Issuu on Google+

Vi ew

in g

sa m

pl

e

Lower

Written by

Diane Henderson and Bruce Tuffin Published by IRE–0114 31/3

Prim-Ed Publishing


READING COMPREHENSION (Lower) This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by R.I.C. Publications® 1999 Reprinted under licence by Prim-Ed Publishing 1999 Copyright© Bruce Tuffin and Diane Henderson 1999 ISBN 978-1-86400-519-6 PR–0114

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Additional titles available in this series:

pl e

READING COMPREHENSION (Middle) READING COMPREHENSION (Upper)

m

For your added protection in the case of copyright inspection, please complete the form below. Retain this form, the complete original document and the invoice or receipt as proof of purchase.

sa

Name of Purchaser:

ew

Prim-Ed Publishing Marshmeadows New Ross Co. Wexford

in g

Date of Purchase:

Supplier:

School Order# (if applicable):

Signature of Purchaser:

Vi

www.prim-ed.com

Internet websites

In some cases, websites or specific URLs may be recommended. While these are checked and rechecked at the time of publication, the publisher has no control over any subsequent changes which may be made to webpages. It is strongly recommended that the class teacher checks all URLs before allowing pupils to access them.

View all pages online

Website: www.prim-ed.com


F oreword Reading Comprehension is designed to present the three levels of questioning to pupils in an attractive format, using original and interesting fiction stories. Where used, artwork has a dual purpose; to increase motivation to read, and to provide visual cues to understanding the story. To assist teachers, while at the same time being unobtrusive to pupils, the comprehension exercises on each worksheet have been coded, as follows:

Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. Literal (recognise and recall directly from text)

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

Interpretive (infer meaning by combining personal experience with text)

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper.

in g

sa m

pl

Evaluative/Appreciative (make associations with text, personal experience and knowledge) Although it is suggested that pupils write their answers for Level C, it may be more appropriate for pupils to provide answers orally, depending on their skill level. Curriculum links have been included to assist planning. This series includes: Reading Comprehension—Lower Reading Comprehension—Middle Reading Comprehension—Upper

C ontents

Vi ew

Curriculum Links ..................................................................................... ii–iii Interesting Words Record ......................................................................... iv Story Outline ............................................................................................... v Don’t Cheat!............................................................................................ 1–2 Play it Again ............................................................................................ 3–4 Lost his Marbles ..................................................................................... 5–6 Hurry Up! ................................................................................................ 7–8 Take him Home .................................................................................... 9–10 What’s for Dinner? .............................................................................. 11–12 Count to 10! ........................................................................................ 13–14 Here, Boy! ........................................................................................... 15–16 It’s Magic ............................................................................................ 17–18 Sammy the Snake ............................................................................... 19–20 ‘Hello, Earthling’ .................................................................................. 21–22 What am I? .......................................................................................... 23–24 Answers .................................................................................................... 25

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

i


Reading Comprehension Curriculum Links The English Language Revised Primary School Curriculum for Ireland acknowledges that the ultimate objective of reading is comprehension or the reconstruction of meaning. However, as children mature and deal with texts of increasing complexity they need to develop higher comprehension skills such as analysis, synthesis, inference and deduction. These may be acquired through a consistent and structured experience of questioning, discussing and probing of text. Reading Comprehension is a high-interest comprehension series, which focuses on this through enabling the child to experience comprehension at literal, inferential and evaluative levels. It covers many of the content objectives from the four Strands of the English Language programme. The objectives include that the child should be enabled to:

Strand

Strand Unit

Class

Content Objectives

Lower

Receptiveness to language

Reading

1st & 2nd

• Engage in shared reading activities • Develop reading skills through engaging with reading material appropriate to his/her stage of development • Experience how a story structure is organised by reading and listening to fiction

Reading

Developing cognitive abilities through language

Reading

Emotional and imaginative development through language

Reading

• Read from a range of children’s literature • Find information and share it with others

in g

Competence and confidence in using language

Writing

Vi ew Middle

Receptiveness to Language

Reading

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading

• Develop comprehension strategies such as recalling details and events, assimilating facts, retelling stories • Write an explanation for something • Write answers to questions asked by the teacher • Engage with a wide variety of text • Respond to characters and events in a story • Express feelings in writing

Writing

Writing Competence and confidence in using language

pl

sa m

Writing

e

Book

3rd & 4th

• Understand the relationship between text and illustration • Use reading as a stimulus for writing • Develop basic retrieval skills scanning and skimming

Reading Comprehension

ii


Reading Comprehension Curriculum Links Strand

Strand Unit

Class

Content Objectives

Middle

Developing cognitive abilities through language

Reading

3rd & 4th

• Continue to develop a range of comprehension strategies to deal with narrative, expository, and representational reading material assimilation, deduction, inference, analysis, prediction, evaluation, summarisation

Emotional and imaginative development

Reading

e

Book

pl

• Extend and develop his/her response to increasingly challenging reading material • Write about favourite moments, characters and events in stories • Express in writing his/her reactions to reading

Upper

Receptiveness to Language

sa m

Writing

Reading

Writing

5th & 6th

• Engage with increasing range of narrative, expository and representational text • Express and communicate reactions to reading experiences

Reading

• Engage with books in group or in whole-class settings

Developing cognitive abilities through language

Reading

• Use comprehension skills such as analysing, confirming, evaluating, synthesising and correlating to aid deduction, problem-solving and prediction • Develop study skills such as skimming, scanning and summarising • Support arguments and opinions with evidence from the text

Emotional and imaginative development through language

Reading

• Relate personal experience to the ideas and emotions conveyed in the text • Express a personal reaction to ideas, emotions and images encountered in literature

Vi ew

in g

Competence and confidence in using language

Prim-Ed Publishing

Writing

Reading Comprehension

iii


I nteresting Words Record Write any help given with meaning

Write your explanation

Dictionary help if needed

Vi ew

in g

sa m

pl

e

Word

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

iv


S tory Outline Title

Characters

in g

sa m

pl

e

Setting

Vi ew

Events and Action

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

v


D on't Cheat! ‘Please do my homework for me!’ Lee asked her best friend, Jody. ‘No way,’ said Jody. ‘That’s cheating.’

pl sa m

‘What will you pay?’ Jody asked.

e

‘No, it’s not! You’re just helping me! And I’ll pay you for it!’

‘Ummm … you can have my pencil case,’ Lee replied. ‘The one you like, with the mermaid on the front.’

in g

Jody thought for a while. Perhaps it wasn’t really cheating … and no one would ever know … and she really did want that pencil case … ‘All right,’ she said at last. ‘But don’t you tell anyone!’

Vi ew

‘I won’t,’ Lee promised.

The next day in school, Miss Jarvis said, ‘Lee James! I’ve just looked at your homework! You’ve been cheating, haven’t you?’ ‘No, Miss Jarvis,’ said Lee. ‘Don’t tell me stories, young lady! Jody did your homework for you, didn’t she?’ ‘No, Miss Jarvis,’ Lee said again. ‘Rubbish!’ said the teacher. ‘This is Jodie’s writing in your exercise book! How do you explain that?’ ‘That’s easy,’ said Jody, thinking quickly. ‘When we did our homework last night, we both shared her pencil!’

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

1


D on't Cheat! Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. What did Lee’s pencil case have on the front?

2.

Who is Miss Jarvis?

3.

What is Lee’s last name?

4.

Jody did not do Lee’s homework. True or False?

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

1.

Why did Jody agree to do Lee’s homework?

2.

Why didn’t Lee think it was cheating for Jody to do her homework for her?

3.

What sort of teacher do you think Miss Jarvis is?

Vi ew

in g

sa m

pl

1.

Explain why you think that.

4.

Why did Jody ask Lee not to tell anyone?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Do you think Jody should have done Lee’s homework or not? If you were Lee, what would you have said to Miss Jarvis? Tell what you think Miss Jarvis said next. Is it fair to cheat a little bit if you want something badly enough?

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

2


P lay it Again Eric, the famous violin player, was lost in the jungle. For two days he had gone without food or water. He had walked over mountains and through rivers, carrying his violin case. Now he was too tired and too hungry to walk any further. He came to a clearing in the jungle and sat down on a log. He decided to play his violin one more time.

pl

e

As soon as he started playing, animals of all kinds began to gather round to listen to his music. The more he played, the more animals arrived. They came and sat quietly in the clearing in front of him. Soon there were birds, lions, hippopotamuses, zebras, snakes, elephants and even wild pigs listening to his music.

sa m

Eric didn’t stop playing. He played better than ever before. The jungle was filled with the beautiful sounds of his violin. Then a huge old crocodile crawled out of the river nearby. It walked into the clearing where Eric was playing. It looked at Eric. It looked at the animals all gathered round.

in g

Then it opened its huge jaws wide and—snap—ate poor Eric, violin and all. The other animals were very angry!

Vi ew

‘That music was the most beautiful thing I have ever heard,’ the lion growled. ‘Why did you eat him?’ The crocodile cupped his hand to his ear. ‘What?’ he said.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

3


P lay it Again Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. 1.

What sort of instrument did Eric play?

2.

Where did Eric sit down?

3.

Put this time line in the order the events happen in the story. Start with number 1.

e

The crocodile ate Eric

Eric became lost in the jungle

4.

sa m

The animals became very angry

pl

The animals listened to the music

The zebra growled at the lion. True or False?

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

Why didn’t the crocodile stop and listen to Eric’s music?

2.

Why were the animals so angry?

Vi ew

in g

1.

3.

What clues does the writer give you to say that Eric was tired?

4.

The writer tells you more about Eric than the animals. Why is this?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Would you rather be the lion or the crocodile? Why? Do you think music could really make wild animals tame? In your own words, explain how Eric became lost. If you were Eric, and you were lost, what would you do?

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

4


L ost his Marbles Three little boys went into a toy shop. The man behind the counter asked the first boy, ‘What can I do for you?’.

e

‘I’d like a dozen of those marbles, please,’ the boy said, pointing to a glass jar of marbles w-a-y up high on the shelf.

pl

So the shopkeeper got his ladder and put it against the shelf. He climbed w-a-y up the ladder, took the glass jar, and counted out a dozen marbles. He put the heavy jar back on the shelf and climbed down the ladder again. Then he put the ladder away.

in g

sa m

‘There you are,’ he said. ‘One dozen marbles.’ He asked the second boy, ‘What can I do for you?’.

Vi ew

‘I’d like a dozen of those marbles, please,’ the second boy said, pointing to the same glass jar of marbles w-a-y up high on the shelf. Grumbling, the shopkeeper got his ladder and put it against the shelf. He climbed w-a-y up the ladder, took the glass jar, and counted out a dozen marbles. ‘I suppose you want a dozen marbles, too?’ he asked the third boy. But the boy shook his head. ‘No,’ he said. So the shopkeeper put the heavy jar back on the shelf and climbed down the ladder again. Then he put the ladder away. ‘Right!’ he said to the third boy, panting hard. ‘What do you want?’ ‘I’d like two dozen of those marbles, please,’ the third boy said, pointing to the same glass jar of marbles w-a-y up high on the shelf.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

5


L ost his Marbles Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. How many marbles did the second boy want?

2.

Where was the marble jar?

3.

What words tell you the shopkeeper was out of breath after climbing the ladder?

4.

How many people were in the shop altogether?

pl

e

1.

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

In your own words, tell what is funny about this story.

2.

Can you think of another title for this story?

3.

Why do you think the third boy didn’t tell the shopkeeper what he wanted until the man climbed down the ladder again?

Vi ew

in g

sa m

1.

4.

Do you think the shopkeeper was a kind man? Explain your reasoning.

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. If you were the shopkeeper, what would you say to the third boy? What else could the shopkeeper have asked the third boy before he climbed down the ladder? 3. Why do you think the boys all wanted marbles at the same time? 4. Do you think the boys acted like this on purpose? Explain your answer. 1. 2.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

6


H urry Up! Father Tortoise, Mother Tortoise and Baby Tortoise went out for a walk one afternoon. It was a very hot day, so they went into a shop to buy some ice-cream sundaes to cool off. They had just sat down to eat when Father Tortoise said, ‘Oh, dear. I’ve left my wallet at home. Now I won’t be able to pay for the icecream sundaes.’

e

‘That’s all right, dear,’ said Mother Tortoise. ‘Junior will get it for you.’

sa m

pl

She turned to Baby Tortoise and said, ‘Junior, I want you to run home as fast as you can and get your father’s wallet. It’s on the dressing table beside our bed.’ So Baby Tortoise got up from the table and left. Four hours later, he still was not back.

‘Junior has been gone an awfully long time,’ said Father Tortoise.

in g

‘Yes,’ Mother Tortoise agreed. ‘I think perhaps you had better eat his ice-cream sundae—before it melts!’

Vi ew

But as Father Tortoise picked up the plate of ice-cream, a little voice from the door said, ‘If you eat my ice-cream sundae, I’m not going!’.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

7


H urry Up! Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. What did the Tortoise family buy in the shop?

2.

What does Baby Tortoise’s mother call him?

3.

Baby Tortoise was gone for four hours. True or False?

4.

Why did Father Tortoise need his wallet?

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

1.

Why was Baby Tortoise still only at the door?

2.

Can you think of another title for this story?

3.

What does the writer want you to think about the speed of tortoises?

4.

What do you think will happen next?

Vi ew

in g

sa m

pl

1.

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper.

If tortoises don’t have pockets, where might Father Tortoise carry his wallet? 2. Mother Tortoise told Junior to ‘run home as fast as you can’. Was he doing this? 3. If you were Baby Tortoise, and just about to eat your ice-cream sundae, how would you feel about having to run home? 4. In this story, the tortoises eat ice-cream to keep cool. How might ‘real’ tortoises keep cool in hot weather? 1.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

8


T ake him Home Sergeant Grey, the police officer, was walking along the busy street one day, just minding his own business and singing a little song to himself.

pl sa m

Sergeant Grey hurried over to the man.

e

Suddenly, he saw a man coming the other way. That wasn’t very strange, but what was strange was the man had a fully-grown lion on a leash with him!

‘What do you think you’re doing?’ he asked.

‘Just taking my lion for a walk,’ the man replied. The lion lay down on the road and began to lick its fur.

in g

‘Where did you get a fully-grown lion from?’ the sergeant asked. ‘My brother in Africa sent him to me as a cub. He just sort of grew up. He’s harmless, you know. He wouldn’t hurt a fly.’

Vi ew

Sergeant Grey wagged his finger. ‘I don’t care if he is harmless— you can’t take a fully-grown lion on a leash through the middle of town. You’ll have to take him to the zoo.’ ‘Oh! Well, all right—if you say so,’ replied the man. ‘Come on, Kitty,’ he called, and off they went towards the zoo. The very next day, Sergeant Grey was walking along the busy street again, just minding his own business and singing a little song to himself. Suddenly, he saw the same man, with same fully-grown lion on a leash, coming towards him! ‘Hey, you!’ he called out. ‘I thought I told you to take that lion to the zoo!’ ’But I did!’ replied the man. ‘And he had such a good time that today I’m taking him to the movies!’

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

9


T ake him Home Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. What is the police officer’s name?

2.

Who is ‘Kitty’?

3.

How many times did Sergeant Grey see the man and his lion?

4.

Where did Sergeant Grey tell the man to take the lion?

pl

e

1.

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

Did the man understand what Sergeant Grey was trying to tell him? Explain your answer.

2.

Why did Sergeant Grey wag his finger at the man?

Vi ew

in g

sa m

1.

3.

Was the Sergeant afraid of the lion?

4.

Can you think why Sergeant Grey was ‘singing a little song to himself’?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Could this story really happen? Explain your answer. If you were Sergeant Grey, what would you say to the man next? Why did the lion lie down in the road and lick its fur? What would a real police officer do if he or she saw a man walking down the street with a lion?

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

10


W hat's for Dinner? ’Who has some news for us this morning?’ Miss Hall asked. She was sitting at her desk at the front of the classroom. ‘All right, Cindy, you can go first.’ Cindy stood up next to her desk and said, ‘Last night, my dog Puddles had puppies. There is six of them, and they are all black and white like Puddles. Mummy said we can choose one to keep.’

in g

sa m

pl

e

‘Thank you, Cindy,’ said Miss Hall. ‘You are very lucky. Does anyone else have some news? Yes, Mark?’

Vi ew

Mark stood up. ‘On the weekend we are going camping. My dad is going to take me fishing, too. I think it will be really good fun.’ ‘Yes, Mark, I agree—it will be good fun. Any more news?’ Only Billy, the naughtiest boy in class, had his hand up. Miss Hall sighed. ‘Yes, Billy, what’s your news?’ ‘My dad’s in hospital,’ Billy said. ‘Goodness!’ said Miss Hall. ‘What happened?’ ‘Well, last night he went out to the garden to cut a cabbage for our dinner. But he slipped with the knife and stabbed himself.’ ‘Good heavens, Billy, that’s awful! What did your mother do?’ ‘She peeled some carrots instead!’

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

11


W hat's for Dinner? Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. How many puppies did Puddles have?

2.

Which child gave news first?

3.

Who was the naughtiest person in the class?

4.

What was Billy’s dad cutting when he had his accident?

pl

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

1.

Why did Miss Hall sigh?

2.

Is ‘What’s for Dinner?’ a good title for this story? Can you think of a better one?

3.

Can you think of any reasons why Cindy’s dog is called Puddles?

Vi ew

in g

sa m

1.

4.

What does the writer want you to think or feel about Billy’s mum?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. 1. 2. 3. 4.

If you were Miss Hall, what would you say to Billy next? Pretend you are a news reporter. What questions would you ask Billy’s mum? What words could you use to say how Billy feels about the accident? Is this a sad story, a happy story, or somewhere in between? Explain your answer.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

12


C ount to 10! Kevin was a mess! His shirt was hanging out and one pocket was nearly torn off. His hair was sticking out everywhere. There was a hole in the knee of his new jeans. He was covered in dirt and grass stains. ‘Kevin!’ said his mother when she saw him. ‘You’ve been fighting again, haven’t you?’

e

‘Yes, Mum,’ Kevin said, hanging his head. ‘But it wasn’t my fault! I didn’t start it!’

in g

‘But, Mum …’

sa m

pl

‘You seem to think it’s never your fault, Kevin. But it’s your bad temper that gets you into trouble. You must learn to control it. From now on, whenever you look like losing your temper, I want you to stop and count to 10.’

‘No ‘buts’, Kevin!’ Mum said sharply. ‘You stop and count to 10. Now promise me!’

Vi ew

‘All right, Mum, I promise.’

For a whole week, Kevin didn’t get into a fight. Then, one day, he came home a real mess—again. His clothes were torn and dirty and he was going to have a b-i-g black eye! ‘What happened this time, Kevin? I thought I told you to count to 10!’ his mother said. ‘I did, Mum, honest! Nick started it anyway!’ ‘Are you sure you counted to 10?’ ‘Yes, Mum—but Nick’s mother only makes him count to five—so he hit me first!’

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

13


C ount to 10! Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. Who was Kevin fighting with?

2.

Why does Mum think Kevin is always getting into fights?

3.

Kevin came home with two black eyes. True or False?

4.

Who hit first—Nick or Kevin?

pl

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

1.

What reasons does the writer give you for saying ‘Kevin was a mess!’?

2.

How does counting to 10 help control your temper?

3.

What makes you think Kevin got into a lot of fights?

Vi ew

in g

sa m

1.

4.

Do you think Nick had a short temper too? Why?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. What other things might Kevin do to control his temper? You are Kevin’s mum and you are phoning Nick’s mum to talk to her about the boys fighting. What will you say? 3. What might Kevin and Nick be fighting about? 4. Is it all right to fight if someone else starts it? Explain. 1. 2.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

14


H ere, Boy!

Vi ew

in g

sa m

pl

e

Two farmers met on a country road and started talking to each other. They talked about their sheep, about the weather, about the price of wool—all the things farmers talk about. Then they began to talk about sheep dogs. ‘This is Bluey,’ said the first farmer, whose name was Bill. He pointed to the dog half-asleep at his feet. ‘Best little sheep dog around.’ ‘Oh, I reckon my dog’s pretty good, too,’ said the second farmer, whose name was Jack. ‘I didn’t think you had a dog,’ said Bill. ‘Can’t see him anywhere around.’ ‘Hang on, I’ll call him,’ said Jack. He whistled and called out, ‘Here, boy!’. An old dog crawled out from underneath Jack’s truck, where he’d been sleeping. He had only three legs. He wore a black patch over one eye. One of his ears was missing. He had a long, white scar down one side, from front leg to hind leg. His tail had a sharp bend in it. He limped over and flopped in the dirt next to Jack. ‘Good heavens!’ said Bill. ‘He’s a bit of a mess! What happened?’ ‘Well,’ Jack replied. ‘He lost the leg when he was just a puppy—got it caught in a rabbit trap. And he lost the eye when he tried to run through a barbed wire fence. And another dog chewed the ear off when they were fighting. The scar? Big wild pig did that to him—nasty, it was. And the tail happened when I slammed my truck door on it.’ ‘What about the limp?’ Bill asked. ‘I noticed he’s limping.’ ‘Oh, that—well, he got bitten by a snake a couple of days ago—nearly killed him, it did.’ ‘I don’t think I’ve ever known an animal to have so many accidents!’ Bill said. ‘What’s his name?’ ‘Lucky,’ said Jack.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

15


H ere, Boy! Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. Bill and John were sheep farmers. True or False?

2.

Where was Jack’s dog sleeping?

3.

Who was Bluey?

4.

Why was Jack’s dog limping?

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

1.

What’s so funny about Jack calling his dog ‘Lucky’?

2.

‘Jack’s dog really was lucky because he was still alive.’

sa m

pl

1.

Do you agree or disagree?

Would Lucky be any good at rounding up sheep?

Vi ew

3.

in g

Explain.

4.

Explain why the writer says Lucky ‘flopped’ in the dirt next to Jack’s feet?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. 1. Why would two farmers on a country road just stop to talk to each other? 2. The writer doesn’t tell you, but what country might this story be set in? 3. Make a list of jobs a sheep dog could do for a farmer. 4. What is a barbed wire fence used for? Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

16


I t's Magic Sylvester the Magician finally got a good job—magician on board an ocean liner. With his parrot, Polly, he did all the usual magic tricks. He pulled a rabbit out of a top hat and made it disappear. He made a silk handkerchief vanish into thin air. He took a glass of water, covered it with a black cloth and then—poof!—it was gone.

sa m

pl

e

Polly’s job was to talk to the audience while Sylvester did his tricks. He would sit on Sylvester’s shoulder and squawk, ‘It’s up his sleeve, folks’. Or, ‘It’s hidden in his cape!’. Or, ‘He’s hiding it in his pocket!’. The audience would laugh along with the cheeky parrot. They knew it was all part of the show. Then, one day, in the middle of Sylvester’s act, the ocean liner hit an iceberg—and sank. Sylvester and Polly found themselves alone on a life raft. For two days they floated on the waves. There was no one else around and no sign of land.

in g

Polly didn’t say a word. He just sat on the edge of the life raft. Sylvester tried talking to him, but the parrot wouldn’t reply. The next morning, Polly suddenly flew onto Sylvester’s shoulder.

Vi ew

‘All right,’ he squawked. ‘I give up! Where did you hide the ship?’

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

17


I t's Magic Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. Why did the ocean liner sink?

2.

Polly was a girl parrot. True or False?

3.

What were Polly and Sylvester floating on?

4.

What was Polly’s job?

sa m

pl

e

1.

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

Why would it be a good job to be a magician on an ocean liner?

2.

Can you think why Polly didn’t talk for two days?

Vi ew

in g

1.

3.

Magicians often wear capes. Why do you think this is?

4.

Why did Polly think Sylvester was hiding the ship?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. Is some magic real, or is it all tricks? If Polly is giving away Sylvester’s ‘secrets’, why do you think Sylvester still uses him in his magic act? 3. Could an ocean liner really hit an iceberg and sink? Explain. 4. Why would anyone want to become a magician? 1. 2.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

18


S ammy the Snake Sammy the snake was always asking his mother questions. ‘Mummy, Mummy, what sort of snake am I?’ ‘You’re a carpet snake, dear,’ his mother said. ‘Mummy, Mummy, why am I green?’ ‘Well, dear,’ his mother explained, ‘you’re green so you can hide in the trees, among all the leaves’.

pl

e

Sammy asked questions all day. He even woke his mother up some nights to ask her a question! Finally, it all became too much for Sammy’s mother.

sa m

‘Sammy!’ she said. ‘No more questions! I’ve had enough! I will not answer one more!’ ‘But, Mummy …’ Sammy said.

‘No, Sammy! Not one more question!’

in g

For days, Sammy didn’t ask a question. Every time he went to open his mouth, he saw the look in his mother’s eyes and closed it again! Then one day he came racing up the tree to his mother. ‘Mummy, Mummy,’ he said. ‘Am I poisonous?’

Vi ew

‘I thought I told you no more questions,’ his mother said. ‘But Mummy, this is really important! I have to know. Am I poisonous?’ ‘No, dear,’ his mother sighed. ‘We’re not poisonous snakes.’

Prim-Ed Publishing

‘Whew!’ said Sammy. ‘I’m really glad—because I just bit my lip!’

Reading Comprehension

19


S ammy the Snake Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. What sort of snake was Sammy?

2.

Why did Sammy’s mother say, ‘No more questions!’?

3.

Sammy was brown in colour so he could hide in the dead grass. True or False?

4.

Why is Sammy so glad he’s not poisonous?

sa m

pl

e

1.

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

What does the writer want you to think about Sammy?

2.

Suppose Sammy was a poisonous snake. What would happen if he bit his lip?

Vi ew

in g

1.

3.

For what reasons do carpet snakes like to hide in trees?

4.

What sort of food might carpet snakes eat?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. Why are some snakes poisonous? Most people are a little bit scared of snakes. Why? Which would you rather be—a poisonous or a nonpoisonous snake? 4. Sammy learns a lot by asking his mother questions. How do real snakes learn things? 1. 2. 3.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

20


' H ello, Earthling' With a loud h-u-m-m-m, the spaceship landed in the park. It was very late, and no one was around. The two aliens waddled up the street, looking for someone to talk to. The first thing they saw was a postbox. ‘Hello, Earthling,’ said the first alien. ‘I am from the planet Zorb. Take me to your leader.’

e

But the postbox just stood there.

pl

‘Don’t worry,’ said the second alien. ‘It’s just a child! We will find some grown-ups to talk to.’

sa m

They waddled on up the road until they came to a petrol station. There was a long row of petrol pumps outside. ‘Look!’ said the first alien. ‘Grown-ups!’ So they waddled over to the pumps.

in g

‘Hello, Earthling,’ said the first alien. ‘I am from the planet Zorb. Take me to your leader.’ But the petrol pumps just stood there. ‘Let’s go,’ said the second alien. ‘If they won’t talk to us, we’ll go home.’

Vi ew

As the spaceship roared up into the sky, the first alien said, ‘I am very sad that the earth people would not talk to us. I can understand the child being shy, but not the grownPost ups.’ ‘Hmmmph!’ said the second alien. ‘What more do you expect from people who stand around all day with their fingers in their ears?’

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

21


' H ello, Earthling' Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. What planet did the aliens come from?

2.

Why didn’t anyone see the aliens land?

3.

The aliens landed in a park. True or False?

4.

What do the aliens call a person from Earth?

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

e

1.

What makes you think the second alien was angry by the end of the story?

2.

Why would the aliens ask to be taken to our ‘leader’?

3.

Do you think the aliens had ever been to Earth before?

in g

sa m

pl

1.

Vi ew

Why?

4.

Explain why the aliens might think a postbox and petrol pumps were people.

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. You have just met an alien who wants to be taken to your leader. Who will you take him to? Why? 2. Could an alien spaceship land on Earth without us knowing about it? 3. Why do the aliens in this story speak English? 4. How would you feel if a real spaceship landed on Earth? 1.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

22


W hat am I? Pete the polar bear and his mother were walking on the ice. The wind was howling and blowing snow everywhere. ‘Mum, what am I?’ Pete asked. ‘You’re a polar bear, son,’ said his mother. ‘Are you sure?’ Pete asked.

pl

‘But are you sure I’m a polar bear?’

e

‘Of course I’m sure,’ said his mother. ‘Look at you. You’re all white and fluffy, and we live at the North Pole.’

sa m

‘Yes, I am sure. I’ll show you.’ She pushed her paw down a crack in the ice and scooped up a big fish. ‘You see? There’s your dinner.’ ‘But Mum, are you positive I’m a polar bear?’

‘Yes, Pete, I’m positive. Your father is a polar bear, I’m a polar bear and you are a polar bear.’

in g

They ate their fish and walked across the white snow for a while longer. Then Pete asked, ‘Mum, are you one hundred per cent, absolutely, positively certain for sure that I’m a polar bear?’

Vi ew

His mother stopped. ‘Look, Pete,’ she said. ‘I’m starting to get very angry. You are a polar bear! Why on earth do you keep asking?’

Prim-Ed Publishing

’Because,’ Pete said, ‘if I’m a polar bear, how come I’m freezing?’.

Reading Comprehension

23


W hat am I? Level A—Use one word or a short phrase to answer these questions. Where does Pete live?

2.

Polar bears eat fish. True or False?

3.

Why was Pete’s mother getting angry with him?

4.

Why did Pete think he might not be a polar bear?

pl

e

1.

sa m

Level B—Use brief sentences to answer these questions.

Why don’t polar bears get freezing cold?

2.

If polar bears don’t feel the cold, why was Pete freezing?

3.

What else might Pete’s mother have said or done to prove he was a polar bear?

Vi ew

in g

1.

4.

If Pete really is cold, what might his mother do to warm him up?

Level C—Use full sentences to answer these on a separate piece of paper. Pete and his mother sound fluffy and cuddly and friendly. Are polar bears really like that? 2. Would a baby polar bear make a good house pet? Why? 3. Polar bears kill fish and seals for food. Is this cruel? 4. What enemies might a polar bear have? 1.

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

24


A nswers Here, Boy!—Pages 15 and 16 1. False—it’s Bill and Jack, not John 2. Under Jack’s truck 3. Bill’s dog 4. He’d been bitten by a snake

Don’t Cheat!—Pages 1 and 2 1. A mermaid 2. The class teacher 3. James 4. False

It’s Magic—Pages 17 and 18 1. It hit an iceberg 2. False 3. A life raft 4. To tell the people in the audience how Sylvester did his ‘magic’ tricks

Lost his Marbles—Pages 5 and 6 1. One dozen 2. W-a-y up high on the shelf 3. ‘panting hard’ 4. Four people

pl

‘Hello, Earthling’—Pages 21 and 22 1. Zorb 2. It was very late; no one was around 3. True 4. Earthling

in g

Hurry Up!—Pages 7 and 8 1. Ice-cream sundaes 2. Junior 3. True 4. To pay for the ice-cream sundaes

Sammy the Snake—Pages 19 and 20 1. A carpet snake 2. She had had enough (Sammy asked too many questions) 3. False—green 4. Because he bit his own lip

sa m

Play it Again—Pages 3 and 4 1. Violin 2. On a log (in a clearing) 3. 3; 2; 1; 4 (top to bottom) 4. False—it was the lion

e

Note: Only Level A questions are literal; the remainder require a certain amount of personal interpretation. Hence, only Level A questions can have ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers. The validity of answers to questions in Levels B and C will be left to individual teachers and/or pupils to determine.

Vi ew

Take him Home—Pages 9 and 10 1. Sergeant Grey 2. The lion 3. Twice 4. The zoo

What Am I?—Pages 23 and 24 1. North Pole 2. True 3. He asked the same question all the time; he wouldn’t believe her answer 4. He was freezing cold

What’s for Dinner?—Pages 11 and 12 1. 6 2. Cindy 3. Billy 4. Cabbages for dinner Count to 10!—Pages 13 and 14 1. Nick 2. Because of his bad temper 3. False—one 4. Nick

Prim-Ed Publishing

Reading Comprehension

25


0114 Ire Reading Comprehension Lower