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Published by Prim-Ed Publishing 0635IRE

www.prim-ed.com


e pl m Sa g in ew Vi The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Foreword

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Contents

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Titles in this series are: The Christmas Kit – Lower The Christmas Kit – Middle The Christmas Kit – Upper

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The Christmas Kit contains activities from across the curriculum, including English, mathematics, science, geography, R.E. art and design technology. The package enables pupils to work independently, in small groups or as a whole class under teacher direction. It has been designed to capture the pupil’s imagination and promote creativity while addressing skill development and cross-curricular learning. Activities include: • comprehending the meaning of Christmas; • exploring Christmas traditions around the world; • following directions in making Christmas gifts and cards; • reading and performing plays; • text analysis; • letter/diary writing; and • problem solving. Comprehensive teachers notes for each page, including learning objectives to explain the learning focus of the activity, background information, answers and additional activities, have been included to save precious time at this stage of the year. Merry Christmas and have fun!

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Teachers Notes ......................................................... ii Assessment Proforma ............................................ iii The Story of Christmas .................................. 2 – 3

The Santa Trap ............................................. 34 – 37

Christmas Customs ......................................... 4 – 7

Origami Christmas Star ............................ 38 – 39

Giving at Christmas ........................................ 8 – 9

Christmas Cracker .......................................40 – 41

Christmas News............................................ 10 – 11

Christmas Cards and Calendars.............. 42 – 45

Boxing Day ................................................... 12 – 13

Stained Glass Window .............................. 46 – 47

Other Religious Celebrations .................. 14 – 17

Christmas Sweets Holder ......................... 48 – 49

Christmas on the Net ................................ 18 – 23

Different Seasons ........................................ 50 – 51

Computer Santa.......................................... 24 – 25

Did You Know? ............................................ 52 – 55

Christmas Shopping .................................. 26 – 27

Christmas Poetry ........................................ 56 – 57

Christmas Symmetry ................................. 28 – 29

Christmas Word Puzzles ........................... 58 – 59

Christmas Mini Debate ............................. 30 – 33

Christmas Maths Puzzles ..........................60 – 61

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Teachers Notes Each pupil page is supported by a teacher’s page which provides the teacher with the following information.

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• Learning Objectives guide the teacher as to the behaviours that pupils should be demonstrating through completing the activity. • Materials are clearly listed to aid in the quick preparation of activities. All resources can be gathered beforehand to aid in the smooth running of the lesson. • Background information has been provided where necessary to give the teacher any additional information that may be needed. This information could be the history behind the topic covered on the pupil page, a point of interest or an additional resource that may be useful. • Additional activities have been suggested as a way to extend pupils or to further develop the ideas on the pupil page. • Answers have been provided where necessary for easy marking of the pupil worksheet.

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• Instructions are clear and easy for pupils to follow. They have been written to suit the specific age group. • Activities provide opportunities for pupils to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained over the school year. • Artwork complements the activity and has been drawn to suit the age of the pupils.

Using the Assessment Proforma

Year

Learning Area

Term

Task

Fill in the appropriate learning area. Give a brief description of the activities in the chosen copymaster and what was expected of the pupils. List the learning objective(s) assessed on the chosen copymaster.

Learning Objective(s) Still Developing

Your child can:

Teacher Comment

ii

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Understanding

Complete the continuums to indicate pupil progress. Use this space to comment on an individual pupil’s performance which cannot be indicated in the formal assessment, such as work habits or particular needs or abilities. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Assessment Proforma Year

Learning Area

Term

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Task

Learning Objective(s)

Still Developing

Understanding

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Your child can:

Teacher Comment

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The Story of Christmas Learning Objectives

• Sequences passages in a story. • Recognises and compares different styles of writing.

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Materials

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Copymaster A class novel or familiar book Background Information

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The story of Christmas is thought to have originated from the Gospels of Saint Luke and Saint Matthew in the New Testament. During the 1400s and 1500s, artists such as Botticello and Sandro depicted scenes of Jesus in the manger with Mary, Joseph, the shepherds and the Three Wise Men (kings) in their paintings. • Before pupils begin the activity, talk about Christmas and the reasons it is celebrated. Through discussion, allow the pupils to have a clear idea in their mind of the story. • For pupils with English as a second language and pupils with special needs, pictures could be drawn on the board that describe each event. • Choose three short passages from a class novel that demonstrate the different styles of writing. Ask pupils to compare the three styles of writing. What are the characteristics of each style? Descriptive - adjectives describing something or someone, with no dialogue and possibly no action occurring. Dialogue - punctuation to show that people are speaking, with use of quotation marks. Action - dialogue could by included, with one main event occurring, and use of short, powerful sentences. Additional activities

1. Choose a novel you have read. Find other examples of the three styles of writing. Write a paragraph comparing the three styles. 2. Think about the different ways you have seen or heard ‘The Christmas Story’; film, radio, at church, in books, from storytellers. Write about what the advantages and disadvantages of each of these different media types. Answers

1. d, e, b, a, c, f 2. (a) descriptive (b) 3. Answers will vary 2

action (c)

dialogue

(d)

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descriptive (e)

dialogue

(f)

action

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The Story of Christmas 1. Read the passages below. Number them in the order they occur in ‘The Christmas Story’. 2. Read each passage carefully. Think about how it is written. Label each paragraph as being written in one of the following styles:

• descriptive – adjectives are used to describe something or someone • dialogue – punctuation is used to show that people are speaking

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The Three Wise Men searched the village of Bethlehem for the Child. ‘Look there! In the sky! A brilliant star!’ shouted one. ‘Let us follow the star. It will lead us to the child,’ said another. ‘Come, there is no time to waste,’ added the third.

1 (d)

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(c)

Mary was about to give birth! The couple searched in vain for a room! Finally, Joseph and Mary found a stable. There among the animals and straw, Jesus was born. Mary laid Him on a bed of straw in a manger.

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The same night, shepherds were huddled together asleep on green pastures. Suddenly, the black night was transformed by a blazing light. Shimmering angels told the shepherds to find their Saviour, a babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a strawfilled manger.

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• action – one main event is occurring, short sentences are used for effect, can have dialogue

Mary of Nazareth, a simple, humble girl, was to be married to a carpenter named Joseph. One night, a beautiful angel visited Mary in her sleep. The angel told Mary that she would bear a son and she was to call Him Jesus.

Descriptive

(e)

The Emperor declared a census was to be held. ‘All people must return to their place of birth,’ Joseph said to Mary. ‘We must return to Bethlehem. You can ride on the back of a donkey. It will be a long and tiring journey.’

(f)

The visitors left. As the family slept peacefully, an angel appeared to Joseph and said, ‘You are in danger!’. Joseph, Mary and Jesus fled Bethlehem in great fear. They escaped to Egypt to save their child’s life.

3. Choose the style of writing that you prefer, and write a paragraph about your own Christmas. Include any family traditions you have. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Christmas Customs Learning Objectives

• Correctly interprets text to complete set activities. • Uses information from text to complete set activities.

Materials

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Background Information

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Many Christmas customs have pagan origins. The examples used in the newspaper articles are just a few of these. • Mince pies: The meat was eventually replaced by spices which the crusaders brought back from the east. • Christmas cards: Some people might argue that the first Christmas cards were actually ‘Christmas Pieces’ which English schoolboys in the mid-1800s were asked to produce for their parents at the end of term. They wrote Christmas wishes on decorated pieces of paper to demonstrate their writing skills. • Christmas trees: Prince Albert, the German husband of Queen Victoria, had the first Christmas tree in England in 1841. • Christmas carols: The earliest English carols date from the fifteenth century. Many are probably adapted from pagan songs. The oldest printed carol is the ‘Boar's Head Carol’ of 1521. Carols of French origin are called noels. • Christmas stockings: The poem ‘A Visit from St Nicholas’ (‘Twas the night before Christmas…’) by Clement C. Moore made the custom of the Christmas stocking popular. Websites http://christmascarnivals.com/aboutchristmas/ http://www.merry-christmas.com/traditions.htm Additional Activities

1. Research the origins of other Christmas customs such as giving gifts, eating turkey or Santa Claus. Pupils can write newspaper articles to explain them. 2. Survey adults and children to find the most popular Christmas carols. Investigate when they were written. Which are most popular – the most modern or the older ones? Why? 3. Discuss family Christmas customs pupils have and how they originated. Answers

1. Teacher check 2. Teacher check 4

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Christmas Customs Read these newspaper articles about the history of some Christmas customs to answer the questions. 1. Write a suitable headline for each article. 2. Finish each article with a sentence about the custom as it is used today.

EVER wonder why mince pies are called that when they don’t contain any meat?

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In medieval times, they did. People made rectangular meat pies with a pastry crust at Christmas time. The crust was indented in the centre and a baby Jesus made from pastry was then placed in it.

BRITISH a rt shop ow ne has been credited w r Sir Henry Cole ith invent Christmas ing the card. In 1843, h e asked a rtis draw Chr istmas sce t John Horsely to nes on a c added the ard a gr and Happ eeting ‘Merry Chris nd y New Ye tmas ar’.

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ristmas put up your Ch NEXT time you s. s German origin tree, consider it decorate mans began to er G s, 0 0 5 1 d e In th roses, apples an ke li s ct je b o h it ded fir trees w les were later ad d an C . er ap p d coloure stmas tree Christ. The Chri f o l o b m sy a as glish-speaking En to in d ce u d o was intr e 1840s. countries in th

DID you know that a legend from the fourth century is responsible for the Christmas stocking? The story suggests St Nicholas dropped gold coins down the chimney of a house where three poor girls lived. The coins landed in their stockings which were hanging by the fire to dry. Once the tale became well known, Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

NEW research has revealed that Christmas carols have not always been sung. In fact, a carol was once a Greek dance. The dance became popular all over Europe and was performed throughout the year. By the 1600s, carols involved singing only and Christmas became the main holiday for their performance.

other people began to hang up stockings for luck.

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Christmas Customs Learning Objectives

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• Correctly interprets text to complete set activities. • Uses information from text to complete set activities. • Draws on own knowledge of Christmas to complete set activities.

Materials

Copymaster Answers

3. Medieval

4. 5. 6. 7. 6

People made rectangular meat pies with a pastry crust at Christmas time and placed a baby Jesus made from pastry in the centre. 1500s Germans began to decorate fir trees with objects like roses, apples and coloured paper. 1600s Carols involved singing only. 1800s Christmas tree was introduced into English-speaking countries. John Horsely creates the first Christmas card. Answers will vary Teacher check Teacher check Teacher check The Christmas Kit

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Christmas Customs

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4. Write keywords or phrases for these customs.

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3. Complete the time line with facts from the articles.

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5. Do you think the story of St Nicholas is true? Why or why not?

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6. Discuss another reason people might have started hanging up stockings at Christmas. 7. Imagine you are Sir Henry Cole. What would you want the first Christmas card to look like? Design the front of your card in the space below. Include a message.

8. Discuss how you think your card shows what the meaning of Christmas is. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Giving at Christmas Learning Objectives

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• Appreciates that gifts can be inexpensive or free. Lists gift ideas for family and friends.

Materials Required

Copymaster Background Information

Encourage children to appreciate the different ways in which each family chooses to celebrate Christmas. Additional Activities

1. Brainstorm materials that can be collected and used to make a gift; for example, used Christmas cards, wrapping paper, shells and leaves. 2. Compose a story about Christmas with your family and friends as the main characters. Turn the story into a small book by adding illustrations, a front cover and blurb. 8

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Giving at Christmas Read and discuss the Bible story of the birth of Jesus. The popular ‘Christmas Story’ is a combination of Luke (2: 1 – 20) and Matthew (2: 1 – 12) from the New Testament. ree Wise Men travelled After Jesus was born, Th t em. They followed a brigh from the East to Bethleh ey e Baby Jesus. The gifts th star that led them to th ld, frankincense and brought for Him were: go ointing the head. myrrh, a fragrance for an Today:

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1. Christmas is a time when families come together. Carols may be sung, a meal shared and gifts given. Think about giving gifts to your family and friends on Christmas Day. Write four words that describe how you feel when you give a gift to someone special to you.

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2. Gifts can be inexpensive or cost no money at all. For example, you could do a good deed, write a poem or story or make a gift from things you have found or collected. Choose four people you would like to give a Christmas gift to. Write a list of inexpensive or free gifts that you could give.

3. Choose one of your inexpensive gift ideas that you can make. Design your gift on the back of this sheet. Remember to add labels and suggestions of where you might find or collect the objects you need. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Christmas News Learning Objectives

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• Can write in a variety of forms.

Materials

Copymaster Additional Activities

1. Share the accounts with the class. Discuss how so many different pieces can be created from the same short piece of text. 2. Compare the different forms of writing. 10

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Christmas News 1. Read the newspaper clipping below. Choose one of the characters from the story and write about his/her experience of the last day of school. Use the facts in the article combined with your imagination.

Greenhill Primary Christmas Mystery 18 December, last day of school before the Christmas holidays. Year 5 pupils at Greenhill Primary were enjoying a Christmas party when the fire alarm sounded. Teacher, Mr Farmer, stopped the celebrations and began counting the children. One of the pupils, Sarah-Jane, remembered that Lee and Lauren had been asked to return paints to the art storeroom. Mr Farmer

Sarah-Jane

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Lee

Mr Farmer

Lauren

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What style of writing will you choose? Remember your piece can be humorous, serious or even magical. (It is Christmas!)

Mrs Tassel (head teacher)

2. Complete this writing plan before you start.

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Boxing Day Learning Objectives

Copymaster

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Additional Activities

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Materials Required

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• Writes notes from nonfiction text and summarises ideas.

1. Repeat the task with a more difficult text. Use a dictionary to understand unknown words. 2. Discuss how pupils in the class spend Boxing Day. Answers

Possible notes What

• Boxing Day When?

• began during Middle Ages Why?

• • • • • 12

boxes in churches collect for poor open day after Christmas day for giving money to the people who provide service throughout year servants have box for tips and gifts The Christmas Kit

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Boxing Day Have you ever wondered why the day after Christmas is called Boxing Day? 1. Read the information below. Highlight or underline the key facts in the text. Boxing Day

During the Middle Ages, boxes were placed in churches to collect money for those in need. These boxes were opened the day after Christmas Day. The money raised was distributed to the poor people who attended the church. Servants also had boxes where gifts and tips received throughout the year were placed. The earthenware containers were broken open the day after Christmas.

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During the 19th century, 26 December was the day for giving money to tradesmen, the postman or paper boy to thank them for their services during the year!

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2. Write the information in note form in the correct box. (Remember notes are not full sentences.)

When?

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Why?

3. Use your notes to write a paragraph about the origin of Boxing Day in your own words. Compare your paragraph with the one written above.

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Other Religious Celebrations Learning Objectives

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• Reads and understands text on other major religious celebrations.

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Materials

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Copymaster Background Information

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• Purim is a happy Jewish festival celebrated between February and March each year. It commemorates the deliverance of the Persian Jews from a massacre. The Book of Esther is read in the synagogue, and children make noise when they hear the name of the evil Haman. Gifts are exchanged, feasts eaten, alms given to the poor and Purim plays are presented by children, who often wear fancy dress. • The Muslim celebration Eid-ul-Fitr (the Festival of Fast-Breaking) occurs at the end of Ramadan. It lasts three days, with the main festivities occurring on the first day. It is a joyous occasion with strong religious significance. Muslims give money to charity, dress in new clothes, attend prayer in the morning and visit friends and family. People greet each other with ‘Eid mubarak’ (A blessed Eid’). In some places, children are given gifts or money. • Diwali is a Hindu celebration. It is celebrated over a five-day period in late October and is one of the major religious festivals in India. Diwali honours Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. During the festival, small clay oil lamps are lighted and placed along the parapets of temples, in houses and set adrift on rivers and streams. The fourth day is the main festival day and also marks the beginning of the new year according to the Vikrama calendar. Hindus visit friends and family, exchange gifts, feast and wear new clothes. Websites

http://www.holidays.net/ http://www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/index.html Additional Activities

1. Pupils could role-play a meeting between any of the penpals in the diaries. 2. Use the Internet to find pictures of these celebrations. 3. Find pupils from schools in other countries and correspond with them about life in Ireland. 14

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Other Religious Celebrations

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Christmas is seen as the happiest time of the year on the Christian calendar. Read these children’s letters to their penpals to learn about some other religion’s happy celebrations.

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Other Religious Celebrations Learning Objectives

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• Uses text to compare and contrast different religious celebrations.

Materials

Copymaster Research materials Answers

1. (a) greggers (b) Diwali (c) triangular (d) Muslims fast for one month. (e) Eid-ul-Fitr (f) small clay lamps 2. Teacher check 3. Teacher check 16

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Other Religious Celebrations Answer these questions. 1. Quick Quiz

(a) What is the Jewish word for the rattles shaken at Purim?

(b) What is known as the ‘festival of lights?’

(c) What shape are ‘hamantashen’?

(d) What happens during Ramadan?

(e) Which celebration lasts three days?

(f)

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What are diye?

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2. These celebrations have many things in common. Complete the table below with your own headings and keywords.

3. Choose one of the celebrations mentioned in the letters. Compare it to the way you celebrate Christmas.

Research

• Find three major countries where each festival is celebrated. • Write other festivals that Jews, Muslims and Hindus celebrate. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Christmas on the Net Learning Objectives

Materials

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• Follows instructions to find information on the Internet.

Copymaster Access to Internet Background Information

At the time of printing, these sites were active and had been for some time. If they are not available, use a children’s search engine such as Ask Jeeves for Kids (http://www.ajkids.com) to find other similar websites. Additional Activities

1. Discuss some of the computer language which is commonly used on such sites. 2. Look at some commercial Christmas websites such as http://www.christmas.com. What techniques do they use to make you try to buy products? Answers Teacher check 18

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Christmas on the Net Christmas on the ‘Net

The Internet can be a great place to find out about Christmas! Try the sites below. www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/xmas/index.html www.night.net/christmas www.santas.net

Use one of these websites to answer the questions. 2. Find a Christmas craft or gift idea.

(a) What kind of food or drink is it?

(b)

Write three of the ingredients you use to make this recipe.

What is the idea?

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1. Find your favourite Christmas recipe on the website.

What age person is this most suitable for? Why?

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(b)

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3. These websites tell us about Christmas traditions around the world. Choose two countries and describe one Christmas custom of each country.

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Christmas on the Net Learning Objectives

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• Follows instructions to find information on the Internet.

Materials

Copymaster Access to Internet Computer magazines Additional Activities

1. Find out how many ways pupils in the school know how to say ‘Merry Christmas’. How many different nationalities are represented? Which languages are similar? 2. Pupils design their own Christmas games in small groups for a younger class. Consider things like number of participants, materials and space required and suitability for age. Teach the game to the younger pupils. How successful were they? Answers Teacher check 20

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Christmas on the Net 4. Write two ways of saying ‘Merry Christmas’ in other languages. You might find this information in the ‘Around the World’ section. Write the name of the language next to each.

(a)

(b)

5. Find a Christmas game. Write the rules as simply as you can in your own words.

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(b) Are colours and fonts used effectively? Why do you think this?

(d) Is the website suitable for children? What age? Why?

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(c) Are links included? Yes No

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(a) What kind of information does the website contain?

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6. Imagine you have been asked to review the website for a computer magazine. Give your opinion in note form about each feature below.

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(e) Website’s best feature:

(f) Website’s worst feature:

(g) Your suggestions for improvements:

Rating out of ten

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Christmas on the Net Learning Objectives

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• Uses viewed information to design own webpage.

Materials

Copymaster Access to Internet Computer magazines Additional Activities

1. Pupils could use a large piece of paper to show how their ‘website’ could expand into different layers. 2. Invite a web designer to talk to the class about his or her job. 22

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Christmas on the Net 7. Design the first page of your own Christmas website for children. Remember that this is the first page people will see, so it needs to be attractive and interesting. Write notes to plan your page before you start.

Colours Special features

Activities/information

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Age level aimed at

8. Describe how one of the areas you click on would expand. For example, the word ‘recipe’ might expand into a recipe for Christmas turkey.

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Computer Santa Learning Objectives

• Determines unknown numbers in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division calculations.

Materials Required

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Copymaster Counters and blocks can be used for pupils who require concrete materials to perform the equations. Background Information

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Questions such as these will become the basis of algebra studied in secondary school. The missing numbers will be replaced with variables such as ‘x’. Additional activities

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1. For pupils who have found this sheet challenging, try more basic questions and allow them to use counters or cubes to visualise the questions. For example: 2 x _ = 8

x

=8

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Two groups of how many cubes make 8? 2. To challenge pupils who completed these activities easily, try using higher numbers. For example: 72 – _ = 39 15 x _ = 60 _ + 83 = 102 Introducing a variable may further challenge some children. Use a star or smiley face to represent the missing number. 47 - ★ = 16 63 + 45 = ★ ★ x 12 = 132 Pupils can then create questions of their own to swap with partners. Answers

1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) 24

20, 30, 40 25, 49, 68 22, 37, 34 36, 10, 54 15, 5, 8 7, 16, 10 3, 4, 22 25, 30, 2 995

2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

x5 ÷3 +15 x7 ÷4 –7 x12 x2+1 The Christmas Kit

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Computer Santa 1. Write the missing numbers by using the operation in the ‘Computer Santa’.

(a)

17

20

(b) 30 44

27 73

37 (c)

(d) 6

10

60

25 46 (e)

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31

(h) 3

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÷

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(g)

(f) 2 5

÷

25

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300

3 5 8

(c)

(e)

(g)

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2. Write the operation in the ‘Computer Santa’ that is changing the numbers on the left to the answers on the right.

18

6

25

24

8

40

27

9

4

28

15

(b)

30

45

42

57

6

42

50

65

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70

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6

21

14

48

12

33

26

60

15

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9 12 Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

(d)

(f)

(h)

2

5

108

8

17

144

11

23

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Christmas Shopping Learning Objectives

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• Uses the four operations (+, –, x, ÷) to solve word problems with money.

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Copymaster Calculators Scrap paper for calculations Cubes Plastic money Catalogues and pamphlets

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Materials Required

Background Information

As Christmas draws closer, some pupils will be saving money to purchase gifts for family and friends. Discussions can begin about why it is important to carefully look at prices and create budgets. Ask pupils to bring in catalogues from their favourite shops. Look together at prices and discounts. Compare prices of certain items from one shop to another. Review terms such as ‘more than’, ‘total cost’ and ‘difference between’. Additional Activities

1. Use catalogues to create a collage of items they would like to buy as gifts for others for Christmas. 2. Imaginary budgets can be written. Give the class an amount they can spend. Pupils look at the catalogues and create their own Christmas budget. 3. Discuss why it is important to look at prices in a number of shops. Answers

1. (a) 13 (b) €8.94 (c) €9.30 2. Teacher check 26

(d) 8

(e) €58.80

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(f) €11.20

(g) 4

(h) €1.60 Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Shopping Georgia has a budget of €70.00 for her Christmas shopping this year. Here is her receipt. Answer the problems below about Georgia’s Christmas shopping. (You may use a calculator for 1. (e) and 2. (b).) 1. Work out the answers on a separate sheet of paper.

(a) How many items are on Georgia’s shopping list? (b) What is the difference in price between the most expensive item and the cheapest one? (c) What is the total cost of the food and drink items?

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(d) How many items on the receipt are a multiple of 5?

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(e) How much did Georgia spend on all of the items on the supermarket receipt?

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(f) How much change does Georgia have?

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(g) On the way out of the shop, Georgia sees individual Christmas crackers with special gifts for €2.40 each. How many can Georgia afford with her change? (h) How much money does Georgia return home with?

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2. Imagine you have a budget of €40 for your Christmas shopping.

(a) Write your own shopping list using some of the items that Georgia purchased. You can buy more than one of the same item but remember, only up to €40. For example:

(b) Give your shopping list to a friend to check your calculations. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Christmas Symmetry Learning Objectives

• Recognises reflective symmetry in 2-D shapes.

Materials Required

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Copymaster Mirrors Background information

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Symmetry can be best explained by folding a piece of paper in half and cutting out a shape. Unfold the paper. The shape created is symmetrical with the line of symmetry being the folded crease down the middle. Do this a number of times with the line of symmetry being horizontal, vertical and diagonal. Additional Activities

1. (a)

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1. Write names and draw lines of symmetry. 2. Write names and reflect them through different angles. Use mirrors as a guide. 3. Draw half of a Christmas gift. Give your design to a friend to draw the other side. The line of symmetry can be horizontal, diagonal or vertical, depending on the gift. Use a mirror to ensure the design is symmetrical!

(b)

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2. Teacher check 3.

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(b)

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Christmas Symmetry 1. Draw the lines of symmetry using a dotted line.

For example,

Remember there can be more than one!

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2. Draw the reflection of these Christmas gifts.

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3. Draw the line/s of symmetry, using a dotted line, for those letters that are symmetrical?

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4. Reflect these Christmas gifts using the dots as a guide.

For example,

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Christmas Mini Debate Learning Objectives

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• Plans and practises a formal speech in debate form.

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Background Information

A formal debate normally involves six speakers and a Chairperson, who states the topic for debate and introduces each speaker.

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Affirmative team

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First affirmative speaker: introduces the topic and his/her team, explains how they will support the topic and presents the first major argument.

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Second affirmative speaker: rebuts points the first negative speaker made and presents further points in support of the topic. Third affirmative speaker: rebuts points of the first and second negative speakers, adds his/her own points and concludes the affirmative case by summing up the team’s points.

Negative Team First negative speaker: introduces his/her team, explains how they will refute the topic and presents the first major argument. Second negative speaker: rebuts points of the first two affirmative speakers and presents further points against the topic. Third negative speaker: rebuts arguments of the affirmative team and concludes the debate by summing up the negative team’s points.

Materials

Copymaster Additional Activities

1. Introduce some impromptu speaking games to improve pupils’ public speaking skills. 2. Set up a proper formal debate on other subjects and present to an audience. 3. View speeches on television by professional/famous public speakers. Discuss how they keep their audiences interested and entertained. 30

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Christmas Mini Debate A debate is usually held between two teams of three speakers. The speakers are given the same topic. One team is called the ‘Affirmative’ and they speak in support of the topic. The other team is called the ‘Negative’ and they speak against the topic. This debate will be held between you and a partner. You will need to prepare a 1-minute speech. Follow these instructions. 1. Find a partner to work with and choose one of the topics below. Tick the one you choose.

‘Christmas has become too expensive.’

‘Santa is real.’

‘Giving gifts is the best part of Christmas.’

‘The Christmas holidays are too short.’

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2. Write who will be the affirmative speaker and who will be the negative speaker.

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3. Fill in the table below (without your partner seeing!). Write in point form.

4. Highlight your three best points. These are the ones you will use for your debate. 5. On the palm cards on the next page, write a beginning, middle (your three points) and ending in point form. Cut them out.

6. Practise your speech using your palm cards. Work on the points below regarding your voice. After you have finished practising, write a comment for each about how you think you improved during your practice time.

(a)

Volume. (How loud is my voice?)

(b)

Interest. (How do I change my voice to make my speech interesting?)

(c)

Pace. (How do I change the pace to make my speech interesting?)

7. When you and your partner are ready, find another pair and present your debate to them. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Christmas Mini Debate Learning Objectives

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• Presents and self-evaluates a formal speech in debate form. • Listens to and evaluates formal speeches of peers.

Materials

Copymaster Scissors Palm cards Additional Activities

1. Pupils could listen to other classmates’ debates on the same topic and discuss which points were similar and which were different. 2. Pupils could make up their own Christmas debate topics and present them. Encourage them to improve their presentations further. 32

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Christmas Mini Debate Beginning: Make your audience take notice! Start with a question, a quote or a strong statement. Beginning

Middle: Support your arguments! Explain why you believe what you are saying. Middle 1

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Ending

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Ending: Make your ending strong! End with a sentence that sums up what you have been saying.

8. Give yourself a rating out of ten. Who did the other pair pick as the winner of your debate? Why do you think this was?

9. Who do you think should be the winner of the other debate? Give your reasons. Consider presentation and arguments.

Rating:

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The Santa Trap Learning Objectives

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• Reads and understands a playscript.

Materials

Copymaster Additional Activities

1. Read a variety of other plays and poems about Christmas. 2. Pupils take on the roles of director and set designer. How would the stage be set for this play? Consider props, actors’ movements and how suspense might be created. 3. In small groups, pupils perform and record the play as a radio play. Sound effects, using ordinary household objects, will need to be considered. After listening to their finished plays, pupils rate how well they used voice and sound. 34

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The Santa Trap Characters: Sam and Jessica, brother and sist er Scene 1: Sam and Jessica are sitting on the floor by the Christmas tree, feeling the presents. Every few seconds, they nervously check over their shoulders.

Sam and Jessic a’s house on the day bef ore Christmas.

(holding up a present) I know what this one is! Jessica No, you don’t. Sam Yes, I do. It’s from Aunty Carol, so it has to be clothes. Boring. (He tosses it back in the pile and sits back.) Jessica You think everything’s boring, Sam. Sam throws Aunty Carol’s present at her. She catches it and puts it down. Sam Well, it is at the moment. This holiday has been the most boring ever! I wish we had something fun to do. Jessica looks at her watch. Jessica We’d better put everything back. Mum and Dad will be here soon. Sam You mean Mum and Santa! Jessica It’s pretty funny that Dad still pretends to be Santa, isn’t it? Like we’re six years old! Sam I have to admit, though, I’ve never caught him putting presents under the tree. Jessica No. I suppose he’s had a lot of experience. Sam sits up, looking excited. Sam I’ve got it! I’ve got it! Let’s make a Santa Trap! Jessica What’s that? Sam It’s going to catch us our Santa! Here’s something that’s going to be fun! Jessica (Thoughtfully) A Santa Trap! I like it. Let’s see, we’re going to need some rope and glue… Sam And elastic and sticky tape… I think we need to make a list. They run from the room, giggling. Scene 2: Sam’s bedroom. Night-time. We can only just see the shape of Sam in bed in the darkness. Suddenly, the door is flung open and the light switched on. Jessica is standing in the doorway, in her pyjamas. She looks astonished. Jessica Sam! Wake up! Sam sits up, rubbing his eyes. Sam What is it? Jessica The Santa Trap! It worked! Sam is now wide awake. He starts to get out of bed. We can hear a crashing sound downstairs. Sam Terrific! I can’t wait to see the look on his face! Jessica Sam, you don’t understand. It’s not what you think. Sam What are you talking about? Jessica I think you’d better come and see. She grabs Sam’s arm and drags him out of the room.

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Sam

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The Santa Trap Learning Objectives

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• Uses information from text to complete set activities. • Creates meaningful ending to text. • Performs playscript aloud with a partner.

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Copymaster Extra paper to write play ending Additional Activities

1. Pupils can perform the play in different styles to see how it affects its meaning; for example, as two very young children, as a soap opera, as two well-known movie stars in a major motion picture. 2. Pupils write their own Christmas plays, using two to five characters. Discuss possible themes and plots with the class first. Answers

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 36

In case their parents walked in unexpectedly. Because she told him that he thought everything was boring. Answers will vary, but might include: bored, nervous, excited. Answers will vary, but might include: nervous, astonished, puzzled. Answers will vary, but might include mysterious or scary. Teacher check Teacher check Teacher check Teacher check The Christmas Kit

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The Santa Trap Read the play and answer these questions. 1. Why were Sam and Jessica nervously checking over their shoulders?

2. Why did Sam throw the present at Jessica?

4. Write three words to describe Jessica’s feelings during the play.

3. Write three words to describe Sam’s feelings during the play.

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5. What mood did the writer create by opening Scene 2 in the dark?

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6. Now practise The Santa Trap aloud with a partner. (You can make up new names for the characters if there are two girls or two boys in your group.) Remember to read the directions which tell you how the characters are moving and speaking.

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7. Add an ending to the play with your partner. Answer these questions to help you get started.

What did the Santa Trap look like?

(b)

Why did Jessica looked astonished?

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What will Sam say when he sees what has happened?

(d)

If you are introducing any new characters in the play, describe them.

(e)

How will the play end? Will your ending be humorous, sad or serious?

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8. Write your ending on a separate piece of paper. Practise it with the rest of the play and perform it for the class. 9. Discuss everyone’s endings and how they were similar or different. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Origami Christmas Star Learning Objectives

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• Follows directions to make a Christmas decoration.

Copymaster Scissors Felt pens or coloured pencils Background Information

The Christmas Star is a popular Christmas symbol in many countries, usually found at the top of the Christmas tree. The Christmas star is symbolic of the star that led the three kings to Jesus. It is believed that a five-pointed star guided them. Debates continue as to what the Christmas star was – a planet, a comet or something more miraculous? Stars have also held importance in other religions. The Ancient Babylonians represented a god with three stars and Ancient Egyptians believed that gods ruled different stars. Jews have a six-pointed star of David as their symbol. Additional Activities

1. Use the Internet or other resources to find patterns for making other stars or different origami designs. 2. Pupils create a way for their star to stand on its own. 38

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Origami Christmas Star Make this star by following the directions carefully. 1. Fold the top corners to meet the point on the dotted line. 2. Fold the right side over again to overlap the left side. 3. Fold down a small part of the top. 4. Fold the left side over the right to form a triangle. 5. Fold each point of the triangle to its opposite edge. You will have made a smaller triangle. Unfold. The creases will have marked four triangles.

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8. Tuck in any loose parts. Turn the paper over to see the star.

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7. Fold down the top triangle and then fold it back at the centre point you found. Repeat for the other two triangles.

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6. Fold the points of the outside three triangles to find the centre of each. Mark it and then unfold.

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Christmas Cracker Learning Objectives

Materials Required

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• Follows instructions to make a Christmas cracker

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Copymaster Large cardboard tube Smaller cardboard tube Crepe paper or fabric String Decoration (holly) Sweets, jokes or little gifts for inside Background Information

Christmas crackers are a tradition for many families on Christmas Day. They usually consist of paper hats, jokes and little gifts such as mini watches, rings and magnifying glasses. Crackers are pulled at the dinner table during Christmas lunch. Christmas crackers were invented in the second half of the 19th century. An English baker, Tom Smith, had visited France and noticed how their sweets were wrapped in paper and tied at both ends. Tom began producing his own type of confectionery with similar packaging. He later decided to add a tiny explosive charge that went off when children played ‘tug-o-war’ with the crackers. The paper hat made of tissue paper was not added to the crackers until 1871. 40

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Christmas Cracker d: You will nee

tubes about • 2 cardboard 10 cm in length board tube • smaller card or fabric • crepe paper • holly • string • scissors • sticky tape

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What to do:

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Christmas Cards Learning Objectives

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• Measures accurately. • Creates a card with efficient moving parts. • Designs an attractive card.

Copymaster Examples of pop-up cards, books and Advent calendars to investigate construction and designs. Collect cards from several cultures. • sheet materials, card, paper, fabric, wrapping • threads, string, glitter, natural and collage materials • pencils, pens, paints • glue, glitter glue, sticky tape, double-sided tape Background Information

Sir Henry Cole created the first Christmas card in 1843. A British artist, J.C. Horsely, designed the picture on the cover that showed a family enjoying the festivities of a Christmas party. The message inside the card read ‘A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you’. Additional Activities

1. Design different ways that a Christmas card can have a moving part. 42

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Christmas Cards Follow the instructions to make a pop-up greeting card.

1. Fold two sheets of card in half. Put one aside for step 5.

2. Make four cuts as shown along the fold line. Fold to form two small flaps.

3. Open the card and push up the flaps so they stand up. These will be the supports for the pop-up shape. 4. Trace (or copy) then colour two of the Christmas characters below to be the centrepiece of your pop-up Christmas card, or create your own design.

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5. Decorate the spare card from step 1 and glue over the outside of the constructed card. (Take care not to glue over the flap area.)

Explore the mechanisms of different kinds of cards. Make sketches first to get the size right or use a template to make a card before you begin your designs. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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Christmas Cards and Calendars Learning Objectives

Materials Required

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• Measures accurately. • Creates a card with efficient moving parts. • Designs an attractive card.

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Copymaster Examples of pop-up cards, books and Advent calendars to investigate construction and designs. Collect cards from several cultures. • sheet materials, card, paper, fabric, wrapping • threads, string, glitter, natural and collage materials • pencils, pens, paints • glue, glitter glue, sticky tape, double-sided tape • Christmas pictures from old Christmas cards or gift tags (to be used instead of drawing pictures) Background Information

Advent calendars of today count down the days from December 1 to Christmas Day. This time is also the first season of the church calendar. The Christian penitential season lasts (in the west) from the Sunday nearest to November 30 to Christmas Day. Additional Activities

1. Design and create a class Advent calendar. It can be attached to a window or door. Make suggestions as to how pupils can be chosen to open a door and what is behind the doors. 44

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Christmas Cards and Calendars Christmas cards with moving parts and Advent calendars can be expensive to buy—but are fun to make. Read the instructions and suggestions below to design your own card or calendar. Cards with moving parts.

1. Choose a design for the front of your Christmas card that has a moving part; for example, Santa coming out of the chimney, a child jumping out of a Christmas present or a kitten peeping out from behind a Christmas tree. 2. Design the front of your card and measure how wide and long your character will be. You want all of the character to be hidden until it ‘pops’ out. Using a craft knife, carefully cut a slit across the front of your card. (Remember to unfold your card first.)

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3. Attach a strip of hard cardboard or a flat stick to your character and carefully slide it through the front of your card.

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1. Design a Christmas or holiday scene for the front of your calendar.

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Advent calendars

3. Draw or glue pictures onto the second card in the correct positions and then attach it behind the cover of your Advent calendar.

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2. Mark where the ‘doors’ will be. Using a craft knife, carefully cut the doors on three sides. Fit the scene over another piece of card and mark the position of the doors in pencil on the paper.

4. Write the dates leading up to Christmas on the doors.

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Stained Glass Window Learning Objectives

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• Follows instructions accurately to make a stained glass window.

Materials Required

Copymaster Black cardboard Craft knife Glue Coloured cellophane Background Information

Stained glass windows are used traditionally in churches and places of worship. Placed on a window, light can shine through them, creating a brilliant effect. This light image represents the ‘Light of the Lord’. 46

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Stained Glass Window 1. Trace design onto black cardboard. 2. Use scissors or a craft knife to cut out the inside of each shape. 3. Cut and glue coloured cellophane behind the cut-out areas.

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4. Display on a window.

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Christmas Sweets Holder Learning Objectives

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• Follows directions to make a Christmas decoration.

Materials

Scissors Glue 20-cm length of string per pupil sweets hole punch Additional Activities

Pupils attempt to make their own sweet holder based on the design of the original. What changes can be made to improve it? Which shapes work the best? What materials would make it stronger? 48

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Christmas Sweets Holder Make this decoration to hang from your Christmas tree.

You will need: Scissors 20-cm length of string/tinsel Hole punch

Glue Sweets

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Instructions: 1. Colour and cut out the sweet holder. 2. Fold along the dark solid lines. 3. Glue tab to Side A to make a pyramid shape. 4. Punch a hole where marked and thread through the string or tinsel. 5. Fill with sweets and enjoy your delicious decoration!

A Side

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Different Seasons Learning Objectives

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• Uses text to compare and contrast the way Christmas is celebrated in countries with hot and cold climates.

Materials Required

Copymaster Posters, pictures or photos of Christmas being celebrated in United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, U.S.A. etc. Additional Activities

1. Write the diary entries of a child celebrating Christmas when it is very hot or cold. 2. Create a play about a Christmas that is different from yours. Use three or four characters. Choose people in your class to be the characters in your play. Rehearse and perform the play. 50

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Different Seasons Christmas is celebrated in many countries all over the world. This religious festival takes place in December and celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ. At this time of the year, countries in the northern and southern hemispheres are experiencing different seasons. The reason we have different seasons is because of the Earth orbiting the sun on its tilted axis. When each hemisphere is tilted away from the sun it is winter, and when it is tilted towards the sun, each hemisphere will experience summer. It takes one year for the Earth to orbit the sun.

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Winter in England can be very cold and wet. Families will spend Christmas Day inside enjoying their warm fires and a hot lunch. The Christmas meal includes roast turkey, roast potatoes and vegetables. Desserts or ‘afters’ are hot also. Fruity Christmas puddings are covered in hot custard and brandy sauce. Many children in England will spend Christmas Day inside playing games. If the weather clears they are able to go outside and play with their toys. It doesn’t snow every Christmas in England. When it does, everything looks magical—white roofs, snowcovered trees and even the cars turn white! Children will play in big coats, gloves, scarves and woolly hats. Sometimes there is enough snow to build a snowman and have snowball fights. When it is time to come inside they hurry by the fire and have a warm drink.

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The warm weather means that many families won’t cook a traditional turkey for their Christmas lunch. Seafood, salad and barbecues are popular dishes in Australia for Christmas. These meals can be prepared, cooked and eaten outside. They are light and allow family members to participate in outdoor activities and swim in the afternoon. Deserts consists of pavlovas, ice-cream and cheesecakes.

When it is summer in the southern hemisphere, it is winter in the north. People in countries such as the United Kingdom celebrate Christmas when it is winter. The children are a third of the way through their school year and only have two weeks of holidays over Christmas and New Year.

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In countries such as Australia, Christmas occurs during the summer months. This means that families are able to plan outdoor activities for their special day. Many Australians will go to the beach or a park after they have eaten their Christmas lunch. They might also swim in the backyard pool. Some Australian families spend Christmas away by rivers or the beach and sleep in caravans and tents.

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Children in Australia may receive Christmas presents that can be used outside, such as cricket sets, balls, skates and bikes. They have their longest school holidays in the summer months and await the new school year at the end of January.

Although there are many differences between how people in the northern and southern hemispheres spend Christmas Day, the importance of family coming together is shared by all. 1. Divide your page into two columns. Write the titles ‘Australian Christmas’ and ‘English Christmas’ at the top. List facts about how Christmas Day is spent in each of these countries. Add your own experiences of Christmas in these countries also. 3. Do you prefer Christmas in summer or winter? Write a short paragraph stating your choice and explaining your answer. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

2. Is your Christmas in the summer or winter? Imagine having Christmas in the season opposite to that you are used to. Write a short story or poem about what you think Christmas would be like. Try to use as many facts from the text as possible. 4. What other countries have very hot or very cold Christmases? Use the library and the Internet to find out as many facts as you can about one other country’s Christmas.

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Did You Know? Learning Objectives

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• Reads and understands informational text on Christmas traditions from other countries.

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www.santas.net/aroundtheworld.htm http://www.santatelevision.com/world/ http://www.californiamall.com/holidaytraditions/

Additional Activities

1. Use the Internet, encyclopedias or other resources to research these traditions further. For example, find a recipe for hallacas, instructions on how to make a paper lantern or a picture of La Befana. 2. Which of these traditions or others are celebrated in the pupils’ community? Find out by talking to ethnic groups in the community or inviting guest speakers to talk to the class. 3. Research to find out the origin of gift-bringers at Christmas. Who is the most common? Answers

1. Answers will vary, but may include Santa Claus, Father Christmas, St Nicholas etc. 2. (a) French children leave out their shoes on Christmas Eve. (b) Romanian children recite poetry on Christmas night. (c) In Denmark, a person who finds an almond in his or her rice pudding will have good luck. (d) A cross is put on the door of each Christian home in Bethlehem. (e) La Befana gives coal to Italian children who have been naughty. 52

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Did You Know? Every country has its own favourite ways of celebrating Christmas. Read about how people in these countries celebrate Christmas. China

People who celebrate Christmas in China light their houses with paper lanterns and decorate their trees with paper chains, flowers and lanterns. Chinese children hang stockings for Dun Che Lao Ren to fill on Christmas Eve.

Denmark

Danish people often eat a feast at midnight on Christmas Eve, which ends with a special dessert of rice pudding. Hidden in the pudding is one almond. The person who finds the almond will have good luck for the year.

France

On Christmas Eve, French children often leave out their shoes for Père NoÍl to fill with presents.

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India

Christians in India decorate mango or banana trees.

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Israel

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Christian homes in Bethlehem are marked by a cross painted over the door and each home sets up a Nativity scene. A star is set up on a pole in the village square.

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ging se to house sin u o h m o fr el av as night. Children tr etry on Christm o p g n ti ci re d a carols an wooden star on e rg la a s ie rr d ribbon. The leader ca d with bells an te ra o ec d is h ic pole, wh y Jesus is Joseph and bab y, ar M f o re tu A pic . iddle of the star glued in the m

Italy

Children have to wait until Epiphany (6 January) for the good witch La Befana to put presents in their Christmas stockings. La Befana gives sweets to children who have been good and coal to those who have been naughty !

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Answer these questions.

1. There are lots of names for different gift-bringers at Christmas. Write the names of any you know which are not mentioned above.

2. These facts have been mixed up! Cross out and replace the incorrect words.

(a)

Italian children leave out their shoes on Christmas Eve.

(b)

Chinese children recite poetry on Epiphany.

(c)

In India, a person who finds an almond in his/her banana pudding will have good luck.

(d)

A picture of Mary, Joseph and baby Jesus is put on the door of each Christian home in Bethlehem.

(e)

Dun Che Lao Ren gives coal to Danish children who have been good.

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Did You Know? Learning Objectives

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• Compares Christmas traditions in other countries with those in the U.K. and Ireland. • Accurately identifies and marks a range of countries and capital cities on a map of the world.

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Did You Know?

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3. Use an atlas to help you answer the questions below.

Write the name of each country you have read about in its correct place on the map.

(b)

Mark the capital city of each country.

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4. Write three ‘Did You Know?’ facts about celebrating Christmas where you live for someone in another country to read.

(b)

(c)

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Christmas Poetry Learning Objectives

• Compares poetic styles and justifies personal taste. • Uses poems as models to write own poetry.

Materials Required

Examples of poetry written in the four different styles outlined below. Background Information Haiku Poems

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• three-line poem • line 1 – five syllables • line 2 – seven syllables • line 3 - five syllables

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• • • • • •

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Cinquain

• Poems written in shapes that enhance the meaning. Acrostic

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• Each line begins with or includes a letter from the title (letter does not have to be at the beginning of the line). Additional Activities

1. Children can keep to the Christmas theme and choose a different style of poem to model their poetry on. When they have written three or more different kinds of Christmas poems, they can create a poetry anthology. Annotated notes can be written about each poem describing the structure, style and how they like their poem. A poem can be chosen to be displayed or performed during assembly. When all poems have been written, checked and presented neatly, a whole-class ‘Big Book of Christmas Poetry’ can be created and placed in the reading corner. 2. Other styles of poetry include limericks, narrative poems, poems using metaphors and similes and humorous poems. Try writing a poem in one of these styles. Answers /Assessment

The children can present their poetry to the class. They need to be able to justify their choice of poem and explain the difficulties or ease they had when writing the poem. Would they choose to write this style of poetry again? 56

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Christmas Poetry Read the collections of poems. Look at the structure. Can you describe to a friend the rules of each poem? 1. You are going to write a Christmas poem. Choose from a haiku, cinquain, acrostic poem or concrete poem. Your teacher will explain the four different styles of poem to you. You decide if your poem is going to rhyme or not. ACROSTIC POEM HAIKU

P resent! Wrapped up and R eady to open E normous in size, I S hake it to see what is inside! E xcitement mounting N ervously I rip it open T hank you! It’s a S uper, new, shiny bike! CONCRETE POEM

ew

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Sa

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Kings, shepherds, bright star, Joseph, Mary and Jesus, Nativity scene.

Mince pie

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CINQUAIN

Thick pastry crust

Slowly melts in my mouth The fruity mix, so rich and sweet Yummy!

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The Christmas Kit

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Christmas Word Puzzles Learning Objectives

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Recognises familiar similes.

Materials Required

m

Copymaster

Sa

Additional Activities

1. Use the structure of the puzzles to create new ones to give to friends to complete. Remember to write the answers down on a separate piece of paper.

g

Answers

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1.

2. Teacher check 3. (a) As quick as a – fox. (d) Swims like a – fish. 4. (a) family (d) peace (g) sleigh 5. feast, celebration 58

(b) (e) (b) (e) (h)

gift wish pie list toys

merry bells star tree elf

As stubborn as a – mule. As thin as a – rake. reindeer stocking decorations

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joy Santa angel stocking ham

(c) (f) (c) (f)

As quiet as a – mouse. Feet like lumps of – lead. tinsel carols

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Christmas Word Puzzles 1. Find the words hidden in the word search.

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2. Make at least 10 words by rearranging the letters in the word ‘decoration’.

As quick as a

(b)

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As stubborn as a

(c)

fox.

As quiet as a

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rake.

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(d)

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Swims like a

(e)

As thin as a

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(f)

fish.

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(a)

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3. Connect the crackers to create these well-known similes.

Feet like lumps of

lead.

mouse. mule.

4. Unjumble the following list of Christmas words.

(a)

myfali

(b)

nerredie

(c)

slinet

(d)

ceepa

(e)

gicstokn

(f)

slaroc

(g)

hisgel

(h)

nearicstodo

5. Cross out every second letter in the Christmas word worm. Rearrange the remaining letters to make one five-letter word and one eleven-letter word.

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Christmas Maths Puzzles Learning Objectives

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• Uses the four operations (+, –, x, ÷ ), fractions and percentages complete puzzles. • Orders decimals from smallest to largest. • Recognises square numbers.

Materials Required

Copymaster Additional Activities

1. Use the structure of the puzzles to create new ones to give to friends to complete. Remember to write the answers down on a separate piece of paper. Answers

1. (a) 37 + 63 = 100 (b) 9 x 7 = 63 (c) 1/3 of 90 = 30 (e) 73 – 41 = 32 2. 0.09 0.2 0.7 1.3 1.8 2.0 3. Square numbers are 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, 100, 121 60

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(d) 50% of 12 = 6

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Christmas Maths Puzzles 1. Work out the answers to each calculation and draw a line to join the stars to the correct tree.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

0.7

0.2

2.0

1.8

0.09

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1.3

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2. Put these numbers on the stockings in order from smallest to largest.

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0.09

49

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3. Some of these Christmas puddings have square numbers written on them. Colour them.

12

104

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36

24

25

6

100

9

Remember – a square number is made when a number is multiplied by itself. For example, 2 x 2= 4 so 4 is a square number.

81 85

64

121

16

45

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