Issuu on Google+

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Middle

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing 0634UK

www.prim-ed.com


e pl m Sa g in ew Vi The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Foreword

m

pl

e

The Christmas Kit contains activities from across the curriculum, including English, mathematics, science, geography, R.E., art and design technology. The package enables pupils to work independently, in small groups or as a whole class under teacher direction. It has been designed to capture the pupil’s imagination and promote creativity while addressing skill development and cross-curricular learning. Activities include: • comprehending the meaning of Christmas; • exploring Christmas traditions around the world; • following directions in making Christmas gifts and cards; • reading and performing plays; • text analysis; • letter/diary writing; and • problem solving. Comprehensive teachers notes for each page, including learning objectives to explain the learning focus of the activity, background information, answers and additional activities, have been included to save precious time at this stage of the year. Merry Christmas and have fun!

g in

ew

Contents

Sa

Titles in this series are: The Christmas Kit – Lower The Christmas Kit – Middle The Christmas Kit – Upper

Vi

Teachers Notes ......................................................... ii Assessment Proforma ............................................ iii The Story of Christmas .................................. 2 – 5

Christmas Shopping Spree ...................... 36 – 37

Nativity Puppets .............................................. 6 – 9

Reindeer Maths ........................................... 38 – 39

Santa’s Elves .................................................. 10 – 13

Christmas Fun ............................................... 40 – 41

Babushka: A Christmas Legend .............. 14 – 17

Advent Calendar ......................................... 42 – 43

Around the World at Christmas .............. 18 – 21

Mini Christmas Puddings ......................... 44 – 45

Christmas Symbols and Traditions ........ 22 – 23

Make a Snowflake ...................................... 46 – 47

Christmas Words ......................................... 24 – 25

Christmas Parcels ........................................ 48 – 49

Christmas Word Sort ................................. 26 – 27

Christmas Vouchers ....................................50 – 51

Christmas Greetings Around the World ...................................................... 28 – 29

Christmas Pop-up Card............................. 52 – 53

Dear Diary ..................................................... 30 – 33 Christmas Books Into Movies ................. 34 – 35 Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Stained Glass Ornaments ......................... 54 – 55 Make a Santa ............................................... 56 – 57 Christmas Desk Calendar ..........................58 – 61

The Christmas Kit

i


Teachers Notes Each pupil page is supported by a teacher’s page which provides the teacher with the following information. Christmas Word Sort Learning Objectives

• Discriminates words hidden in a puzzle. • Sorts words according to specified categories. Materials

Copymaster Coloured pencils Background Information

Christmas is a time of tradition. The traditional colours of Christmas are red and green. Green was chosen to represent the continuance of life through the winter and the belief of eternal life through Christ. Red was chosen to symbolise the blood shed by Jesus at his crucifixion. Christmas decorations such as the Christmas tree, wreath, holly and mistletoe are all used to represent these beliefs. Traditionally, European people tended to celebrate the end of the year with huge feasts which may have lasted for many days. Later, the preparation of special foods became an important part of Christmas. Different foods are traditional in different countries. For example, roast turkey is popular in the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, while roast goose is popular in England. Father Christmas, St Nicholas, Santa Claus or Kris Kringle—by whatever name you know him— represents the jolly fellow who delivers Christmas presents to children all over the world. Santa is responsible for bringing together many traditions—Christian and pagan, Old Catholic, Scandinavian, Dutch, German and English. He brings us all together and children all over the world know who Santa is, even if they have a different name for him. mince pies

Additional Activities

1. Source as many different names for Santa as possible from around the world. Record them on a world map to develop pupils’ geographical knowledge. 2. Brainstorm different traditional Christmas foods. Categorise them according to the five food groups. Develop a healthy Christmas Day menu. 3. Study proper nouns. The names for Santa all begin with capital letters. All proper nouns begin with a capital letter. Brainstorm proper nouns that are relevant to Christmas. Display on a class chart for easy reference. Answers

Food

Decorations

plum pudding ham turkey eggnog vegetables

star angel tinsel bells lights tree mistletoe stockings wreath holly crackers

Different Names for Santa Santa Claus Father Christmas Saint Nicholas E

B

I

A O S

A M

T

M R S T

N

J H L L A A L Q L R

H C

S

T

O C

K

I

A C

L

A U

S H N

S

X

I

C

H O

L

A

S

L

C

G

E

L

T

S

I

M Y

L

H H

B

L

E

S

J

G E

A

T

H

T

D D

I

N G

G

B

P

E

S A

I

N

T N

V E

L

E

O T

V

E

G

E

T

A

P

L U M

P U

L

The Christmas Kit

Z

R

K

T

N

T S

E G G N O G S T I N S E L

26

T

I

C

S S A

H

T

N G

E S

A F

H

T

L

Y

T

X

I

L

U

E

L

R

E

O K

R

E

I

P

E

C

N

S M Y I M J

R E

K

C A

R

C

A

R W T

E

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

pl

e

• Learning Objectives guide the teacher as to the behaviours that pupils should be demonstrating through completing the activity. • Materials are clearly listed to aid in the quick preparation of activities. All resources can be gathered beforehand to aid in the smooth running of the lesson. • Background information has been provided where necessary to give the teacher any additional information that may be needed. This information could be the history behind the topic covered on the pupil page, a point of interest or an additional resource that may be useful. • Additional activities have been suggested as a way to extend pupils or to further develop the ideas on the pupil page. • Answers have been provided where necessary for easy marking of the pupil worksheet. Christmas Word Sort

m

There are 20 Christmas words hidden in the word search. Find and write them under the correct headings below

Sa

• Instructions are clear and easy for pupils to follow. They have been written to suit the specific age group. • Activities provide opportunities for pupils to demonstrate skills and knowledge gained over the school year. • Artwork complements the activity and has been drawn to suit the age of the pupils.

Different Names for Santa

g

.

Christmas Decorations

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Vi

ew

in

Christmas Food

The Christmas Kit

27

Using the Assessment Proforma

Fill in the appropriate learning area.

Assessment Prof Learning Area

Year

Term

Task

Give a brief description of the activities in the chosen copymaster and what was expected of the pupils.

Complete the continuums to indicate pupil progress. Use this space to comment on an individual pupil’s performance which cannot be indicated in the formal assessment, such as work habits or particular needs or abilities.

Learning Objectives(s)

Your child can:

orma

Still Developing

Understanding

List the learning objective(s) assessed on the chosen copymaster. Teacher Comment

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

ii

The Christmas Kit

The Christmas Kit

iii

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Assessment Proforma Year

Learning Area

Term

Sa

m

pl

e

Task

Learning Objectives(s)

Still Developing

Understanding

Vi

ew

in

g

Your child can:

Teacher Comment

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

iii


The Story of Christmas Learning Objectives

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Reads and understands text to complete set activities. • Extracts information from the text to complete set activities.

in

Materials

ew

Copymaster Background Information

Vi

The story of Christmas is thought to have originated from the Gospels of Saint Luke and Saint Matthew in the New Testament. According to the Gospel of Saint Luke, an angel appeared outside the town of Bethlehem to some shepherds and told them of the birth of Jesus. The Gospel of Saint Matthew tells how the Wise Men (kings) followed a bright star which led them to Jesus. The first mention of Christmas in the Roman calendar occurred in AD 366; 25 December was indicated as a day of observance. By 1100, Christmas had become the most important celebration in Europe. During the 1400s and 1500s, artists such as Botticelli, Sandro and painters of the Renaissance painted scenes of the Nativity. These paintings depict Jesus in the manger with Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, farm animals and the Wise Men (kings). Additional Activities

1. Pupils can use the characters on pages 7 – 9 to role-play the story of the Nativity. 2. Cut the story on page 3 into paragraphs and ask pupils to sequence them in the correct order. 3. Research the origins of the story. Answers

1. (a) (b) (c) 2

Six Joseph, Mary, angel, emperor, innkeeper, shepherds, three kings, Jesus Answers will vary The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


The Story of Christmas Read the story of Christmas.

Long ago, in a village called Nazareth, there lived a carpenter called Joseph. He was to marry a young woman by the name of Mary. One night, Mary had a dream. She was visited by an angel sent from God and told that she would bear the Son of God. She was to name Him Jesus. She told Joseph about the dream. The emperor of the time declared a census—which meant that everyone had to return to their place of birth and be recorded on a register. Mary and Joseph had to return to Bethlehem. Mary, who was pregnant with Jesus and due to give birth, rode on a donkey’s back for the journey, while Joseph walked alongside. While in Bethlehem, the time came for Jesus to be born.

m

pl

e

Mary and Joseph went from inn to inn to find a room for Mary to give birth to the baby Jesus. They were turned away because there were no rooms available. Finally, one innkeeper allowed them to use his stable. Joseph cleaned the stable and lined a feeding trough with fresh straw to use as a bed for baby Jesus. When the baby was born, they named Him Jesus as the angel had said.

in

g

Sa

After Jesus was born, a bright star appeared over Bethlehem. It could be seen in fields near and far. Shepherds in the fields were visited by an angel and told that Christ’s child was born and to follow the star. Shepherds came from all over the land to visit Jesus.

Vi

ew

Three kings in the east saw the star and knew what it meant. They followed the star to the stable and arrived bearing gifts for the Son of God. One brought a gift of frankincense, one a gift of myrrh and the other a gift of gold. Once they gave their gifts, they returned to the east to spread the word of the birth of Christ’s son.

1. Answer these questions.

(a)

How many paragraphs make up this story?

(b) Make a list of the characters mentioned in the story.

(c)

Who do you think is the most important character? Why?

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

3


The Story of Christmas Learning Objectives

Sa

m

pl

e

• Reads and understands text to complete set activities. • Extracts information from the text to complete set activities. • Demonstrates the ability to research information.

g

Materials

Answers

4

announced – declared trip – journey hotel – inn manger – feeding trough paddocks – fields present – gift One night, Mary had a dream. She was to name Him Jesus. She told Joseph about the dream. myrrh – an aromatic oil used for incense or perfume frankincense – an aromatic resin used for burning as incense census – the registration of citizens and their property for the purpose of taxation Research Activity Three Kings – Caspar; Melchior; Balthazar Angel – Archangel Gabriel Nazareth and Bethlehem – Israel

Vi

2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) 3. (a) (b) (c) 4. (a) (b) (c)

ew

in

Copymaster Dictionaries Research resources; e.g. Internet, encyclopedias etc.

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


The Story of Christmas 2. Write synonyms from the story for these words.

(a)

announced

(b) trip (c)

hotel

(d) manger (e)

paddocks

(f)

present

Research Activity Select one of the questions below.

3. Punctuate these sentences from the story.

e m

she told joseph about the dream

ew

in

(c)

g

(b) she was to name him jesus

pl

one night mary had a dream

Sa

(a)

1. What were the names of the three kings?

4. Find out the meaning of these.

myrrh

Vi

(a)

2. What was the name of the angel who came to Mary in her dream? 3. In which country are Nazareth and Bethlehem situated? Now think about:

• Where you might find the information to answer the question. Highlight the question you are going to research.

(b) frankincense

Record your answer below. (c)

census

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

5


Nativity Puppets Learning Objectives

Materials

ew

in

g

Sa

Worksheet puppet outlines (pages 7 – 9) Colouring pencils/felt-tipped pens Scissors Glue Lolly sticks Variety of books or readings of The Christmas Story Storyboard outline (or A3 paper folded to suit) Covered desks or puppet theatre to perform plays

m

pl

e

• Follows instructions to make a puppet. • Develops a storyboard to perform a play. • Demonstrates ‘The Christmas Story’ through the use of puppets.

Vi

Instructions for Using the Nativity Puppets

1. Discuss and read The Christmas Story (either as a whole class or small groups). 2. Cut, colour and assemble puppets using strong glue to attach lolly sticks to the paper figures (either in groups or individually). 3. Divide children into small groups and allocate characters to role-play (some may play several parts depending on class numbers). 4. In groups, children develop a storyboard as a plan for their actions and dialogue in the play. They will need to consider: – key events in the story – what action will take place (in sequence) – what dialogue is to be used – whether there should be sound effects/special effects for certain parts – props needed for setting the scene Additional Activities

1. Make storyboards and role-play other traditional Christmas tales (e.g. Babushka, St Nicholas). 2. Create a story map following the travels of Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem. 6

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Nativity Puppets

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

7


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Nativity Puppets

8

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Nativity Puppets

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

9


Santa’s Elves Learning Objectives

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Reads and understands text to complete set activities.

Materials

Copymaster Additional Activities

1. Pupils can role-play the story of Santa’s elves. 2. Cut the story provided on page 11 into sections or paragraphs and ask pupils to sequence them in the correct order. 3. Discuss ways in which the confusion among the elves could have been avoided. This is a good opportunity to demonstrate the importance of listening carefully to instructions! 4. Pupils can work in small groups, or independently, to make up their own ending to the story. 10

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Santa’s Elves Read the story about Santa’s elves.

One Christmas, a long time ago, Santa and his elves were busily getting ready for Christmas. ‘Oh, it’s always such a rush at the last minute, no matter how organised we are!’ moaned Elvin, Santa’s chief elf, as he rushed around getting all the other elves organised.

pl

e

‘All right elves, listen carefully. We have a lot to do and very little time in which to do it. We need to break into teams and concentrate on one area at a time,’ Elvin announced. He was quite proud of his plan. ‘Andy, you take your group and work on the toy trains and planes. Lisa, take your group to work on the puzzles and games. Angela, your group can work on the dolls, prams and doll houses while Lloyd, your group can work on sporting equipment. Once your group has finished that task, see me and I’ll allocate you another one. Now off to work, we have a lot to do!’

Sa

m

The elves quickly moved to their workstations to begin work on their set projects. However, Andy took his group to work on the puzzles and games, Lisa took her group to work on the sporting equipment, Angela took her group to work on the toy trains and planes and Lloyd took his group to work on the dolls, prams and doll houses.

in

g

Before long, the groups were in despair. None of them knew what they were doing. Lisa’s group only knew how to make puzzles and games—they didn’t know how to make sporting equipment. All the groups were confused.

ew

‘Why did Elvin give us such difficult tasks when we are already running behind schedule?’ asked Meg, the smallest elf of all.

Vi

Elvin began to notice what was happening. He couldn’t believe that no-one had listened to his instructions. He called everyone to stop work and explained again what everyone’s tasks were. There was a sigh of relief as everyone moved towards their workstations. ‘Maybe we should listen more carefully next time!’ whispered Meg. ‘Then we wouldn’t have become so confused.’ Finally, after a long night and day’s work, all the toys were ready. Elvin was just checking the final list to make sure nothing had been forgotten. Santa was in his sleigh waiting for the last of the presents to be loaded. ‘Elvin!’ called Santa. ‘You and your elves have excelled yourselves once again. Thank you for all your effort. Have the night off!’ ‘Thanks, Santa, I think we’ll do just that!’ replied Elvin, rather exhausted, as he waved Santa goodbye. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

11


Santa’s Elves Learning Objectives

• Extracts information from the text to complete set activities. • Demonstrates the ability to use a dictionary.

Materials

pl

e

Copymaster Dictionaries

m

Additional Activities

Answers

in

g

Sa

1. Use the words given which can replace ‘said’ to begin a class list. Brainstorm with the class and record further words on a chart to be displayed. 2. Study word building. Develop a list of things to remember when building from base words. This is a good opportunity to revise any word building strategies taught through the year. 3. Revise dictionary skills. Use the keywords at the top of the dictionary page to assist in finding the required word.

Vi

ew

1. Andy’s Group – trains and planes – puzzles and games Angela’s Group – dolls, prams and doll houses – trains and planes Lisa’s Group – puzzles and games – sporting equipment Lloyd’s Group – sporting equipment – dolls, prams and doll houses 2. Answers will vary; could include listening more carefully, writing down the information, the chief elf could have made a chart etc. 3. moaned, announced, asked, whispered, called or replied 4. (a) busy – busily (b) elf – elves (c) small – smallest (d) happen – happening (e) care – carefully (f) forgotten 5. (a) concentrate – to focus or direct towards one point (b) allocate – to set apart for a special purpose (c) despair – a feeling of hopelessness (d) schedule – a plan to show how a project is to be done with a timetable (e) confused – mixed up or puzzled (f) task – a piece of work or a duty 12

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Santa’s Elves Answer these questions. 1. Write the tasks allocated to each group and the task they began to work on.

4. Write the word from the text that is built from these base words. Circle the part that changes.

ew

in

g

Sa

3. Make a list of five words used in the story instead of ‘said’.

m

pl

e

2. How do you think the confusion could have been avoided?

busy

(b) elf (c)

small

Vi

(d) happen

5. Use your dictionary to write the meaning of these words.

(a)

(a)

(e)

care

(f)

forgot

concentrate

(b) allocate (c)

despair

(d) schedule (e)

confused

(f)

task

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

13


Babushka: A Christmas Legend Learning Objectives

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Reads and understands a playscript.

Materials

Copymaster Background Information

This is a Russian tale, which tells the story of Babushka quietly tending her little house, when three strangers stop at her door. They are following a star to a place where a baby has just been born. They invite Babushka to travel with them, but she thinks it’s too cold and wants to clean her house before going on such a journey. After the men leave, Babushka realises they are no ordinary strangers and they are seeking an extraordinary baby. Additional Activities

1. Read stories about other gift-bearers around the world (St Nicholas, Pere Noël, Three Wise Men). 2. Use storyboards in groups to organise plays based on these stories. Pupils will need to think about actions, dialogue, costumes and props that may be needed. Video the results or perform plays for the class. 14

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Babushka: A Christmas Legend Chara c ters:

Babushka, three ki ngs, a villager, a wo odcutter, a w asherwo man, narrator Stage right, interi or of Babushka’s c o ttage; centre st age, a ‘forest’; s tage left, an e m pty manger; foreground, a Ch ristmas tree

Setting:

Once, long ago, an old woman lived alone by herself on the edge of a village. Her name was Babushka. One night, as she was cleaning her house, there was a noise outside.

VILLAGER:

Babushka! Babushka! Come quickly, come and see the star!

BABUSHKA:

I have no time for stars. There is work to be done.

VILLAGER:

But, Babushka, it is a wondrous magical star!

BABUSHKA:

All this fuss for a star. Go away, I say, and let me do my work.

NARRATOR:

Very early the next morning, there is a sudden knock on the door.

BABUSHKA:

Now what!

NARRATOR:

To Babushka’s amazement, three kings, wearing crowns and robes, are standing outside.

KING 1:

Babushka, we have travelled a long way, and need a bed to rest in and some warm food to eat. Will you help us?

KING 3:

pl

m

Sa

g

in

ew

It will only be until night falls.

Vi

KING 2:

e

NARRATOR:

For then we must follow the star once more.

BABUSHKA:

Then you must indeed stay. I have food enough for all, and a bed you may use.

NARRATOR:

As Babushka served the kings their food, she asked them about their journey.

KING 1:

We must follow the star, to see the newly-born king of heaven and earth.

KING 2:

And we take Him gifts, of gold, myrrh and frankincense.

KING 3:

Why not join us, Babushka?

BABUSHKA:

Me? Why, what I could possibly offer to a baby such as He?

KING 1:

Perhaps one of these excellent pies!

BABUSHKA:

Pies? For a baby? I don’t think so. But I do have toys, in the cupboard. They belonged to my children, now grown up and gone far away.

KING 2:

Then come with us, Babushka!

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

15


in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Babushka: A Christmas Legend

ew

Instructions for Performing the Play

Vi

Pupils could rehearse the play in groups of five, with the villager, woodcutter and washerwoman doubling as the three kings. Before they practise, teachers could introduce character study using these simple steps. • Discuss the characters in the play. For each character, teachers could ask questions like: What is this character’s work? How wealthy is he/she? How does he/she feel during the play? Encourage pupils to think about what the characters do in the play as well as what they say. • With the whole class, focus on each character’s movement. How do the pupils think each character would move? Encourage children to consider the answers they gave to the last activity. Discuss also age and social standing. • Give the children some scenes from the play to mime. For example, Babushka cleaning her house, the kings following the star, the woodcutter working in the forest. Ask pupils to think about how every part of their body is moving to show the characters they are playing and encourage individual responses. • With the whole class, discover the relationship between the way a character moves and his or her voice. Encourage pupils to experiment with power (volume), pitch and pace in creating a voice for each character. Pupils can form small groups to improvise scenes that are not in the play; for example, the kings talking just before they reach Babushka’s house, Babushka talking to the villager after she returns from the stable. Each group could present these improvisations to the class. 16

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Babushka: A Christmas Legend I … I’ll think about it. Come now, I’ll show you where to sleep.

NARRATOR:

That day, while the weary kings slept, Babushka took the toys from the cupboard. She cleaned and polished them until they shone like new. As the sun set, the kings awoke.

KING 2:

Well, Babushka, have you made up your mind? Will you join us?

BABUSHKA:

Yes … yes, I will. But I must clean my house before I leave. You go and I will follow you. I will catch up easily.

NARRATOR:

All that day, Babushka cleaned and polished. Carefully, she placed the toys into a large basket. Then, weary from her work, she sat down to rest for a few minutes—and fell asleep. When she awoke, the roosters were crowing, and the sky was lightening.

BABUSHKA:

Oh, no! I have slept away the night! Never mind, tonight I shall follow the star.

NARRATOR:

But when night fell, the star was gone. Babushka took her basket of gifts and began to search for the kings. All that night she searched, and in the morning she found a woodcutter in the forest.

BABUSHKA:

Excuse me, sir, but I seek the three kings who follow the mystical star. Have you seen them?

WOODCUTTER:

They were here, old mother, but they have long passed.

NARRATOR:

For another day and night, Babushka searched, until she came across a washerwoman at a stream.

BABUSHKA:

Good woman, can you help me? I seek the three kings who follow the mystical star.

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

BABUSHKA:

They stayed here, old mother, but they have now gone.

BABUSHKA:

They stayed? And was there a baby, a royal baby?

WASHERWOMAN:

Why, yes, there was. A child like no other. Come, I can show you where He was born.

NARRATOR:

The washerwoman led Babushka to a stable behind an inn. The stable was empty.

BABUSHKA:

Where has the child gone?

WASHERWOMAN:

Sadly, I know not, old mother. You are too late.

BABUSHKA:

No, I will find Him, for I know now that He is the most important thing in my life.

NARRATOR:

And Babushka still searches for the baby Jesus today. Sometimes, at Christmas, when she sees a child sleeping, she will take a toy from her basket and leave it under the tree—just in case.

Vi

WASHERWOMAN:

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

17


Around the World at Christmas Learning Objectives

Materials

Copymaster

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Reads and understands informational text on Christmas customs around the world.

Background Information

Try these websites for Christmas around the world. http://christmas.com/worldview http://www.ozkids.gil.com.au/christmas/ http://santas.net/australianchristmas.htm http://www.crewsnest.vispa.com/christmas.htm Additional Activities

1. Select one country to write a detailed report about the activities, traditions and special events celebrated at Christmas. Present the report to the class. 2. On a world map select, locate and record key information about how different countries celebrate Christmas. 3. Discuss the similarities and differences in the ways pupils in the class celebrate Christmas. 18

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Around the World at Christmas Christmas is celebrated throughout many parts of the world. Here are ways some countries celebrate.

pl

e

Italy Eight days before Christmas, children go door to door singing carols and saying Christmas poems. After a midnight church service on Christmas Eve, a special supper of ‘panettone’ (spiced bread) and chocolate is enjoyed. The setting-up of the Christmas manger is an important Italian custom. Presents are delivered by a kind witch called Befana, on a broomstick.

m

France Many French people decorate their homes with Nativity scenes. On Christmas Eve, French children often leave out their shoes for Père Noël to fill with presents.

g

Sa

China People who celebrate Christmas in China light their houses with paper lanterns. Christmas trees are decorated with paper chains, flowers and lanterns. Children hang stockings for Dun Che Lao Ren to fill on Christmas Eve. Denmark Danish people eat a feast at midnight on Christmas Eve, ending with a special rice pudding dessert. Hidden in the pudding is one almond. The person who finds the almond in his/her serve of pudding will have luck all year. Children in Denmark wait for Julemanden and his Juul Nisse elves to bring gifts.

Vi

ew

in

Venezuela Many homes in Venezuela put up a Nativity scene. Christmas presents are found around the scene or under the Christmas tree. Children are brought gifts on Christmas Day by Baby Jesus.

A huge feast called ‘le rèveillon’ is served after a midnight church service on Christmas Eve. Many treats, including the yule log cake, are eaten.

Venezuelans often eat hallacas dumplings filled with meat and vegetables at their Christmas meals. Spain At Christmas time a special dance is performed called the ‘jota’. People dance to the music made by guitars and castanets. After a midnight church service and Christmas dinner, Papa Nöel delivers his presents by climbing up balconies. On 6 January, the ‘Three Wise Men’ come to visit the children of Spain with gifts. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Greece Many Greek families bake a special Christmas bread. They twist it into animal shapes which they nail onto the walls of their home for a whole year. Families celebrate with a huge feast after an early morning church service. Children often leave cakes or biscuits for the ‘kallikantzeri’, mischievous goblins who appear during the 12 days of Christmas. At New Year, St Basil brings gifts to the children. The Christmas Kit

19


Around the World at Christmas Learning Objectives

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Analyses and extracts information about Christmas customs around the world.

Materials

Copymaster Answers

1. Dun Che Lao Ren, Julemanden, Juul Nisse elves, Befana, Père Nöel, St Basil, Papa Nöel, ‘Three Wise Men’, Baby Jesus 2. The dessert is a rice pudding with one almond inside. The person whose serve it is in will have luck all year. 3. Teacher check 4. (a) hallacas – Venezuela (b) panettone – Italy (c) kallikantzeri – Greece (d) le rèveillon – France (e) Papa Nöel – Spain (f) Juul Nisse – Denmark (g) paper lanterns – China 5. Teacher check 6. Teacher check 20

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Around the World at Christmas Answer these questions. 1. Name the gift bearers described in the text.

2. What is so special about the Christmas dessert in Denmark?

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

3. Choose three countries to complete the table.

4. Match the words to the country.

hallacas

China

(b) panettoni

France

(c)

Venezuela

(d) le rèveillon

Denmark

(e)

Papa Nöel

Greece

(f)

Juul Nisse

Spain

(g) paper lanterns

Italy

Vi

(a)

kallikantzeri

5. Write some traditions your family follows to celebrate Christmas.

6. Write three things you might eat at your Christmas feast.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

21


Christmas Symbols and Traditions Learning Objectives

Materials

Copymaster

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Understands and extracts relevant information from text about Christmas symbols and traditions.

Additional Activities

1. Write a procedure on how to make a Christmas decoration. Demonstrate it to a small group and have all pupils make one. Display them on the Christmas tree or around the classroom. 2. Research Christmas symbols and traditions further and present a report to the class. Answers

1. Possible answers could be: turkey, ham, Christmas pudding, Christmas stocking, bells, tinsel, cards, candles 2. Mary, Joseph, shepherds, Three Wise Men, angel, star, sheep, horses, donkey 3. novelty surprise, special verse 4. a sign of peace; people have ‘sweet dreams’ if it is above their beds; represents the colours of Christmas 5. Teacher check 22

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Symbols and Traditions Here are some things we see or use at Christmas time.

Answer these questions.

e

1. List other Christmas symbols or traditions you know.

pl

Nativity scenes – Pictures or small figurines gathered around the baby Jesus in a manger to represent the true reason for celebrating Christmas. Christmas tree – A German, called Martin Luther, decorated the first indoor Christmas tree over 500 years ago with candles, so it resembled the stars at night in the forest. Christmas trees can also mean peace and eternal life. Christmas star – This is often placed at the top of Christmas trees to represent the star that led the Three Wise Men to Bethlehem and baby Jesus. Mistletoe – This plant is thought to have magical powers of peace. In countries such as England and Australia, people who pass under it are given a kiss. Holly – This shiny green leaf plant with its bright red berry fruit is also meant to be a sign of peace. People who sleep with holly above their beds are thought to have ‘sweet dreams’. Holly also represents the colours of Christmas. Crackers – In 1896, Thomas Smith invented the friction-pulled ‘noisy’ Christmas cracker. He filled it with novelty surprises and special verses. Candy Canes – This is one of the oldest symbols and represents a shepherd’s crook. It is good to break and share a candy cane with a friend at Christmas time. Carols – Though the word ‘carol’ now means ‘a song of joy’, originally it was a circular dance. ‘Carols by Candlelight’, a tradition enjoyed by millions around the world, began in Australia over 60 years ago. Now, people come together to sing carols in the true spirit of Christmas—love and goodwill.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

2. What other figures would you find in a Nativity scene?

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

3. What might you find inside a cracker?

4. Give one reason why holly is special in celebrating Christmas.

5. List special thoughts we should have at Christmas.

23


Christmas Words Learning Objectives

• • • •

Matches words related to Christmas with their correct meaning. Uses a dictionary to locate unfamiliar words. Uses clues to name some Christmas traditions. Reads and attempts to say tongue twisters.

Materials

Copymaster Dictionaries Background Information

Epiphany is the end of the Christmas season. It falls on the 12th day of Christmas, which is 6 January. The ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’ refers to the 12 days between Christmas and Epiphany. January 6 is said to have been when Jesus was baptised into the Christian church. Others believe it is a celebration of the Three Wise Men coming to visit Jesus.

g

Sa

m

pl

e

The Twelve Days of Christmas (Traditional) On the first day of Christmas my true love gave to me a partridge in a pear tree. On the second day of Christmas my true love gave to me two turtle doves and a partridge in a pear tree. On the third day of Christmas my true love gave to me three French hens, (repeat previous ones). On the fourth day of Christmas my true love gave to me four calling birds, (repeat previous ones). On the fifth day of Christmas my true love gave to me five gold rings, (repeat previous ones). On the sixth day of Christmas my true love gave to me six geese a-laying, (repeat previous ones). On the seventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me seven swans a-swimming, (repeat previous ones). On the eighth day of Christmas my true love gave to me eight maids a-milking, (repeat previous ones). On the ninth day of Christmas my true love gave to me nine ladies dancing, (repeat previous ones). On the tenth day of Christmas my true love gave to me ten lords a-leaping, (repeat previous ones). On the eleventh day of Christmas my true love gave to me eleven pipers piping, (repeat previous ones). On the twelfth day of Christmas my true love gave to me twelve drummers drumming, (repeat previous ones).

Vi

Additional Activities

ew

in

Eggnog Ingredients: 1 L milk, 4 eggs, 2 tsp vanilla extract, 85 g sugar, 450 mL vanilla ice-cream, nutmeg Method: Pour all ingredients into a blender. Cover and blend for one minute. Pour into four glasses and sprinkle each with nutmeg. 1. Pupils could sing ‘The Twelve Days of Christmas’ OR Make a display using artwork to represent the song. 2. Pupils could make eggnog. Answers

1. (a) wreath – flowers and/or leaves tied together to make a ring (b) advent – a coming or arrival (c) evergreen – having leaves all year round (d) manger – a box from which cattle or horses eat (e) Epiphany – the end of the Christmas season 2. (a) Christmas carols (b) Christmas cracker (c) (d) Christmas cards (e) eggnog 3. seven silly Santas singing seven silly songs tiny tots trim tall trees with tinsel eleven elves eagerly drink early evening eggnog running reindeer romp through red wreaths cool kids chant cheeky Christmas carols Answers will vary 24

The Christmas Kit

Christmas stocking

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Words Answer these questions. 1. Match these Christmas words to their meaning.

(a)

wreath

• the end of the Christmas season

(b) advent

• having leaves all year round

(c)

• flowers and/or leaves tied together to make a ring

(d) manger

• a coming or arrival

(e)

• a box from which cattle or horses eat

evergreen

Epiphany

2. What Christmas traditions are being described?

(b) This gives a ‘pop’ to reveal a surprise inside.

Special songs sung at Christmas time.

(c)

These are hung for Santa to fill with presents.

(e)

A traditional Christmas drink that tastes like a vanilla milkshake.

m

pl

e

(a)

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

(d) These are sent around the world with Christmas wishes inside.

3. Fill in the missing letters, then try saying these tongue twisters five times in a row. Make up one of your own.

even iny leven

illy ots

ool

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

rim

lves

unning

antas all

agerly drink

eindeer ids

inging

even

rees with arly

omp through ant

The Christmas Kit

eeky

illy

ongs

insel vening ed w

ggnog eaths

ristmas

arols

25


Christmas Word Sort Learning Objectives

• Discriminates words hidden in a puzzle. • Sorts words according to specified categories. Materials

Copymaster Coloured pencils Background Information

Sa

m

pl

e

Christmas is a time of tradition. The traditional colours of Christmas are red and green. Green was chosen to represent the continuance of life through the winter and the belief of eternal life through Christ. Red was chosen to symbolise the blood shed by Jesus at his crucifixion. Christmas decorations such as the Christmas tree, wreath, holly and mistletoe are all used to represent these beliefs. Traditionally, European people tended to celebrate the end of the year with huge feasts which may have lasted for many days. Later, the preparation of special foods became an important part of Christmas. Different foods are traditional in different countries. For example, roast turkey is popular in the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, while roast goose is popular in England. Father Christmas, St Nicholas, Santa Claus or Kris Kringle—by whatever name you know him— represents the jolly fellow who delivers Christmas presents to children all over the world. Santa is responsible for bringing together many traditions—Christian and pagan, Old Catholic, Scandinavian, Dutch, German and English. He brings us all together and children all over the world know who Santa is, even if they have a different name for him.

g

Additional Activities

Answers

Food plum pudding ham turkey eggnog mince pies vegetables

Vi

ew

in

1. Source as many different names for Santa as possible from around the world. Record them on a world map to develop pupils’ geographical knowledge. 2. Brainstorm different traditional Christmas foods. Categorise them according to the five food groups. Develop a healthy Christmas Day menu. 3. Study proper nouns. The names for Santa all begin with capital letters. All proper nouns begin with a capital letter. Brainstorm proper nouns that are relevant to Christmas. Display on a class chart for easy reference.

Decorations star angel tinsel bells lights tree mistletoe stockings wreath holly cracker

Different Names for Santa Santa Claus Father Christmas Saint Nicholas M R

B

I

A O S

A M

T S

I

R

H C

T

S T

C

K

S

T

O C

K

I

T

A C

L

A U

S H N

Z

J H L L A A L Q L R

E

H

T

N G

S

L

Y

T

X

S

X

I

L

U

E

G

L

R

E

A F

S S A

N

T

S A

I

N

T N

I

C

H O

L

A

S

L

C

V E

L

E

O T

E

L

T

S

I

M Y

L

H H

O K

R

V

E

G

E

T

A

B

L

E

S

J

H

T

P

L U M

D D

I

N G

E

P U

E G G N O G S T I N S E L L

26

N

E

The Christmas Kit

H

T

G E

A

T

G

B

P

E

I

P

E

C

N

S M Y I M J

R E

K

C A

R

C

A E

R W T

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Word Sort

Sa

m

pl

e

There are 20 Christmas words hidden in the word search. Find and write them under the correct headings below.

Christmas Decorations

Different Names for Santa

Vi

ew

in

g

Christmas Food

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

27


Christmas Greetings Around the World Learning Objectives

Uses code-breaking strategies to solve and rewrite the words from other countries. Attempts to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in several different languages. Locates listed countries on a world map. Uses a key to show countries on a world map.

Sa

m

pl

e

• • • •

Materials

Additional Activities

ew

in

g

Copymaster Pencils Coloured pencils Atlases

Vi

1. Ask pupils in the class to share how to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in any languages they may use at home. A class book could be produced listing all the different ways pupils in the class say ‘Merry Christmas’. 2. Brainstorm with pupils any countries of interest to them. Research to find out how the people in each country say ‘Merry Christmas’. Locate the countries on a world map, displayed in the classroom, to develop a comprehensive list. Answers

The Netherlands – Zalig Kerstfeest France – Joyeux Noël Indonesia – Selama Hari Natal Japan – Meri Kurisumasu New Zealand – Kia orana e kia manuia rava Vietnam – Chuc Mung Giang Sinh

The Netherlands Japan

France

Vietnam Indonesia

New Zealand

28

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Greetings Around the World Learn how to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in different languages. 1. Use the code to fill in the missing vowels. Write the word in full underneath. 2. Try saying ‘Merry Christmas’ in the different languages. 3. Colour the countries on the map. Use a colour key.

Japan

The Netherlands

M❅r❉ K◆r❉s◆m❁s◆

pl

e

Z❁l❉g K❅rstf❅❅st

New Zealand

m

France

K❉❁ ❏r❁n❁ ❅ k❉❁ m❁n◆❉❁ r❁v❁

g

Sa

J❏y❅◆x N❏❅l

Vietnam

in

Indonesia

Ch◆c M◆ng G❉❁ng S❉nh

Vi

ew

S❅l❁m❁ H❁r❉ N❁t❁l

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

29


Dear Diary Learning Objectives

Materials

Copymaster

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Reads and understands text to complete set activities.

Background Information

The Christmas stocking originated from a story concerning the charity of St Nicholas. Legend has it that three poor sisters had left their stockings to dry by the fireplace. St Nicholas had thrown gold pieces through the smoke hole (chimneys were unknown) and these had lodged inside the stockings. The tale spread and soon many people were hanging stockings by the fire in the hope that they too might find gold pieces from St Nicholas. The fact that 25 December was dedicated to the memory of St Nicholas linked his life, his charity and the stocking with the celebration of the birth of Christ. Advent calendars are believed to have originated in Germany and have since spread throughout the world. They can vary greatly in design but all work on the same principal of counting down the four weeks before Christmas. Additional Activities

1. Pupils can write their own diary entry about the lead-up to Christmas or another special event. 2. Devise and present a menu for Christmas Day lunch. 30

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Dear Diary

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Read the diary entries.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

31


Dear Diary Learning Objectives

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Extracts information from the text to complete set activities.

Materials

Copymaster Answers

1. (a) (b) 2.

3. 4. 5. 32

Australia – 1; England – 2 The Australian diary entry talks about the scorching temperature, while the English diary entry talks about clearing the snow from the driveway. No. The Australian diary entry was written by a girl because she talks about wearing a summer dress. The English entry was written by a boy because he talks about the men having to clear the snow from the driveway. Australia: Advent calendar, clean up the house, prepare clothing for the next day England: clear the snow, hang the Christmas stockings, watch a Nativity play They both spend Christmas lunch with their families. Answers will vary The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Dear Diary Use the diary entries to answer these questions. 1. One diary entry was written in England and the other in Australia.

(a)

Which one is which?

Australia

England

(b) How do you know?

pl

e

2. Do you think both entries were written by girls? Explain.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

3. What were some of the things each person had to do to get ready for Christmas Day? England Australia

4. Are there any similarities in the way each family spends Christmas? Explain.

5. Briefly write a list of things you do to get ready for Christmas Day.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

33


Christmas Books Into Movies Learning Objectives

Materials

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Compares a book and movie version of the same Christmas story.

Copymaster Christmas book and movie of the same title/story (e.g. Miracle on 34th Street, The Grinch Who Stole Christmas, The Nutcracker Suite, Jingle All The Way, A Christmas Story, The Santa Clause). Background Information

• Discuss the fundamental differences between writing books, and movies and their components. Books – author, illustrator, publisher, print detail to provide imagery, cover appeal etc. Movies – scriptwriter, director, actors, visuals, sound, colour, action, dialogue, costumes etc. • Discuss book/movie styles – humorous, mystery, fantasy, sci-fi, drama, thriller, adventure, animation, romance. • Find preferences for the book or movie version and reasons why. Blackboard answers for discussion. Additional Activities

1. Write/draw a storyboard for a section of a Christmas book read. Discuss dialogue and action. Practise and present to the class in small groups, or videotape. 2. Write a ‘critics review’ for a Christmas movie or book. Give it a rating. 34

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Books Into Movies Compare a book and video of the same story, recording the information below.

Book

Movie

Title

Title

Author

Scriptwriter

Illustrator

Director Actors/Main characters

m

pl

e

Main characters

Setting

g

Sa

Setting

in

Three main events

ew

Three main events

Vi

Favourite part

Favourite part

1

2

3

4

5

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

6

7

8

9

10

1

The Christmas Kit

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 35


Christmas Shopping Spree Learning Objectives

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Uses a Christmas catalogue to search for costs of items. • Uses problem-solving strategies to find out what can be purchased on a budget.

Materials

Copymaster Christmas catalogues, junk mail, advertisements Additional Activities

1. Pupils can plan a budget to spend on their family. Make 2 – 3 lists of possible gift choices from catalogues. Estimate and tally total costs to fit the budget. 2. Brainstorm ways to make their own presents to save costs. 3. Make a wish list for Christmas. 36

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Shopping Spree 1. List three items from the catalogues that you would like for Christmas this year. Tally the cost.

2. You are buying a gift for a friend. What will you buy if you have …

£20 to spend …

Change:

Change:

£50 to spend …

Sa

Change:

Vi

ew

in

g

3. Find a gift you could buy for …

m

pl

e

£10 to spend …

4. You have a budget of £100 to buy three gifts. What will you buy? Total the cost and work out the change.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

37


Reindeer Maths Learning Objectives

Demonstrates the ability to solve number problems. Converts measures to maintain consistency. Orders measures according to direction. Adds measures of length correctly.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• • • •

Materials

Copymaster Calculator Additional Activities

1. Pupils can make their own mathematical problems and ask friends to solve them. Answers

1. (a) 55 (b) 770 kg (c) 495 2. (a) Comet, Blitzen, Cupid, Donner, Dancer, Prancer, Rudolph, Dasher, Vixen (b) 9.42 m 38

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Reindeer Maths Rudolph and his reindeer are preparing for their Christmas Eve journey around the world to deliver presents to all the children. Help them to solve the following problems so they can have a safe journey. 1. Solve these number problems.

(b) The sle igh weighs approxima te ly 200 kg and San approxima te ta weighs ly 90 kg. The two sa cks approxima te weigh ly 60 kg each. The nine re indeer weig h approxima te ly 40 kg eac h. How much does every thing weigh?

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

(a) Santa’s sleigh only holds two sacks of presents at a time. Each sack carries enough gifts for two countries. They have to visit 220 countries. How many trips from the North Pole do they have to make?

ew

(c) Each reindeer needs to eat a plate full of special reindeer food on each return trip to the North Pole. How many plates of special reindeer food will be needed?

Vi

2. Solve these measuring problems.

(a) Order the reindeer according to the length of their antlers (from longest to shortest). You will need to make all the measures the same unit (mm, cm or m) before you begin. (b) What is the total length of all the antlers in metres? You may need to use a calculator to help.

m

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

39


Christmas Fun Learning Objectives

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Uses decoding methods to solve word problems. • Uses problem-solving strategies to help decode messages.

ew

Materials

Copymaster

Vi

Background Information

Try these websites for Christmas jokes and riddles. hhtp://www.crewsnest.vispa.com/christmasjokes.htm http://www.kidsdomain.com/holiday/xmas/games/riddles.htm http://homepage.ntlworld.com/story100/xmas%20jokes.htm Additional Activities

1. Make a class Christmas joke, riddle and tongue twister book. 2. Invent your own coded language and write messages for friends to decode. 3. Make Christmas word searches or mazes. Answers

1. (a) So he can ho-ho-ho (b) Santa Clues (c) Santa Paws 2. £25 129.60 3. Teacher check 40

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Fun 1. Find the answer to these Christmas jokes by working out the maths problem. Then use the code to find the matching letters to write in the box.

(a)

Why does Santa have three gardens?

Sa

m

pl

e

(b) What do you get if you cross Father Christmas with a detective?

g

Who delivers Christmas presents to cats?

ew

in

(c)

Vi

2. Try This!

3. Answer the sums. Use the colour key to finish the picture and find a Christmas symbol.

A man once held a record for sending 62 824 Christmas cards! What would it cost him if each stamp cost 40p?

ÂŁ

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

41


Advent Calendar Learning Objectives

pl

e

• Follows instructions to make an Advent calendar. • Displays knowledge of the purpose of Advent calendars.

m

Materials

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

Copymaster Coloured pencils Christmas pictures (from old Christmas cards or gift tags) Glue Scissors Helpful hints • Enlarge to A3 size. • Copy onto card for durability. • Remind pupils to leave enough gluing space around pictures they may cut out from cards or gift tags. • Pupils can also draw pictures instead of cutting them out. Background Information

The word ‘advent’ means ‘coming’ or ‘arrival’ from the Latin ‘adventus’ and is used at Christmas time to refer to the coming of Jesus on Christmas Day. Advent calendars are believed to have originated in Germany and have since spread throughout the world. They can vary greatly in design but all work on the same principle of counting down the four weeks before Christmas. Most Advent calendars count down from December 1 through to Christmas Eve or Christmas Day. All the windows begin closed, and are opened—one each day for the four weeks leading up to Christmas— to reveal a surprise picture. Additional Activities

1. Pupils can research the history of the Advent calendar. Include where it originated, its purpose and any variations on the idea. 2. Brainstorm other Christmas traditions which have developed. Create a class display showing the various traditions celebrated by the pupils in the class. 42

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Advent Calendar Follow these instructions to make an Advent calendar.

Colour in the Christmas picture below. Carefully cut each window along the dotted lines. Collect 24 small pictures which can be glued behind each window. Glue the pictures behind each window, so that when each window is opened, the picture can be seen. 5. Display your advent calendar and open each window in order.

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

1. 2. 3. 4.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

43


Mini Christmas Puddings Learning Objectives

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Follows directions of a recipe to make ‘Mini Christmas Puddings’. • Demonstrates the ability to work in groups. • Demonstrates hygiene practices and the safe use of equipment.

in

Materials

ew

Copymaster Refer to ingredients and utensils on page 45. Background Information

Vi

Christmas pudding was a treat that started long ago. Dried fruits were always available, but sugar and spices were kept for special treats like Christmas. Originally, the pudding was made of boiled wheat and spices and eaten on Christmas Eve. Over time this changed and eggs, spirits and suet (fat) were added. The true Christmas pudding is totally round in shape and flamed in brandy to represent the sun and warmth. When the pudding was being made each family member made a wish as he or she stirred the mixture in the same direction three times. Silver coins and charms were then added. The person who found a coin or charm in his/her slice of pudding was thought to have luck all year. Additional Activities

1. Make a Father Christmas cake to share at class party. Use red and white icing, sweets and licorice strips for decorations. 2. Write a procedure for a favourite Christmas recipe. Collect and make the recipe in groups as Christmas gifts. 3. Research gift-bearers around the world (e.g. St Nicholas, Befana of Italy, Jult omte [Sweden]). Label a world map with these names in the appropriate locations. 44

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Mini Christmas Puddings Things we need:

• • • • • • • • •

Ingredients

measuring cups and spoons chopping board sieve bowl knife saucepan/microwave-proof dish paper cake cases stove/microwave tray • fridge

• • • • • • •

1 cup powdered milk 1 cup coconut 1 cup mixed fruit 1 cup icing sugar 11/2 cups rice cereal 125 g margarine (melted) red/green cherries (optional) to decorate

Method

1

pl m Sa

g

ew

5

Pour melted margarine into the fruit and cereal mix. Stir well.

7

Place margarine in a saucepan (or microwave dish). Stir over heat until melted. (An adult should help with this part.)

6

Vi

4

Add mixed fruit, rice cereal, coconut and stir.

in

Sieve icing sugar and milk powder into a large bowl.

3

e

2

Place spoonfuls of the mixture into each paper cake cases.

Cut small pieces of red and green cherries to decorate the top of each pudding.

These could be wrapped in cellophane and given as Christmas presents

or Place on a tray and refrigerate until firm. Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

just shared with friends and enjoyed! The Christmas Kit

45


Make a Snowflake Learning Objectives

Follows instructions to make a snowflake. Demonstrates scientific behaviours. Carefully records results of an experiment. Considers alternative ways to obtain a similar result.

Sa

m

pl

e

• • • •

Materials

in

Background Information

g

Copymaster Enough of the materials listed on page 47 for each child in the class

Vi

ew

The word ‘crystal’ comes from Greek word ‘krystallos’ meaning ‘ice crystal’. At one time people believed that all crystals were made up of water that was frozen so hard it would never melt. Borax, salt, sugar and Epsom salts are all examples of crystals. A crystal is a solid that is composed of atoms arranged in an orderly pattern. Every crystal has a repeating pattern based on its unique shape. Crystals may be small or large. How does the borax work? Hot water is used as it holds more borax crystals than cold water. The heated water molecules move further apart which makes more room for the borax crystals to dissolve. As the water cools, the molecules move closer together. Crystals begin to form and build on one another as the water evaporates. How is snow made? If a cloud is full of moisture and its temperature falls to freezing or below, snow crystals begin to form. The ice crystals form on dust particles as the water vapour condenses and partially melts the crystals forcing them to join together to form snowflakes. All snowflakes have six sides and can be grouped according to various categories—needles, columns, plates, columns capped with plates, dendrites and stars. The type of snowflake depends on the temperature and the amount of humidity present when it is forming. The colder the temperature, the smaller the flakes. Additional Activities

1. Try making different shaped snowflakes by using different shaped frames. 2. Make different coloured snowflakes by using different food colouring. 3. Use the snowflakes to decorate the classroom. 46

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Make a Snowflake 1. Make a snowflake by following the directions.

You will need:

string boiling water

a wide jar borax

white pipe-cleaners pencil

blue food colouring

How to make a snowflake!

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Cut a white pipe-cleaner into three equal sections. Twist the sections together in the centre so you have a star shape. Attach string along the outer edges of the pipe-cleaners (a bit like a spider’s web). Attach a piece of string to one of the pipe-cleaners and the other end to the pencil. This is to balance across the jar, so the star can dangle. Fill the jar with boiling water. Add the borax, one tablespoon at a time (three tablespoons for every cup). Stir until dissolved. Add blue food colouring. Insert your pipe-cleaner star into the jar, suspended from the pencil. The star should be fully covered by the solution and not touching the sides of the jar.

ew

in

Wait overnight for your results.

Vi

2. Describe what happened to the pipecleaner.

3. Why do you think this happened?

4. Do you think you could use anything other than borax to get the same effect?

YES

NO

5. How could you improve the experiment?

Explain.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

47


Christmas Parcels Learning Objectives

Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Demonstrates problem-solving behaviours. • Plans, produces and evaluates a parcel following set specifications.

Materials

Copymaster Resources for pupils to use in making their parcel (cardboard, foam, polystyrene etc.) Additional Activities

1. Pupils can make wrapping paper for their parcel. Use large sheets of white paper, craft paint, stamps, brushes etc. to create a Christmas design. 2. Pupils can find out how much it would cost to send their parcel overseas to a country of their choice. This may lead to pupils modifying their original parcel to make it lighter and save costs. 48

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Parcels You have made a precious gift for a friend overseas. It is approximately 10 cm by 15 cm by 18 cm and weighs about 250 g. It is made of breakable materials and is quite delicate. You need to make a parcel which will protect it and ensure it gets to its destination in one piece. The parcel cannot be too heavy, or the cost of postage will become too expensive. You can use any materials you choose.

What will I use?

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

How will I put it together?

Vi

ew

How will I test my parcel?

How well did my parcel protect my gift?

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

What changes did I make to my parcel?

The Christmas Kit

49


Christmas Vouchers Learning Objectives

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Demonstrates how to complete a written form. • Makes appropriate choices to complete forms.

Materials

Vi

Copymaster Coloured pencils/felt-tip markers Scissors Glue/glitter (optional decoration)

Instructions for Making Christmas Vouchers

• • • •

Cut, colour and make the promise vouchers to use as gifts at Christmas. Children can use the ideas presented or write voucher promises of their own. Use glitter or Christmas colours to decorate the voucher. Vouchers can be presented in envelopes or tied with a piece of ribbon to hang on the tree for each family member or friend. • Brainstorm the types of jobs that could be done to help people around the house and which could be used on their vouchers. Additional Activities

1. Make ‘Promise Vouchers’ for other special occasions (e.g. Father’s Day, Mother’s Day, Grandparent’s Day). 2. Design special gift envelopes to hold the promise vouchers. 50

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Vouchers Christmas Promise

Christmas Promise nights of washing dishes

breakfast in bed To

To

From

From

Christmas I.O.U

To

pl

car washes

m

afternoons of help in the garden

e

Christmas I.O.U

Sa

To

From

g

From

Christmas Promise

Vi

ew

in

Christmas Promise

To From

To From

Christmas I.O.U

Christmas I.O.U

To

To

From

From

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

51


Christmas Pop-up Card Learning Objectives

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

• Follows directions to make a Christmas card.

Materials

Vi

Copymaster (photocopied onto thin card) Felt-tipped pens, crayons or coloured pencils Scissors Background Information

One would think Christmas cards have been around forever. However, they are a reasonably new introduction to Christmas traditions. They were first developed by an English artist in 1843. John Calcott Horsley designed the first Christmas card which looked rather like a postcard. The design showed a large family enjoying their Christmas celebration. He produced 1 000 of the cards and sold them for about one pound each. The concept of Christmas cards took until about 1860 to catch on and become popular. The United States followed suit in 1875, when Louis Prang, a German-born printer, began designing and printing Christmas cards. Competitions were often held to find the best design to go on the Christmas cards. Additional Activities

1. Pupils could make an envelope for their Christmas card. 2. Use the design to make other Christmas cards. 52

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Christmas Pop-up Card Follow the instructions below to make your own pop-up greeting card.

You will need: • 3 pieces of A4 card (colours optional) • felt-tipped pens, crayons or coloured pencils 1. Fold two sheets of

• glitter or glitter glue (optional) • scissors • pencil/ruler • glue

2. Measure and make four short

3. Fold to form

parallel cuts about 4 cm in length along the fold line. (Make the cuts in two pairs about 4 cm wide.)

two small flaps. Unfold the flaps and open the card.

pl

e

A4 card in half. (Put one aside for use in step 7.)

5. Trace (or copy) and cut out

Sa

m

two tree shapes (or other chosen shapes). Make sure the shape fits inside the card when it is closed.

4. Push up the flaps so they

6. Colour, decorate and glue the

g

tree shapes onto the paper ‘trunks’. When dry close the card.

folded card from step 1. Decorate the front, then glue to the outside of the constructed card, taking care not to glue over the flap area. Decorate the front of your card and write a greeting inside.

Merry Christmas

Vi

ew

in

stand up. Close the card so the flaps are inside the card. These will be the ‘trunks’ for the trees or the supports for any other chosen shapes.

7. Use the previously

Here are some shape ideas for you to copy or trace.

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

53


Stained Glass Ornaments Learning Objectives

Sa

m

pl

e

• Follows directions to construct stained glass ornaments.

g

Materials

Vi

ew

in

Copymaster Oil-based crayons/permanent coloured markers Cooking oil Bowl Small paintbrush Ribbons (optional)

Instructions for Making Stained Glass Ornaments

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Colour the picture with oil-based crayons or permanent coloured markers. Cut out the ornament shapes along the dotted lines. Pour a little cooking oil into a small bowl. Paint the back of the ornaments with cooking oil. Place flat to dry. When dry, add ribbons, if you like, to the ornaments or arrange them in a pattern against a window.

Additional Activities

1. Children can create their own stained glass pictures using the same technique. 2. Collect or draw symbols of Christmas (e.g. Christmas tree, bells, candles). Design stained glass drawings to display for Christmas. 3. Make a stained glass card to send at Christmas by mounting a stained glass drawing into construction paper and folding it into a card. 54

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Stained Glass Ornaments

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

55


Make a Santa Learning Objectives

• Follows instructions to construct a paper model Santa. Materials

• • • • •

Copymaster Scissors Glue Colour pencils/felt-tipped pens White cottonwool to add as fur trim and beard (optional).

Instructions for Making Santa

1. Colour Santa’s clothes, face and hair. (Decorate with cottonwool trim at a later stage.)

pl

e

2. Carefully cut out each part. 3. Fold along dotted lines.

g

6. Push neck up through body, spread out ends to stick to the inside of the body.

Sa

5. Roll around neck and glue into place. Cut fringe edges and glue.

m

4. Roll body around and glue into place.

ew

in

7. Fold top of arms and glue into place on the body.

Vi

8. Fold and glue the last section of the heads to the back of the face. Glue tip of hats. 9. Place head over neck. (Pinch top of the neck and slide head on). Head can be moved side to side or glued into a position if desired. 10. Cottonwool can now be added as fur trim and beard (optional). Additional Activities

1. Use the Santa model in a play about Christmas. Construct other characters for the play using the same basic model as Santa. 2. Find out the names used in different countries around the world for Santa Claus, or other Christmas phrases (e.g. Merry Christmas). Make labels and match them to their country on a world map. 3. Send a letter to Santa in his North Pole home.

56

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Make a Santa

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

57


Christmas Desk Calendar Learning Objectives

Materials

ew

in

g

Copies of pages 59 – 61 per child. Bright coloured pencils/felt markers Scissors Stapler Glitter or other decorative pieces (optional)

Sa

m

pl

e

• Follows directions to construct a desk calendar as a Christmas gift.

Instructions for Making the Flip-date Desk Calendar

The worksheets can be enlarged to A3 to produce larger gift calendars. Colour and decorate the calendar pictures. Cut along the dotted lines only. You should now have 12 pictures varying in size. Arrange them in month order starting with December at the bottom and building upwards to begin with January on top. 6. You should be able to see the January picture followed by the months of the year and dates in staggered sheets to December. 7. Staple the pages together at the top (2 places). 8. If you wish (especially if the calendar has been enlarged) punch two holes at the top and thread ribbon through the holes.

Vi

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Additional Activities

1. Learn the song ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’. 2. Follow the pattern of the song but change the words to more modern ‘things’ (e.g. computers, TV, cars, bikes etc.) or 12 of your favourite things (e.g. animals, flowers, toys). 3. Design and make a special envelope to fit the calendar. Decorate and present as a gift. 58

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Christmas Desk Calendar

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

59


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Christmas Desk Calendar

60

The Christmas Kit

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com


Vi

ew

in

g

Sa

m

pl

e

Christmas Desk Calendar

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

The Christmas Kit

61


0634UK Christmas Kit - Middle