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Middle (3rd/4th Class)

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PRIM-ED PUBLISHING www.prim-ed.com

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LOWER (1st/2nd Class)

0662IRE – 09/03

MIDDLE (3rd/4th Class)

UPPER (5th/6th Class)


Foreword Cloze is an effective teaching strategy widely used to assist in the development of reading and comprehension skills. Semantic and syntactic skills are developed as pupils use the context clues around the missing words in the text to make sense of each individual sentence.

As the title suggests, Contemporary Cloze – Middle covers a wide range of contemporary topics.These include up-to-date information about popular interests or themes, recent inventions or developments, and discussion about a selection of contemporary issues. A variety of learning areas is covered including science, geography, technology, the arts, SPHE and physical education. Other titles in this series:

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Contemporary Cloze –Lower (1st/2nd Class) Contemporary Cloze – Upper (5th/6th Class)

The author wishes to thank his wife, Mary Moore, for her assistance during the writing of this book.

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Contents

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Teachers Notes .................................................................................... ii – iii Curriculum Links ........................................................................................ iv Bicycles! Bicycles! Bicycles! ............................................ 1 Raising Healthy Children (Verbs) ................................ 2 Strange Creatures.................................................. 3 Sun Safety .......................................................... 4 Animated Films (Verbs) ..................................... 5 Children’s Toys .................................................. 6 Graffiti .............................................................. 7 Dinosaurs ......................................................... 8 Homes of the Future .......................................... 9 Patterns and Numbers in Nature (Nouns) ........ 10 Speed! (Nouns)................................................... 11 Games Around the World ........................................ 12 Fighting Malaria............................................................. 13 Nature Fights Back............................................................................ 14 Space Travel (Adjectives) ......................................................................... 15 Our Changing Language ........................................................................... 16 Computers and Your Health (Adjectives) ................................................. 17 Benefits from Space Research (Nouns) ................................................... 18 The Book or the Film? .............................................................................. 19 Endangered Animal Snippets ................................................................... 20 The Water Cycle ....................................................................................... 21 Multicultural Foods .................................................................................. 22 The Harry Potter Phenomenon (Nouns).................................................... 23 Antarctica ................................................................................................ 24 Astronauts ............................................................................................... 25 Answers ........................................................................................... 26 – 27

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Contemporary Cloze

i


Teachers Notes Contemporary Cloze provides pupils with the opportunity to practise using semantic and syntactic skills to assist in the development of reading and comprehension. Pupils use the context clues around the missing words in the text to make sense of individual sentences. A variety of contemporary topics is covered including popular pupil interests or themes, recent inventions or developments, or discussion about a contemporary issue. In some activities, pupils are provided with the list of missing words. After reading the text, pupils should sort out the obvious choices first and cross out the words as they are used.

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The missing words may be a random selection or a specific group of words such as nouns, verbs or adjectives.

In other activities, pupils must choose their own words to complete the text. Again, pupils should sort out the obvious choices first. Pupils may choose different words to the answers provided. These may still be correct if used in the proper context.

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Sometimes pupils will need to refer to a map, diagram or illustration to work out the missing word.

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Further suggestions: • The topic can be discussed with the whole class or in small groups before pupils complete the cloze activity. • Some of the contemporary topics suggest further discussion following the completion of the activity. Reports by small research groups on particular topics could feature in a series of lessons. • Unless teachers want to assess the ability of individual pupils, the cloze activities could be completed in pairs to enable an interchange of ideas. This works well with less capable readers, who could be partnered with a reader of the same ability or learn from a more capable pupil. • Similarly, the activities could be enlarged and completed as a group or class. The teacher could model techniques to work out the missing words. • Encourage the use of dictionaries to clarify the meaning of difficult words. • Teachers could revise with the pupils a particular part of speech for the activities where a specific group of words is missing. These include: Nouns are naming words like ‘dog’, ‘Africa’, ‘summer’. Adjectives are words which describe nouns or words which represent nouns (pronouns). Adjectives usually appear in front of the word they describe but can appear after that word: e.g. ‘The boy is tall’. Verbs used are mainly ‘action’ words; e.g. ‘run’, ‘fly’, ‘skate’ etc. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com Contemporary Cloze ii


Teachers Notes Relevant background information has been included where necessary for each topic. Graffiti ........................................................................................................................................................... Page 7 • In the early days, graffiti was mainly used by street gangs and political activists wanting to get their messages to the public. Dinosaurs ...................................................................................................................................................... Page 8 • A person who is an expert on prehistoric life through the study of fossils is a palaeontologist.

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Patterns and Numbers in Nature .................................................................................................................. Page 10 • A growing amoeba divides into a pair of smaller cells, each one a new amoeba. So amoebas multiply by dividing!

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Games Around the World ............................................................................................................................. Page 12 • The class could be split into small groups to play the games listed. They could then rotate round the games during the lesson(s). • Haba Gaba: African children may have used nuts, rocks etc., but beanbags or rolled-up socks can be used. Nature Fights Back ...................................................................................................................................... Page 14 • Fire ants in America and Australia are believed to have been imported accidentally in ships’ cargoes. Our Changing Language ............................................................................................................................... Page 16 • See how many shortened words the class can find—a group competition?

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Benefits from Space Research ..................................................................................................................... Page 18 • The infrared sensors react to the heat given off by objects like pottery, which stand out as three-dimensional images. • Shuttles have to withstand high temperatures (up to 1600ºC) caused by friction as they re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere. • NASA – National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

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The Water Cycle ........................................................................................................................................... Page 21 • When air cools it contracts. This brings water droplets in clouds closer together to form larger drops as they touch. These larger drops are heavier and can’t be held up by the air currents in clouds so they fall as rain. • Wet a patch on the blackboard. Wait for a while and it disappears, which shows evaporation has occurred. The Harry Potter Phenomenon...................................................................................................................... Page 23 • The Little White Horse was written by Elizabeth Goudge and was the Carnegie Medal-winning book in 1946.

Astronauts ................................................................................................................................................... Page 25 • Radiation storms are bursts of electrically charged cosmic rays which travel through space at almost the speed of light. The radiation belts around Jupiter are much stronger than those around Earth and pose a threat to any space exploration. • Gravity: Microgravity is a greatly reduced pull of gravity, whereas zero gravity is weightlessness in space. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

iii


Curriculum Links The activities within the three–book series Contemporary Cloze have been written to assist the development of reading and comprehension skills. The non–fiction cloze procedure activities are ideal for developing prediction strategies, encouraging children to predict, check, confirm and self-correct when reading. The variety of cloze procedures in Contemporary Cloze will encourage children to demonstrate the following objectives of the English Language Revised Primary School Curriculum for Ireland.

Middle

Class

Receptiveness to language

Reading

1st & 2nd

• develop reading skills through engaging with reading material appropriate to his/her stage of development

Developing cognitive abilities through language

Reading

1st & 2nd

• develop comprehension strategies

Emotional and imaginative development through language

Reading

1st & 2nd

• engage with a wide variety of text

Receptiveness to language

Reading

3rd & 4th

• use more than one strategy when reading unfamiliar text • become an increasingly independent reader

Reading

3rd & 4th

• experience different types of text

Developing cognitive abilities through language

Reading

3rd & 4th

• continue to develop a range of comprehension strategies • use a knowledge of printing conventions as an aid to expression and comprehension

Receptiveness to language

Reading

5th & 6th

• achieve proficiency in word identification by refining different word identification skills

Competence and confidence in using language

Reading

5th & 6th

• read widely as an independent reader from a more challenging range of reading material

Developing cognitive abilities through language

Reading

5th & 6th

• use comprehension skills such as confirming and prediction

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Competence and confidence in using language

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Upper

Content Objectives

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Strand Unit

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Lower

Strand

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Book

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Contemporary Cloze

iv


Use the following words to complete the letter. You will need to read the graph to fill some of the spaces. accidents crowded

Japan holiday

school cars

copied popular

gifts America roads factories barriers

year three

Bicycles! Bicycles! Bicycles! Guilin Cottages, 5 March

1

I’m enjoying our

travelling

around China but I’ve never seen so many bicycles! This 2

country has

hundred million, about three times the number in

and five times as many as

4

. I bet when bikes

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3

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Dear Roslyn,

were invented over 150 years ago they didn’t realise they would be so 5

. In China, a bicycle has usually been one 6

of the wedding

a groom gives his bride!

or to work. Millions jam the streets of

in

7

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Bicycles are used for local travel such as going to

8

cities and many cyclists die in road

because they swerve in and out 9

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of traffic. To encourage people to use old,

public buses, Beijing, 10

China’s capital, has banned bikes from busy 11

or trees which separate

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8.00 a.m. They’re also removing protective

between 7.00 a.m. and

12

car lanes from bicycles. Guangzhou has banned

over 15 years old

and motorcycles from its city centre. That means more bikes! 13

Next week we go to Shanghai where

produce over four million

14

. Let’s hope there’s a subway!

bicycles every Your friend, Jane. P.S. I Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

15

the graph from a magazine. Contemporary Cloze

1


Use the following VERBS to complete the passage. Keep

warned doubled

means include

choose helps

wash work

showed visit

improves spend builds stay

Raising Healthy Children 1

Many children in developed countries

too much time in front of TV or 2

computer screens. The drop in physical exercise 3

4

exercise is important as it

to prevent weight problems and

the work done by the heart and lungs.

For decades, American doctors have

6

parents about high levels of fat

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5

in the last twenty years! Regular

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children are obese, a rate which has

10% of British

and sugar in ‘junk’ foods. Research in 2002 7

Americans still spend

around $200 billion on fast food each year, with 8

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over 300 companies to

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from! The high fat content in ‘junk’ foods means

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and fruit.

9

the body has to harder to digest it. A child’s diet should 10

11

much

plenty of vegetables, cereals

fried chips, cakes, ice-cream etc. for special occasions. Your

body constantly

12

new cells so your skin, brain, muscles and bones

come from the same source—food. As well as diet and exercise, there are some other simple steps to

13

healthy. Don’t carry heavy school bags, which can lead to neck and back problems, take care in the sun and always

14

your hands after you

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the toilet. Good health is so important as you grow up. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

2


Use the following words to complete the passage. Use the diagrams to help you fill some of the gaps. catch microscopes fruit seen ants swimming tongue teeth creatures dancing angler mammal hide appearance Africa

Strange Creatures 1

Modern electron

help us to see 2

unusual tiny creatures no-one has ever

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before. Of course, we wouldn’t have needed one to see the 150 kg jellyfish, each the size of a washing machine, 3

off Japan’s beaches in 2002!

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Special deep-sea submarines have found 4

5

to

and their own shining fishing rod

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fish with rows of long sharp

prey. A lizard in the Namib Desert

hops from leg to leg on hot sand 8

.

in

and looks as though it is 9

The odd-looking African aardvark eats

and 10

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termites and sometimes smells like rotten

,

which attracts these insects. The chameleon, a lizard with a

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11

as long as its body, changes colour 12

to

from its enemies or sneak up on insects. The Australian 13

platypus is a

which lays eggs, and

when scientists first heard reports about its strange 14

15

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they didn’t believe such weird

existed. How wrong could they be!

Contemporary Cloze

3


Use the following words to complete the poem. This poem is made up of rhyming couplets, which means two lines following each other rhyme (aa, bb, cc and so on). Knowing that the words rhyme at the ends of each line pair should help you. plus rule

aware thin delay play grey checks tan

school skin

fuss midday

sex can

Sun Safety 1

Many admire a dark brown

,

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2

.

But it’s best to avoid it if you

3

,

The ozone layer is now so

4

.

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It increases the danger to your

5

In the summer heat just don’t

6

Especially when you’re out at

’, 8

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And put on a hat without any

9

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Teachers protect the pupils at

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.

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Use a sunscreen, ‘15

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‘No hat, no play!’ is a common

Avoid that sun around

.

11

, 12

.

And even take care when the skies are Visit the doctor for regular

13

, 14

.

Cancer is a problem for either People long ago just weren’t

,

15

,

Our 21st century message ‘YOU MUST TAKE CARE!’

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

4


Use the following VERBS to complete the passage. painted gallops records drawn take displayed checks use complete jump began paid placed mixed move

Animated Films 1

Animation perhaps

when our early ancestors drew animals galloping 2

across cave walls or ancient Egyptians

pictures inside tombs and

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temples. 3

To produce an animated cartoon, teams of artists 4

drawings which are then

dozens of

on a ‘storyboard’. A digital camera linked to 5

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a computer

them in the

story’s correct order. For recording, each drawing 6

is

under a sheet of

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glass to keep it flat and absolutely still. If the 7

drawings

slightly, the 8

film’s characters will

around jerkily on the screen. The computer then 9

each moving sequence of 10

drawings to see that a horse

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correctly or a hero’s walking action looks natural. 11

In recent years, some artists have preferred to 12

instead of the cartoon animals 13

films like Stuart Little have

human characters

by Walt Disney’s ‘storymen’. Recent

real-life actors and computer-animated

characters which almost look real. It is thought that, in future, computer animations more 14

life-like than Stuart Little may avoid the huge salaries Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

15

some screen roles from real actors to

to film stars.

Contemporary Cloze

5


Use the following words to complete the passage. young swallowed

dangerous spinning countries dangers today costs Christmas injur y car twheels kites film

ignore batteries

Children’s Toys 1

Ancient Greek and Roman children flew their

, rolled hoops and 2

.

whipped tops, but didn’t have the variety of toys you have 3

. However, the top toy in

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Many very expensive toys appear around

4

pre-Christmas sales in 2003 was a simple

5

about €9.

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is used to play ‘attack’ games and only

top called a ‘beyblade’. It

Toys are great fun but there are also 6

. Messages on

some packets warn that a particular toy 7

for

children under three as it contains tiny 8

.

parts which could be

Others may have sharp points which could cause 9

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may be

or contain poisonous liquids,

such as are sometimes found in paints or crayons. We must remember that some which make toys do not have our strict safety standards. One toy, a

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10

11

, has been

plastic elf based on a character in a Harry Potter 12

described as very dangerous for

children by one member of

Parliament. 13

, talk to you, and

Some modern toys are amazing—they can do 14

remind you they are there when you with Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

15

them! There are plastic balls

inside which even bounce around by themselves! Contemporary Cloze

6


Use the following words to complete the poem. Use the rhyming words to help you fill in the spaces. site know results mine adults right

display trains

sign show

walls brains town way down scrawls

Graffiti 1

Annoying tags the world sees on

,

2

.

Not works of art, but just plain

3

,

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Councils dislike them, they feel they’re not

4

They make efforts to clear them from every

5

’,

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Street gangs use them: ‘This area’s It marks their territory, a warning

6

. 7

Tags scratched on windows in buses and Visual pollution by irresponsible

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Some are fine artists as you and I

,

8

. 9

, 10

.

in

Decorated bus shelters – their creations on

11

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They brighten drab walls in poor parts of

.

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13

, 14

.

By selfish taggers who go their own

15

,

Shopkeepers’ spray cans sold only to We’re battling graffiti and getting

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

,

12

With bubble letter messages written Chemical blasts wipe off a

Contemporary Cloze

.

16

.

7


Use the following words to complete the passage. fossils size found hunted foothills

dinosaur myster y centur y elephant scientists unsolved million plains

skeleton ever y

Dinosaurs Dinosaurs were amazing creatures. Some were plant-eaters while others were meat-eaters. 1

Some were the

but with a brain the same size as your pet cat’s! They lived millions 3

of years ago, but

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2

of a chicken! Others were many times bigger than an

discover several new kinds of dinosaur fossil

year. Discoveries are mainly made in China, Mongolia, the central

5

of the USA, Argentina and Australia.

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4

6

At the start of this

, two

fossils were discovered in China. They were

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about 130

10

7

years old. 8

One is the first to be with its feather-like body covering still intact.

9

Recently, researchers in the of the Andes Mountains found the almost complete

of a meat-eater. It is possibly the world’s oldest

11

fossil—230 million years old! (It would take you 11 days to count to one million!) The same 12

expedition also found skull and

13

of two predators near a river. They had a bird-like

their prey standing upright on two hind legs. 14

We know a lot about them—but the still remains Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

of why dinosaurs disappeared

15

. Contemporary Cloze

8


Use the following words to complete the passage. clear screens thumbprint darkens most kinds

animal future

wood boring skin walls outside

change panes

Homes of the Future Class 4H All Saints Primary School Dear Stephanie,

1

We’re studying different 2

made from

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In your letter you mentioned what you are studying at school. of homes—mud-brick houses, Indian tepees

hides, Inuit igloos built of ice, and American pioneer

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cabins. But our teacher says the homes of the

4

We’ve all heard about huge plasma TV 5

3

will amaze us all!

we’ll have hanging on the

, but what about walls made from soy flour and recycled newspaper! This

is a product called ‘Environ’ which looks like granite but can be drilled, hammered and sawn 6

8

colour! When the weather is cold the paint

in

7

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. And there’s a paint being developed for outside walls that can

like

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to absorb more heat. (Remember that T-shirt you had that changed colour when you got hot?) 9

How about windows that go

at the flick of a switch! ‘Viracon’ uses liquid 10

crystals (the stuff used in watch screens), sandwiching them between

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of glass to make it look foggy. When electricity is passed through, the liquid crystals go clear 11

! Amazing!

and, hey presto, you can see 12

But that’s not the

amazing thing Mr Harris said. We’ll have a mirror with

a camera and LCD screen that can check our health by analysing 14

Electronic diaries that will scan a seemed

15

13

colour!

to open doors to cars and homes

after this!

Kate Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

9


Use the following NOUNS to complete the passage. angelfish hive legs tigers snowflake animals stripes

cockroach Patterns leopards butterfly numbers scientists

ground speeds

Patterns and Numbers in Nature 1

are found everywhere in nature. We have the pattern of hexagonal 2

shapes on a honeycomb in a bees’

and the rhomboid shapes on a 3

.

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snake’s scales. There is also the six-sided rotation symmetry of an icy 4

Left and right symmetry is common. The right wing of a beautiful

is

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the mirror image of the left one and other insects are the same.

Parallel stripes are seen on 5

and zebras

but jaguars, cheetahs and

g

spots. Fish also have stripes and

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stripe patterns on the tropical break apart and 9

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then rejoin. New develop as the fish grows. 10

11

versa. When centipedes travel at high

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7

Japanese

8

legs. The front and back left

only one cell, certainly know their

have

have shown that horizontal

Numbers are found too. When a

40 touch the

6

13

moves fast it uses two sets of three

move with the middle right leg and vice 12

sometimes only three legs out of

at one time! Amoeba, tiny 15

14

with

. They multiply by dividing!

Contemporary Cloze

10


Use the following NOUNS to complete the passage. cars run friends grandparents kilometres records race motorways sausages people school towns hour seconds destination

Speed! probably tell you that life is just too fast for them today. They 2

think too many 3

speed

want to live their lives at breakneck speed. High-

have been built all around the world so people can reach their

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1

Your

4

more quickly

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at speeds of at least 100 km per 5

. That’s

much faster than the early 6

steam

in Britain. They could only

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travel at 3 km per hour in

in

7

because of a law passed in

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1865. It was quicker to walk!

listed in the 2003 Guinness Book of Records? They include the fastest

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8

And what about some of the speed

9

backwards

12

from Los Angeles to New York—a distance of 2 400

10

! Another entry tells us that a New Zealander ate eight

11

in just one minute. Perhaps you and one of your

could beat the book’s listed record of nine

for a 50-metre, three-legged 15

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14

13

achieved by the pupils of a Japanese

. It’s worth a try! Contemporary Cloze

11


Use clues from the diagrams and some of your own words to complete the passage.

Games Around the World For thousands of years many of the world’s children have played 1

which help to improve their physical and

mental skills.

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Children in the Dominican Republic play 2

’ and use a spinning top to try to knock

off small stones. The stones are placed in 4

a

drawn on the ground. Inuit children spin a top inside their home

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3

5

and try to run

the house before it stops spinning!

Nigerian youngsters play a war

7

members sit on a

6

game. Team

and move backwards 8

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across a ‘river’ drawn on the ground. A

in

steers them around obstacles representing rocks, crocodiles etc. 9

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‘Haba Gaba’ is a game played in Sierra Leone in

,

with each player given three throws and the highest score winning. 10

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‘Papago’ is a native American Indian game using 11

are filled with sand. One has a

paper cups. They

hidden in it. 12

, he/she

If player 1 finds it at his/her first

earns four points. His/Her second try earns three points and so on. 13

The first player to reach 10 points

the game. 14

At Easter, Dutch children gently bump hard-boiled 15

together. The person whose egg is the Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

to crack is the winner! 12


Use the following words to complete the passage. Look at the map and bar graph to fill some spaces. nor thern centur y

warm disease

Russia four children bite harmless year Australia Africa drugs Korea scientists

Fighting Malaria 1

Malaria is a disease found in

from the female Anopheles mosquito. Millions of people die each 3

year; most are

4

Control of the

under the age of 10.

has become

5

some of the

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more difficult as it has developed a resistance to

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2

humid climates. It is spread by a

used by doctors. 6

However, in the 21st

experts expect to find a cure. In 2002,

discovered the mosquito’s

g

7

in

gene pattern. They now hope to make the insect by experimenting with those genes.

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8

9

In the

hemisphere, 10

America, Canada and

are 11

,

free of malaria, but people in India and South America suffer a great deal. The

graph of the Asia-Pacific region shows most cases in the

12

2000 were found in

Papua New Guinea, which lies just north of 13

. Of the countries listed, only

than 20 000 cases, and Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

15

14

had fewer

had about the same number as Vanuatu.

Contemporary Cloze

13


Use the following words to complete the passage. dollars painful

tadpoles suburbs

getting farmers

South poisoned

hunt sugar

spread foxes lay destroying damage

Nature Fights Back 1

Many animals are endangered or extinct because we 2

their environment. Perhaps now they’re

them or destroy

their own back! 3

beetles. They’ve increased to huge numbers as they can

cane

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Cane toads were brought to Queensland in Australia to control

4

up to 10 000 eggs

6

and lizards. Even pets can be

if they eat these toads! 7

This century, South American fire ants have

8

States in the USA. They have a

northwards across some

bite and cost America millions of

each year. Their nest mounds are so hard they damage farm

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5

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at a time. They are spreading across north Australia, eating native

10

in

machinery, so

are very unhappy. Now these

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ants have been found in Australia. 11

Argentine ants, also from

America, were recently found in New Zealand.

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They

12

fruit crops

and climb trees, sometimes killing baby native birds. Bears in Canada and

13

in

Britain are often found scavenging food from rubbish 14

. Thousands of crown-of-thorns starfish are slowly

bins in city 15

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

some of the world’s finest reefs. Looks like nature’s fighting back! Contemporary Cloze

14


Use the following ADJECTIVES to complete the passage. harmful valuable special thrilling outer new

enormous reusable impor tant far-off

several red brilliant regular different

Space Travel 1

Space travel has fascinated the world’s 2

moon landings, the

scientists for years. Since the 3

targets have been Venus and the ‘

4

A

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planet’, Mars—which are both closer to Earth than the other planets. camera on the ‘Odyssey’ spacecraft has been photographing the 5

Saturn in the near

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surface of Mars and the ‘Cassini’ probe will orbit

future. The ‘Stardust’ spacecraft is at present collecting 6

dust from a comet’s tail in space and will return

7

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information to Earth several years from now.

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Rocket planes can fly over 7000 km/h and 8

space flights are expected during the

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21st century. The price of one ticket on ‘Xerus’, a rocket plane planned to 9

take tourists on a

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Astronauts from

11

possible

one-hour trial flight in the next decade, is €150 000! countries have spent months orbiting in space to test

effects. These experiments will lead to space stations where 12

people will live and work for

years.

If space travel for ordinary people is to become a reality, the scientists need to cut the 13

costs. At present, a shuttle’s main fuel tank drops away in flight and 14

must be replaced for each develop Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

15

mission. One way to reduce this huge expense is to

launch vehicles, and various designs are being tested. Contemporary Cloze

15


Use the following words to complete the passage. something lazy England changing called adults centuries years plane different word young shor ten pupils Roman

Our Changing Language 1

There are thousands of languages and over the

our English 2

language has seen many changes. An Old English

like ‘cese’ has 3

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become ‘cheese’ and ‘forca’ is now ‘fork’. The Saxon invaders of

called short garments ‘shirts’, whereas the Danes, also invaders,

5

them ‘skirts’. Now, centuries later, they mean totally

articles of

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clothing!

4

6

Humans tend to be so refrigerator, omnibus, aeroplane and telephone have become fridge, bus,

g

7

Shakespeare shortened ‘do not’ to

in ew Vi

9

‘don’t’—and that was over 300 8

‘autumn’ and ‘hymn’ were once ancient

them! 11

Who’d have thought that

12

people are 13

our language.

you did that was ‘wicked’ was good! A 14

wicked witch—a good one? ‘Gross’ can mean 144 items to 15

‘yuck’ to their children. Let’s hope the

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

ago! Our words

words ‘autumnus’ and ‘hymnus’ but, hey, let’s

10

Nowadays,

and phone. Even

Contemporary Cloze

, but

reading this think it’s ‘cool’!

16


Use the following ADJECTIVES to complete the passage. Japanese young clever overweight serious Long painful shor t unsuitable English unfor tunate comfortable developing American suitable

Computers and Your Health 1

An

expert warns that most computers are designed for adults. He 2

says

4

muscles and bones could be harmed and

pl e

3

children using them can damage their health. A child’s

neck and bone problems follow in later life. Recent research in

5

and

English schools shows many pupils suffer frequent neck and back pain. As a result,

designers are being asked

Sa m

6

7

to design

computers for children. 8

g

found we shouldn’t be staring at

in

computer screens for hour after hour. They reported that

ew

9

headaches

and eyestrain were problems for those

Vi

10

or foolish enough to 11

spend over five hours a day in front of a computer.

periods sitting down 12

are also thought to be one reason we see so many

study found many schools had

experts have

13

children. Another

chairs and tables which couldn’t be

raised or lowered for different age groups. 14

REMEMBER! Position the chair and keyboard so you are 15

feet flat on the floor and take frequent Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

, rest your

Contemporary Cloze

breaks. 17


Use the following NOUNS to complete the passage. horse potter y pictures doctors suits Statue metals dolphins friction Sweden problems

bodies signals paint children

Benefits from Space Research 1

The enormous pressures on astronauts’ 2

material made in 3

. It spreads pressure around the body as a person

recommend mattresses made of it.

pl e

sleeps and now

at lift-off led to a new foam

4

Superman star, Christopher Reeve, was paralysed when he fell from a

.

5

Sa m

He now uses a space research invention which sends tiny electrical

to stimulate muscles and nerves and maintain his fitness. NASA technology, which took amazing 6

of the moon, is now used 7

g

for eye testing. Young

ew

in

don’t sit still long enough for normal tests but

now thousands are screened to detect possible 8

.

future 9

Insulating materials made from

and ceramics protected the space 10

as they re-entered Earth’s

Vi

shuttles from the fierce heat caused by atmosphere. These materials are now used in firefighters’

11

.

Space research has led to many benefits: sensors which help archaeologists to find ancient 12

prevent

buried underground and ‘bleepers’ attached to underwater nets to 13

becoming entangled. A ceramic

to protect the Apollo launching pad now protects bridges and the

14

used

15

of

Liberty from corrosion! Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

18


Use your OWN WORDS to complete the passage below.

The Book or the Film? 1

Would Hans Christian Andersen, who 2

1836, like the Walt Disney 3

with

better than his book? Perhaps he would,

the wonderful computer 4

!

pl e

images used in modern Some children prefer the book as they can it at their own

Sa m

5

The Little Mermaid around

speed. Others are disappointed when 6

so many

of the

story are omitted by film makers. One 7

in a recent

g

survey was very annoyed when she found details 8

Many young

in

about a troll and a trapdoor had been 9

out of a Harry Potter film. 10

preferred to read the book 11

Vi

ew

they saw the film. They thought that watching the film

took away

some of the interest and excitement. A number of children liked to

12

the various 13

characters in their

using the more detailed descriptions usually found in

14

. Also, it

costs you absolutely nothing to borrow a book from a public

15

.

Which do you prefer? Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

19


Use the following words to complete the passage. Look at the map to fill some of the spaces. skins protect Bwindi breeding elephants

surface find Santiago medicines Kenya Java

underground China diseases Madrid

Endangered Animal Snippets 1

An Australian wildlife conservation group was formed in 2001 to

50

endangered native mammals. In November 2002, officials from 160 countries met in , Chile’s capital, to discuss trade in endangered species. Outside,

pl e

2

3

hundreds of students protested that

would suffer if ivory trading

Sa m

bans were lifted.

In Asia, ‘jinbou’ is the ancient belief that 4

made from animal

parts improve poor health. One result is that tiger

in homes are

more common than tigers in the wild! In

g in

5

6

, Spain’s capital,

2002, in

7

the city’s zoo was trying to

a 8

ew

mate for its Iberian lynx. With fewer than 200 left, they hope to start a 9

programme. There are fewer than 100 of the world’s only 10

Vi

elephants who move into caves at night in native to the island of

11

, Africa. The silvery gibbons

in Indonesia are seriously threatened. Concerned 12

scientists fear that human

from tourists may reduce mountain 13

gorilla numbers in Uganda’s

National Park. The number of pandas in 14

a nature reserve in Sichuan province in 15

Only 5% of the Earth’s

is also declining.

is protected for wildlife. Let’s hope that this

area is greatly expanded in the 21st century. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

20


Use the information on the diagram to complete the passage.

The Water Cycle 1

The

cycle is part of our daily lives. Clouds produce rain which falls 2

, lakes and rivers. Most of the rain which falls on to

onto land areas, 3

the

is evaporated by the sun’s heat or flows underground into the 4

5

or lake can be purified in a water

pl e

Earth’s waterways. Water from a

6

works. This clean water is used in factories and

7

and then

g

Sa m

carry the waste water from

8

treatment plant. Any unused treated water is then returned to the

in

9

and rivers where the cycle

ew Vi

these buildings to a

begins again. 10

The

evaporates

water from the Earth’s surface and from 11

the leaves of plants. This invisible water water droplets which form

rises and cools into tiny

12

. As the clouds rise higher the water

vapour cools even more and the drops join together to form bigger drops of water. These 13

14

become too heavy to stay in the air, so they fall as

. The sun heats the water and the

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

15

begins again.

21


Use the following words to complete the passage. Use the illustrations to fill some of the spaces. duck cashew hot French lime grandparents rolls millions diners

citizens sweet make recipes enjoy elsewhere

Multicultural Foods 1

For many years,

of people have moved from their own countries to 2

seek a better life

. With them they took their traditional which they introduced

pl e

3

to generations of

4

Sa m

in their new homeland.

We now have restaurants which 5

serve us dishes with frogs’ legs! Chinese

ew

in

g

restaurants have their sliced 6

with bean

sprouts and ginger. Families around the country eat takeaway Thai meals flavoured with

7

leaves,

8

nuts. Indian migrants have brought spicy meat

dishes with delicious

9

sauces. Vietnamese vegetarian spring

Vi

coconut milk and

10

dipped in a tasty thin sauce are also very popular with diners. Plus 11

everyone loves baklavas, 12

These exotic foods 13

your 14

Greek pastries made with honey and nuts!

the potatoes, roast meat and vegetables eaten by

sound very ordinary, don’t they? I’m sure we all

these tasty foods brought by our new

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

15

.

22


Use the following NOUNS to complete the passage. awards Horse author worked wizard films Myrtle names languages child truancy

books booksellers schools France

The Harry Potter Phenomenon 1

Joanne Kathleen Rowling is the

of the popular books about an 2

orphan Harry Potter, who is a young

she ‘lived in a fantasy world’. Her favourite book, ‘The Little White

pl e

3

and says as a

. The author was born in England

4

’, influenced

the Harry Potter series of seven planned

Sa m

books. Rowling taught English in 5

and Portugal 6

and also

for

in

g

Amnesty International. 7

Her

have

been praised by reviewers throughout Europe and have won many European 8

. They have

ew

book been translated into more than 28

9

Vi

, sold in more than 130 countries and made into

10

which are exciting and very, very popular. 11

Children love the interesting character Moaning some church

12

and Nearly Headless Nick. Book sales have been huge but 13

witchcraft. When

have banned them because of their emphasis on 14

released the third book in Britain, they were asked 15

to sell them after school hours so that Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

like Helga Hufflepuff,

Contemporary Cloze

wouldn’t be a problem! 23


Use the following words to complete the passage. Use information from the graph to fill some spaces. nations size

preser ved harmful

minke islands windiest oil southern declare blue

penguins protests ships largest

Antarctica Antarctica is 14 million square kilometres in area, the coldest 1

and one of the

regions on Earth. Its 2

pl e

waters teem with life like the

whales, which reach 10 m in length. This is one-third the 3

size of the

whale. Unfortunately,

Sa m

whalers killed over 400 minke whales in 2001 despite 4

from around the world. 5

The environmental group Greenpeace believes Antarctica should be as a world park. It thinks its wildlife, like leopard seals, the

8

check on possible

ew

realises that several

11

deposits of

elephant

7

, should be protected for future generations.

regularly visit the region to interfere with whaling fleets or

in

Greenpeace

g

seals and the emperor

6

9

developments in this unique environment. It 10

are interested in the area as it may hold huge

and minerals.

Vi

The Australian Heard and McDonald 12

form part of the Antarctic

region. By early 2003, Australia will 13

them part of the world’s 14

latest and

marine park. It

will be 6.5 million hectares in area, almost the 15

of Switzerland!

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

24


Select your OWN WORDS to complete the passage. Use a word only once and have one word in each gap.

Astronauts 1

Explorers have 2

a burning

on unknown waters, trekked across hot deserts under

or cut their way through dense jungles. There are also 3

courageous astronauts who risk their 4

than 45, but former American

pl e

Chinese astronauts have to be

as they explore outer space.

5

astronaut John Glenn, a US senator, was 77 years

when he last flew in

space! The American astronauts have no age limit but 6

Sa m

need to be very

to pass 7

.

extremely strict physical 8

New entrants are

by

top scientists and experienced astronauts who 9

g

make them aware of the

in

they will face in space. These problems include 10

, radiation

cramped living

11

ew

storms, space debris, zero gravity (weightlessness), motion sickness and 12

eye-hand coordination. Astronauts also have to

freeze-dried food, but

Vi

experiments to produce an onboard ecosystem by scientists in Germany could see astronauts 13

.

eating fresh fish in the near 14

have also taken huge risks in space. Russian cosmonaut Valentina

Tereshkova was the

15

woman in space and American Eileen Collins the

first to command a space shuttle. Do you have what it takes to be an astronaut in the 21st century?

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Contemporary Cloze

25


Answers Bicycles! Bicycles! Bicycles!

Children’s Toys

Speed!

Page 1 1. holiday 3. America 5. popular 7. school 9. crowded 11. barriers 13. factories 15. copied

Page 6 1. kites 2. today 3. Christmas 4. spinning 5. costs 6. dangers 7. dangerous 8. swallowed 9. injury 10. countries 11. film 12. young 13. cartwheels 14. ignore 15. batteries

Page 11 1. grandparents 2. 3. motorways 4. 5. hour 6. 7. towns 8. 9. run 10. 11. sausages 12. 13. seconds 14. 15. school

Raising Healthy Children

Graffiti

Games Around the World

Page 2 1. spend 3. doubled 5. improves 7. showed 9. work 11. Keep 13. stay 15. visit

Page 7 1. walls 3. right 5. mine 7. trains 9. know 11. town 13. display 15. adults

means helps warned choose include builds wash

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14. 16.

scrawls site sign brains show down way results

Page 12 1. games 3. buttons 5. round 7. pole 9. Africa 11. stone 13. wins 15. last

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

Dinosaurs

Fighting Malaria

Page 3 1. microscopes 2. 3. swimming 4. 5. teeth 6. 7. Africa 8. 9. ants 10. 11. tongue 12. 13. mammal 14. 15. creatures

Page 8 1. size 3. scientists 5. plains 7. million 9. foothills 11. dinosaur 13. hunted 15. unsolved

Page 13 1. warm 3. children 5. drugs 7. scientists 9. northern 11. Africa 13. Australia 15. Korea

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

can skin play fuss rule grey sex

Vi

ew

Page 4 1. tan 3. thin 5. delay 7. plus 9. school 11. midday 13. checks 15. aware

in

Sun Safety

g

Strange Creatures seen angler catch dancing fruit hide appearance

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

elephant every century found skeleton fossils mystery

Nature Fights Back

Page 9 1. kinds 3. future 5. walls 7. change 9. clear 11. outside 13. skin 15. boring

Page 14 1. hunt 3. sugar 5. tadpoles 7. spread 9. dollars 11. South 13. foxes 15. destroying

animal screens wood darkens panes most thumbprint

Animated Films

Patterns and Numbers in Nature

Space Travel

Page 5 1. began 3. complete 5. records 7. move 9. checks 11. use 13. mixed 15. paid

Page 10 1. Patterns 3. snowflake 5. tigers 7. scientists 9. stripes 11. legs 13. ground 15. numbers

Page 15 1. brilliant 3. red 5. far-off 7. valuable 9. thrilling 11. harmful 13. enormous 15. reusable

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

painted displayed placed jump gallops drawn take

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

Homes of the Future 2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

people destination cars records kilometres friends race

pl e

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

three Japan gifts accidents roads cars year

Sa m

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

hive butterfly leopards angelfish cockroach speeds animals

Contemporary Cloze

Moteca circle canoe guide four attempt/try eggs

bite disease century harmless Russia year four

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

getting lay poisoned painful farmers damage suburbs

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

important special outer regular different several new

26


Answers Our Changing Language

The Water Cycle

Page 16 1. centuries 3. England 5. different 7. plane 9. Roman 11. young 13. something 15. pupils

Page 21 1. water 3. land 5. treatment 7. drains 9. ocean 11. vapour 13. drops 15. cycle

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

word called lazy years shorten changing adults

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

oceans river homes sewage sun clouds rain

Multicultural Foods

Page 17 1. English 2. young 3. developing 4. serious 5. America 6. clever 7. suitable 8. Japanese 9. painful 10. unfortunate 11. Long 12. overweight 13. unsuitable 14. comfortable 15. short

Page 22 1. millions 2. 3. recipes 4. 5. French 6. 7. lime 8. 9. hot 10. 11. sweet 12. 13. grandparents 14. enjoy 15.

Benefits from Space Research

The Harry Potter Phenomenon

Page 18 1. bodies 3. doctors 5. signals 7. children 9. metals 11. suits 13. dolphins 15. Statue

Page 23 1. author 3. child 5. France 7. books 9. languages 11. names 13. schools 15. truancy

Sa m

g

Sweden horse pictures problems friction pottery paint

in

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

Antarctica

Page 19 1. wrote 2. film 3. all 4. films 5. read 6. details/parts 7. girl/boy/child 8. left 9. readers/children 10. before 11. first 12. visualise/imagine/picture 13. minds/heads 14. books 15. library

Page 24 1. windiest 3. blue 5. preserved 7. penguins 9. harmful 11. oil 13. declare 15. size

Vi

ew

The Book or the Film?

Endangered Animal Snippets Page 20 1. protect 2. 3. elephants 4. 5. skins 6. 7. find 8. 9. underground 10. 11. Java 12. 13. Bwindi 14. 15. surface

Santiago medicines Madrid breeding Kenya diseases China

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

elsewhere diners duck cashew rolls make

pl e

Computers and Your Health

citizens

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

wizard Horse worked awards films Myrtle booksellers

2. 4. 6. 8. 10. 12. 14.

minke protests southern ships nations islands largest

Astronauts Page 25 1. sailed 2. sun 3. lives 4. younger 5. old 6. fit 7. examinations/tests 8. taught/trained 9. problems 10. quarters/areas 11. poor 12. eat 13. future 14. Women 15. first

Contemporary Cloze

27


0662IRE Contemporary Cloze - Middle