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UPPER

Written by Danielle Howton

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Published by Prim-Ed Publishing

IRE–0599 REV05/02


Computers in the Classroom Foreword As computers are an integral part of our society, pupils need to be computer literate and to be confident and efficient users.

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• • • •

how computers work; computer language (binary code); detailed knowledge of computer hardware and software and terminology; organising information in a computer; computers in society; caring for computer hardware and software; and safety and health issues.

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• • •

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Computers in the Classroom – Upper provides activities covering:

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Computers in the Classroom is a four-book series that takes pupils through a structured skill development and awareness programme that provides a foundation for effective computer use.

The activities in the book can be used in a variety of ways, including: the language area to develop a ‘computing’ theme; as part of a whole-class computing programme; and in small groups where pupils rotate activities with time on the computer.

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• • •

An overview and glossary for each book in the series have also been included. Books in this series are: Computers in the Classroom Lower Computers in the Classroom Middle Computers in the Classroom Upper Computers in the Classroom Extension

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A certificate is provided for each book when appropriate activities have been completed successfully.

Contents

Series Overview

................................................................. ii

Computer Spark Certificate .......................................... iii Do Computers Think? .............................................. 1 – 2 Input and Output ........................................................ 3 – 4 How does it work? .................................................... 5 – 6 The CPU ......................................................................... 7 – 9 Computer Memory ............................................... 10 – 11 Bits and Bytes ........................................................ 12 – 14

Prim-Ed Publishing

Bytes .......................................................................... 15 – 16 Computer Language ............................................ 17 – 18 Operating Systems .............................................. 19 – 20 Graphical User Interface .................................... 21 – 22 Files and Folders ............................................................. 23 Computers in Society .......................................... 24 – 26 Safe and Healthy Computing ........................... 27 – 28 Computer Terminology ....................................... 29 – 30 Glossary .................................................................... 31 – 32 Answers .............................................................................. 33 Computers in the Classroom

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Series Overview Learning Areas

Lower

Middle

Upper

Extension

Computer terminology (includes glossary)

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Computer components:

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• hardware

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• software • peripherals

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Computer ‘language’ (including binary code) Input and output

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Operating systems

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Information storage

Computers in society

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Computer care

Healthy, safe computing

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Viruses and worms The future

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Computers in the Classroom

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Presented to

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Date:

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Signed:

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k r a p S Presented to

For Signed:

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Date:

Computers in the Classroom

iii


Do Computers Think? – 1 It is common to read stories and watch movies which show computers thinking and acting like people. They often have personalities and seem to make decisions and plan things all by themselves. Now this may be true in science fiction books and movies, but in real life computers cannot think and act like people. A computer cannot think and act by itself. It needs to be given instructions, called programs, by people to tell it what to do. The people who create the programs are called programmers.

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So when a computer does something that seems very difficult or clever, it is because the people who programmed it were very clever. Computers simply follow instructions that they have been given. Some instructions are very simple (adding numbers) and others are quite complicated (creating a 3-D picture).

Is science fiction about real-life occurrences? Explain.

2.

In your own words, explain why computers can’t think and act like people.

3.

Have you read a story or seen a movie in which a computer was just like a person? Briefly describe this computer.

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1.

4.

Was the computer you wrote about ‘good’ or ‘bad’? Why? What did it do?

What About the Future? Scientists do not agree if in the future computers will think and act like people. Some think that it will never happen, others think that more studies on the human brain will help to create computers that can think for themselves. Prim-Ed Publishing

Computers in the Classroom

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Do Computers Think? – 2 Tick true or false.

true

false

(b) A program instructs the computer what to do.

true

false

(c)

true

false

true

false

(a)

Computers think just like people.

Computers are clever.

(e)

true

false

Sort these tasks into ‘simple’, ‘unsure’ or ‘complicated’.

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Computers simply follow instructions.

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(d) A programmer makes programs.

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5.

• adding • drawing a square • spellchecking • making 3-D pictures • making a line • multiplying • playing a video clip Unsure

Complicated

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Simple

List five tasks a computer could not do as well as you could. Briefly explain why. Reason

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Task

(i)

(ii)

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(iii)

(iv) (v)

8.

Work in pairs. One person writes clear and precise instructions to perform a simple task, for example, opening a door. The other person then follows the instructions without any deviation from the written card to check if the task can be completed. Instructions may need to be modified to make sure they are precise. Swap tasks so both people have the opportunity to write instructions.

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Input and Output – 1 What you put into a computer (input) controls what you get out of it (output). The equipment which you use to put information (called data) into a computer is called input devices. The equipment we use to get data out of a computer is called output devices.

Here are some input devices. Write the missing letters. k

d

(c)

e

j

s

(d)

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Here are some output devices. Write the missing letters. (a)

las

(c)

sp

p

n

r

k

(b) (d)

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(b)

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(a)

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ink

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The instructions which have been programmed into a computer enable it to work with (or process) the information (called data) it is given to produce different results. The data a computer needs is fed into the computer by different input devices. Data

Computer

words, sentences

numbers e.g. 1 + 2 =

result is 3

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typing letter on a keyboard

scanned picture in a book

copy on monitor screen

Name five pieces of data you could input into a computer.

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Result

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

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(v)

4.

Label the input devices shown in this diagram.

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Input and Output – 2 Explain, in your own words, the difference between an input device and an output device.

6.

Sort these devices into the correct column. • monitor • joystick • speakers Output Device

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Input Device

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• scanner • printer • keyboard • mouse

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5.

Name five other input devices in your community. For example, Automatic Teller Machine (ATM).

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7.

(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv) (v) 8.

Write the data you would need to input to have a printout of the name, age, date of birth and address of yourself and five friends. Then input the data to obtain your results.

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How Does It Work? – 1 In order to work with the data fed into it, a computer needs both hardware and software. Hardware is the physical parts of a computer that can be seen and touched. The most important part of the hardware is the CPU (Central Processing Unit). 1.

Name five pieces of computer hardware. (i)

(iv)

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(v)

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(iii)

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(ii)

2.

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Software is the instructions (program) a computer needs to process the data it is given. We cannot really see and touch computer software. It is like a movie recorded on a videotape. You can’t touch the movie, but you can see and hear it when the videotape is played on a video cassette recorder (VCR). The most important software in a computer is the operating system (OS).

Name five pieces of computer software.

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(i)

(iii)

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(ii)

(v)

Which pieces of a computer’s hardware can be used to input information?

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3.

4.

What computer software would you use to: (a)

draw a picture?

(b) create a database? (c)

type a story?

(d) surf the Net? (e)

send an email?

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How Does It Work? – 2 5.

Write these abbreviations in full. (a) CPU (b) OS (c) VCR

(e) www

Name some different operating systems.

Software often comes on CD. Design a cover for your favourite piece of software. You will need to include a description, what it does and what operating system it will run under.

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(d) IBM

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The CPU – 1 The most important part of the computer is the central processing unit or CPU for short. The CPU is the brain of the computer. Nothing happens without the CPU. Millions of calculations are done in less than a second by the CPU when it is given instructions by a computer program. All these instructions are sorted by the CPU and passed on to other parts of the computer. There are different types of CPUs for different types of jobs that need to be done. Some are very powerful and very expensive, others are much cheaper and limited in what they can do.

Pentium II and Power PC 604e processors (average) Pentium and 040 processors (old, dated)

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Pentium III and Power PC G3 processors (very powerful)

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You can usually tell what type of work a computer can do by the type of CPU it has. The faster the CPU, the more powerful it is. The speed of a CPU is measured in megahertz (MHz). Here are some common CPUs you may have heard of:

Name the four main parts of a computer.

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1.

(i) (ii) (iii)

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• monitor

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(iv) • computer

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In some computers today, you can simply replace the old CPU with a more powerful one, if the old CPU can no longer do what you want it to do.

2.

Write the devices in the order that you would use them to: (a) scan a picture.

• keyboard

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• mouse

(b) write a letter.

• microphone

• joystick

(c) record a sound. • scanner

• printer

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The CPU — 2

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Here is a simple picture of how the CPU or ‘brain’ of a computer works.

The control unit and maths unit make up the CPU. The control unit controls everything that happens in a computer. It receives the input first and is responsible for sending the data it receives to the correct part of a computer to be processed. The maths unit is where all the important work happens. The maths unit carries out all the calculations needed to process the data which it then sends back to the control unit for storage or output.

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The CPU – 3 Look through the newspaper to find three advertisements for second-hand computers. Glue them in the spaces below and rate them according to their power. Explain.

4.

These instructions need to be sorted. Sort them to find the task that needs to be done.

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(a) quietly the very walk Open door and through.

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(b) put the glue away. the on before Carefully it lid putting

(c) your in dining bin. Eat then quietly room put rubbish lunch the the your in

(d) swimming not slip. Walk the pool to carefully around so as

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Computer Memory – 1 A computer’s memory can affect the amount of work it can do and the amount of information it can store. The amount of work you can do on a computer often depends on the amount of RAM (Random Access Memory) it has. This memory is like the space on top of a desk. The larger the desk the more work you can do on it at one time.

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Some computer programs need a lot of RAM to work. The more complicated the work, the more RAM it will need. Programs which have a lot of sounds, pictures and video clips need a lot of RAM to work properly.

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The amount of work or information you can store on your computer depends on how much storage memory you have on your hard drive. The hard drive in a computer is like a bookshelf. The more shelves you have the more books you can store. The larger your hard drive the more information you can store on your computer.

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Some information you store may take up a lot of space on the hard drive. If you try to store too much you will run out of space. So it is important to save only what is really important and to throw away things that you no longer need.

What is RAM compared to? Explain why.

2.

What is the hard drive compared to? Explain why.

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Why is it a good practice to save only what is really important?

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4.

Why do you think sounds, pictures or video clips need a lot of RAM to work properly?

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Computer Memory – 2 (a) RAM

hard drive

(b) RAM

hard drive

(c) RAM

hard drive

(d) RAM

hard drive

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6.

Look through a newspaper to find various memory configurations. Write them below.

Unjumble these computer words and write each in a sentence.

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(a) rormpgas

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(b) roemmy

(c) onfmoiraitn

Write key words and sentences from each paragraph.

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(d) aesncnr

Key Words

Longer Sentences

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Paragraph

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Bits and Bytes – 1 All information (data) and instructions in a computer are processed and stored as numbers. Most computers use only two digits, 0 and 1, to represent all the data it uses. This is called binary code and 0 and 1 are called binary digits or bits for short. A bit is the smallest amount of data a computer can use. A group of eight bits represents a byte.

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Astonishing as it may seem, all kinds of information—sounds, images, words and music—that a computer processes and stores is made up of varying patterns of these two digits. The digits are recorded as pulses of electricity on tiny electronic circuits. When a pulse is sent, this represents a 1; when there is no pulse, it represents a 0.

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It is the job of a computer programmer to make sure that all the information fed into a computer is represented by different combinations of electrical pulses and non-pulses.

What could happen if a computer programmer makes a mistake and writes an 0 instead of a 1?

2.

Answer true or false.

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(a) The number eight is a bit.

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(b) Letters can be read by a computer.

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(c) A pulse is represented by 1.

(d) Bits actually represent electrical pulses.

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(e) The code of 0 and 1 is called Morse code.

3.

4.

Write four types of information a computer can process. (i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

Explain the job of a computer programmer.

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Bits and Bytes – 2 A computer uses binary code to process many different kinds of information. All information fed into the computer is represented by 1s and 0s. Numbers and letters of the alphabet can be written in binary code.

Code 6

0110110

1

0110001

7

0110111

2

0110010

8

0111000

3

0110011

9

0111001

4

0110100

=

5

0110101

+

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0101011

Decode these sums and then work out the answer. Write it in binary code. 0101011

(b) 0110101

0101011

0110000

0111101

(c) 0110100

0101011

0110011

0111101

0101011

0110110

0111101

(e) 0110111

0101011

0110001

0111101

(f) 0111000

0101011

0110000

0111101

0101011

0110001

0111101

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(g) 0110001

0110100

0111101

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(a) 0110010

(d) 0110011

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0110000

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0

Make up your own sums to be decoded by a friend.

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Bits and Bytes – 3

E F G H I J K L M

Q R S T U V W X Y Z

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

––––– ...––––––– ...– – – ....–

..... –.... – –... – – –.. – – – –. .–––...–.–– – ..– –..

full stop comma query

Write these words represented in Morse code. (a)

/

/

/

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(b)

.– .– –. .– –. .–.. . –... –.– – – . ... –.. .. –. .. – ...

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0

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D

O

.–.– ––– .––––..– ....–. – .....–– .– – –..– –.– – – –..

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B

.– –... –.–. –.. ...–. –. .... ...– – – –.– .–––..

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Another kind of binary code is Morse code. In Morse code, numbers and letters are represented by a row of long or short sounds known as dots and dashes. The most widely recognised Morse code is:

/

/

/

/

/

/

/

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(c)

/

/

8.

Write your first name in Morse code.

9.

Write your teacher’s name in Morse code.

10.

Make up your own code.

11.

Write a message to your friend using your code.

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Bytes – 1 The capacity of a computer’s memory is measured in ‘bytes’. People talk about ‘kilobytes’, ‘megabytes’ and ‘gigabytes’. A kilobyte is around 1 000 bytes (or exactly 1 024 bytes). ‘Kilo’ is a Greek word meaning one thousand. A megabyte is about one million bytes (or exactly 1 024 x 1 024 bytes). ‘Mega’ is a Greek word meaning one million. A gigabyte is approximately 1 000 megabytes (one billion bytes). ‘Giga’ is a Greek word meaning giant. Abbreviations: kilobyte – K megabyte – Mb gigabyte – Gb

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How many:

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1.

How many bytes make a kilobyte?

(a) bits make a byte?

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(b) bits make a kilobyte?

IBM Compact

2.

1 000 bytes make a kilobyte.

Look at the advertisement for a computer. (a) What size Random Access Memory does this system have?

(b) What is the capacity of the hard drive storage in this system?

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66 Mhz Intel Pentium 1 32 Mb RAM 2.5 Gb H/D M 8 Speed CD RO rd 16 bit sound ca rs 80 watt speake itor 15” digital mon Windows 98

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(c) bits make a gigabyte?

3.

Abbreviate these words. (a) random access memory (b) worldwide web (c) operating system(s) (d) megabyte (e) gigabyte (f)

kilobyte

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Bytes – 2 4.

What is the meaning of the prefix: I need more megabytes!

(a) kilo?

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(b) mega?

(a) kilo

:

kilo

:

(b) mega

:

mega

: :

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(c) giga

:

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giga

Look through newspapers to find advertisements for computer systems. Copy the advertisements and circle the amounts of RAM each system has.

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List two words that use these prefixes. Write definitions for the words. Use a dictionary if needed.

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(c) giga?

7.

What would you choose first in a computer—more RAM or faster operating speed? Why?

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Computer Language – 1 Writing programs in binary code can be a very tedious task made up of endless rows of 0s and 1s. To make this easier, computer languages have been developed that use decimal numbers (like the ones we use to count and add), words and symbols. These are then converted into binary code by programs called compilers.

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Once converted into binary code, the instructions are fed into a computer and checked for ‘bugs’. Computer bugs are errors in the code which prevent a computer from doing what it is being asked to do. This process of checking is commonly called ‘debugging’ a program. When all known bugs have been eliminated, a computer program is ready for public use.

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A program which is not ready for public use is called ‘alpha’ or ‘beta’ software—depending on how close it is to being ‘bug-free’.

What is meant by ‘tedious’? Explain and write a synonym for it.

2.

What does a compiler do?

3.

Write synonyms for these words.

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(a) eliminated

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1.

(b) converted (c) prevent

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(d) task

4.

Write key words and sentences from each paragraph. Key Words

Longer Sentences

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Paragraph

1

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Computer Language — 2 Use the binary code to answer the questions.

Binary Code 5.

Write these binary codes as words.

A

01000001

(a) 01000010 • 01010101 • 01000111

B

01000010

C

01000011

D

01000100

E

01000101

F

01000110

G

01000111

H

01001000

I

01001001

J

01001010

K

01001011

L

01001100

M

01001101

N

01001110

O

01001111

P

01010000

Q

01010001

R

01010010

S

01010011

T

01010100

U

01010101

V

01010110

W

01010111

X

01011000

Y

01011001

Z

01011010

(c) 01000110 • 01000101 • 01000100

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(d) 01000011 • 01001111 • 01000100 • 01000101

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(b) 01010100 • 01000001 • 01010011 • 01001011

Write your first name in binary code.

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(e) 01010010 • 01001111 • 01010111 • 01010011

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Write your teacher’s name in binary code.

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7.

8.

Make your own code using the numbers 0–9.

9.

Use your code to write a message to a friend.

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Operating Systems – 1 The most important software a computer needs is the OS or operating system. It is made up of programs which allow the computer to do its job and follow instructions. It controls and organises the computer. The operating system controls all the input and output devices. It allows other programs, called applications, to run and do certain jobs of their own. The operating system also organises all the data in a computer so that it can be stored and used when needed.

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Different operating systems are designed for different types of computers. If you own a PC, it will use an operating system such as Windows 95, Windows 98 or Windows NT. If you own an Apple Mac, it will use System 7.5, OS 8.5 or OS X server.

An Operating System at Work

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This shows you what happens when you want to check a document for spelling errors.

1

2

The CPU tells the OS to power the data to run a spellcheck.

3

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The operating system finds the spellcheck application and runs it.

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You type the command to check spelling.

1.

Name five input devices controlled by the operating system.

4 The system checks the document and counts any errors.

2.

Name five output devices controlled by the operating system.

(i)

(i)

(ii)

(ii)

(iii)

(iii)

(iv)

(iv)

(v)

(v)

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Operating Systems – 2 3.

Draw the process for:

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(a) adding numbers.

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(b) scanning a picture.

Search through newspapers to find advertisements for a second-hand computer. Glue three of them below. Highlight the operating system.

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5.

Explain which operating system you believe is the best and why.

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Graphical User Interface – 1

(GUI—pronounced ‘gooey’)

Some operating systems use typed commands (called command lines) to tell the computer what to do. Whenever you want the computer to do something, you need to type a command. Two operating systems which use command lines are DOS and UNIX.

Macintosh

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Windows 98 and MAC OS 8.5 use pictures (called icons) and menus to help you run programs. This is much easier than having to remember commands which have to be typed every time you want the computer to do something. Under Windows 98 and MAC OS 8.5, you simply point at the menu or icon with the mouse. Operating systems which have menus and icons are using what is called a ‘graphical user interface’ rather than command lines.

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UNIX

Windows

Write the advantages of an operating system that uses icons.

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2.

Explain how a menu works.

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Graphical User Interface – 2

What does it mean to ‘run’ a program?

5.

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4.

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Explain how a command line works.

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3.

Write these abbreviations in full. (a) DOS

g

(b) www

(d) GUI

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(c) OS

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Icons Icons are small graphic images or pictures used to represent commands instead of words which have to be typed and read on a monitor. They make using a computer much easier.

6.

Find a computer. Draw an icon which represents:

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(a) a folder

7.

(b) a word processing application

(c) a file

(b) a printer

(c) your rubbish bin

Design your own icon for: (a) your hard drive

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Files and Folders All data fed into a computer is organised into files (sometimes called documents). These files are stored in groups called folders or directories. The operating system uses special programs called utilities to keep these files and folders in an orderly condition. The utilities in an operating system of a computer allows the user to name, rename, copy, delete and move files. All files and folders (directories) are stored in hierarchical order for easy access. Files and folders can be sorted according to size, date, name and the application that created the document.

system folder

date and time

Sa

PC version

my computer

disk drive c

control panels

date and time

Sort these files by name. Number them in order. (a)

Daniel’s Folder

(b)

Games

e e e e

letter to Grandma

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e e e e

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1.

control panels

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hard drive

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Macintosh version

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card for Mum

bedroom rules

Army Road Racer Fishing Fever

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door sign

Blitz ‘em

(c) Sort these files by date. Number them in order. Rebecca’s Stuff

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maths homework

12/02/99

poster

14/04/99

bathroom roster

07/01/99

dishes roster

26/09/99 Computers in the Classroom

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Computers in Society – 1 Computers are now such a part of our lives that society as we know it could not exist without them. Computers are used everywhere, from big and small businesses, to schools, aircraft, cars and even in our homes.

List how computers can be used at home.

2.

Write the advantages of having a computer at home.

3.

Write the disadvantages of having a computer at home.

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4.

Give Mum and Dad three good reasons why you need a computer at home. (i) (ii) (iii)

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Computers in Society – 2 5.

List as many places as possible where computers are used in the community and what their job is. Computer

Function

monitors engine, brakes, fuel, gearbox

List the advantages and disadvantages of more and more computers being used in our community.

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e.g. motor cars

Disadvantages

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Advantages

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Computer in Society – 3 List ways in which computers are used in your school.

8.

In what ways do computers benefit your school?

9.

In what other ways could computers be used to benefit your school further?

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7.

10.

Write notes to debate the topic ‘Every child should have his or her own computer in the classroom’. Against

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Safe and Healthy Computing – 1 1.

Setting up a computer properly can help eliminate problems such as tired eyes or sore backs. Use this checklist as a guide to safe and healthy computing. Sit comfortably at your desk.

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Lower back, feet and thighs should be supported.

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The chair should suit the height of the desk.

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Knees bent at right angles. Clearance between desk and thighs.

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Monitor positioned centrally on the desk.

Minimise glare and reflections on monitor.

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Your eyes should be approximately 50 cm away from your monitor.

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Good lighting to comfortably read instructions without reflections on the screen.

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Keyboard angled between 5° and 15° above the desk. Take regular breaks from looking at the monitor.

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All electrical leads and plugs installed properly and tucked well away. Keep fingers out of internal parts of the computer or peripherals.

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Choose five of the above points to create a poster advertising the importance of ‘safe and healthy computing’. Remember to make the poster: • large enough to read; • attractive to the viewer; and • simple yet informative.

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Safe and Healthy Computing – 2 Use the picture below to complete the table and make your own healthy/safe computing habit.

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Computer Terminology – 1 Match the words to the correct definition. program

The information put into a computer though input devices.

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The brain of the computer.

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A group of eight bits.

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software

Where all the important work is done. It carries out all the calculations to process the data.

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central processing unit

Small graphic images or pictures used to represent commands.

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The instructions given to a computer to make it work.

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RAM

The program a computer needs to process the data it is given.

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bytes

The computer’s memory. Can be compared to your desktop.

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gigabytes

Approximately equal to 1 000 megabytes.

icons

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Find the words hidden in this word search.

The words read letter to letter in any direction except diagonally.

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Computer Terminology – 2 Use the clues to complete the crossword puzzle.

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A group of eight bits.

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One part of a byte.

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Used to transfer data from one computer to another by phone line.

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An input device used to point and click.

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Programs which process data.

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An input device used to type data.

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The physical parts of computer.

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An output screen which allows us to see what is happening.

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Approximately equal to one million bytes.

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The computer’s memory.

10. Also called a document.

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16. An error in software. 17. Information you get out of a computer.

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19. Software allowing the computer to follow instructions.

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Glossary application binary code bits

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byte CD-ROM command line compiler CPU

another word for a computer ‘program’ represents all information by a combination of 0 and 1 short for ‘binary digits’; the smallest amount of information a computer can use eight bits equal one byte Compact Disk-Read Only Memory; a storage device a typed instruction that tells the computer what to do a software application that converts data into binary code Central Processing Unit; where the computer processes all information the information that is put into a computer something that attaches to your computer, such as a printer or modem numbers, specifically 0 and 1, used by a computer a group of related files or documents Disk Operating System electronic mail; sends messages from one computer to another data fed into a computer is stored in these; also called documents a thin disk in a plastic cover for storing small amounts of information an operating method that uses ‘icons’ (pictures) instead of command lines (also called ‘GUI’ and pronounced ‘gooey’) a much larger disk which can store very large amounts of information the mechanical parts of the computer a picture used instead of a typed command line a printer that ‘squirts’ special inks on a page to print any information you put into the computer a worldwide ‘web’ of computers, connected using telephone or data lines a control stick, useful for games the ‘typewriter’ part of your computer 1 024 bits a printer that uses a laser beam and melts toner powder to print part of the CPU; does all the calculations needed to process data a measurement of how fast the CPU operates a device for connecting your computer to the telephone lines

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digits directory DOS email file

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floppy disk

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graphical user interface hard disk (drive)

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hardware icon inkjet printer input Internet joystick keyboard kilobyte laser printer maths unit

megahertz (MHz) modem

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Glossary monitor Morse code mouse OS

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virus

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software storage UNIX utilities

the ‘TV’-like screen that displays what your computer is doing a type of binary code, where numbers and letters are represented by dots and dashes of sound or light an input device for ‘pointing’, ‘clicking’ and ‘dragging’ on screen operating system; the instructions that tell the computer how to run what your computer produces for you; for example a printed page or a picture any devices connected to your computer, such as a joystick or modem a device to give you a permanent print-out of your computer’s work what the computer does with information that is given to it an application; a set of instructions for your computer a person who writes computer programs Random Access Memory; amount of memory a computer has to work with a device which allows you to input pictures into your computer instructions that tell the computer what to do and how to do it a way of keeping information; a hard disk is a storage device an operating system software programs that organise the computer’s filing system a program written specially to harm your computer

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Answers Do Computers Think?

Bits and Bytes

Safe and Healthy Computing

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Pages 12 – 14

Pages 27 – 28

1. (a) keyboard (b) joystick (c) mouse (d) scanner 2. (a) laser printer (b) monitor (c) speakers (d) inkjet printer 3. Teacher check 4. scanner, joystick, keyboard, mouse 5. Teacher check 6. input device; scanner, keyboard, mouse, joystick output device; printer, monitor, speakers 7. – 8. Teacher check

How Does it Work? Pages 5 – 6

CPU (ii) monitor keyboard operating system scanner, mouse, monitor, computer (b) keyboard, monitor, mouse, computer, printer (c) microphone, mouse, computer 3. Teacher check 4. (a) Open the door very quietly and walk through. (b) Carefully put the lid on the glue before putting it away. (c) Eat your lunch quietly in the dining room then put your rubbish in the bin. (d) Walk carefully around the swimming pool so as not to slip.

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1. (a) 8 (b) 1024 (c) 1024 000 2. (a) 32 Mb (b) 2.5 Gb 3. (a) RAM (b) www (c) OS (d) Mb (e) Gb (f) Kb 4. (a) 1000 (b) 1000 000 (c) 1000 000 000 5. – 7. Teacher check

Computer Language Pages 17 – 18

1. Teacher check 2. coverts numbers, words and symbols into binary code 3. – 4. Teacher check 5. (a) bug (b) task (c) fed (d) code (e) rows 6. – 8. Teacher check

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The CPU Pages 7 – 9

1. program – the program a computer needs to process the data it is given. data – the information put into a computer though input devices. software – the instructions given to a computer to make it work. central processing unit – the brain of the computer. maths unit – where all the important work is done. It carries out all the calculations to process the data. RAM – the computer’s memory. Can be compared to your desktop. bytes – a group of eight bits. gigabytes – approximately equal to 1 000 megabytes. icons – small graphic images or pictures used to represent commands. 2.

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1. – 4. Teacher check 5. (a) Central Processing Unit (b) Operating System (c) Video Cassette Recorder (d) International Business Machines (e) worldwide web 6. – 7. Teacher check

Pages 29 – 30

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Computing Terminology

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Input and Output

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1. Teacher check 2. (a) false (b) false (c) true (d) true (e) false 3. sounds, images, words, music 4. ensures all information fed into a computer is represented by different combinations of electrical pulses and non-pulses. 5. (a) 2+4=6 (b) 5+0=5 (c) 4+3=7 (d) 3+6=9 (e) 7+1=8 (f) 8+0=8 (g) 1+1=2 6. Teacher check 7. (a) apple (b) bytes (c) digits 8. – 10. Teacher check

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Computer Memory Pages 10 – 11 1. space on the top of a desk – Teacher check 2. a bookshelf – Teacher check 3. considerations of space 4. Teacher check 5. Teacher check 6. (a) programs – Teacher check (b) memory – Teacher check (c) information – Teacher check (d) scanner – Teacher check 7. Teacher check

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Graphical User Interface

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Files and Folders Page 23 1. (a) 4,2,1,3 (b) 2,1,4,3 (c) 2,3,1,4

Computers in Society Pages 24 – 26 Teacher check

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