draw a picture of myself in one minute.

(d)

I can bounce a ball one minute.

(e)

I can hop on one foot in one minute.

yes no

times in times

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Time

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• read and record time using simple devices Prim-Ed Publishing

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to read time in hours and half-hours on 12-hour analogue clock •

become familiar with clock face, movement of hands

record positions at hours and half-hours

record activities at these times

examine television schedules to find programmes that begin on hour and half-hour

state what time it will be one hour later, half an hour later

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

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• Construct clock faces using paper plates. Discuss and manipulate the ‘hour’ hand and the ‘minute’ hand. Make ‘o’clock’ times from digital, verbal and written displays. • Draw pictures of events that happen during the child’s day e.g. getting up, leaving for school, morning break etc.

m

• Know that 1 hour = 60 minutes, 1 minute = 60 seconds, half an hour = 30 minutes.

12

11

1

10 o'clock

12

12

1

11 2

8 7

3 8

5

6

4 7

half past two

11

12

8 o'clock 11

1

10

7

11

6

12

1

10

8

4 7

6

5

half-past 10

Maths Assessment

6

11 o'clock 11

12

1

2

11

2

4 7

6

3 4 6

12

5

1

10

3 8

1

8

7

9

12

9

5

10

3

6

half past seven

4

11

2

9

3 4

5

10

3

7

5

2

7

1

8

4

1

8

2

9

12

9

Vi

3 8

12

10

2

9

5

6

10:30

Task 2 12 o'clock

11 10

2

9

4

5 o'clock

1

10 3

5

6

ew

11 10

3 4 7

2 o'clock

9

2

8

5

6

1

9

4 7

12

10 3

5

6

11 2

8

4 7

1

9

3 8

12

10

2

g

11 10 9

in

Task 1

Sa

Answers

5

half-past 3

2

9

3 8

4 7

6

5

half-past 1

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TASK 1

11

The child was asked to show the correct time on the clocks.

12

10 9

6

12

1

10 9

8

half past two

12

1

10

2

9

3 8

4

4 7

5

6

6

11

1 2

7

4 5

5 o'clock

3

5

6

12

9

4 7

8 7

10 3

8

6

11 2

3

5

10 o'clock

2 o'clock

2

9

4 7

1

10 3

8

4

11

2

5

12

11

9

3

7

1

10

2

8

12

11

1

5

6

half past seven

m

The child was asked to match the correct times to the clocks.

Sa

TASK 2

pl

e

10:30

8 o'clock

1

10

3 8

4

11

6

12

10

5

3 8 6

4

11

12

5

12

5

1

10

2

9

4

3 8

4 7

half-past 3

Mathematics

6

11

5

6

4 7

3

7

half-past 10

6

5

half-past 1

Measures – First Class

Time

Demonstrated

• read time in hours and half-hours on 12-hour analogue clock Prim-Ed Publishing

8

2

8

2 3

1

10

1

9

5

6

12

10 3

9

4 7

11 2

7

2

11 o'clock

1

8

1

9

12

9

Vi

7

11

10

2

9

in

12

ew

11

g

12 o'clock

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Time

The child should be enabled to read day, date and month using calendar •

read today’s day, date and month

discuss birthdays and other significant dates

identify from the calendar the day of the week on which a given date occurs

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Hold a daily ‘morning session’ where the day, date and weather can be recorded. Children can take turns to change the appropriate signs and read the day’s date. • Encourage children to write the date on diary entries or daily writing exercises.

pl

e

• Know in order the days of the week and the months and seasons of the year. Make simple picture calendars.

m

Answers Task 1

Sa

Teacher check

Task 2

Vi

ew

in

g

Teacher check

Maths Assessment

98

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TASK 1

The child was asked to write about the day, date and month of the year.

Sunday Monday

Today is

Tuesday

.

It is the

Wednesday

day of the .

month of

Thursday

e

Friday

Sa

m

pl

Saturday

TASK 2

ew

in

g

The child was asked to sequence the months of the year in order and to colour his/her birthday month.

1

January

August

December

November

June

February

April

September

May

October

March

Vi

July

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Time

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• read day, date and month using calendar Prim-Ed Publishing

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99

Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Money

The child should be enabled to recognise, exchange and use coins up to the value of 50 cents •

practise tendering and receiving amounts of money

calculate and give change

exchange a coin or coins for others of equal value

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

Give opportunities for children to sort collections of notes and coins according to face value. Investigate and become familiar with the pictures on coins and notes. Match coins to outline cards with values written inside each shape. Practise placing coins in order according to value. Encourage children to bring empty grocery packaging for a class shop. Label each item with a price tag and encourage children to role-play exchanging the correct coins for an item.

m

• • • • •

Sa

Answers Task 1

g

Teacher check

(b) 5c

Vi

(c) 10c

ew

(a) 10c, 10c

in

Task 2

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to asked to match the coin to the cost of each item.

50c

2c

1c

e

10c

20c

Sa

m

pl

5c

TASK 1

g

The child was asked to match groups of coins to a group with an equal value.

(b)

Vi

ew

in

(a)

(c)

Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Money

Demonstrated

• recognise, exchange and use coins up to the value of 50 cents Prim-Ed Publishing

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101

Needs Further Opportunity Se

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Maths Assessment


Measures – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Money

The child should be enabled to calculate how many items may be bought with a given sum

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Using play money and the class shop, give the child a shopping card and an amount of money to spend. • Practise working out change in the class shop. • Solve problems e.g. John paid 6c for sweets with no change. What coins did he use? • Begin to appreciate, for example, that €4.60 means 4 euro and 60 cents.

Answers

e

Task 1

pl

(a) 1 carton juice + 1 ice-cream

m

(b) 2 cartons juice (c) 1 packet crisps + 1 ice-cream

Sa

(d) 1 packet crisps + 1 lollipop

(b) 10c

(f)

20c

(c) 20c

(g)

50c

(d) 10c

(h)

10c

in

50c

ew

(e)

Vi

(a) 5c

g

Task 2

Maths Assessment

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TASK 1

The child was asked to colour the balloon that contains the items that can be bought for the stated amount.

€1

80c

25c

50c

What can I buy for: 2 juices

2 lollipops + 1 ice-cream

2 crisps + 1 lollipop

2 ice-creams

2 juices

(b) €2.00 €1.30

2 lollipops + 1 juice

2 cartons juice

1 crisps + 1 lollipop

1 crisps + 1 ice-cream

e

(c)

pl

(a) €1.80

1 juice + 1 ice-cream

1 ice-cream

TASK 2

Sa

m

(d) €0.75

The child was asked to calculate how much change is needed.

Change

Item and cost

ew

50c

(f)

€1

Vi

(b)

Change

€1

20c

15c

Amount given

(e)

in

(a)

Amount given

g

Item and cost

20c

10c

2 juices + 1 lollipop

80c

(g)

(c)

€2

50c €1.50

30c

(h)

(d)

€2

50c €1.90

40c Mathematics

Measures – First Class

Money

Demonstrated

Needs Further Opportunity

• calculate how many items may be bought with a given sum Prim-Ed Publishing

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103

Maths Assessment


Data – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Representing and interpreting data

The child should be enabled to sort and classify objects by two and three criteria •

sort blocks according to colour, shape, size and thickness

identify a block in the collection from a description of its attributes

Other activities suitable for developing this objective: • Classify numbers and organise them into lists and simple tables. e.g. make a list of all the multiples of 10 between 0–100, all the odd numbers from 15–35 etc. • Respond to questions such as: How can we find out? What information should we collect? How shall we organise the information?

pl

e

• Make a simple list of class names. Categorise by the number of letters in each name.

m

Answers Teacher check

Sa

(a) 3 furniture (b) 4 electrical (c) pets (5)

Vi

ew

in

g

(d) instruments (2)

Maths Assessment

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TASK

The child was asked to sort the pictures into four groups by colouring each group a different colour.

Group 2 – instruments (green)

Group 3 – pets (red)

Group 4 – electrical (yellow)

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Group 1– furniture (blue)

(a) How many things are in the furniture group? (b) How many things are in the electrical group? (c) Which group has the most things? (d) Which group has the least things? Mathematics

Data – First Class

Representing and interpreting data Demonstrated

• sort and classify objects by two and three criteria Prim-Ed Publishing

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Needs Further Opportunity Se

105

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Maths Assessment


Data – First Class Assessment Tasks Strand Unit: Representing and interpreting data

The child should be enabled to represent and interpret data in two, three or four rows or columns using real objects, models and pictures •

represent concretely and pictorially the sets of children who had an apple, an orange or a banana for lunch

identify the correspondence between the number of the symbols (fruit pictures) and the people in the set

progress to representing data using more abstract 3-D forms, e.g. coloured blocks to represent people

construct simple pictograms

Other activities suitable for developing this objective:

pl

e

• Make a collection of objects found in the playground and group according to the child’s own criteria. • Match objects in collections, one to one, to make comparisons. • Investigate how many different ways a group can be classified; e.g. weight, colour, purpose, living/non-living, edible and so on.

Sa

m

• Construct simple pictograms to represent the hair colour of a specified number of children in the class.

peaches

(c)

5

(d)

4

(e)

2

(f)

26

in

(b)

ew

apples

Vi

(a)

g

Answers

Maths Assessment

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TASK

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The child was asked to interpret the pictogram showing children’s favourite fruits and answer the questions about it.

(a) Which fruit is the most liked?

Vi

(b) Which fruit is least liked? (c) How many children like oranges? (d) How many children like strawberries? (e) How many more children like apples than bananas? (f)

How many children are in this class?

Mathematics

Data – First Class

Representing and interpreting data Demonstrated

• represent and interpret data in two, three or four rows or columns using real objects, models and pictures Prim-Ed Publishing

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107

Needs Further Opportunity

Maths Assessment


2429 Maths Assessments - 1st Class