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BOOK D

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Teaching Values toolkit

A CONCEPT BY DAVID KOUTSOUKIS 2776IRE


TEACHING VALUES TOOLKIT (Book D)

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing, 2009 CopyrightŠ David Koutsoukis 2006 ISBN 978-1-84654-115-5 PR–2776

Copyright Notice

Additional titles available in this series:

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TEACHING VALUES TOOLKIT (Book A) TEACHING VALUES TOOLKIT (Book B) TEACHING VALUES TOOLKIT (Book C) TEACHING VALUES TOOLKIT (Book E)

Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs. For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase. Name of Purchaser:

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Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

View all pages online

Website: www.prim-ed.com


Foreword Values education in schools is crucial for developing future citizens of good character. The Teaching values toolkit, featuring the Six kinds of best concept, is a series of five books expressly designed to assist the teaching of values education in primary and lower secondary schools. The varied activities in this book extend across all major learning areas and will have relevance for a wide range of pupil learning styles and intelligences. Titles in this series are: • Teaching values toolkit — Book A • Teaching values toolkit — Book B • Teaching values toolkit — Book C • Teaching values toolkit — Book D • Teaching values toolkit — Book E

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Contents

Teachers notes......................................................iv – ix Curriculum links......................................................... x Certificates.........................................................xi – xvi Checklists....................................................... xvii – xix Be kind to yourself..................................... 1–24

Be kind to the environment..................45–59

Overview...............................................................46–47 Teacher information............................................48–49 Clean up after yourself.............................................. 50 Keep the land, water and waterways clean................ 51 Recycle and don’t waste............................................. 52 Save water.................................................................. 53 Conserve energy......................................................... 54 Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species................................................ 55 Use environmentally-friendly products..................... 56 Consider environmentally-friendly energy sources.. 57 Consider using resources that can be replaced......... 58 Value our cultural heritage....................................... 59 Chatterbox template.................................60

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Overview...................................................................2–3 Teacher information................................................4–5 Be proud of your uniqueness....................................... 6 Develop a sense of identity........................................... 7 Know your strengths and weaknesses......................... 8 Exercise regularly........................................................ 9 Eat well...................................................................... 10 Sleep well................................................................... 11 Take time to relax...................................................... 12 Minimise risks............................................................ 13 Keep learning and growing....................................... 14 Strive for success........................................................ 15 Love and value the love of others.............................. 16 Develop a circle of good friends................................ 17 Stand up for yourself................................................. 18 Make good choices..................................................... 19 Forgive yourself if you make mistakes...................... 20 Be positive.................................................................. 21 Be useful.................................................................... 22 Have some fun........................................................... 23 Be proud of the things you say and do...................... 24

Seek a fair go for all.................................................. 39 Manage and resolve conflict...................................... 40 Cooperate and be a team player................................ 41 Support and include others....................................... 42 Value family life......................................................... 43 Treat others the way they need to be treated............. 44

Be kind to others.......................................25–44

Overview...............................................................26–27 Teacher information............................................28–29 Value relationships.................................................... 30 Respect the rights of others....................................... 31 Be polite and use good manners............................... 32 Praise people who do things well.............................. 33 Develop good people skills......................................... 34 Work at building and maintaining relationships.... 35 Be tolerant and understanding of difference............ 36 Respect other points of view...................................... 37 Don’t bully or put others down................................. 38

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Be the achieving kind..............................77–95

Overview...............................................................78–79 Teacher information............................................80–81 Have a go!.................................................................. 82 Try lots of different things......................................... 83 Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing......... 84 Do things to the best of your ability.......................... 85 Pursue quality and personal excellence................... 86 Use your talents......................................................... 87 Develop a sense of purpose........................................ 88 Manage your time effectively.................................... 89 Manage your time wisely........................................... 90 Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them.......................................................... 91 Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals.............................................................. 92 Look at different ways of doing things—creativity and innovation...................................................... 93 Develop good communication skills......................... 94 Seek good role models............................................... 95 Chatterbox...............................................96 Be the community kind........................ 97–114

Be the learning kind................................61–76 Overview...............................................................62–63 Teacher information............................................64–65 Be positive about learning......................................... 66 Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you.................................................. 67 Recognise the value of knowledge............................ 68 Have an enquiring mind—be curious..................... 69 Determine how you learn best (learning styles)....... 70 Have an open mind................................................... 71 Be a critical thinker................................................... 72 Have a global perspective.......................................... 73 Seek learning opportunities everywhere................... 74 Learn from your mistakes......................................... 75 Keep learning............................................................. 76

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Overview...............................................................98–99 Teacher information........................................100–101 Behave responsibly.................................................. 102 Respect authority..................................................... 103 Follow rules.............................................................. 104 Be honest and seek truth......................................... 105 Show integrity.......................................................... 106 Be useful.................................................................. 107 Get involved in the community............................... 108 Strive for justice and a ‘fair go for all’.................... 109 Share and care for those in need............................. 110 Support reconciliation............................................. 111 Contribute to research............................................. 112 Support freedom...................................................... 113 Strive for peace......................................................... 114 ‘And I love life’...................................... 115 References.............................................116

Teaching values toolkit


Teachers notes What are values?

Values education encourages pupils to become ‘nice human beings’.

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Values are ideals that guide our behaviour and decisions, and help us distinguish between what is right or wrong. They outline Values within school curriculums what is important to us in terms of our conduct, our interaction with others and how we might live our lives in a meaningful way. Generally speaking, there are nine agreed values to be incorporated Values give us a guiding framework by which to lead our lives. into school curriculums. People who engage in antisocial behaviour often lack a values These are: framework. Care and compassion Doing your best Why teach values? ‘Fair go’ Freedom Developing good values gives us a structure to guide our conscience Honesty and trustworthiness and helps us make good choices. If we have strong values and are Integrity put in challenging situations, we are more likely to make good Respect decisions according to those values. Developing strong values Responsibility also helps address our spiritual needs and self-esteem by giving Understanding, tolerance and inclusion. us a personal sense of identity and direction. In addition, it helps develop a sense of responsibility for the consequences of our own The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept incorporates all these values. behaviour and how our actions might affect ourselves, others and the environment. The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept Teaching values in schools is a proactive approach towards The ‘Six kinds of best’ is a model that outlines six core values managing pupil behaviour. It gives pupils effective strategies to for becoming a person of good character and for leading a help them lead happy and successful lives. happy and successful life. It frames the core values in a way that Values can be incorporated into a whole-school approach and can pupils, teachers and parents can remember and apply in everyday situations. It provides ‘anchor points’ upon which we can reflect include: when faced with decision-making situations and helps us make • encouraging staff to model good values, good choices. It may be considered a ‘recipe for life’. • including values in the school vision and mission The ‘Six kinds of best’ are: statements, Be KIND to yourself.................................. (Respect yourself) • creating a school motto, slogan or ethos based on Be KIND to others....................................... (Respect others) specific values Be KIND to the environment............. (Value the environment) • displaying values posters, Be the learning KIND................................. (Seek knowledge) • including values in school rules and policies, Be the achieving KIND....................... (Achieve your potential) • including values in structured classroom guidelines Be the community KIND......... (Contribute positively to society) such as class rules, • introducing ongoing daily or weekly values programmes, • integrating the teaching of values into all curriculum learning areas, • collating and using resources for specific values education lessons, • inviting guest speakers to the school, • including values-based activities in pastoral care programmes and • teaching values incidentally during class or break and lunch times.

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Teachers notes The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept uses a play on the word ‘kind’ to make it memorable and repeatable. It also reinforces the word ‘kind’. It provides a mechanism to continually reinforce good values and teach them in context. This book is divided into six sections to indicate the six core values. Each section has a number of pointers which illustrate and support the six values.

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Teachers and parents are encouraged to highlight incorrect behaviours and reinforce correct behaviours by using the language of the ‘Six kinds of best’.

These six fingers represent the ‘Six kinds of best’. Get your pupils to make the sign. Tell them if they apply these principles throughout their life, they will be ‘A-OK’.

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The ‘Six kinds of best’ concept provides a framework and a language for teaching and reinforcing values at school and in the home. It aims to make pupils familiar with the six core values and internalise them by using the ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation. (Refer to page ix, the cover pages of each section and page 115.)

For example: • When a pupil makes a negative comment about himself/herself, the teacher may say, ‘Sasha! You’re not being kind to yourself! Are you?’, • When one pupil bullies another, the teacher may say, ‘John! You’re not being kind to others! Are you?’ • When a pupil drops some rubbish, the teacher may comment about the child not being ‘kind to the environment’. • When the class does well in a test, the teacher may comment that they are really ‘the learning kind’.

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• When a group of pupils help to clean up, the teacher may state that they are ‘the community kind’.

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Make the ‘Six kinds of best’ your personal quest

• When a pupil does an assignment well, the teacher may say that the pupil is ‘the achieving kind’.

Using the Values toolkit book

The activities in this book may be:

– incorporated into a continuing weekly programme – used incidentally as required in the classroom – incorporated into an existing personal development or values programme – used in conjunction with special values events such as a values ‘supercharger’ day or values ‘week’ where a guest speaker works with the pupils.

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Teachers notes The format of the book

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The book is divided into six sections. The six sections are: • Be kind to yourself • Be kind to others Title page • Be kind to the environment The first page of each section is a title page • Be the learning kind designed to introduce the section. • Be the achieving kind • Be the community kind • A pictorial representation of the affirmation(s) is/are also supplied.

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Overview A two-page overview of additional activities has been provided for each of the six sections. The activities cover a variety of learning areas and learning styles. Teachers may use the activities to further develop each section with the class or as extension work for more able pupils.

Teachers notes pages The pupil pages are supported by a two pages of teachers notes, which comprise: – an introduction to the section, – a compilation of discussion points for each pupil page, and – answers (where required). Each double teacher’s page also includes an example of a graphic organiser, which teachers may find beneficial for recording summaries of pupils’ discussion or for pupils to record their thoughts. Graphic organisers provide a visual representation of information. They employ four intelligences at the same time—verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical, visual/spatial and naturalist. (Different organisers use aspects of the naturalist intelligence, including categorising, classifying, identifying etc.)

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Teachers notes Pupil pages Each section is divided into a number of key pointers. The bullet points are utilised as individual pupil pages. The activities on the pupil pages are intended to be mostly open-ended, ‘fun’ tasks focusing on the eight multiple intelligences.

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Each pupil page includes: – the title of the relevant section, – title of the pupil page.

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The final two pages in the book include: a pictorial representation of the ‘I love life’ affirmation, a bibliography of references and suggested readings to further teacher knowledge, and appropriate websites.

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Additional information Discussion and pupil reflection about their own personal experiences form an important part of values education. For this reason, discussion points form a major portion of the teacher information section of teachers notes for each section.

‘By applying the ‘Six kinds of best’ principles, pupils and adults will lead a happy, successful and fulfilling life and make them feel like saying ‘I love life!’’

David Koutsoukis is the creator of the ‘Six kinds of best’ concept. He is an educator with over 20 years’ experience who has a passion for encouraging people to develop good values and become persons of good character. He is also the author of the Behaviour management toolkit and the Behaviour management and Values poster sets. David is now a full-time presenter and consultant who works with educators, helping them build positive school cultures. He conducts professional development programmes for teachers throughout Australia, New Zealand and South-East Asia on how to effectively deliver the Six kinds of best programme. David also does a motivational programme for pupils entitled Make the six kinds of best your personal quest.

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Be KIND to others

Respect others

1. Value relationships 2. Respect the rights of others 3. Be polite and use good manners 4. Praise people who do things well 5. Develop good people skills 6. Build and maintain relationships 7. Be tolerant and understanding of others 8. Respect other points of view 9. Don’t bully or put others down 10. Seek a ‘fair go’ for all 11. Manage and resolve conflict 12. Cooperate and be a team player 13. Support and include others 14. Value family life 15. Treat others the way they need to be treated

Respect yourself

1. Be proud of your uniqueness 2. Develop a sense of identity (know what is important to you) 3. Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses 4. Exercise 5. Eat well 6. Sleep well 7. Take time to relax 8. Minimise risk 9. Keep learning and growing 10. Strive for success (and get some ego food) 11. Love and value the love of others 12. Develop a circle of quality friends 13. Stand up for yourself (be confident but humble) 14. Make good choices 15. Forgive yourself if you make mistakes 16. Be positive 17. Be useful (and you will feel good about yourself) 18. Have some fun 19. Be proud of the things you say and do

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Seek knowledge

g 1. Be positive about learning 2. Seek knowledge about yourself 3. Recognise the values of others 4. Have an enquiring mind – be curious 5. Determine how you learn best (learning styles) 6. Have an open mind 7. Be a critical thinker 8. Have a global perspective 9. Seek learning opportunities 10. Learn from your mistakes 11. Keep learning

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1. Have a go! 2. Try lots of different things 3. Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing 4. Do things to the best of your ability 5. Pursue quality and personal excellence 6. Use your talents 7. Develop a sense of purpose 8. Manage your time 9. Manage your money wisely 10. Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them 11. Show persistence and selfdiscipline to achieve your goals 12. Look at different ways of doing things—creativity and innovation 13. Develop good communication skills 14. Seek good role models

Achieve your potential

Be the achieving KIND

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1. Clean up after yourself 2. Keep the land, air and waterways clean 3. Recycle and don’t waste 4. Save water 5. Conserve energy 6. Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species 7. Use environmentally friendly products 8. Consider environmentally friendly energy sources 9. Consider using resources that can be replaced (sustainable development) 10. Value our cultural heritage

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key Pointers

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Six core values

The Six Kinds of Best

1. Behave responsibly 2. Respect authority 3. Follow rules 4. Be honest and seek the truth 5. Show integrity – develop a sense of what’s morally right, and act that way 6. Be useful 7. Get involved in the community 8. Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all 9. Share and care 10. Support reconciliation 11. Contribute to research 12. Support freedom 13. Strive for peace

Contribute positively to society

Be the community KIND

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Teachers notes The ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation The ‘Six kinds of best’ affirmation is a series of actions which reinforces the six core values in a memorable and fun way. Reciting the affirmation engages visual, auditory and kinaesthetic learners.

I am kind to myself.

(Right index finger in the air in front of body.)

(Clenched fist over heart.)

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I am one of a kind.

And I am kind to the environment.

(From clenched fist over heart, swing right arm clockwise and point outwards.)

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I am kind to others.

(Touch left index finger with right index finger– Auslan sign language for ‘E’.)

I am the learning kind.

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(Have left hand flat, palm upwards, waist height–like a book. Take right hand and sweep the left hand with the back of your hand and swing your hand up to touch the top of your head—putting the information from the book into your head.)

And I am the community kind.

(Point upwards–aim for the stars.)

(Form an ‘A’ shape in front of your body with your fingers—like a house.)

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I am the achieving kind.

And I

Love

Life!

(Point to yourself and touch your chest.)

(Hug yourself.)

(Hands and arms outstretched above your head.)

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Curriculum links Objective • recognise that each person is a unique individual and that this individuality is expressed in many different ways • reflect on his/her experiences and the reasons for taking different courses of action • identify realistic personal goals and targets and the strategies required to reach these • develop further the ability to express personal opinions, thoughts and ideas and to listen to, respect, think about and comment critically and constructively on the views of others • enhance skills to improve learning • take increasing personal responsibility for himself/herself • become more independent and autonomous

Myself Taking care of my body

• recognise and examine behaviour that is conducive to health and that which is harmful to health • appreciate the importance of good nutrition • explore the factors that influence food choices

Myself Growing and changing

• identify and discuss the changes that are experienced in growing from child to adult • acquire the ability and confidence to identify, discuss and explore a range of feelings • identify and learn about healthy ways to help him/her feel positive about himself/herself

Myself Safety and protection

• explore rules and regulations and the importance of adhering to them • identify situations and places that may threaten personal safety • identify and explore some potential risks to health and safety in the environment

Myself Making decisions

• acquire a growing sense of the importance of making informed decisions and identify some of the decisions he/she has to make • recognise that decisions have consequences and that not all people will make the same decisions all of the time

Myself and others Myself and my family

• explore what belonging to a family means • discuss and identify behaviour that is important for harmony in family life • compare and contrast the lifestyles of families, in Ireland and abroad

Myself and others My friends and other people

• discuss and appreciate the different aspects of friendship and the difference between close friends and acquaintances • consider problems that can arise in friendships and other relationships and how these could be handled • explore how the opinions, views or expectations of others can influence how people relate to each other, either positively or negatively • practise and recognise the importance of care and consideration, courtesy and good manners with others • recognise, discuss and understand bullying and its effects • explore and discuss how individuals can deal with being bullied, knowing that others are being bullied and being a bully

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Myself Self-identity

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Myself and others Relating to others

• listen actively to others and respect what each person has to say • begin to appreciate the importance of maintaining a personal stance while also respecting the beliefs, values and opinions of others • discuss how conflict can arise with different people and in different situations • identify and discuss various responses to conflict situations • explore and practise how to handle conflict without being aggressive

Myself and the wider world Developing citizenship

• develop a sense of pride in his/her local community • recognise and explore the positive contributions made to the local community by various organizations, groups and individuals • recognise and acknowledge the various cultural, religious or ethnic groups that exist in a community and explore ways in which these differences can be respected • become aware of some of the cultures, lifestyles and languages of some countries in the EU and the wider world • explore how justice and peace can be promoted between people and groups • appreciate the environment and develop a sense of individual and community responsibility for caring for the environment

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Be the learning kind

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Be the learning kind

Make ‘the Six Kinds of Best’ your personal quest!

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Be the achieving kind

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Make ‘the Six Kinds of Best’ your personal quest!

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Teacher – pupil self-reflection checklist Name Go through the list, tick the appropriate boxes and see how you rate. You will notice a profile that will indicate which of your values are strongly developed, and which areas you need to improve. Strongly agree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

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1. I am proud of my uniqueness 2. I have a strong sense of identity 3. I know my strengths and work on my weaknesses 4. I exercise regularly 5. I eat well 6. I sleep well 7. I take time to relax 8. I minimise risks 9. I like learning 10. I strive for success 11. I love, and value the love of, others 12. I have a circle of quality friends 13. I stand up for myself 14. I make good choices 15. I forgive myself if I make mistakes 16. I am positive 17. I am useful 18. I have fun 19. I am proud of the things I say and do

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2 Be kind to others

Strongly agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

1. I value relationships 2. I respect the rights of others 3. I am polite and use good manners 4. I praise people who do things well 5. I work at building and maintaining relationships 6. I am tolerant and understanding of difference 7. I respect other points of view 8. I don’t bully or put others down 9. I seek a fair go for all 10. I try to manage and resolve conflict 11. I cooperate with others 12. I support and include others 13. I value family life 14. I treat others the way they need to be treated

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Name 1. I clean up after myself 2. I don’t pollute the land, air or waterways 3. I recycle and don’t waste 4. I don’t waste water 5. I conserve energy 6. I care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species 7. I use environmentally friendly products 8. I use environmentally friendly energy sources 9. I use resources that can be replaced 10. I value our cultural heritage

Disagree

Strongly disagree

Strongly agree

Agree

Disagree

Strongly disagree

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4 Be the learning kind 1. I am positive about learning 2. I seek knowledge about myself, others and the world around me 3. I recognise the value of knowledge 4. I have an enquiring mind—I am curious 5. I know how I learn best 6. I have an open mind 7. I am a critical thinker 8. I have a global perspective 9. I seek learning opportunities everywhere 10. I learn from my mistakes 11. I am a lifelong learner

Agree

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Strongly agree

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3 Be kind to the environment

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‘six kinds of best’ checklists Name 5 Be the achieving kind

Strongly agree

Agree

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Agree

Disagree

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6 Be the community kind 1. I behave responsibly 2. I respect authority 3. I follow rules 4. I am honest and seek the truth 5. I show integrity—I know what is morally and ethically right, and I act that way 6. I am useful 7. I get involved in the community 8. I strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all 9. I share with and care for those in need 10. I support reconciliation 11. I contribute to or support research 12. I support freedom 13. I strive for peace

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1. I have a go! 2. I try lots of different things 3. I know what I am good at and enjoy doing 4. I do things to the best of my ability 5. I pursue quality and personal excellence 6. I use my talents 7. I have a sense of purpose 8. I manage my time effectively 9. I manage my money wisely 10. I set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them 11. I am persistent and self-disciplined at achieving my goals 12. I look at different ways of doing things 13. I have good communication skills 14. I have good role models that I look up to

Disagree

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Right index finger in the air in front of body.

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I am a one of a kind

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1. Be kind to yourself

I am kind to myself

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Clenched right fist over heart.

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Be kind to yourself – overview BE PROUD OF YOUR UNIQUENESS

them sleep. What are their common features and why do you think they work? • Collect data from the pupils in your class to determine the number of hours each sleeps at night. Represent your information graphically. • Research to find out what happens when we sleep.

• Write a list of sentences or phrases to reinforce your uniqueness; e.g. I am special because I have sun kisses across my nose. • Create an All about me cube. Cut pictures from magazines that relate to things you like to do. Glue them on to the net of a cube made from coloured card. Make the cube and hang it from the ceiling. • Create a musical collage that represents your personality, by recording parts of your favourite songs to make one continuous piece of music. Explain why you chose each piece of music.

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• Build up a library of favourite books to read, music to listen to and quiet games to play. • Listen to some relaxation CD-ROMs for children that use visualisation. Afterwards, respond creatively to the experience; e.g. draw a picture, write a poem or story. • Write a poem with the title, ‘My peaceful place’. It should describe a place where you can relax; e.g. beach, park or garden. Publish and illustrate your poem.

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DEVELOP A SENSE OF IDENTITY

TAKE TIME TO RELAX

• Write a poem about yourself and complete a sketch or selfportrait to accompany it, called ‘Celebrating me’. • Create a family motto which includes important values.

MINIMISE RISKS

KNOW YOUR STRENGTHS AND WORK ON YOUR WEAKNESSES

• Consider relationships you have with different people. Think how your behaviour might put these relationships at risk. Design a poster of positive words and phrases to help minimise these risks. • Write a playscript in which the characters have to deal with a risky situation. • Create for younger pupils posters of ways in which they can stay safe in different environments.

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• Complete some two stars and a wish sheets in specific areas; e.g. I am good at … and … but I wish I was better at … . These can be used to assist in goal-setting. • In a group, create a rap that reminds children that it is okay to be good at some things and not so good at others. • Classify some of your strengths and weaknesses into categories such as talents and personal qualities. Suggest how you could develop each. EXERCISE REGULARLY

• Hold a class challenge in which one pupil each day presents an interesting fact for the class to learn. • Create a collage of photographs of yourself at different ages. Underneath each, write one important thing you learned at that age. • Write about an important event you have experienced. Explain what you have learned from it.

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• Create a list of fun physical activities to do outside. For example, plan a treasure hunt for selected natural objects. • Create health hustles to popular music, individually, in pairs or groups. • Design a fun circuit that will motivate pupils who dislike physical exercise to become more active. All types of equipment are available to you. Be creative!

STRIVE FOR SUCCESS

EAT WELL

• Design a chart of healthy foods from each food group, to incorporate into a weekly eating plan. • Plan a healthy menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner for a weekend. Choose one meal and describe it in detail, how it is prepared, cooked and served. With the help of an adult, prepare the meal for family or friends. • Using pictures from supermarket brochures, create two collages; one of healthy foods, one of junk foods. SLEEP WELL

• Compile a list of lullabies sung to young children to help

Teaching values toolkit

KEEP LEARNING AND GROWING

• Write a narrative with the title, The secret to my success. • Explain to the class how to be successful at a particular skill that you have mastered. • In a small group, discuss this quote by Thomas Edison: Many of life’s failures are people who did not realise how close they were to success when they gave up. LOVE AND VALUE THE LOVE OF OTHERS • Collect a range of inspirational quotes or poems about love to display in the classroom. • Select two people who love you. How do you know they love you? Make a list of the things each does or says to let you know you are loved.

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Be kind to yourself – overview sheets to create an attractive, motivating poster. • ‘Positive people see a glass as half full rather than half empty.’ With a partner, discuss the lifestyle implications of this statement. Do you consider yourself a positive person? Does your partner agree with you? Use specific examples to reinforce your opinions. • With a small group, act the role of a modelling agency instructor. Using good body language skills, transform your pupils from seeming awkward and shy to being confident and positive.

• Write poems, repeating the line, ‘Love is …’ . DEVELOP A CIRCLE OF GOOD FRIENDS

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• Create a list of ideas for how lonely people could make friends. • Write about a time when a good friend stood up for you. • Complete a mind map (graphic organiser) that lists words and phrases to describe the qualities and characteristics of a good friend. STAND UP FOR YOURSELF

BE USEFUL

MAKE GOOD CHOICES

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• In a small group, create a rap about standing up for yourself. • Write a short play based on someone having to stand up to their peers because they did not want to follow the crowd. Examples of disputed topics could be choice of clothes, behaviour, friends or music. • Complete personal action plans to deal with bullying situations.

• Find an environmental group in your area to become involved with. • Look around at home for things you could do to help your family without being asked; for example, collecting newspapers for recycling, emptying and cleaning lunch boxes after school, bringing toys in from the garden at the end of the day. • Collect information from all pupils in the class about jobs they do at home. Decide on the best way to graphically represent this information.

• Devise and play a hopscotch type game where each square has a good and a bad choice option. • In a group, devise a start-to-finish board game called ‘Choices’. In the squares, write a number of different choices. Colour the good choice squares green and the bad choice squares red. For landing on a good choice square, give a bonus; e.g. another turn, move forward on squares. Give a forfeit for landing on a bad choice square; e.g. miss a turn, back to the beginning. • With a partner, create a Choose your own destiny narrative, containing choices to be made at different points in the story.

HAVE SOME FUN

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• Think about a character in a book, television programme or film who has a fun life. List the fun things he/she does. Tick the things on the list you have done or would like to do. • Construct a chatterbox with a riddle and answer in each section. • In a group, construct an action plan for children who need more fun in their lives. Find out from local charitable organisations if there is some way in which you could implement your plan.

FORGIVE YOURSELF IF YOU MAKE MISTAKES

• Design merit certificates for forgiving yourself for making a mistake, for not being afraid to make a mistake and for learning by your mistakes. • As you make mistakes, write them on a sheet of paper. In a special little notebook, record the lessons you make from these mistakes. As soon as you have recorded the lesson learned, tear the paper with the mistake into small pieces. Throw the pieces in the bin and let that mistake go. Regularly read through your little notebook to remind yourself of your lessons learned. • Research to find how famous people have overcome their mistakes and carried on positively with their lives.

BE PROUD OF THE THINGS YOU SAY AND DO • Draw one smiling face and one happy face. During the day, tally the number of times you make someone happy or sad, by drawing a strand of hair on the appropriate face. At the end of the day, which face has more hair? Share your faces with the rest of the class. How will your results affect your future behaviour? • Paste a photograph of yourself on to an A3 piece of card. Using glitter pens, draw the outline of large balloons around the photograph. In each, write something positive about how you speak and act. Display the card in a prominent position. • Write a narrative or a recount of a situation in which you felt proud of how you behaved.

BE POSITIVE • Make a list of positive words or phrases such as, ‘State opinions clearly’ or ‘Use eye contact when speaking directly to someone’. Write these in decorative script on large coloured

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Be kind to yourself – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Often, pupils are told to be nice to other people, but how often are they told to be kind to themselves? All people, at times, feel bad about themselves or put themselves ‘down’. In fact, we are often harsher critics of ourselves than others are. It is really important to encourage pupils to think positively about themselves as much as possible to develop high self-esteem — to ‘be kind to yourself’. Discussion points

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Page 6 – Be proud of your uniqueness

Page 7 – Develop a sense of identity

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• What does it mean to be unique? • It is our differences that make us interesting. Discuss. • In what ways are you unique?

Page 12 – Take time to relax

• What does it mean to have an ‘identity’? • How can knowing what is important to you and what your values are help you to develop a better sense of your identity? • People who are unsure of their own identity are more likely to succumb to peer pressure. Discuss.

• Why is it important to find time to relax? • Why might different people find different activities relaxing? • What are your favourite ways to relax?

Page 13 – Minimise risks

• What are some physical or other risks you might encounter

Page 8 – Know your strengths and work on your every day? weaknesses • What sort of risks are worth taking? Which are not? • How do you feel when you are asked to do something you know you are good at (especially when it is in front of others)? • Why is it important to be aware of the things that you are not so good at? • Asking for help is the first step in changing a weakness into a strength. Discuss.

• How can you minimise risks when riding a bike?

Page 14 – Keep learning and growing

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• How could life experience help you to learn and grow? • What important things have you learnt about life so far? • Why could we learn about life from older people?

Page 15 – Strive for success

• What is your favourite type of exercise? Why is it your favourite? • Discuss the differences between people who are active and those who are inactive. • What are the benefits of being involved in a team sport?

• What does ‘perseverance’ mean? • What does it mean to be successful? • Why should we strive for success?

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Page 9 – Exercise regularly

Page 16 – Love, and value the love of, others • Love can exist in many different forms. Discuss some of these. • How can we show that we love someone? • How can we show that we appreciate the love we receive from others?

Page 10 – Eat well

• What does it mean to have a ‘balanced’ diet? • How can eating foods low in nutrition or not eating enough food affect you at school? • Why should some foods be eaten only occasionally or on special occasions?

Page 17 – Develop a circle of good friends • Why are good friends important? • What qualities do you admire most in your friends? • What are some of the benefits of having more than just one good friend?

Page 11 – Sleep well

• How do you know when you have not had enough sleep? What are the signs? • How can lack of sleep affect us physically, emotionally and socially? • What do you think is a reasonable bedtime for someone your age? Discuss.

Teaching values toolkit

Page 18 – Stand up for yourself • Why is it important to stand up for yourself? • Why can standing up for yourself be difficult sometimes? • How does it feel when you stand up for yourself?

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Be kind to yourself – Teachers notes Page 19 – Make good choices

Graphic organiser example

• Discuss different choices pupils face. Categorise severity. • Discuss how making the wrong choices can often have severe repercussions for themselves and for others. • What can pupils learn from the bad choices made by others?

Matrix To classify and categorise information

Page 20 – Forgive yourself if you make mistakes

Page 21 – Be positive

• Discuss the idea that being positive means always looking for a solution to a problem while being negative means accepting a bad situation. • How can a motivational poster help to make someone feel positive? • Discuss a strategy for trying to be more positive.

Page 22 – Be useful

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1B

2A

2B

2 x 2 Matrix

• When do you think you should start being useful at home? • Are there any reasons (not excuses) why you can’t do some chores? • How does being involved in the running of the home affect your respect for it?

Something to think about: A clever teacher sends this note to all parents on the first day of school: ‘If you promise not to believe everything your child says happens at school, I’ll promise not to believe everything they say happens at home’.

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Page 23 – Have some fun

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• Discuss the importance of not putting off until tomorrow what can be done today. • Discuss the value of making mistakes as a learning experience. • Discuss how many inventions were the results of mistakes.

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• How does having fun help our wellbeing? • Should learning be fun? Explain. • What are some of the essential requirements for having fun?

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Page 24 – Be proud of the things you say and do

• Discuss the different meanings of being proud. • Does being proud refer to the small, mundane things we do? Discuss. • How might having a personal motto motivate you?

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Be kind to yourself – Be proud of your uniqueness

My magazine! Imagine that there is a magazine for sale at the newsagents all about you! You are going to create the cover art for the magazine.

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1. Look at other magazine covers to see what they include. Make notes below.

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2. Complete the fact file to help you decide what to put on your magazine cover.

FACT FILE

Name:

Age:

• Date of birth:

Place of birth:

• Best physical feature: • Best academic strength: • Best sporting strength:

• Personal qualities: (You may like to ask your friends or your teacher for these!)

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• Earliest memory:

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• Greatest achievement:

• Something no-one at school knows about you:

• Ideal career:

Short-term goals

Long-term goals

3. On the back of this sheet, create a draft of your magazine cover. This will include artwork and captions about yourself. Remember, you must try to entice people to buy this magazine all about you! When completed, proofread and edit your work. Create your final copy on art paper or using a word processor. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Develop a sense of identity

Personal crest A crest (or coat of arms) is an official symbol that represents families or groups. Crests were used to identify armies, displayed on their flags and shields during battle. Royal families have their own crests. Crests are divided into four sections with artwork and phrases that symbolise what is important to that family. 1. Complete a personal crest. Read all four of the section notes before you begin. Draw symbols for each section. Write a word or words to describe your symbol somewhere in the section. Write in cursive writing.

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2. Cut out the crest and glue it onto coloured card. Cut around the card about two centimetres away from the paper crest. Display your crest.

Section 1

Section 2

Your family

Your interests at school

Draw a symbol to represent something that makes your family special. It may be where you come from, something you all enjoy doing, a sporting team you support or a physical characteristic you all share (such as red hair).

Draw a symbol that represents your favourite things to do at school. It may be reading, science, maths games, art and craft or playing sport.

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Include your last name in this section.

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Draw the equipment you use to do your favourite things.

Section 3

Section 4

Your outside interests

Your values

Choose something that you enjoy doing outside school. It may be cooking, playing a sport, spending time with friends or listening to music.

What do you value? It may be honesty, friendship, sportsmanship, courage etc. Represent what you value (what is important to you) as a symbol. Your could draw an animal (such as a lion for courage) to represent your values.

Draw the equipment you use or something that represents that interest.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Know your strengths and work on your weaknesses

Know yourself! The things we are good at are the things that we feel confident doing. Doing them makes us feel good about ourselves. We will volunteer to do them and even offer to help others who find these things challenging.

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1. What are your strengths? If you are not sure, ask your friends or your teacher. Write your strengths in the weights below.

The things that we have the least confidence in doing are our weaknesses. Often we will try to avoid doing these things or make negative remarks about ourselves, such as ‘I’m terrible at fractions’ or ‘I’ll make you lose the game if I play’.

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2. Write two of your weaknesses in the feathers below.

3. Think about what you can do to help yourself become better at these things (such as, ‘Practise my 9 times tables when I’m in the car with Mum’ or ‘Practise shooting hoops at the courts after school’.) Write your ideas of how to turn your weakness into strengths in the weights above. 4. Choose one of your weaknesses above and make some short-term and long-term goals to work towards.

• The weakness I am going to focus on is:

• By the end of this week I will

• By the end of this term I will

• By the end of this year I will

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Be kind to yourself – Exercise regularly

The perfect playground Your school has been granted €10 000 from the ‘Fit Kids Foundation’ to construct the perfect playground. The only condition is that the playground must promote physical activity to all pupils in the school. In your group, plan and design this playground. 1. Answer the questions about your school and its current facilities.

• Number of pupils:

• Age range: from

• Current equipment/facilities used for sport (physical education) and break times. Equipment

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Ages of kids used Mainly girls or boys?

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2. List the types of equipment and facilities you will purchase and/or construct in your perfect playground. Consider the size of your school (you can remove old equipment).

3. Choose two things from your list and explain how they will encourage pupils to become more active (especially the pupils who are normally inactive!).

4. Why do you think it is important for children to be physically active? Think of three reasons.

5. On A3 paper (or on the back of this sheet), design your perfect playground for your school. Add notes to each area, explaining what it is and who will use it. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Eat well

Healthy eating habits Eating a nutritious, balanced diet that only includes sweet and fatty foods occasionally, will help you to achieve a healthy body and give you the energy for an active lifestyle.

After school snack

Lunch

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Morning break snack

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1. Draw an alternative healthy meal or snack for each mealtime below. Label the foods.

Dinner

2. What might be some alternatives to eating foods high in sugar and fat for dessert?

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3. Explain how the following can influence what you eat. • friends

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• advertising

• money • special occasion

4. With a partner, role-play each of the scenarios below. Choose the best one and perform it for another group or the class. Scenario 1

Scenario 2

Scenario 3

Child pleading to a parent for a ‘burger meal’ after school so he/she can have a toy. Parent giving reasons why he/she can’t have it.

Parent discussing reasons why school canteen should sell only healthy foods with manager of canteen, who is not agreeing.

President of ‘Healthy Kids Foundation’ asking television company to play junk food advertisements only after 8.30 pm, when most children are asleep.

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Be kind to yourself – Sleep well

Who needs help? 1. Imagine a friend has just said the comment below to you. Write three responses you could say to your friend to convince him or her to get more sleep. You could include how your friend’s lack of sleep affects his or her personality, energy levels and school work. �

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On school nights, I go to bed at 8.30 pm. Mum and Dad think I’m sleeping but I play my Xbox™ or watch TV till midnight, sometimes later.

2. Conduct the survey with the people in your class. Use tally marks and remember to include yourself! Time you go to bed

7 pm

7.30 pm

Total

9 pm

Listen to music Watch TV

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Total

Read

8.30 pm

9.30 pm

Play computer games

10 pm

Chat with siblings

Later than 10 pm

Other

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When you go Go straight to to bed you … sleep

8 pm

Most mornings you … have to be woken by a parent or an alarm clock

Yes

No

would like to Yes sleep longer

No

go to school feeling tired

Yes

No

Total

3. Use the data above to help you write a paragraph that summarises the sleeping habits of the people in your class. Continue on the back of this sheet.

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Be kind to yourself – Time to relax

Relaxation retreat Imagine you own a small hotel in the country. You decide to offer a relaxation retreat, where guests can choose from different relaxing activities each day. You plan to hire experts to run the activities for you.

fishing

yoga classes

cycling

horse riding

walking

art classes

foot massages

writing classes

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playing board games

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1. You begin by surveying your guests to find out what relaxing activities they enjoy. Add to their suggestions below with your favourite relaxing activities.

2. Choose five of your favourite activities listed above to create a day’s programme for your guests. Think carefully about how long you think each activity should take and which time slot would be most suitable. Next to each, write some information on how it will be run, why it will be relaxing etc.

Relaxation retreat schedule – Day 1 Activity

Information

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We hope you enjoy your day!

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Lunch

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Be kind to yourself – Minimise risk

Risky business … Read each of these scenarios. Discuss and write the best way to deal with each situation. Report your ideas to the class. The rules Imagine you are a teacher in charge of some young children. You take them to a local pool on an excursion. But before they enter the water, you speak to them about the important safety rules they must follow.

What could you do?

What could you say?

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The thieves You are out shopping with a group of friends when you notice two of them stealing from a toyshop. They laugh when you tell them you saw them and dare you to do the same thing. Otherwise, they say they won’t be friends with you anymore and will spread nasty rumours about you. You know stealing is wrong.

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The new friends You have just started at a new school and are finding it difficult to make friends. You are relieved when two pupils from your class offer to sit with you at lunchtime. But after a short while, your two new friends talk to you in a way that makes you feel upset. They tease you about your clothes and your haircut and make faces at the things you say.

The stranger

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You are walking home after school when a car pulls up beside you. The driver asks you to come over to the car and show him the location of the nearest shops on a map he has of the local area. You are still 10 minutes’ walk from home and there is no-one around. What could you do?

What could you do?

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Keep learning and growing

Life lessons As we get older, we learn a lot about life and the important lessons it has to teach us. In this way, older people are a valuable resource. Interview a grandparent or other older person in the community. Ask him/her to describe three important lessons he/she has learned in life. Write the keywords from his/her descriptions in the space below. 1. Person interviewed: Lesson 2

Lesson 3

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Lesson 1

2. Find a partner. Use the words you have gathered to write three short, catchy sayings to be published in a class book. For example, ‘Life is not a dress rehearsal’. Design and sketch an appropriate illustration for each saying.

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Saying 1

Saying 3

3. On separate sheets of paper, write or type your sayings in an attractive font along with final copies of your illustrations. Staple your sheets together with the finished sheets from the rest of the class to create your book. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Strive for success

Successful people What does it take to be a successful person? One of the most important ingredients is perseverance—aiming for your dreams and never giving up! Some famous people have achieved success despite difficult odds. 1. With a partner, choose one of the successful people below to research, or choose one of your own. Stephen Hawking (scientist) J K Rowling (author) Martin Luther King Jr (human rights activist) Louise Sauvage (sportsperson)

Name of person: Date of birth: Date of death (if appropriate): Nationality:

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2. Research your person using the Internet and other resource materials. Write some notes below.

Write three things this person has achieved: •

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Describe some of the things he/she had to overcome to achieve success.

List words you think describe this person’s personality.

Glue or draw picture here

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Be kind to yourself – Love, and value the love of others

Love is … A shape poem is written in the shape of the subject it is about. For example, a poem about sadness might be written in the shape of a teardrop.

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1. Try writing a shape poem about love. Brainstorm and write a list of words that describe what love means to you. Think about the love you might give to and receive from your family, friends or pets.

2. Highlight your favourite words in the list.

3. Choose a suitable shape for your poem from the list below or write your own. • a love heart

• a kiss

• other

• a smile

• a gift box

4. Use the highlighted words to write your poem on a piece of scrap paper. Your poem should be between 8 and 12 lines long. You could begin each line with the words ‘Love is …’ 6. Share your poem with a partner. List the words your poems had in common in the box below.

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5. Use a pencil to lightly sketch the shape of your poem in the box below. Write your poem to fit the shape.

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Be kind to yourself – Develop a circle of good friends

Robo friend What type of person do you think makes a good friend? What sorts of qualities should he/ she have?

ROBO FRIEND IS HERE! Ever wanted to own your own robot? Well now you can!

1. Imagine that one day you are reading a magazine. This advertisement catches your eye.

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Introducing ‘robo friend’ – a robot that will be your ideal friend. You decide which qualities your new friend should have and our scientists will design it specially for you. Don’t delay – order your best friend

today!

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GRC

GENESIS Robotic and Cyborg Systems (Australia) 111 Silicon Road • Bayswater 6053 • New South Wales

Phone: 02 272 123 456 • Email: genesisrcs@circuitmail.com.au • Website: www.genesisrcs.com.au

2. You decide to order one of these robots. You ring the company and soon receive an order form in the mail, which asks you to complete the following information. To be a good friend:

• my robo friend must be able to express these feelings or qualities:

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3. Draw a picture of what you would like your robo friend to look like, based on features of your current friends. Label the features you think are the most important; e.g. ‘a friendly smile’.

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• my robo friend must be able to share these hobbies or activities with me:

• my robo friend must also:

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Be kind to yourself – Stand up for yourself

Problem page 1. Read these letters from the problem page of a magazine for children. Sh e w h k no w o s all k no w s be s t !

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Dear Helping Hero Dear Helping Hero I have just started at a new school and I am Our drama teacher is holding auditions for very unhappy. Because of my religion, I wear a musical at the end of the year. I really want a turban and there is a group of kids who to be a singer when I grow up so I wrote are teasing me about it. They point at me my name on the list to audition for the main and laugh out loud and sometimes try to role. But the most popular girl in my class grab at my turban. I’ve tried yelling at them saw my name and has tried to talk me out and ignoring them but neither of these things of auditioning. She says I am a hopeless is working. I would like to try solving this singer and will just embarrass myself. I think the real reason is that she wants the main problem myself before telling the teacher. role and is worried I might get it instead. I What should I do? have been taking singing lessons for three Satish years so I know I can sing. But now the girl’s friends have started spreading nasty rumours about me and I am starting to feel terrified Dear Helping Hero about auditioning. My birthday is coming up soon and my mum has said I can invite 10 school friends to my What should I do? party. I wrote a list and showed it to my two Kelly best friends. But they thought some of the people on my list aren’t ‘cool’. They crossed out their names and wrote the names of some Dear Helping Hero other more popular people in our class. But My older brother is driving me crazy! At home, I don’t really want to invite these people. in front of our parents, he acts nicely towards Please help me. I don’t want to be pushed me. But at school, it is a different story. He around but I don’t want to lose my friends. teases me in front of his friends and tells them things about me that are embarrassing. He What should I do? says if I tell Mum and Dad, he will just say that Jamie I am lying. I don’t know whether to speak to him at home or at school—and I don’t even know what to say to him. Dr Marie Magnifique is available for one on one counselling and advice

What should I do? Andrew

phone: 08 123 456 789 email: mmhelp@whispernet.com

2. Discuss each problem with a partner. 3. Write a reply to each letter on a separate sheet of paper. Suggest to the writer of each letter how he/she could stand up for himself/herself by acting in an assertive way. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to yourself – Make good choices

Make good choices While the consequences of some bad choices are minor—e.g. wearing the wrong clothes for the conditions—the effects of other bad choices may be far more serious—e.g. choosing to steal or vandalise property. When making a choice about a situation, it should be based on what you believe is right, without pressure from others; e.g. refusing to be part of a bullying gang. If you make what you believe is the right choice, even though your life may seem difficult at first—e.g. you may lose some friends—you will feel happy about your decision.

Title:

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1. With a partner, write an outline for a short story about a group of friends who fall out because not everyone wants to go along with the strongest character.

One of the group suggests it would be a good idea to take money from younger Orientation: pupils during break. Introduce members of the group, the pupils they intend to target and where.

Complication and events: Describe how each group member reacts to the suggestion and how the leader responds.

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Resolution:

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Conclusion: Explain the relationships within the group as the pupils return to class.

2. What choices were made and by whom? List them in the table. name

good choices

bad choices

3. (a) On a separate sheet, write your story in full as a narrative or a play. (b) Read your narrative or perform your play for the rest of the class. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Be kind to yourself – Forgive yourself if you make mistakes

Robert’s dilemma There’s one thing you must remember about making mistakes—everybody does it! Sometimes, we worry about the mistakes we have made instead of learning from them and letting them go. Remember, the past is gone. We can’t change what has happened but we can learn from it. Robert was a bright, happy pupil who loved sport and enjoyed school but wasn’t fond of homework. He would much prefer going to the park after school, playing footy, cricket or anything to keep him away from the dreaded ‘h’ word.

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His class had been given two weeks to complete a history project at home. Robert would have enjoyed this task if he could have done it at school but at home, no way! He kept putting it off. The weekend before the project was due, Robert’s parents announced they were taking him to a sporting carnival at a nearby town. They would be leaving early on Saturday and returning late on Sunday. Robert hadn’t told his parents about the project. What should he do? He would be in serious trouble on Monday if he had no project to hand in, but miss a weekend of sport, that was unimaginable! 1. (a) What was Robert’s mistake?

(c) How do you think Robert could resolve his dilemma?

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(b) What lesson do you think he could learn from this mistake?

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2. (a) Write a recent mistake you have made and the lesson you could learn from it. mistake

lesson

(b) Write this mistake in large bold letters on another sheet of paper. (c) Sitting in a circle with a waste bin in the centre, take turns to read your mistakes out loud, rip the paper into small pieces and throw them in the bin. Congratulation! You have just let go of a mistake! Now, try to remember the lesson you have learned!

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Be kind to yourself – Be positive

Always look on the bright side! There is always more than one way of looking at any given situation. An optimistic person will find something positive but a pessimist will believe the worst. Even though it may seem hard, try to have a positive outlook. You will feel so much better for it! 1. Your task is to design some positive motivational posters for your school. (a) For each category, write suggestions for words or phrases to write on your posters.

being helpful learning from your mistakes

(b) For each category, draw an eye-catching design.

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showing persistence

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sporting behaviour

sporting behaviour

showing persistence

being helpful

learning from your mistakes

2. Enlarge your designs to A4 size. Decorate, laminate if possible and display around the school. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Be useful

Every home should have one! Every home should have a magical fairy or goblin who races from room to room doing those jobs that are only small but need to be done. How about becoming the fairy or goblin in your home!

(b) For each job, tick if it is an hourly, daily or weekly chore. chores

hourly

(b) Explain your answer.

in

(c) Does your answer involve any excuses? yes

(b) How much difference do you think your contribution would make to the smooth running of your home?

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not much

weekly

no

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2. (a) Do you think it will be difficult to carry out all of these tasks? yes

daily

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1. (a) Make a list of jobs you could do that would really help the smooth running of your home; e.g. keep your room tidy, take all your clothes that need washing to the laundry, collect rubbish from each room’s waste bin on bin days. If you can’t think of enough home chores, write some that you could do in school.

a little

no

a lot

3. Why do you think it is important to be helpful around the home?

4. (a) Try doing your chores for one week.

(b) How do you feel about being useful?

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Be kind to yourself – Have some fun

A fun weekend We all need to spend time doing the things we enjoy. It makes us feel better and ready to tackle the more serious things in our lives. At weekends, we have more time to spare, so why not fill it up with lots of fun activities?

Friday evening

Saturday morning

Saturday afternoon

in

Sunday morning

g

Saturday evening

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2. Complete the diary for a fun-filled weekend you would love to have with family and friends. Make it realistic and achievable.

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1. On a separate sheet, write a list of all the things that you enjoy doing with family and friends.

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Sunday afternoon

Sunday evening

3. Write words or phrases to describe how you would feel after this weekend. physically

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mentally

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emotionally

Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to yourself – Be proud of the things you say and do

Your life’s motto When we say or do something which makes us feel proud, we get a little buzz which makes us smile and adds a spring to our step. Sometimes, these things are for our personal gain—e.g. doing well in an activity—but often other people are involved—e.g. standing up for someone against a bully. 1. Make a list of the things you say and do that make you feel proud of yourself, for personal gain and involving others. 2. What character trait does each one display?

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involves others

character trait

animal

in

g

personal gain

e

3. Choose an animal to represent each of these traits; e.g. the lion for strength, the spider for persistence.

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4. (a) Using the animals and your name, design a personal coat of arms.

(b) Write a brief motto describing yourself, to include on the coat of arms.

5. Enlarge your coat of arms and motto, decorate and display. Teaching values toolkit

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2. Be kind to others

I am kind to others

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From clenched fist over heart, swing right arm clockwise and point outwards.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – overview VALUE RELATIONSHIPS • Draw a family tree with a positive comment next to the name of each person. Display in a prominent position at home. • Try to imagine your life without family or friends. Write a poem to express your thoughts and feelings about the things you would miss and how lonely you would feel. • Get in touch with someone you had a good relationship with but with whom you have not been in contact for a while.

• In a group, discuss what you think good people skills are. Write two lists, the skills you believe you have and those you believe you do not have. Which list is longer? Take turns to read your lists to the group. Do they agree with you? What can you do to improve? • Discuss the use of language for different situations. Role-play humorous situations where inappropriate language is used. WORK AT BUILDING AND MAINTAINING RELATIONSHIPS

BE POLITE AND USE GOOD MANNERS

• Survey family members to determine the responsibilities each has. Swap home jobs for a week to appreciate the differences in responsibilities. • Tally the number of times you make positive connections— e.g. by talking, hugging—with family and close friends, in one day. Tabulate your results. Who receives the most contact from you? • Design and place around the circumference of a circle an icon to represent each type of relationship in your life. Taking each in turn, suggest something positive to build, maintain or repair a relationship. Refer to your circle regularly to remind yourself of the important people in your life.

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• Make a list of ten basic rights you believe everyone should have. • Read a scenario of a situation where someone’s rights have not been respected. Discuss how the situation could be altered so that the rights are respected. Role-play both scenarios and discuss why the second version is preferable to the first. • Collect local, national and international news headlines which tell of the loss of rights for some people. Choose one headline to follow up and research the full story. Present your information to the rest of the class.

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RESPECT THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS

BE TOLERANT AND UNDERSTANDING OF DIFFERENCE

• Paint a mental picture of everyone being the same, with the same hairstyle, clothes, hobby, house, car etc. How would you describe this same world? Why is it good to have differences? Identify the differences within your group. Use the information collected as a springboard for research and display. • In a group, discuss experiences of being victims of intolerance to difference and experiences of being accepted regardless of differences. • Make a list of stories and children’s television programmes which emphasise that it is okay to be different; e.g. Todd Parr’s Todd’s World.

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in

g

• Role-play situations where good manners are not displayed. Discuss the situation then role-play the good manners displayed version. • Discuss good telephone skills and write a list of acceptable and unacceptable manners. Practise a number of telephone conversations with a partner, varying the ages of and relationships between the two speakers. • Make a number of good manners posters to be placed around your school; for example, hold the door open for people, offer to help. PRAISE PEOPLE WHO DO THINGS WELL

• During the term, keep a record of the positive contributions to school life made by your peers. Collate all these comments and, at the end of term, include them in a small booklet for each pupil titled, ‘What my friends say about me’. • Make a fortune cookie with a personal praise message for each pupil. • At the end of each week, have a simple class ceremony where all deserving pupils are praised for their efforts. DEVELOP GOOD PEOPLE SKILLS • Think of three awkward situations you might find yourself in. In a group, discuss how you might deal with each so that all parties involved are happy with the outcome.

Teaching values toolkit

RESPECT OTHER POINTS OF VIEW • Choose a current topic for debate. Work through the debating process, remembering that everyone has the right to an opinion. • From current local, national and international news, research the headlines of events which have occurred because of a lack of respect for the opinions of others. Report back to the class.

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Be kind to others – overview DON’T BULLY OR PUT OTHERS DOWN

SEEK A FAIR GO FOR ALL

• Write a short playscript where a person is not being given a fair go. Add a concluding scene where the situation is resolved fairly. • In small groups, discuss behaviour problems that might occur throughout the school day. List the problems in order of gravity and suggest appropriate discipline for each one. As a class, agree on the best disciplinary action for each problem. Ensure that each measure is followed through whenever an infringement occurs. • Compile a class jobs list and devise a roster system that ensures all pupils have a turn.

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MANAGE AND RESOLVE CONFLICT

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• Role-play conflict situations and discuss the resolution steps needed for peaceful, positive outcomes. • Write a short play about a conflict. Give it two endings; one positive, the other negative. Present the first part of the play and discuss how the problem might escalate before showing the negative conclusion. Discuss how the play might have ended more peaceably before showing the positive conclusion. Conclude that all problems can be resolved amicably if all sides show respect and are prepared to compromise. • All pupils read the same conflict story and, in groups, record ideas for resolving the conflict amicably. Groups share ideas with the class and vote for the best idea. COOPERATE AND BE A TEAM PLAYER

• Play games outside which require all team members to pull together for the success of the team. Discuss how the team is affected if an individual does not play his/her part. • After working in a group on a class project, evaluate how well you all worked as a team. Discuss the positive and negative aspects and devise a plan for improving your performance next time you work together. • In a group, design and construct a model from boxes. Each model will be judged and awards given for the best design and construction.

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• Form a musical group and compose a short piece including solos from each person. • Write a ‘When I need support’ list. Include things such as problems with relationships, school work, illness or death of a loved one. Describe how your behaviour changes at such times and in what ways you would like support. In a group, share your list so that others will know how to support you. • Think of times when people could be excluded; e.g. at break, invitations to parties, joining clubs. Make a ‘Watch out for others’ display. Sketch pictures of scenes where someone is being left out. Underneath each, write how you could include the person.

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• Discuss reasons why people might bully and how they could be helped to change their behaviour. • List three bullying scenarios. Counter each with a positive alternative. • Brainstorm to list examples of bullying under the headings ‘physical’, ‘verbal’ and ‘emotional’.

SUPPORT AND INCLUDE OTHERS

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• Each class member is given one of six topics on which to write an exposition. Display the expositions for each topic together so that different points of view may be compared.

VALUE FAMILY LIFE

• Present your family with a framed poster, highlighting the things you appreciate about them. • Write a poem about what your family means to you. Publish, illustrate and present to your family. • Using photographs from magazines, make a collage of family pictures. All pupils write a sentence describing why their families are important to them. The sentences can be attached to the collage, which is displayed. TREAT OTHERS THE WAY THEY NEED TO BE TREATED • Make small appropriate gifts for elderly people in nursing homes or children in hospital who need to know that others are thinking about them. • Spend time with an elderly relative. Ask him/her to teach you something; for example, an old song, calligraphy, how to crotchet. • Find out the meaning of the word ‘empathy’. Discuss the importance of putting yourself in the position of someone in need. By imagining how that person might be feeling, you are better equipped to think of the best way to treat them.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Being kind to others is an essential element in the development of good people skills. These skills are important in forming and maintaining the many different relationships which are an integral part of living in society. Pupils need to understand the nature and importance of relationships and how to form and support them. Comprehending and considering the needs of others and knowing how to interact with them in a positive way are the keys to good relationships.

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Discussion points

Page 30 – Value relationships

Page 31 – Respect the rights of others

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• Why are relationships important? • How can you improve the relationships you have with people? • Why should we value the relationships we have?

• How can you show your respect for other people? • Do all people have the same rights? • How do you feel when your rights have not been respected by others?

Page 32 – Be polite and use good manners

• How can we show respect for other people’s opinions? • How do you feel when other people don’t respect your opinions?

Page 38 – Don’t bully or put others down

• How does it feel to be bullied or ‘put down’? • What is bullying? • What might be some reasons people bully or put other people down?

Page 39 – Seek a fair go for all

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• Why is it important to use your manners? • People who are polite and use good manners are more successful. Do you agree? Discuss. • Do you use people’s names when speaking to them?

Page 37 – Respect other points of view

Page 33 – Praise people who do things well

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• How many different ways can you say ‘Well done!’? • Why is it important to recognise the achievements of others? • How do you feel when you receive praise (especially for something you have worked hard to accomplish)?

Page 34 – Develop good people skills • Are you a good listener? How do you know? • How do you feel when you are given a compliment? Do you give compliments to others? • How can you work to ‘develop’ better people skills?

Page 35 – Work at building and maintaining relationships • Why do we need to work on relationships? • How can we make important people in our lives feel special? • How can important people in our lives make us feel special?

Page 36 – Be tolerant and understanding of difference • What does the word ‘tolerant’ mean? • How can we become more accepting of difference? • How could a lack of tolerance lead to hate?

Teaching values toolkit

• What does a ‘fair go’ mean to you? • Why should we be fair to others? • How could you seek a fair go for others?

Page 40 – Manage and resolve conflict • Discuss a range of conflict situations in which the pupils might find themselves. • Discuss the range of gravity of conflict situations, from trivial, through to important but not serious, to important and serious. • What qualities does a person need to have to be able to resolve conflicts effectively? Discuss.

Page 41 – Cooperate and be a team player • Discuss how team activities may fail even though all participants are very good at their assigned roles. • What qualities are required for a good team player? • Is skill more important than cooperation?

Page 42 – Support and include others • Is it only people in trouble who need support? Discuss. • Discuss the idea that needing the company of friends to help us enjoy our lives better, is also a need for support. • Discuss the saying, ‘Walk a mile in my shoes’. What does it mean? How does it help us to support each other? Discuss.

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Be kind to others – Teachers notes Page 43 – Value family life

Graphic organiser example

Tree To classify and categorise information

Page 44 – Treat others the way they need to be treated

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• Choose any group with particular needs. Discuss how these needs might be met. • Discuss how treating people empathetically helps us grow as individuals. • Consider the consequences of ignoring people who need a little tender loving care.

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• Discuss the many ways in which family members support each other. • Sometimes we take our families for granted. Discuss ways in which we do this. • Discuss the ways in which dependence on our parents alters as we grow.

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Something to think about: One evening, t wo friends and I went to a nightclub, only to find the place packed with young people. At 40, we felt old, but before we could make a dignified exit, a tall, handsome man approached us. Perhaps we were being hasty leaving, I thought. Then with a big smile, the young man extended his hand and said, ‘Hello. Remember me? You taught me when I was eight years old’.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Value relationships

RELATIONSHIPS 1. Complete the chart by choosing three people you have a relationship with that you value. Think about why you value each relationship and different ways you can show each person how important he/she is to you. Relationships can include: parents, step-parents, carers, sisters, brothers, grandparents, aunties, uncles, cousins, friends, family friends, coaches, teachers, penfriends etc. Relationship 1

Relationship 2

Relationship 3

Name and relationship of person (e.g. mother, friend, teacher)

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Things you can say and do to show the person that you value your relationship with him/her (make a thankyou card, help with chores, create a certificate, give a hug etc.)

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Reasons why you value the relationship (e.g. listens to you, gives up weekends to coach you, helps with homework, always there for you)

Set yourself a short-term goal of when you will show or tell this person you value this relationship.

Goal achieved on: Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to others – Respect the rights of others

RESPECT THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS It is our responsibility to respect the rights of other people. We can do this by: • treating people with courtesy and respect (be sensitive to the feelings of others and never judging someone before getting to know them), • allowing them to do their work in a safe environment (no name calling or physical bullying), • letting them teach and learn without disruption (be considerate of others trying to learn), • not interfering with their property (respect school, staff and pupil property).

Title: Characters: Main idea(s):

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Plan your cartoon strip below:

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1. Choose one or more of the statements above and create a cartoon strip that will teach younger pupils how to respect the rights of others. Tick the statement(s) you have chosen.

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2. Create the first draft of your cartoon strip below. Use speech and thought bubbles to let the reader know what the characters are saying, thinking and feeling.

3. The message of my cartoon strip is to respect the rights of others by … 4. Present your polished cartoon strip on art paper and in colour. Write the title in big, bold letters. Display your cartoon strip somewhere in the school where younger pupils can read it. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Be polite and use good manners

SPEAKING POLITELY People (especially children) who are polite and use good manners shine above those who do not. 1. Write in the empty speech bubbles how each person might reply politely, using good manners. (a)

Now, Nanthini, have I told you the story about when I was a little boy in Burma and I saw an elephant parade?

(c)

I’ve heard this story lots of times.

(d)

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You have worked very hard this term, Jerome, and it shows in your test results. Well done! I hope you keep it up for the rest of the year.

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(b)

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You played well today, Braden, but as Paul is back on the team this week you will be a reserve for Saturday’s game.

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I had such a bad weekend! I went to Dad’s and my stepbrother broke my mp3 player, then I got the flu and missed Sam’s birthday party!

2. It is very important to be polite and use your manners with the people closest to you too. Draw and write a conversation between yourself and someone in your family. Show how well you can use your manners.

3. With a partner, role-play a conversation between you and someone in your class who thinks you have taken his or her calculator (but you have not). Be polite! Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to others – Praise people who do things well

ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS SHOW In groups of four, you will plan, rehearse and present a short television awards programme recognising the achievements of three people in your class. 1. Roles of group members: Awards show host:

Presenter 1:

Presenter 2:

Presenter 3:

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2. Choose three people in your class who do something particularly well. They may excel academically, in sport, be the most creative artist or perhaps they always offer to help or listen. Name:

Name:

Achievement:

Achievement:

Achievement:

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Name:

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3. Your show will be called:

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4. How will you make the show entertaining to the audience? Make notes below.

5. Time allocated to each award winner for a thankyou speech.

minutes

6. Rehearse and present your awards ceremony. How did the audience react to your presentation? freezing

chilly

warm

hot

sizzling

7. Why do you think it is important to recognise the achievements of others? Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Develop good people skills

GOOD People SKILLS 1. Place a cross on the part of the scale that best describes you.

Always

Mostly

Sometimes

Never

(a) I like to smile at people. (b) I use good manners.

(d) I use people’s names when speaking to them.

(f) I am a good listener. (g) I accept people for who they are. (h) I respect the opinions of others. (i) I give compliments to others.

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(e) I look at people when talking.

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(c) I say ‘hello’ and ‘goodbye’.

2. Read the conversation between Kiara and Darcy. Use a highlighter to mark the words or phrases in the conversation which show good people skills being used. Kiara: (smiling) Hi Darcy! Great to see you! How were your holidays?

Darcy: Excellent, Kiara. Thanks for asking. (smiling) How were yours?

Kiara: They were OK. I read lots of great books and listened to my mp3 player. I didn’t meet many other kids in the caravan park though.

Darcy: (leaning closer with a thoughtful expression) That’s a shame. Was there a games room you could play in to meet other kids?

Kiara: Yes, but I preferred to stay in our caravan. Plus the games room smelled a bit and it had cobwebs everywhere.

Darcy: Oh … OK. Well, I guess you do love reading! I think I would have gone into the games room to meet the other kids though.

Kiara: (Nodding) Heh! (pointing) Is that your new bike? It’s fantastic!

Darcy: Yes! Would you like to go for a ride? You can wear my helmet.

Kiara: Thanks, Darcy. Perhaps after school tomorrow. See you later. (walking away)

Darcy: OK. See you tomorrow, Kiara. (waving and smiling, hopping on his bike)

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3. Which good people skills did each child display? Write the letter next to each skill above, alongside the name of the person who displayed it.

• Kiara:

• Darcy:

4. Choose one skill you need to work on and write a short-term goal for yourself below. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to others – Work at building and maintaining relationships

MAKING PEOPLE FEEL SPECIAL The way we make other people feel has a huge effect on our relationships with them. It is important to let people in our lives know they are special. We can show this by the things we say and do. These may be simple, like listening carefully when someone is speaking or paying a compliment, or it may be something exciting, like planning a surprise party! 1. Brainstorm some things you could do to make important people in your life feel special. Things I could do

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Things I could say

2. You decide to plan a special day for an important person in your life. You have a budget of €10 for the day. Use your answers from Question 1 to help you write at least eight special things you could say or do. Remember, some of them could be free!

A special day for Time

Special things

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Morning

Cost

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Afternoon

Evening

3. Choose another important person in your life. Write the top five free things this person could do to make you feel special.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Be tolerant and understanding of differences

tolerance SPEECH Tolerance is the ability to accept differences among people. These could include religious, physical, family or personality differences. Use this information to present a speech in favour of the following topic: A tolerant person is also a wise person.

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(a) Write notes on what you think makes someone ‘wise’.

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1. Follow the steps below to prepare your speech.

(b) Brainstorm words you associate with the word ‘tolerance’.

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(c) What could be some positive outcomes of being tolerant? List four important ideas below.

2. Use your answers to the questions above to make palm cards for your speech. Use note form. Some hints are below.

Beginning: Start with a question or strong statement. Middle: Expand on the four ideas you listed for Question 1(c). Explain why you believe what you are saying.

Ending: End with a sentence that sums up what you have been saying. 3. Practise your speech using your palm cards. Make sure you use a clear, strong voice. When you are ready, present your speech to a partner. Discuss similarities and differences between your speeches. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to others – Respect other points of view

PARTY PLAN Find a partner to work with. Imagine that your birthdays fall on the same day. Your parents give you permission to hold a joint fancy dress party. You may invite a maximum of 10 guests between you and you must decide together on the details of your party. 1. Begin by thinking about the best birthday party you could imagine—one you think your parents would agree to! Without your partner seeing, write details under each of the following headings. who to invite

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time and place for party

food

type of invitations

music

theme for costumes

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2. Read out your list and listen to your partner’s. Discuss any differences between your lists, making sure you are respectful when you listen to each other. 3. Decide on new details for your party you are both happy with. You may need to compromise. Write notes about your final decisions in the space below.

4. Answer these questions by yourself. (a) Do you feel your opinions and ideas were respected by your partner?

yes

no

yes

no

Give reasons for your answer.

(b) Do you feel you respected your partner’s ideas and opinions?

Give reasons for your answer.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Don’t bully or put others down

Bullying SCENARIOS 1. With a partner, read each of the scenarios below. For each, write words to describe how it might feel to be A (the person doing the bullying) and B (the person being bullied). A is top of the class in English but B struggles with reading and writing. Whenever the teacher’s back is turned, A teases B for being ‘stupid’. A uses a loud voice so his/her friends can hear. Feelings

A and B are best friends. A has recently made friends with a person who is new to A and B’s school and suddenly starts avoiding B. When B asks A what is wrong, A says he/she doesn’t want to be friends with B any more. A then walks off with the new person.

A:

A:

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Feelings

B:

B:

Every lunchtime at school, A, who is older than B, demands that B gives A his/her lunch. If B ever refuses, A pushes B over and takes it from him/her anyway. B is frightened.

B is new to A’s school. The first day, at break, B asks A if he/she can join in a basketball game with A’s friends. A laughs at B’s accent and clothes and refuses to let B join in.

Feelings

Feelings

B:

B:

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A:

A and B belong to the same tennis club. B really enjoys tennis coaching, until one day, he/she overhears A spreading an unkind rumour about B’s family. B has no idea why A is doing this and feels very hurt. B feels like giving up tennis for good. Feelings

3. When you have practised your role-plays, present them to the class. Discuss the different ways the role-plays ended.

A: B:

Teaching values toolkit

2. Choose three of the scenarios. Discuss how the character of ‘B’ in each might best deal with the situation. Role-play each of your chosen scenarios with your created ending.

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Be kind to others – Seek a ‘fair go’ for all

FAIR GO STAMPS Imagine that this year is the ‘Year of the Fair Go’. The government decides to issue a series of three postage stamps to commemorate the year. A competition is announced to find the best designs. You decide to enter. Fill in the entry form below.

‘Year of the Fair Go’ t

a

m

p

c

o

m

p

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t

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t

i

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Entrant’s name

Age:

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1. What does the idea of a ‘fair go’ mean to you?

2. Why do you think it is important to be fair to others?

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3. Please show your three design ideas in the stamp outlines below. You can use words and/or images in your design. Underneath each, please explain your design and why you chose it.

IRELAND

30c

IRELAND

Explanation

45c

IRELAND

Explanation

Explanation

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Manage and resolve conflict

Out for a duck? We often find ourselves in conflict with the people in our lives. Sometimes the problems are very simple and easily resolved; e.g. deciding what to have for tea. At other times, they may be more serious and unless dealt with sensitively, may escalate into greater problems.

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During a match between the two teams, Joe drops an easy catch from Jason’s first bat. Joe’s captain, Ross, is furious with him. For Jason to be caught out without scoring any runs would have been a great advantage for Joe and Ross’s team.

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Joe and Jason are best friends who attend different schools. The boys are keen cricket players and both represent their school teams. Joe admires Jason, who is a great batter.

Ross accuses Joe of deliberately dropping the ball because Jason is his hero and he didn’t want to upset him. Jason is annoyed with Joe for thinking that catching him out would spoil their friendship. Joe is very upset that no-one will believe that he simply dropped the catch. If it had been anyone other than Jason, they would have just called him ‘Butter fingers’, and left it at that. 1. Assume the role of each character in turn.

(a) Put forward your initial opinion of the event to the referee.

Ross

in

Jason

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Joe

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(b) After taking time to reflect on the situation and consider the opinions of the other two, give your opinion of the event. Joe

Jason Ross

2. Suggest some ideas for resolving the bad feeling among the three boys. Write them on the bat.

Problem-solving ideas

Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to others – Cooperate and be a team player

Greater than the sum of its individual parts You are going to demonstrate the importance of cooperation in a group task. 1. Choose a well-known fairy story to dramatise and perform for a younger class.

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2. (a) Briefly outline the story in bullet points.

(b) Describe what is required for each task. script writing

stage props

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music/sound

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wardrobe

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advertising

3. Set a time limit for completing the tasks. 4. Allocate character parts and practise the play. 5. Perform the play.

6. Evaluate your performance as a: (a) team

terrific

indifferent

bad

(b) team player

terrific

indifferent

bad

(c) theatre company

terrific

indifferent

bad

7. What do you think the title of this page means?

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Support and include others

Walk in my shoes People of all ages need support in many ways; for example, if someone close has died, if they are not well, if they are lonely. 1. (a) Has there been a time when you or someone you know needed support? yes

no

(b) Who supported you?

2. (a) (b) (c) (d)

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(c) What did he/she do?

Make a list all the different areas of your life; e.g. home, school, swim club etc. For each area, write the name of one person whom you could support. Explain why you think he/she needs support. Describe how you would show your support. name

why he/she needs support how you can give support

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3. (a) Choose one person from your list and (b) Design a card for this person. write a short message of support. (c) Make the card with the message inside and give to your chosen person. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to others – Value family life

Look after the tree and it will grow Looking after our families helps the bonds of love grow stronger. If we value family life, it will always be there to support and protect us.

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1. (a) Make a list of the people in your family tree. Include your generation, your parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts.

(b) For each person, write words or phrases to explain why he/she is special to you. reasons why this person is special

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name

2. (a) (b) (c) (d)

On a large sheet of paper, draw your family tree. Paste a small photograph of each person under his/her name. Under each photograph, write a sentence describing why that person is special to you. Display your family tree in a prominent position at home so everyone can see how much you appreciate them.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to others – Treat others the way they need to be treated

Treat others the way they need to be treated We all know that we should treat people as we would wish to be treated, but sometimes people need extra attention and more sensitive handling. 1. Compile a list of reasons why people of different ages may require more tender care.

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children

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adolescents adults the elderly

2. Choose one example from each list and suggest what you could do to show more tender care. a child

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an adolescent

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an adult an elderly person

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3. (a) What signs do people display that indicate they may need more sensitive treatment?

(b) Why is it important for us take notice of these signs? 4. Research to find some sayings which are used to help people look on the bright side. Teaching values toolkit

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3. Be kind to the environment

Touch left index

And I am kind to finger with right index the environment finger – Auslan sign language for ‘E’.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – overview CONSERVE ENERGY

• Write a rhyming poem about a messy monster who never cleans up after himself. What mess and havoc does he create? What is his fate? • Make ‘Don’t litter’ signs to display around the school. Think about the best way to get the message across to other pupils. Ask another class to vote for the most persuasive sign. • Walk in and around the school buildings to note areas which are either unclean or littered. Discuss how these areas might be improved.

• Become an energy patrol officer at home. Make note of all the times electrical appliances are left on when no-one is in the room; e.g. lights, television, radio. Present your results in a way that makes it clear how much energy your family is wasting. Discuss with them how they could reduce wastage and bills! • Research to find the difference between renewable and nonrenewable energy sources. • Compare your family’s electricity and gas bills before and after energy saving practices, or compare between summer and winter months.

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CLEAN UP AFTER YOURSELF

KEEP THE LAND, AIR AND WATERWAYS CLEAN

• Research to discover how your local environment has changed in the last 10, 20 and 50 years. What habitats have been destroyed and for what reasons? • Devise a crossword puzzle with clues about the natural environment and its protection. • Research to discover how introduced animal and plant species are affecting the native fauna and flora. USE ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY PRODUCTS

• Research to find a list of harmful ingredients used in household cleaning products. Find alternative products which are more environmentally friendly. • In groups, invent an environmentally friendly cleaning product. Plan a short commercial to advertise its use. Present your commercial to the class. • Research to find less toxic ways to eliminate garden pests.

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• Collect samples of water from a nearby source and compare with water used for domestic use. • Place white material in selected areas outside for a set time. Compare to see how much dirt each piece has collected. What does this tell you about each area? • Contact a local environmental group to learn more about the problems we face and how you might help.

CARE FOR NATURAL HABITATS, WILDLIFE AND ENDANGERED SPECIES

RECYCLE AND DON’T WASTE

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• Learn how to recycle paper. On the paper you make, design a poster to display at home, reminding your family to recycle and not waste. • Make a list of suggested uses for recycling materials in your classroom; e.g. egg cartons for mixing paints, large yogurt pots for storing paintbrushes. • Find out how a compost heap works. Start one at home. SAVE WATER

• Time how long it takes to clean your teeth, then run the tap for the same time, collecting the water. Measure the volume of water collected and multiply it by the number of times you clean your teeth in a day, a week, a month and a year. How much water do you waste? Use a small glass of water when cleaning your teeth. • Write a narrative about a set of taps that went on strike because the family wasted too much water. • Discuss the problems we would all experience if we had running tap water for just two hours each morning and evening. Write a list of strategies for overcoming these problems.

Teaching values toolkit

CONSIDER ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY ENERGY SOURCES • Complete a research project for an alternative energy source, such as solar or wind-driven power. • In pairs, list reasons for reducing the use of fossil fuels. Research for specific information. • Design and construct a water wheel. Research to discover where and for what purpose water wheels were used in the past. CONSIDER USING RESOURCES THAT CAN BE REPLACED (sustainable development) • Construct a flow chart for a specific resource such as the soil, showing its use and renewal.

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Be kind to the environment – overview • Write an advertisement for a company, inviting people to invest in a sustainable development project; for example, aquaculture or a plantation. Emphasise the environmental issues. • Sort a collection of packaging materials into biodegradable, reusable and recyclable.

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• Research to find particulars for an individual’s family tree, including anecdotal information such as occupation, religion, education. • On a large world map, indicate where families in your class originated. Include booklets detailing some cultural traditions for each nation. • Help to organise an excursion to a local heritage site or national park.

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VALUE CULTURAL HERITAGE

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION The environment can be defined as the world that exists around us. This is not just the physical conditions of a place, but includes all those conditions and influences that affect it. Human behaviour is responsible for many detrimental changes to the environment and pupils need to be aware of how they should care for the environment so the things they do have a lessened impact on it.

Page 55 – Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species

• Everyone should be responsible for cleaning up after themselves. Discuss. • Do you think it is more, less or equally important to clean up after yourself at home than as it is in public places? • Do you think it is fair that people can be fined for littering?

Page 51 – Keep the land, air and waterways clean

• Which products do you use at home that are and are not environmentally friendly? • What are some alternatives to household products that are not environmentally friendly? • What makes an environmentally-friendly product?

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• Discuss the benefits of using solar, wind and wave power as alternative sources of energy. • Discuss the major causes of the Greenhouse Effect. • Discuss the role of the ozone layer in protecting the planet from the harmful effects of the sun.

Page 52 – Recycle and don’t waste

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• Why is it important that we recycle? • What are some of the strategies shops are using to reduce the number of plastic bags being used? • Where are your closest recycling bins situated? Does your family use them?

Page 53 – Save water

• Why is it important that we don’t waste water? • Do you have water restrictions during summer in your town? What are they? • What ways does/can your family conserve water at home?

Page 54 – Conserve energy

• Why is it important to conserve energy? • How could we conserve energy at home? In other areas of life? • Name the different types of energy.

Teaching values toolkit

Page 56 – Use environmentally-friendly products

Page 57 – Consider environmentally-friendly energy sources

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• What are chlorofluorocarbons? Why should we try to reduce the amount being used? • Do you sort your rubbish and recycle objects such as soft drink cans, newspapers and glass bottles? Why/ Why not? • What can the consequences be to animal life when the rivers and oceans are polluted?

• How can we care for natural habitats? • What are some reasons wildlife might become endangered? • What sorts of organisations support endangered species?

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Page 50 – Clean up after yourself

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DISCUSSION POINTS

Page 58 – Consider using resources that can be replaced (Sustainable development) • Discuss how fossil fuels are formed. • Discuss why using up all fossils fuels now will cause a problem with energy requirements in the future. • Discuss how individuals can help to reduce the overall use of fossil fuels.

Page 59 – Value cultural heritage • Discuss the different waves of emigration to the United Kingdom, including when they occurred. • Why do people from the same countries often live close to one another, forming distinct ethnic areas? Discuss. • How does diverse cultural heritage help us to understand more about the world’s cultural differences? Discuss.

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Be kind to the environment – Teachers notes ANSWERS

Graphic organiser example

Word Web To organise the development of a concept

• • •

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• •

Something to think about: You must be a school teacher if: you feel like hitting the next person who says that it must be nice to work from 8.30 to 3 pm and have lots of holidays, you have no life from September to July, you encourage your spouse by telling they are ‘a good helper’, meeting a child’s parents instantly answers the question ‘Why is the child like this?’ you believe ‘extremely annoying’ should have its own box on the report card, you know one hundred good reasons for being late, or you don’t want children of your own because there isn’t a name you can hear which does not elevate your blood pressure.

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Page 53 – Save water 1. (a) Check taps for leaks. (b) Wash the car on the lawn. (c) Have shorter showers and shallow baths. 2.–3. Teacher check

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – Clean up after yourself

Clean UP AFTER YOURSELF 1. Read and then complete the play. Write the name of the person talking on the left. Remember to include directions in brackets so the reader knows what the children are doing.

The disagreement

Setting: Late afternoon at the beach. Ty and Jackson have spent the day there and are now packing up to leave. (shaking out his towel and tossing it over his shoulder) Wicked day! They’ve been the best waves this whole holiday!

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Ty:

Ty:

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Jackson: I know! (putting his boogie board back in its bag) Can’t believe the girls missed it to go to the cinema! Ha! (walking up the sand dune) Hope my dad’s started the barbecue. C’mon, let’s go! (looking around at the empty soft drink cans, crisp packets, ice-cream wrappers and plastic shopping bag on the sand) Hang on … what about this?

Jackson: Just leave it! Let’s go … I’m starving! Ty:

(still standing in the same spot, looking from Jackson to the rubbish) Um … I really think we should pick this up.

Jackson: Someone else will do it. Let’s go! (standing at top of dune with hands on hips) Ty:

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2. Imagine you were in the same situation as Ty. Do you think you would have the courage to stand up for what you believe in, even when it means having a disagreement with a friend? Never! I hate arguing

I’m unsure (but I hope so!)

Yes, if I believe in it strongly

Definitely! Always do!

3. With a partner, read and perform your play. Include the actions. 4. Now swap roles and read and perform the play your partner has written. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to the environment – Keep the land, air and waterways clean

KEEP OUR ENVIRONMENT CLEAN 1. (a) Colour each tip to match the part of the environment it helps to keep clean. land – green

air – yellow

waterways – blue

pick up rubbish

use unleaded petrol

wash your car on the grass

use canvas shopping bags reduce CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons)

use roll-on deodorant not spray never put paints and other chemicals down the drain

recycle used fats and oils pick up litter at the river

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recycle paper and plastic

use cloth nappies

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(b) Think of two more ways to help keep our land (L), air (A) or waterways (W) clean.

(

)

(

)

2. Discuss with your group the benefits of working hard to keep our land, air and waterways clean. What might some of the consequences be if we do not? Write your ideas below. Consequences

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Benefits

3. Use the information above to create a poster that promotes keeping our environment clean. Choose one part of the environment and complete the poster plan below. land

air

Target audience?

waterways

Poster (Layout/Design plan)

Title

Key information points

Pictures/Graphics to include

4. Use your ideas to complete your poster on a sheet of card or heavy paper. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – Recycle and don’t waste

INTERACTIVE RECYCLING BIN As an inventor and an environmentalist, you have noticed that the citizens of the world have lost interest in recycling. The rubbish dumps are overflowing with plastic bags, newspapers, glass bottles and other recyclable objects, so you have decided to take action! You are going to invent the world’s first ‘interactive’ recycling bin. A ‘fun’ recycling bin that will make people want to recycle their rubbish and make it easier for them to do so.

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1. Record your ideas in the design plan below.

Today’s recycling bins (types, appearance, where found)

‘Interactive’ ideas

Design ideas

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Materials which can be recycled (list or draw and label)

Materials required

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Ways to make recycling easier (more accessible for busy people)

2. On the back of this sheet, draw your first design for your interactive recycling bin. Complete the checklist before you transfer the design onto art paper. I used a sharp pencil. ❒ I used a ruler for straight lines. ❒ My design is more than half a page in size. ❒ My design has a name/title. ❒ I labelled the materials required for each section. ❒

Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to the environment – Save water

SAVING WATER 1. Solve the mathematical codes to discover water-saving ideas. B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

2

20

9

16

5

22

24

3

26

50

17

12

11

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

15

6

14

18

8

4

7

25

1

10

30

100

13

18 ÷ 2

27 ÷ 9

44 ÷ 2

/2 of B

1

/4 of R

1

1

/3 of L

1

/2 of X

56 ÷ 8

60 ÷ 5

/2 of O

/2 of P

1

A+V

Q ÷ 9 W ÷ 10 S + 1

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(c)

/3 of Q

1

64 ÷ 8

40 ÷ 2 – 3

8÷4

28 ÷ 2

/2 of P

1

/2 of O

1

10 ÷ 2

/2 of O

16 ÷ 8

30 ÷ 2 + 2

/3 of N

1

/2 of Q

1

/3 of N

/2 of G

1

1

/4 of R

1

20 ÷ 5

/4 of R

1

1

32 ÷ 8

/2 of D

1

1

/2 of B

1

/2 of X

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1

24 ÷ 4

18 ÷ 2

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(b)

25 ÷ 5

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(a)

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A

2xA

2xA

A+V

C÷3

H+H

Vx2

T+3

2xA

S+1

E–2

Ax4

H+H

2xA

R+S R+S H+H T+3

Ax4

A+A+H S+1

D÷8

D–V

W x A Y ÷ 50 A + A + H N ÷ 5

Ax4

R+R

2xA

2. Think of two more tips for saving water. Write them below.

3. Choose one tip and, on a separate sheet of paper, create a code for a friend to solve. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – Conserve energy

ENERGY BROCHURE Use your own knowledge and/or resources to plan a ‘top five tips’ brochure on conserving energy at home The brochure should: • be aimed at families • use simple language • include a cartoon or simple drawing to illustrate each tip • be created on an A4-sized sheet of card or paper, folded into three equal sections water heater

refrigerator

cooking

lighting

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heating and cooling

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1. Begin by writing one energy saving tip for each of these headings.

dishwasher

washing machine or clothes dryer

computer or television

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2. Tick the five tips you think are most useful and would like to use in your brochure. 3. Plan the layout of the front and back of your brochure in the spaces below. Show where your main heading, information and drawings will go.

page 1

page 2

page 3

page 4

back

cover

4. Complete the final draft of your brochure on an A4-sized sheet of card or paper. Teaching values toolkit

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Be kind to the environment – Care for natural habitats, wildlife and endangered species

ENDANGERED ANIMAL Use the Internet or other resources to prepare a scientific report on an endangered animal of your choice. Make a draft of your report by following the steps below. 1. Write notes under each heading. Animal name How many are left in the world?

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Physical description

Habitat

Diet

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2. Why is it endangered?

Predators (if any)

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Movements

3. What is being done/could be done to save it?

4. Why should we want to save this animal from extinction? 5. Write your report on a separate sheet of paper.

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – Use environmentally-friendly products

ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY CLEANER Many household cleaners we buy at the supermarket contain chemicals that are not environmentally friendly. Research to find a recipe for a general household cleaner that is safe for the environment. Use the plan below to write instructions for making this product. Make the product and use it as directed. Test your product. Does it work?

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Name of product:

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Goal:

Materials:

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Method:

Test results:

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Be kind to the environment – Consider environmentally-friendly energy sources

RESEARCH HOTLINE! For many years, one of the main topics of debate, within and between countries, has been the need to use environmentally-friendly energy sources instead of those which produce large quantities of toxic gases. These gases have produced pollution problems worldwide and have contributed greatly to the depletion of the planet’s ozone layer and to the Greenhouse Effect. 1. Explain these phrases. (a) toxic gases

(c) ozone layer

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(b) pollution problems

(d) Greenhouse Effect

2. (a) Type environmentally-friendly energy sources into an Internet search engine, such as google, to find information about the alternative energy sources currently available and those still under research. (b) Choose an energy source to research and complete the table. energy source

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how energy is harnessed

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availability

cost

percentage of total energy requirement it would meet

3. Briefly describe another alternative energy source you would be interested in researching. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


Be kind to the environment – Consider using resources that can be replaced (Sustainable development)

INDUSTRY VERSUS THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT The big question is, which will win, industry or the environment? In a little over 300 years since the industrial revolution began, the state of our natural environment has declined. With great advances in science and technology, People have been able to soak up the goodness from the planet, thinking little about how to recharge it.

(a) Research for information and evidence to support each side of the motion. Write bullet point notes.

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evidence against

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evidence for

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1. Prepare for a class debate on the statement, ‘We need to ban the use of all non-renewable resources before they are exhausted’.

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(b) List your arguments for and against.

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arguments for

2. Hold the debate. 3. (a) Were you for or against the statement? .............................................

For

(b) Were you happy with the outcome? ....................................................... Teaching values toolkit

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Against Yes

No

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Be kind to the environment – Value cultural heritage

RICH TAPESTRY The population of the U.K. can trace its ancestry back to many areas of the globe. This means they enjoy a rich heritage with a varied range of cultural experiences, such as cuisine, music and literature. It is important that we know something of all the countries from which we originate.

countries

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2. (a) Choose and list three countries in the table. (b) Add significant festivals or celebrations. (c) Include examples of cuisine, special to each country.

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1. (a) On a separate sheet of paper, write a list of the different countries of origin of the families of pupils in your class. (Some may have more than one.) (b) Discuss aspects of each country’s culture.

festivals/celebrations

cuisine

2. Research one festival to describe.

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festival:

3. Research one example of cuisine. Write the ingredients and method of preparation.

4. (a) On a large world map, draw lines from different countries of origin to the U.K. (b) Around the map, display pictures and information about each country represented by your class. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Teaching values toolkit


chatterbox A chatterbox is a fun method to reinforce concepts as well as engage learners who utilise the visual/spatial, verbal/linguistic, logical/mathematical and bodily/ kinaesthetic intelligences, while encouraging the interpersonal intelligence.

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Use the pattern given to encourage pupils to make individual chatterboxes relating to specific areas of the Teaching values toolkit. A specific example is given on page 96.

Instructions

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1 Begin with a square piece of paper or light card.

2 Fold each corner in so that they meet in the centre of the square.

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3 Turn over and repeat the procedure, folding corners in to meet at the centre. This will create four triangular flaps.

7 8

6 Place thumbs and forefingers under the square flaps. Move thumbs and forefingers in an ‘open/shut’ motion. This will mean the chatterbox opens and shuts, revealing the eight ‘triangular’ numbers each time.

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4

1

3

2

5 Fold the chatterbox in half, so that the numbered squares are on the outside.

Teaching values toolkit

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3 4

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4 Number each half of the triangular ‘flaps’ (eight in all). Any numbers can be used. Number also each of the four square flaps on the underside of the construction.

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4. Be the learning kind

Have left hand flat, palm upwards, waist height— like a book.

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I am

kind

Swing your hand up to your head—putting the information from the book into your head.

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the learning

Take right hand and sweep the left hand with the back of your hand.

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – overview BE POSITIVE ABOUT LEARNING

• Set specific learning tasks such as naming ten rivers. Working in pairs, pupils test one another and discuss how they tried to remember the information. Techniques can be shared with the class. • Try working in different environments; e.g. noisy, quiet, at a desk, on the sofa, indoors, outdoors. Make a list of the environments you try. What are the good and bad points for each? What are the best working conditions for you? • Plan a project which will require you to work in different ways; e.g. research, writing, art, construction. Which part of the project did you enjoy doing most?

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• Make a list of the people who have taught you something. Write what you have learned from each of them. • Debate: ‘We learn the most important lessons in the classroom’. • With the teacher’s permission, teach a pupil in a younger class a simple skill or concept. Describe how the child felt about learning something new and how you felt about teaching him/her.

DETERMINE HOW YOU LEARN BEST (LEARNING STYLES)

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SEEK KNOWLEDGE ABOUT YOURSELF, OTHERS AND THE WORLD AROUND YOU

• Email pupils in other countries to find out what their daily lives are like. • Study travel brochures to find out which famous places in the world you would like to visit and why. Create a tour based on your interests. • Complete KWL sheets about topics of personal interest (K–what I know, W–what I want to know, L–what I have learned). RECOGNISE THE VALUE OF KNOWLEDGE

• Read, retell and discuss traditional tales from the villain’s point of view to challenge established concepts such as good and bad, justice and happy endings. • Using different sources, research a current news story. Write an explanation of the story, including the points of view of the different parties involved. • Research an historical event where the absolute truth is not known. Look at the evidence to support all sides to the story before giving your opinion.

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• Discuss or debate the statement, ‘Knowledge is power’. • Give pupils a group task to construct something. Supply instructions with vital pieces of information missing. After a set time, give the missing information. Discuss the difference this extra knowledge made to the successful completion of the task. • Research to name and describe the different areas of specialisation in medicine and the time required to study them.

HAVE AN OPEN MIND

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HAVE AN ENQUIRING MIND – BE CURIOUS

• In a small group, create and perform a 10-minute segment for a children’s television show called Curious in which you demonstrate an interesting science experiment. • Create a children’s story which contains a curious character getting into trouble or solving a mystery. Read it aloud to a group of young children then discuss what happened to the character and why. • Write survey questions for a younger class to determine what they would like to know more about. Conduct the survey and use the data to plan, write, edit and illustrate a nonfiction picture book for younger children.

Teaching values toolkit

BE A CRITICAL THINKER • Create an advertisement promoting crisps as a very healthy food for children to eat every day. Discuss the strategies advertisers use to sell their products. • Write an objective review of a popular children’s novel. • Write a newspaper review of an important sporting event. HAVE A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE • Allocate a different country to small groups of pupils. Each group lists twenty questions to research about its country. Pupils make question and answer cards which may be used in a quiz game. Having tested their cards, each group swaps with another and learns something about another country. • Write a brief explanation of an international news story. Use the story as a springboard for a project on the country. • Research to find international population statistics and make a list of the top ten most populous countries. Make some general comments about your information.

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – overview SEEK LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES EVERYWHERE

LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES

KEEP LEARNING

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• Write a short imaginative story to demonstrate that we all make mistakes; wise people learn from them but fools do not. • Describe what happened to something when you made a mistake; e.g. baking a cake, loading a PC program, knitting a sweater. Do you know what you did that led to the mistake? What have you learned from it? • Write a humorous narrative about the catastrophic chain of events which occurred after a simple mistake was made. In the conclusion, include any lessons learned.

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• Ask an adult to show you how to carry out a simple practical task in an area such as plumbing, automotive engineering, dressmaking. • Draw a freehand street map of a journey you make regularly. Label major roads and sites. • Ask someone you know to take you to work one day to find out about his/her job.

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• Interview an older person and ask what new things he/she has learned in the past five years. • In a group, offer to teach each other a new skill; e.g. play chess, braid hair, make jewellery. • Improve your general knowledge by playing or w a t c h i n g television quiz games.

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION Learning enables us to grow as individuals. Learning new things keeps our mind active and makes us more interesting human beings. It is important that children understand the benefits of learning and realise that knowledge gives us more choices and opportunities in our lives. Children and adults should continue to be curious and seek learning opportunities everywhere. As teachers, we can help children to recognise mistakes as important lessons rather than failures. We can provide learning opportunities in a range of intelligences to enable children to discover the types of learners they are, and we can work towards installing a lifelong love of learning in all pupils. • Do you think you are open-minded? • Is it OK to challenge someone who is showing a closed mind? How could you do this politely?

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Page 66 – Be positive about learning

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Discussion points

• What do you think are the most important things you learn at school? • How do you feel when you learn something challenging? • What are you most looking forward to learning in the future?

Page 67 – Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you • How can you get to know yourself better? • What are some ways in which you could ‘seek’ knowledge? • Why is knowledge so important?

Page 72 – Be a critical thinker

• What does it mean to think ‘critically’? • Do you believe everything you see and hear? • Do you agree with everything you are told or do you have your own opinions?

Page 73 – Have a global perspective

• Why is it important to know about places outside of where you live? • How can you find out more about the people of and events occurring in other countries? • How can you help other countries in need?

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Page 74 – Seek learning opportunities everywhere

Page 68 – Recognise the value of knowledge

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• How could being knowledgeable help you in life? • Discuss a time when you wish you had been more knowledgeable. • What effect can knowledge have on our self-esteem?

Page 69 – Have an enquiring mind

• Is it a positive thing to be curious about the world? • Children are always asking questions about the world around them. Why do you think they might stop this as they grow older? • How could you develop an enquiring mind?

Page 70 – Determine how you learn best

• What is your favourite pastime? What is your favourite subject at school? Are these related? • Would you prefer to read a book, play a team sport or paint a picture? • How will it help you to know the type of learner you are?

• Discuss how a walk through a shopping centre could present a vast opportunity for learning. • Discuss why we need to know what is going on in the rest of the world even though it is so far away.

Page 75 – Learn from your mistakes • Discuss how different your learning experiences would be if you never made mistakes. • The invention of the wheel and the discovery of the power of fire; mistakes or deliberate intentions? Discuss. • Discuss learning experiences you have had as a result of mistakes.

Page 76 – Keep learning • Discuss the benefits of continued learning. • Does learning only occur within an educational establishment and between certain ages? Discuss. • How does motivation for learning occur for pre-schoolers, school/college age pupils, adults? Discuss.

Page 71 – Have an open mind • What traits does a person who shows ‘open-mindedness’ have?

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Be THE LEARNING KIND – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples

Concept charts to organise the development of a concept

Something to think about: Learning is like breathing; we start from the moment we are born and we keep learning until we take our last breath.

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where when why

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Know-Wonder-Learned chart

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Be the learning kind – Be positive about learning

HEAD OF LEARNING Imagine it is the future. You and a group of friends have the opportunity to set up a completely new type of school—and you are appointed ‘head of learning’. This means you can decide what you think children should learn at this school to equip them for the future.

Mathematics

Science

History

Geography

Gaeilge

PE

Art

Music

2. Which other subjects would you add?

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English

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1. Which of these subjects would you keep?

3. In the weekly timetable below, write how you think your chosen subjects should be scheduled. Think carefully about how much time you think should be given to each.

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9.30 – 10.00

Wednesday

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9.00 – 9.30

Tuesday

Thursday

Friday

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Monday

break

10.15 – 11.15 11.15 – 12.15

lunch

1.00 – 1.30 1.30 – 2.30 2.30 – 3.15

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Be the learning kind – Seek knowledge about yourself, others and the world around you

FUTURE SHIELD

1. What do you wish for your future? Write words to describe your hopes and dreams for each of these aspects of your future life. Family Travel Skills/Interests

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Career Home

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Possessions

2. Use your descriptive words to create a ‘future shield’. In each part of the shield, use pictures or logos that represent the words. Plan your design on a sheet of scrap paper first. travel

skills/interests

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Be the learning kind – Recognise the value of knowledge

FOREST JOURNEY Find a partner to work with. Imagine you are both well-known children’s authors. You decide to co-write a book in which a child makes a journey through a forest. The child has no magical powers or weapons, but is very smart. He/She must rely on his/her knowledge to survive the dangers of the forest. This might include threatening plants, animals or characters

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1. List brief details about your main character, including his/her name and age.

2. List five school subjects he/she is most knowledgeable about.

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3. Think of five dangerous scenarios the character could face in the story. For each scenario, describe how he/she uses knowledge to escape the situation. method of escape

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Be the learning kind – Have an enquiring mind

Curious facts With a partner, use the Internet or encyclopedias to find answers to the five challenges below that interest you most. Share your answers with the class when you have finished. 2. Write a fact about what scientists believe was the smallest dinosaur.

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1. Find five unusual collective nouns for animals; e.g. ‘a murder of crows’.

4. Write how the jigsaw puzzle began.

5. Find out why the colour blue is associated with boys and the colour pink is associated with girls.

6. Write a curious fact about cats.

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3. Find out why onions make you cry when you chop them.

7. Write one reason why some people think the first moon landing was a hoax.

8. Write the weirdest Guinness world records you can find.

9. Write a curious fact about dogs.

10. Find and write a curious fact of your own.

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Be the learning kind – Determine how you learn best

What kind of learner are you? 1. Tick the sentences that best describe you.

Body wise • I enjoy playing sport and being active. .................

• I prefer to work in a group. . ................................

• I like making things with my hands. ....................

• I have more than three close friends. . ..................

• Drama is lots of fun. ...........................................

• I like to share my ideas with others. . ...................

• I prefer to ‘do’ rather than watch. ........................

Music wise • I like to sing. .....................................................

Nature wise • I like to care for animals. ....................................

• I enjoy listening to music. ....................................

• I collects shells and other natural objects. ............

• I play, or would like to play, a musical instrument. ..

• I enjoy gardening and being outside. ..................

• When I work, I often tap my feet or my fingers. . ...

• Caring for the environment is important to me. .....

Self wise • I do my best schoolwork on my own. . ..................

Word wise • I love to read books. ...........................................

• I think about what I will do when I grow up. . .......

• I like writing stories and poems. ..........................

• I have one or two close friends. . ..........................

• Word puzzles and games are fun. ........................ • I am good at spelling. ........................................

Logic wise • I like to know how things work. ............................

Picture wise • Art is my favourite subject. ..................................

• I love board games like chess. ..............................

• I am good at drawing. ........................................

• I like puzzles and solving problems. ......................

• I enjoy making models. ......................................

• Number games are fun. .......................................

• I like to do jigsaw puzzles. ..................................

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• I write in a diary in my free time. . .......................

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People wise • I enjoy team sports and games. ...........................

2. (a) Tally your ticks for each box. Which learning style(s) has/have the most ticks? Circle the icon(s).

learner.

(b) I am a 3. Is this correct for you? Explain your answer, giving examples. Teaching values toolkit

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Be the learning kind – Have an open mind

Have an open mind A person who has an open mind listens to and considers other people’s points of view about different topics. He/She is also open to trying new things and does not agree with stereotyping people. 1. Read each scenario. Tick if person A is showing that he/she has an open mind.

Scenario 2 Setting: Dining room. A is having dinner at a friend’s house for the first time. A: What’s for dinner tonight, Mr Patil? Mr Patil: Chicken korma, naan bread and pilau rice. A: Wow! (smiling) I’ve never tried any of that before but it sounds interesting! Open mind: Yes No

Scenario 3 Setting: At the local park. A: OK. (holding football under his arm) Let’s make up two teams. B: (counting the kids) We have an odd number. I can ask my sister to join us so the teams will be even. A: A girl playing football! No way! Someone can sit out and then we’ll rotate players. Open mind: Yes No

Scenario 4 Setting: In the back garden B: I can’t wait to see the new version of A West Side Story at the cinema. A: Isn’t that a musical with heaps of singing? B: Yes. I love musicals. A: (shaking head) Why would you waste your money on a musical when you could go and see a good action film? No Open mind: Yes Scenario 6 Setting: In the classroom B: I think it is important we use only recyclable materials for our project. It will show that we care for the environment. A: Interesting idea! We can go around to each classroom and see what materials they have to spare. Open mind: Yes No

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Scenario 1 Setting: The school playground A: What does your dad do? B: (proudly) He’s a nurse at Royal Fairbridge Hospital. A: Your dad’s a nurse! (laughs) That’s a woman’s job! How embarrassing! Open mind: Yes No

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Scenario 5 Setting: In the back garden A: What do you think you will get for Christmas? B: We don’t celebrate Christmas. We are Jehovah’s Witnesses. A: Oh, that’s right. I forgot. Is there a special time of the year that you celebrate and give presents? Open mind: Yes No

2. (a) With a partner, think of a situation you have been in or witnessed (or invent one) where someone did not display an open mind. Role-play the scenario. (b) Now alter the scenario so that the person is showing that he/she has an open mind. 3. Present your role-plays to another group. How did your audience react to your presentations? sizzling Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Be the learning kind – Be a critical thinker

THE ART CRITIC Find a book in the library that shows pictures of different styles of paintings. Choose a painting for each of the categories below. Describe and give your opinions about the paintings. Decide what you like and critically explain why you like it. Painting 2: portrait (person/people)

Title:

Title:

Artist(s):

Artist(s):

Oil

Other

Describe it:

Watercolour

Oil

Other

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Painting 1: scenery/landscape

Describe it:

Do you like it? Yes

No

Do you like it? Yes Explain why:

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Explain why:

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Painting 4: your own choice

Title:

Title:

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Painting 3: modern/abstract

Artist(s):

Watercolour

Oil

Artist(s): Watercolour

Other

Describe it:

Do you like it? Yes

Oil

Other

Describe it:

Do you like it? Yes

No

No

Explain why:

Explain why:

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Be the learning kind – Have a global perspective

LEARNING ABOUT THE WORLD 1. You have been given a newspaper article by your teacher that describes an event that has occurred in another country. You will read, analyse and comment on the article. • Title of newspaper: • Date of newspaper: • Headline of article:

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• Journalist/Writer of article:

• Summary of article:

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• Town and country article set in:

• Your opinion/comments about the article:

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2. Look at a world map or atlas to locate the country and town where your article is set. Draw where the country is in relation to where you live. Label your work.

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3. Use the library/Internet to find three interesting facts about the country you have read about. Write them below.

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Be the learning kind – Seek learning opportunities everywhere

WHERE IN THE WORLD? We are a great distance away from many countries of the world. Unless we make the effort, it would be very easy for us to have little or no knowledge of what is happening in other parts of the world. 1. (a) Choose a recent news story from another country which focuses on a major problem; e.g. a natural disaster, social or political unrest, poor health.

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(b) Using all the facilities available to you, research to discover more about your chosen story.

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(c) In the table, write bullet point notes from your research. problem

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(d) List the resources you used to investigate this story.

2. (a) Present your research as a short talk to the class. (b) Use visual aids to enhance your project and aid understanding. Teaching values toolkit

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Be the learning kind – Learn from your mistakes

LIFE’S LEARNING CURVES By making mistakes, we learn more about the world and our place in it. When we experience something first hand, we are more likely to remember it and, if it is a mistake, not repeat it! Some lessons are quite simple, such as a child learning not to touch a hot fire. Others are more complex and environmental factors may determine what is the correct thing to say or do. 1. (a) List six mistakes you have recently made. Write each in the second person; e.g. ‘You washed the dishes with shower gel’.

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(b) Use these mistakes to make mistake cards.

2. Devise a board game which includes a set of mistake cards.

(a) When a player picks up a mistake card, he/she has to read it to the others and:

(i) give an account of how he/she would resolve the situation his/her mistake has put him in; e.g. ‘I would rinse them thoroughly in cold water’, and,

(ii) what lesson and he/she has learned; e.g. ‘In future, I will always store the shower gel in the bathroom and the dishwashing liquid in the kitchen’.

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(b) The other players confer and decide whether he/she has responded positively or negatively to his/her mistake; e.g. ‘Should he/she have wasted precious water by rinsing the dishes?’

(i) For positive responses, devise some bonuses.

(ii) For negative responses, devise some forfeits.

3. Play your game and iron out any problems before giving it to another group to play. 4. How would you rate your game?

excellent

okay

terrible

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Be the learning kind – Keep learning

USE IT OR LOSE IT! We know that if we stop using our muscles, they lose their strength and we become unfit. Think of your brain in the same way. Do you want an unfit brain? No, so keep it in training. Keep learning!

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1. Complete the table by: (a) choosing an example of something you would like to learn in each category, (b) explaining what advantages learning each might give you.

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physical activity

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(c) Choose one example and explain what taking part in this activity would involve; e.g. equipment, lessons, training/practising, competing, levels of competence.

2. Describe why you think it is important to keep learning. Teaching values toolkit

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5. Be the achieving kind

I am the achieving kind

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Point upwards—aim for the stars.

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – overview • Hold a ‘have a go’ day in the classroom where the pupils can try out a range of activities, such as maths games and science experiments. Afterwards, the pupils can comment on their feelings about trying each activity. • Think of something you have never tried before but would like to. Create a time line for yourself showing when you will inquire about it, try it, practise it and possibly even master it. • Learn some simple words and phrases in another language. Find resources on the Internet.

PURSUE QUALITY AND PERSONAL EXCELLENCE

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TRY LOTS OF DIFFERENT THINGS

• In pairs, choose a successful, well-known person (athlete, writer, singer etc.) and plan, rehearse and present an interview between him/her and a talk show host, discussing what inspired the person to work hard to achieve success in his/her field. • Set yourself a task—e.g. a school project—plan how you will organise time and resources to work on it. Follow the plan and complete the task without getting distracted. If you know you have performed as well as you possibly can, reward yourself!

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HAVE A GO!

• Keep a special diary which details different activities and skills you try during a school term. The diary entries can be shared with the class on a regular basis to give other pupils ideas for new things to try. • Write a motivational poem that will inspire your classmates to try lots of different things. Find a partner and change the poem into a song and accompany the song with musical instruments. Present your song at assembly. • With a group of friends and their parents, plan an international cuisine party where everyone dresses in national costume and brings a ‘foreign’ dish to try.

USE YOUR TALENTS

• In groups, discuss what you think the word ‘talent’ means and in which areas of life you can be ‘talented.’ Answers can then be discussed and debated with the class. • Create a ‘for-sale’ poster that advertises yourself and your talents. If you are not sure of your talents, ask your classmates, teacher and family. • Make a list of the things you know you are good at. Design a plan to show when and where your special talents could be used.

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DISCOVER WHAT YOU’RE GOOD AT AND ENJOY DOING

• In small groups, devise a television commercial aimed at young children that encourages them to try their best at all times. • Consider an area in your work (such as learning tables, handwriting, using paragraphs in your writing etc.) and write a goal for yourself to be achieved by the end of the term. Display the goal for the whole class to see and review it at the end of the term. • Choose one area of your life to improve. Concentrate your efforts to pursue quality and personal excellence. Record the strategies used to achieve this.

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• Set a 20-minute ‘discovery’ task each week for the class to try; e.g. writing a haiku poem, making up a song, acting in a play etc. The pupils can discuss what they enjoyed doing the most and why. • Write down the names of five pupils in the class and list what they are good at. The lists are placed anonymously in a box and the data collated and displayed. • Compile a list of varied activities to try. Spend time learning the basic skills. If you enjoy them, carry on! DO THINGS TO THE BEST OF YOUR ABILITY • In pairs, prepare a role-play that shows two characters performing an important task to the best of their ability, and then doing the same task using minimal effort. Demonstrate how the characters feel and the different outcomes that occur as a result of the amount of effort put into the task.

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DEVELOP A SENSE OF PURPOSE • Write a poem with the title ‘Chasing my dreams’. • Write your own obituary (a biographical piece about a person’s life once he/she has passed away) that clearly shows the purpose of your life. • Set a personal goal for an area of your life. Plan stages and strategies for achieving this goal. Promise yourself a reward for reaching the goal. MANAGE YOUR TIME EFFECTIVELY • Use pie graphs to depict how you use time on a particular day or over a week. • Write a list of the things you ‘have to do’ and ‘like to do’ on a weekday. Prioritise each one by numbering them from the most important to the least important.

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – overview MANAGE YOUR MONEY WISELY

LOOK AT DIFFERENT WAYS OF DOING THINGS – CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION • In small groups, create a simple child’s toy using household materials. Everyone’s ideas and opinions must be taken into account. • In small groups, create a mime with the title ‘Think outside the square’. Perform your mime to another group who must be able to verbally explain the scenario being performed. • Each person in a group individually writes ideas for the same task; e.g. an afternoon’s entertainment for a younger class. Pupils share ideas and activate their plan.

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• Devise an individual savings plan to show how you could save for something special. • Design and construct a money box that makes children want to save their pocket money. It could have different compartments for short- and long-term saving and perhaps a special way to reward children who are good savers. • Each week, decide how much money you will spend and how much you will save. If you have any spending money left over at the end of the week, add it to your savings. If you spend more than your allowance, spend a little less in following weeks until the deficit is made up.

• Record any times when you felt like giving up on a particular goal. Each time you do something positive towards achieving a goal, place a small pebble in a box. Whenever you feel like giving up or not bothering, remove a stone from the box. Aim to always have stones in the box.

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• Each week, make a list of all the things you have to and want to do. Record how long each would take. Organise the most efficient way to plan your week. Is it realistic?

SET WORTHWHILE GOALS AND MAKE PLANS TO ACHIEVE THEM

DEVELOP GOOD COMMUNICATION SKILLS

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• Create a laminated, reusable ‘goal chart’ for children. The chart should use an inspiring theme to show how steps are needed to reach a final goal; e.g. a trail of stars leading to the moon. • Set yourself three goals—one for each category: – academic (school work) – physical (sport/exercise/balanced diet) – social (family/friends/self-esteem). Which goal will be the most challenging to achieve. Why? • Set three goals, one from each area—home, school, interests. Set a realistic time scale for achieving each one. Design a poster for each, with smaller goals represented by stepping stones leading the way to the final goal. Display the posters in a prominent position and let others know what you are trying to achieve so they can help and support you along the way. SHOW PERSISTENCE AND SELF-DISCIPLINE TO ACHIEVE GOALS

• Recall a time when you showed persistence or self-discipline to achieve something. Use the experience as a springboard to write a playscript or short story. • Design a type of ‘snakes and ladders’ game that promotes selfdiscipline and persistence. For example, a player may slide down the board when landing on a square that says ‘Play computer games instead of learning for test’ or travel up the board on a square that says ‘On the bench for football game so tries harder during next practice’.

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• Create and then play a range of drama games in which speaking clearly and listening well are important. • In a small group, create a set of posters that give easy steps for children to improve communication between themselves and their friends, family and teachers. Use colour and bold letters to make your posters eye-catching. • Pupils take turns delivering instructions to the rest of the class, focusing on getting attention, speaking clearly, making eye contact. SEEK GOOD ROLE MODELS

• Name someone you look up to and write a speech which explains how he/she inspires you. • Write, rehearse and present a play about a pupil in his or her first year of secondary school who befriends, and copies the behaviour of, an older pupil who is a poor role model. • Research to find out how some famous people use their fame to promote a worthwhile cause.

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION To discover what it is we are good at and enjoy doing, it is necessary to try out a range of different experiences and activities—especially when we are children. Pupils need to understand that they will have to take risks and overcome feelings such as fear to achieve something worthwhile in life. Other qualities or skills, such as persistence and time management, are also important, and are worth exploring and learning about.

Page 87 – Use your talents What talents do you have? How did you develop these talents? Why? Do you use your talents in any way? How? Name some well-known people who use their talents to help other people.

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• • • •

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Discussion points

Page 88 – Develop a sense of purpose • • • •

What things are important to you? What things do you like doing? What things do you expect to happen to you in the future? How do you expect to achieve your goals?

Page 89– Manage your time effectively

Page 82 – Have a go!

Page 90 – Manage your money wisely

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• How do you feel about having a go at something new? • Why is it important to have a go? • How do you know when it is a good time to have a go at something?

• What things do you HAVE to do each day? • What things do you LIKE to do each day? • How can you fit in the things that you have to do and the things that you like to do?

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Page 83 – Try lots of different things

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• Why should we try out lots of different activities? • What things have you tried? • Do you think it is only children who should try lots of different things?

Page 84 – Discover what you’re good at and enjoy doing • What are you good at or do you enjoy doing? • How can being good at something make you feel? • Should we only do those things we are good at?

Page 85 – Do things to the best of your ability • Why should you always try your best? • Do you always achieve the results you want when you try your best? • How can trying your best make you feel?

Page 86 – Pursue quality and personal excellence • What are some things you might need to give up to achieve your best? • What does the word ‘quality’ mean?

Teaching values toolkit

• Do you get any money of your own to spend? If so, how do you get it? Do you have to do jobs at home? • What do you spend your money on? • Do you save any money for special things?

Page 91 – Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them • • • •

What things would you like to achieve? How can you go about achieving them? What happens if you don’t achieve them? Do you reward yourself if you do achieve them?

Page 92 – Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals • What does it mean to be ‘persistent’? • Why is it important to not give up? • Have you ever given up trying to do something? What was it?

Page 93 – Look at different ways of doing things • Do we all think the same way? How? • What are you good at? • How do you go about solving a problem?

Page 94 – Develop good communication skills • How do people communicate with one another?

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Be THE ACHIEVING KIND – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples

• What is the difference between passive, aggressive and assertive styles of communication? • What style do you think you use?

Line graphs 1910

Page 95 – Seek good role models

1930

1950

1970

1990

2010

Cartoon and picture strips

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Something to think about: Some pupils drink at the fountain of knowledge … others just gargle!

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• Whom do you admire? • What qualities do they have that you admire? • What have they taught you?

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Be the achieving kind – Have a go!

THE BIG DECISION

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Sarah was devastated when her family relocated to the country to help her Aunt and Uncle with the farm. In the city, Sarah was always very busy with piano lessons, jazz ballet classes and callisthenics. After a few weeks in the country, Sarah realised that none of the classes she enjoyed was available in the town. The closest would have to sign up. Her mother happily was a dance class over an hour’s drive away. ordered Sarah a hockey uniform and, during a weekend visit to the city, they chose a hockey ‘You will just have to join a sporting club in stick. town, Sarah. There is a hockey team for girls your age. What do you think?’ asked Sarah’s Sarah arrived at the first hockey training of mother. the season nervous and anxious. ‘What if I’m terrible?’ she thought to herself. ‘What if no Sarah was shocked! She had never played one likes me?’ a team sport before in her life! She couldn’t imagine wearing a uniform and trainers and After a few weeks, Sarah realised that she a mouthguard! For a month Sarah told herself had a lot to learn to play hockey well but she that she would be fine just spending her spare was thoroughly enjoying trying. She became time at home on the farm, reading and playing close with the girls her age on the team. After the piano but, deep down, she knew she was Saturday games, they would go to the shop to lonely—plus she seemed to have very little buy sweets and play at the playground together. energy thanks to her inactive lifestyle. Sometimes, they even had sleepovers. Sarah was so glad that she had joined the hockey team! She was having more fun than she could ever remember, her energy had returned and she had a great group of friends.

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When the flyers for the under-12 hockey team started appearing at school and on the shop windows, Sarah decided that if she was going to make friends and get her energy back, she 1. Read the story above.

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2. In a group, complete this talking and listening activity. (a) Discuss Sarah’s story. Listen to the ideas and opinions of the other group members and contribute your own ideas.

(b) Discuss each of these questions with your group. (Remember: Only one person speaking at a time and respect the opinions of others.) • Why did Sarah decide to sign up for the hockey team even though her first reaction to joining was shock and negative feelings? • How did Sarah feel at her first hockey training session? Do you think these are normal feelings when starting something new? • What were the benefits for Sarah in joining the hockey team? 3. Think about yourself and your own experiences when answering the following questions. You may like to share some of your answers with your group. • When have you felt nervous and anxious about trying something new? • Were you glad once you had tried it? • Is there something you would like to try but have not been brave enough to do so? What is it? Teaching values toolkit

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Be the achieving kind – Try lots of different things

TRY MANY DIFFERENT THINGS If you try lots of different types of activities or join different clubs, you will learn a huge variety of skills. You will also discover what you enjoy doing the most and what you are good at.

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1. Brainstorm at least ten activities that you would like to try. Think about what you will be able to do in secondary school as well as different types of after-school activities.

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2. Choose three activities and complete the chart. Activity 1 Activity name

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What interests you about it?

Activity 2

no

yes

no

yes

no

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Is it possible for you to try this activity some time in the future?

yes

Activity 3

Explain your answer.

3. (a) Choose the activity you are most likely to try. Activity

:

(b) Set yourself some short-term and long-term goals and insert them on the time line below. Include when you will first try it, become better at it and possibly even master it. (Perhaps you will become a professional—use your imagination!)

(Today’s date) Decided I will try the activity:

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Be the achieving kind – Discover what you are good at and enjoy doing

THE MILLION EURO DIARY

Your personal diary has just been discovered by a 12-year-old boy who was digging around in some very old boxes in his back shed. The diary is one hundred years old and describes when you first discovered your abilities in your field, your early successes and your greatest achievements as an adult. The boy has been offered one million euro for the diary so it can be published and inspire thousands of children around the world to discover what they are good at and see the benefits of working hard to pursue a dream.

Monday

I can’t believe it! Today I tried good at it! I … Date:

Date:

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Date:

for the first time and I’m

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Here is a photo of me at …

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Date:

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Below are some excerpts from your diary. Complete your diary. Draw a picture of yourself in the space provided. Be creative!

Date:

Today I achieved it—my most challenging goal so far and one of my biggest dreams!

Date:

Date: I bought the

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magazine today with ME on the front cover!

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Be the achieving kind – Do things to the best of your ability

INTERVIEW WITH A STAR!

1. With a partner, choose one person you admire who has achieved great success in his/her life and career. The person could be successful in film, music, literature (books), science, inventions, TV, sport, medicine or other areas.

We have chosen:

2. Use the Internet and library/resource centre to find some information about the person before you complete the next activity.

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3. Decide who will be role-playing the interviewer and who will be roleplaying the interviewee (the star) and complete the interview below by answering the questions. Interviewer:

Interviewee:

• Interviewer: Welcome to another episode of ‘Interview with the stars’. Tonight, my special who

guest is

.

• Interviewer: Could you please tell us how you first became interested in your field? • Interviewee:

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• Interviewee:

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• Interviewer: How did you become better at it?

.

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• Interviewer: How did you motivate yourself to work hard and to the best of your ability? • Interviewee:

• Interviewer: What advice do you have for children who have found something that interests them and which they would like to become successful at? • Interviewee:

• Interviewer: Thank you for coming in and speaking with us. We wish you the best. 4. Rehearse your interview. Add more questions and answers if you wish. When you are ready, perform your interview for another group or the class. Find some ‘props’ to help make the interview seem more realistic. sizzling hot warm cool icy cold freezing 5. How did you feel about your interview? Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Be the achieving kind – Pursue quality and personal excellence

SETTING GOALS Achieving your best at what you do can be easier when you set small, achievable goals for yourself. You can make goals in all areas of your life and work towards them. When you successfully achieve a goal, you feel great about yourself! 1. Think about what you would like to improve and set goals for yourself in each of the areas below. Make short-term goals. These are goals you can achieve by the end of the month or end of the term. Choose two of your own areas and set yourself a goal for each. Short-term goal

e.g. learn 7x tables, learn to add fractions, try to solve problems myself first

Language

neater handwriting, 20/20 in spelling test, read a whole novel, write in paragraphs

Homework

finish by due date, take time to do best work, do straight after school

Social/Family

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e.g. do dishes once a week, tidy bedroom, play with sister, be a better friend by …

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Sport

e.g. jump three metres in long jump, shoot 10 goals next game, show good sportsmanship

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Organisation

diary signed, remember sports gear/lunch order, don’t lose things

No.

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Maths

Achieved by

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Area

2. Read through your list of goals and rank them from 1–8, with 1 being the most important goal to achieve and 8 the least important goal to achieve. Write the numbers in the last column.

3. (a) Which goal do you think you are most likely to achieve by the date?

(b) [i] Which goal do you think you are least likely achieve by the date?

[ii] List two things you can do to help you achieve this goal (such as asking for help).

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Be the achieving kind – Use your talents

DESIGN A ‘MY TALENTS’ T-SHIRT We all have talents. Some are obvious, such as being a fast runner or being a mathematics champ. Other talents are not so obvious, such as being a good friend or being great with younger children.

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My talents

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1. What are your talents? Ask at least five people in your class (including your teacher) and consider what your family would say your talents are. Think about a symbol your could draw for each talent. For example, a music note if you are musical, or two hands shaking to show you are a great friend. (Draw the symbol in brackets next to your talent.)

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2. You are going to design a T-shirt to promote yourself. Write your name in artistic lettering and surround it with symbols that represent some or all of your talents. Be colourful and creative!

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Be the achieving kind – Develop a sense of purpose

THE PERSON I HOPE TO BE Close your eyes. Imagine yourself as a teenager. What are you like? Who are your friends? How do people describe you? Keep your eyes closed and fast forward further into the future. Imagine yourself as an adult. What are you like? Are you well liked and respected? Are you kind and caring? Think about the type of person you hope to become. 1. Fill in each of the body parts below. Draw your own face and hair on the head.

I work as a

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2. Cut out each of the parts carefully and glue on to a separate sheet of paper or card to create a ‘future’ you. Add more information about yourself on the page such as: Are you married with children? What do you do in your spare time? and so on.

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I look after my health by …

and respec The people I admire

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s I care for them by …

t share these qualities

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I show my family and friend

because …

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When people describe me, they often use words like …

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Be the achieving kind – Manage your time effectively

WEEKLY TIMETABLE Complete the steps below to manage your time during a school week. 1. Use highlighters and a pen on the timetable below to:

Monday

7 am 8 am 9 am 10 am 11 am noon 1 pm

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5 pm

Friday

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4 pm

Thursday

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2 pm 3 pm

Wednesday

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6 am

Tuesday

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(a) show the things you must do, such as going to school, sleeping, doing homework, chores, exercise or music lessons, (b) show the time you need for relaxation, such as watching TV or reading, (c) fill in any time you have left with other things you would like to do to achieve special goals; e.g. extra music practice.

6 pm 7 pm 8 pm 9 pm

2. Try sticking to your timetable for one week. At the end of the week, write positive and negative comments about how well it worked. Suggest any improvements you could make. positive comments

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negative comments

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improvements to make

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Be the achieving kind – Manage your money wisely

CAMPING BUDGET Find a group of four to five people to work with. Imagine you are going camping for two days. You need to buy all the food before you leave because there are no shops near the camping ground.

1. Plan what you think the group would like to eat on each day.

breakfast snack lunch

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dinner

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snack

Day 2

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Day 1

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Your group budget is €90. You must include a range of foods so you are eating as healthily as possible—so remember things like fruit and vegetables!

2. Make a shopping list based on your menu on a separate sheet of paper. Use supermarket catalogues and the Internet or visit a local supermarket to write the price of each item.

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3. Did your list fit your budget? Discuss with your group any changes you will have to make. List your decisions below.

4. Do you feel the €90 budget was used wisely?

yes

no

Do you think less or more money was needed?

less

more

Write reasons for your answers.

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Be the achieving kind – Set worthwhile goals and make plans to achieve them

REACHING A GOAL Setting a goal helps you to achieve something which is important to you. 1. In which area of life would you like to set a goal? hobby

school

personal (e.g. breaking a bad habit)

other

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2. My goal is:

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3. This goal is important to me because:

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4. The steps needed to reach my goal are:

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5. Some difficulties I might need to overcome are:

days/weeks/months to achieve my goal.

6. It will take me about

7. When I achieve my goal I will feel:

8. Place the information above in a prominent place and look at it often. Tick off each step from Question 4 as you achieve it, then complete the sentence below.

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Be the achieving kind – Show persistence and self-discipline to achieve your goals

TELEVISION INTERVIEW

Imagine in the future you are asked to take part in an interview about how you set an ambitious goal as a child and managed to achieve it by showing persistence. 1. Think of a goal you would like to achieve as an adult. Write some of the steps you would need to reach it. Goal for the future:

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Steps to take:

2. Write five questions you would like an interviewer to ask your adult self about your goal-setting success. Write answers to the questions. Use extra paper if you need to. Question 1: Answer:

Answer:

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Question 3:

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Question 2:

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Answer:

Question 4: Answer:

Question 5: Answer: 3. Find a partner to work with. He/She should use your questions to play the interviewer. You can then swap over. Practise your interviews and then present them to the class. You may like to use props or costumes. Teaching values toolkit

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Be the achieving kind – Look at different ways of doing things

CREATIVE BOOK PROMOTION Imagine you are a budding author. You have just written and published your own book. Now you need to promote your book—to let people know what it is about and how good it is so they will buy it! 1. What is your book about? 2. What age group is it aimed at?

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3. Below are some ideas for how to promote your book. Tick the ones you like. Brainstorm to add some more ideas. Be as creative as you can! Hold an author talk at a library.

Design and make bookmarks with your book’s title on to give to friends.

Set up a stall with your books at a local shopping centre.

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4. You decide to put some of your ideas into action over three days. Plan a timetable in the space below. Think carefully about what time is best for each activity and where it will be held. Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

morning

afternoon

evening

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Be the achieving kind – Develop good communication skills

NEGOTIATING NEEDS AND WANTS Good communication involves both speaking and listening. Find a partner to work with. Decide who is A and who is B. Cover the scenario below which is not yours. Read your scenario silently. Keep your partner’s covered so you don’t read his/hers. For B’s eyes only!

You are doing your homework in the dining room at home on a Sunday night. It must be handed in to your teacher in the morning or you will miss out on sport, which you love. But while you are trying to work, your brother/sister comes in the room, puts on a CD and turns up the volume. You can’t concentrate. You tell your brother/sister to leave. He/She refuses.

You have just finished doing your homework in your bedroom and you need time to relax. You decide to listen to some music. The best CD player is in the dining room, so you go there, put on your favourite CD and turn up the volume. Your brother/sister is writing something on the dining table and tells you to leave. You refuse.

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For A’s eyes only!

1. Take turns to tell each other what you want or need. Afterwards, write what you heard your partner say. Take turns to read aloud what you wrote.

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On fire

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2. Highlight how well you think your partner listened to you. Hot

Warm

Cold

Ice-forming

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3. Highlight how well you think you explained yourself to your partner. On fire

Hot

Warm

Cold

Ice-forming

4. If you chose ‘Warm’, ‘Cold’ or ‘Ice-forming’ for either Question 2 or 3, try explaining and/or listening again until you and your partner are both happy.

5. Discuss how you think both sets of needs and wants could be met. Decide on the best solution and write it below.

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Be the achieving kind – Seek good role models

AN OUTSTANDING ROLE MODEL 1. Imagine in the future you are given an award by the government for being an outstanding role model for children. What would your award say? Complete the certificate, thinking carefully about what sort of person you think makes a good role model.

OUTSTANDING ROLE MODEL CERTIFICATE

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in the area of

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awarded to

for children in the age group

You have been chosen for this award because

CONGRATULATIONS!

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2. When you go to receive your award, you are expected to give an acceptance speech about your work and how you plan to encourage others to be positive role models for children. Plan your speech on a piece of scrap paper and then write it in the space below.

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Chatterbox

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You are hungry for knowledge.

You are well informed.

You value the people in your life.

You care for the world around you.

When you look in the mirror, you smile.

You are proud of who you are.

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Use the chatterbox to reinforce concepts from this book.

You support your community.

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You set yourself goals.

Instructions: 1. Cut out the square. 2. Place the square with the written side down and fold as directed on page 60. 3. To use with a partner: • Ask your partner to select an affirmation and ‘open and close’ according to the number of words or syllables.

• Ask your partner to select a number and ‘open and close’ the chatterbox the given number of times.

• Ask your partner to choose a number and open to reveal a nice comment about the person!

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6. Be the community kind

Form an ‘A’ shape

I am the in front of your body community kind with your fingers—like a house.

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Be the community kind – overview

RESPECT AUTHORITY

SHOW INTEGRITY – DEVELOP A SENSE OF WHAT’S MORALLY AND ETHICALLY RIGHT, AND ACT THAT WAY

• From a list of basic morals (e.g. ‘Always tell the truth’), choose three you live your life by and explain why they are important to you. • Draw a cartoon strip showing two children who find something of value in the playground at the local park. One child thinks they should keep it but the other is unsure. Include speech and thought bubbles to show what each character is thinking and feeling. One child shows integrity and makes the right decision. • Collect headline stories from the newspapers about situations of conflict. Find out the facts about the stories. Discuss how you feel about how the conflict is progressing.

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• In pairs, role-play scenarios in which one person behaves responsibly and the other irresponsibly. • Role-play scenarios that you witness in the classroom and playground where pupils are behaving irresponsibly. Repeat the role-play showing the correct way to behave in these situations. • Take a walk around your local area. Record any evidence of irresponsible behaviour, e.g. children playing chicken, vandalism, graffiti, litter. Discuss why such behaviour is irresponsible. Have a competition to design the best poster discouraging irresponsible behaviour.

• Write a recount of a time you didn’t tell the truth. What were the consequences of your dishonesty? Include a short message at the end of your recount that clearly states what you learned from the experience. (Or write a recount with a similar theme to the tale of The boy who cried wolf.) • Arrange a visit to a court to find out how the justice system works.

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BEHAVE RESPONSIBLY

BE USEFUL

• On a map showing a section of your community, indicate where and how you could be useful; e.g. shopping locally. • Keep a personal diary for one week. Keep records of each time you have felt you have been useful at home, at school and in the community. • Visit a local home for the elderly and find out how your talents could be used for the good of others.

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• Invite a member of the police or fire and emergency services to talk to the class about the importance of respect from the general public to their daily work. • Plan, rehearse and present a news bulletin with a ‘live-feed’ to a place where people are not respecting authority (such as the police at a protest, security at a rock concert or teachers/ principals/headteachers at a school). • In a group, role-play a situation in a swimming pool where some children did not respect the authority of the lifeguard. FOLLOW RULES

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• Hold a class debate on the saying ‘Rules are made to be broken’. • Pupils form groups to prepare and present a debate on one of the following topics: – Pupils should create the school rules as they are the ones who have to follow them. – Electronic devices such as mobile phones and hand-held computer games should be allowed in schools. – All children 12 and under should be in bed by 9 pm so they are not exposed to the violence on television shown after that time. • Play a well-known game without using any of the rules. How long did it last? Did you enjoy it? Do you think it will catch on?

GET INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY • Use the Internet to find out which special events are coming up in your community. Use the information for one of the events to create a colourful advertisement to display at your school or another appropriate location. • In a group, create a display for a common area in the school that shows ways pupils can become more involved in the local community. If possible, take a digital camera to local areas and facilities to add images to your display. • Contact the local council to discover how you could become more involved with the community.

BE HONEST AND SEEK TRUTH • Record the number of times in a week you are less than honest. Explain why you felt the need to lie and if it was really necessary.

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STRIVE FOR JUSTICE AND A ‘FAIR GO’ FOR ALL • Watch for scenes in television dramas that show characters being treated unfairly. Describe each situation and give your opinion on how it was dealt with.

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Be the community kind – overview

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CONTRIBUTE TO RESEARCH • Create and conduct a survey which asks pupils about times when they felt justice had not been served at school. Display • Invite a research scientist involved in medicine to speak to the the results as a graph and present it to the pupil council class about his/her work. Prepare a list of questions beforehand representatives with suggestions for improvements. to ask the speaker. • From recent international news stories, describe situations • Use the Internet to find out the date of the next fundraising where you believe people are not being treated justly. Offer day for medical research (such as ‘Jeans for genes day’ etc.) your opinions and explain how you would like to see the Speak to the principal/headteacher to organise a fundraising problems resolved. event at the school and promote it. • Compile a list of annual fundraising days for medical research. SHARE WITH AND CARE FOR THOSE IN NEED Make a calendar highlighting these days and promote any fundraising activities for these special days. • Design greeting cards to give to people in need in the community; e.g. people in nursing homes. SUPPORT FREEDOM • Write a newspaper article about a girl or boy who showed great compassion, caring for someone in need without expecting • Imagine a school that did not allow its pupils or teachers to anything in return. have freedom of speech. Discuss the problems with such a • Become involved in a local charity, raising funds through concept in small groups. sponsored events or responding to appeals for victims of • In a group, hold a discussion and record your responses to the natural disasters. following statement: ‘In our country, we have the freedom to …’ SUPPORT RECONCILIATION • Research news stories about the loss of freedom for both people and animals. Choose a story as a subject for debate. • Use the Internet to find web sites in favour of reconciliation. Note the group behind the web site and its hopes and goals for STRIVE FOR PEACE the future. • Look in a number of different dictionaries and list the • Devise an assembly item that uses the theme of peace. definitions for the word ‘reconciliation’. Write your own • Write a narrative story with the title: ‘The peacemaker’. definition for the word and draw and colour • Select an international news story about troubled communities. a picture of what ‘reconciliation’ Research the facts of the story and try to understand the cause means to you. of the problems. Make notes from your research, use an atlas • Research to find out about to locate where the situation is occurring and develop a time national and international line to record when significant events occurred. bodies involved in reconciliation.

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Be the community kind – Teachers notes INTRODUCTION The community refers to any group of people, ranging from close family and friends in the local neighbourhood to the populations of all countries around the world. By being the community kind, we are playing our part to strive for a peaceful, harmonious life for all. This requires compromise and understanding from individuals and a willingness to follow order for the good of the community.

Page 109 – Strive for justice and a fair go for all

Discussion points

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• What does the word ‘justice’ mean? • What is the opposite of justice? Can you think of an example? • Why is it important that everyone gets a fair go?

• What is meant by ‘responsible’ behaviour? • Which are your most important responsibilities? • How do you feel about the responsibilities you have?

Page 103 – Respect authority

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Page 102 – Behave responsibly

Page 110 – Share with and care for those in need

• Name some authority figures in your life. • Why do we need to respect authority? Should we always do it? • What responsibilities do authority figures have?

Page 104 – Follow rules

• What does it mean to care for ‘people in need’? • What sort of people might be in need in your community? • What type of things could you share with people in need?

Page 111 – Support reconciliation

• What does the word ‘reconciliation’ mean? • Why is reconciliation important? • Why do you think some people may not welcome reconciliation?

• What do you think of your school and/or classroom rules? • What sorts of things do you think school rules should cover? • Discuss a time when you have broken a rule and been caught.

Page 112 – Contribute to research

• Have you ever contributed to medical research by supporting a fundraising event such as Red Nose Day? • How do you think funds raised help with medical problems or other people in need? • Can you name a scientist who researches cures for diseases?

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Page 105 – Be honest and seek truth

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• How important is telling the truth? Should you always tell the truth? • What problems can be caused by telling a lie? • How can telling the truth make you feel? How can lying make you feel?

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Page 106 – Show integrity

• What does ‘integrity’ mean? • Discuss a time when you have felt badly about something you have done. • Why might different people have different morals?

Page 107 – Be useful

• Why should you support your local community? • How could you support your local community? • What sorts of work do volunteers do in your community?

Page 108 – Get involved in the community

• How can you and your family become more involved in your local community? • What type of clubs (sporting and other) are available in your local community? • Why is it important to support events and shop in your local community?

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Page 113 – Support freedom • What does it mean to be ‘free’? • Why might some people not live in freedom? • Can you name countries or cities where people do not have freedom?

Page 114 – Strive for peace • What do you imagine when you think of ‘peace’? • How can you help to promote peace at your school and in your classroom? • What kinds of things might prevent peace?

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Be the community kind – Teachers notes Graphic organiser examples

Something to think about: Some pupils drink at the fountain of knowledge … others just gargle!

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Fish bone

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Target

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Pie chart

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Be the community kind – Behave responsibly

Responsibility questionnaire Complete the questionnaire. Compare your answers with those of other pupils in your class. 1. List your responsibilities in each of the following areas.

school/classroom

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home/family

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other

2. Highlight two of your most important responsibilities. Explain why they are important. 3. Do you feel you have: too many responsibilities?

just the right amount?

not enough?

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4. Name some consequences of avoiding your responsibilities.

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5. List words that describe how you feel when you are being responsible.

6. List words that describe how you feel when you are being irresponsible.

7. Name a responsibility you are looking forward to as you get older. 8. Name a responsibility you are not looking forward to as you get older.

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Be the community kind – Respect authority

Have some respect! Create a poster that encourages people to respect authority figures. These figures may be different for different age groups, but some (e.g. police) are the same for everybody. Use the steps below to help you plan your poster. 1. Which age group will you aim your poster at?

4. (a) Decide on the mood of your poster.

serious

4–6-year-olds..................................

other

7–9-year-olds..................................

(b) List images and colours you could use on your poster that would capture this mood.

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5. Use some or all of your answers from Questions 1 to 4 to design your poster in the space below.

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2. List four major authority figures in the life of the people in this age group.

scary

adults..............................................

teenagers........................................

funny

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10–12-year-olds..............................

3. Why is it important to respect people in authority?

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6. Create your poster on a large sheet of paper or card. Display it in an appropriate place.

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Be the community kind – Follow rules

Cool school rules 1. Write the areas you think school rules should cover; e.g. ‘pupil safety’.

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2. Find two other people to work with. Discuss all the ideas you have written. Use them to agree on eight important school rules you would choose if you were responsible for writing rules for your school. For each rule, give an example of a fair consequence if a pupil happens to break it; for example, ‘Sit on the bench during break’. Consequence

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Rule

3. Report your decisions to the class and compare your rules to those of other groups. What do they have in common? Teaching values toolkit

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Be the community kind – Be honest and seek truth

Being truthful and lying Design a collage aimed at young children that they can both see and feel. One half of your collage will be labelled ‘Being truthful’. The other half will be labelled ‘Lying’. Your aim is to teach the children how they are likely to feel about doing these things. They can then discuss what they saw and felt with their teacher or the class. 1. Plan your collage in the space below.

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Write words to describe the feelings you associate with being truthful and lying

lying

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being truthful

Think about the words you have written and list images you can use for each; e.g. a smiling face to represent happiness

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List objects you can glue to your collage; e.g. a prickly object to represent fear

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2. To construct your collage, you can draw images and glue on objects or cut-outs from magazines. Collect any materials you need, then plan a miniature version of your collage in the space below. being truthful

lying

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Be the community kind – Show integrity

Integrity situations Showing integrity means you act in a way that you know is right. It involves thinking about how your actions will affect other people or how you will feel about yourself later on. 1. Find a group of three or four people to work with. Read each of these situations below, which show a lack of integrity.

4 A pupil finds a €20 note in the school grounds and decides to keep it.

5 Someone borrows a friend’s bike and accidentally scratches it. When questioned, he denies knowing how it happened.

2. Discuss each situation in your group.

3 A friend tells someone a secret, making him promise not to repeat it. He betrays the confidence immediately.

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2 A new pupil arrives at school and one of his classmates starts unpleasant rumours about him.

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1 A pupil has not prepared for a test so he decides to cheat.

6 Someone sees a sibling’s diary on the table at home and chooses to read it.

(a) Consider why someone might choose to behave in this way. (b) How might this person feel about himself/herself later? (c) Think of how a person with integrity would behave in each situation. 3. Record your ideas in the table using keywords and phrases.

Alternative response to situation showing integrity

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2

Feelings about self later

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Possible reasons for dishonest behaviour

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Situation

3

4

5

6 4. Compare your list from Question 2 with that of other groups. Be prepared to defend your decisions! Teaching values toolkit

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Be the community kind – Be useful

Nursing home help 1. Imagine your school receives the following email:

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To: The headteacher From: Blackwood Nursing Home

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Dear Headteacher We would like to ask if any pupils at your school would like to help make the lives of our elderly residents a bit brighter. Some of the people here do not often receive visitors. Please let us know if you are interested. Jane Nicholas Senior nurse

2. Your teacher reads the email to your class and asks you to help. Begin by brainstorming to list some things the pupils in your class could do to help as individuals, in small groups or as a class. Be creative! class

e.g. playing board games

e.g. performing a play

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e.g. reading aloud

groups

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individuals

3. Your teacher asks you to reply to the email, describing some of your ideas and how you think they could be put into action. Draft your email on a piece of scrap paper first, then write it in the space below.

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Be the community kind – Get involved in the community

Be involved in your community 1. Discuss each of the scenarios and consider how it benefits the community and the people involved. Record your ideas on the chart. One has been done for you. Scenario

Benefits for the community

Benefits for the people involved

A family spends the day collecting litter at the local park and beach for a ‘Clean Up’ day.

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A father takes his teenage children to help a neighbour repair a shed that has fallen down in a storm. A family plants flowers and trees alongside other members of the community during a ‘Tree planting’ day. Two children visit an elderly people’s home to chat and play games with some of the residents.

2. Your local council.

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A teenage girl volunteers at the local animal shelter during her spare time.

Name:

Telephone: Website:

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Address:

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(a) Find out these facts about your local council.

(c) Choose an event that will interest pupils at (b) Use the information above to find out your school. Record the facts. On a separate about any special events coming up in sheet of paper, produce an eye-catching your local area. List them below. poster that will advertise this event and encourage children to become involved in their community. Event name

Date and time

Place held

Target audience

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Be the community kind – Strive for justice and a ‘fair go’ for all

Fighting for justice – Internet challenge In December 1955, a bus pulls up in Montgomery, Alabama, USA. After a weary day working, Rosa Parks boards the bus. The seats at the front are marked ‘Whites Only’. She walks to the middle of the bus where African-Americans are allowed to sit as long as no white person is standing. Rosa sits down in one of those seats.

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A few stops later, as more people have boarded the bus, all the seats in the middle section are taken and a white man is left standing. Upon noticing the situation, the bus driver tells the African-American people seated in the middle to stand down the back of the bus. When Rosa refuses to do so the bus driver stops the bus and demands she move at once. Rosa decides to stand her ground and the bus driver hurries off to get the police. As it is illegal to disobey the segregation laws, Rosa is arrested. The African-American community rallies behind her.

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Internet challenge Use a search engine such as google (www.google.com) 2. What happened next? to find the answers to the following questions. Record (a) Once Rosa Parks was charged and fined, the websites you browsed. a young minister organised a boycott of the bus company. What was this soon to 1. Who was Rosa Parks? be extremely well-known man’s name? • Born (date): • Born (place): (b) What happened next? Summarise the • Lived: events that led to the changing of the laws that had forced whites and blacks to be • Death (date): segregated on buses. Use bullet points. • Funeral held (place): • Occupation (when arrested): • List one award Rosa was given in her lifetime: • Find, print out and glue a picture of Rosa Parks below.

(c) Why do you think Rosa Parks inspired so many people? Websites:

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Be the community kind – Share with and care for those in need

Join a service organisation! One way you can care for people in need is to join a service organisation. People who freely volunteer their time and effort to help others are very special and deserve thanks and appreciation. 1. Choose a group that interests you and find out more about it. Girl Guides (www.girlguiding.org.uk) ................................................................................................................ ❏ (www.scouts.org.uk) ......................................................................................................................

Sea cadets (seacadets.ms-sc.org) .................................................................................................................... ❏ Is the group for girls/boys/mixed?

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At what age can you join?

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What types of things can you do?

What do you wear?

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Who can you help?

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Scouts

Facts about the group closest to where you live.

Meetings held at:

Address:

Group leader:

Telephone number:

2. Imagine you are a member of this group and you have just helped some people in need such as the elderly or people with a disability. Write words and phrases to describe how you think being involved in this activity would make you feel about yourself. Teaching values toolkit

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Be the community kind – Support reconciliation

Designing a reconciliation stamp The word ‘reconciliation’ means bringing together and uniting all the different groups of people who live in a country. Reconciliation encourages working towards solutions so that all groups of people live together in harmony. As an award-winning artist, you have been approached by the postal authorities to design a stamp that promotes reconciliation.

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1. Record your first thoughts and ideas for the art piece below.

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2. Sketch your design on the stamp. Add colour to your design. Think about which medium you will use: pencils, wax crayons, marker pens, charcoal, paint etc.

50c

Ireland

Cut out your design and glue it to black cardboard. Display your reconciliation stamp. 3. Organise for pupils to vote anonymously for the most effective stamp. Prim-Ed Publishing • www.prim-ed.com

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Be the community kind – Contribute to research

Special day research People with serious medical problems rely on research that can find cures or new medicines. Sometimes, money is raised for research by asking people to join in activities on special days. 1. Use a search engine such as google (www.google.com) to complete the chart below. In the last column, record if your school helps support this fundraising event. Fundraising event

Date held

Medical problem funds raised for

What people do on this day

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Red Nose Day

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Jeans for Genes Day Wallace and Gromit’s Great Tea Party Wallace and Gromit’s Wrong Trousers Day Daffodil Day

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World’s Biggest Coffee Morning

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Dress Red for Heart Day Bad Hair Day

At your school? Yes/No

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2. Choose one event that your school is not currently supporting and complete the information below.

• Event:

• Why you think your school should support this special day?

• Website or telephone number of company running event.

• Write or email the company and ask them to send information about the special day to your school so you can find out more about it.

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Be the community kind – Support freedom

Researching a hero People such as Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr are peacemakers who fought for freedom and human rights. These people made a big difference to many people’s lives in this world.

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1. Research and record information about one of the people listed above or choose another person you feel has fought for freedom and peace and made a great difference in the lives of others.

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Name: Date of birth:

Death:

Where born:

Lived:

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How it all began:

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Beliefs:

Will be most remembered for:

Illustration of peacemaker

How does this person inspire you?

Where did you find your information?

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Be the community kind – Strive for peace

What does peace mean to you? 1. In a group, discuss each of the questions below. Listen to the ideas and opinions of the other group members and contribute your own ideas. Record the discussion below in point form. Do we live in peace today? How do you know?

What is the opposite of peace?

Which places in the world are not in peace?

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What does it mean to live in peace?

2. Think of at least two ways you can help to promote peace in your … homes

community

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classrooms/schools

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3. (a) Imagine yourself feeling completely peaceful and calm. • Where are you? • What can you see? • What colours surround you? • What can you smell? • How do you feel? • What can you hear?

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(b) Record your thoughts on scrap paper.

4. Write a poem that describes this peaceful place and/or what peace means to you. Write your draft on a separate sheet of paper and record your finished poem below. Include a title.

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And I love life

Point to yourself and touch your chest

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And I …

Hug yourself

life!

Hands and arms outstretched above your head.

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love …

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e

Books Conflict resolution Middle Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Conflict resolution Upper Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Multiple intelligences Middle Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Multiple intelligences Upper Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Health and values E, F and G Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Bullying Middle Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Bullying Upper Published by Prim-Ed Publishing Six thinking hats by Edward De Bono Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences by Howard Gardner Taxonomy of educational objectives by Benjamin Bloom Revised Bloom’s taxonomy by Lorin Anderson

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TEACHERS NOTES

References

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Websites http://kidshealth.org/parent/positive/family/volunteer.html http://www.enviro-friendly.com/environmentally-friendly-products-resources http://housekeeping.about.com/cs/environment/a/alternateclean.htm www.charactercounts.org/ www.goodcharacter.com www.kidshealth.com/kid/feeling/

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(Note: Websites correct at time of publication.)

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(Six kinds of best values education programme http://www.sixkindsofbest.com)

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2776IRE Teaching Values Toolkit Book D  
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