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Oral and Mental Maths Activities

4th Class www.prim-ed.com

Listening, Discussing and Reasoning in Mathematics

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0083IRE

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Gunter Schymkiw


Oral and mental maths activities – 4th Class

This master may only be reproduced by the original purchaser for use with their class(es). The publisher prohibits the loaning or onselling of this master for the purposes of reproduction.

Published by Prim-Ed Publishing® 2000 Revised and reprinted by Prim-Ed Publishing® 2013 Copyright© Gunter Schymkiw 2000 ISBN 978-1-84654-604-4 PR–0083

Copyright Notice Blackline masters or copy masters are published and sold with a limited copyright. This copyright allows publishers to provide teachers and schools with a wide range of learning activities without copyright being breached. This limited copyright allows the purchaser to make sufficient copies for use within their own education institution. The copyright is not transferable, nor can it be onsold. Following these instructions is not essential but will ensure that you, as the purchaser, have evidence of legal ownership to the copyright if inspection occurs.

Titles available in this series: Oral and mental maths activities – 3rd Class Oral and mental maths activities – 4th Class Oral and mental maths activities – 5th Class Oral and mental maths activities – 6th Class

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FOREWORD The overall aim of the Oral and Mental Maths Activities series is to promote and develop mathematical discussion and pupil understanding of mathematical concepts within the classroom. Pupils need to develop good communication skills – the ability to listen, discuss and reason – in order to promote understanding of concepts and problem-solving techniques in mathematics. Oral and Mental Maths Activities combines the development of mathematical discussion, mental calculation skills and understanding of concepts in a resource which provides maximum ease of lesson organisation for teachers. Features include: • • • • • • • •

precise mathematical explanations at both pupils’ and teacher’s levels; a structured questioning layout to develop concepts sequentially and lead pupils to a logical answer; strong support for the development of listening skills; simple assessment of pupil understanding; facility for the teacher to supply further information as required; an ideal basis for further mathematical discussion; emphasis on pupil understanding rather than rote ‘correct’ answers; and answers and explanations are provided for quick and easy reference.

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CONTENTS

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Oral and Mental Maths 3rd Class Oral and Mental Maths 4th Class Oral and Mental Maths 5th Class Oral and Mental Maths 6th Class

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T itles in the series are:

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The structured and easy-to-organise concept behind the series could not be simpler. Pupils are given a ‘working’ sheet, containing key information they will need to record their responses. Teachers read from an instruction/background sheet which contains precise instructions, sets the problems and outlines the tasks. Pupils respond to these instructions by completing the appropriate section on their worksheet.

Pupil Progress Chart........................ iv

Set 15....................................... 30–31

Teachers Notes................................. v

Set 16....................................... 32–33

Curriculum Links......................... vi–vii

Set 17....................................... 34–35

Set 1............................................. 2–3

Set 18....................................... 36–37

Set 2............................................. 4–5

Set 19....................................... 38–39

Set 3............................................. 6–7

Set 20....................................... 40–41

Set 4............................................. 8–9

Set 21....................................... 42–43

Set 5.......................................... 10–11

Set 22....................................... 44–45

Set 6..........................................12–13

Set 23....................................... 46–47

Set 7..........................................14–15

Set 24....................................... 48–49

Set 8..........................................16–17

Set 25....................................... 50–51

Set 9..........................................18–19

Set 26....................................... 52–53

Set 10....................................... 20–21

Set 27....................................... 54–55

Set 11........................................ 22–23

Set 28....................................... 56–57

Set 12....................................... 24–25

Set 29....................................... 58–59

Set 13....................................... 26–27

Set 30....................................... 60–61

Set 14....................................... 28–29 Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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TEACHERS NOTES The activities contained in the Oral and Mental Maths Activities series are wide and varied and practise a range of general strategies pupils can use when dealing with mathematical problems across the curriculum. Teacher pages

SET 1 Question and Discussion

Answer

Look at the group of two-dimensional (or 2-D) shapes on your sheet. They are called 2-D because they have the two dimensions of length (up and down) and width (side to side). Ask the children to stand and move through these two dimensions.

1. A hexagon has six sides and six corners. Which 2-D shape is the hexagon?

F

2. A pentagon has five sides and five corners. Which 2-D shape is the pentagon?

E

3. An octagon has eight sides and eight corners. Which 2-D shape is an octagon?

G

4. I am going to let the stopwatch run for approximately the length of time it takes an Olympic runner to run 200 metres. Close your eyes and estimate, to the nearest five seconds, the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’.

teacher check

Extra information and explanations are included in italics.

(Allow the stopwatch to run for 20 seconds.) Abbreviations are shortened ways of writing things. Many abbreviations are used in mathematics. Choose from the answers on your sheet when answering the next three questions.

5. Small masses are measured in grams. The mass of a tin of baked beans is 425 grams. Which abbreviation is used for the word ‘grams’?

g

6. Large masses like trucks are measured in tonnes. A car might have a mass of around one tonne. Which abbreviation is used for the word ‘tonnes’?

t kg

8. What number am I? I have 3 tens and 7 ones.

37

9. Jim has three marble bags. In the first he has five marbles, in the second he has four marbles and in the third two marbles. He decides to put them all together in one bag. How many marbles altogether? Circle the symbol he would use to find the answer on your answer line: ‘add’, ‘subtract’, ‘multiply’, or ‘divide’. 10. There were 30 children in a class doing a maths lesson. Five children were called out to play in a sports team. How many were left? Circle the symbol you would use to find the answer on your answer line.

Answer to each question provided here for easy reference.

+

Materials needed for the session are listed here.

The next 4 questions are about the three-dimensional (or 3-D) shapes drawn on your sheet. They are called 3-dimensional because they have the three dimensions of length (up and down), width (side to side) and depth (backwards and forwards). Ask children to stand up and move through these three dimensions. C

12. A cube has all its edges and faces the same size. Which picture on your sheet represents a cube?

A

13. Shoe boxes are often in the shape of a square prism. A square prism has its two end faces square. The other faces, however, can be rectangles (unlike a cube which has all faces square). Which picture on your sheet represents a square prism?

B D

15. Look at the abbreviations for the days of the week on your sheet. Use these to answer the next 4 questions. Write the abbreviation for today.

teacher check

16. Write the abbreviation for yesterday.

teacher check

17. Write the abbreviation for the day that is the middle day of the school week.

Wed. teacher check

19. Choose a child from the class. Ask the children to estimate the child’s height within 20 cm.

teacher check

20. What day will it be two days after tomorrow?

teacher check

Stopwatch, something to measure one child’s height (do this before the lesson)

Activity Answers 1. 2.

(a) 237 (f) 685 (a) 927

(b) (g) (b)

472 926 308

(c) (h) (c)

354 708 364

(d) (i) (d)

193 841 870

(e) 519 (j) 430 (e) 785

(f)

900

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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18. Write the abbreviation for tomorrow.

Additional Material Needed

2

Answers to extra activities provided where necessary.

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11. In ancient Egypt the kings (called pharaohs) were buried in giant pyramids built of stone. Which picture on your sheet represents a square pyramid?

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7. The mass of a person is measured in kilograms. A child of your age might have a mass of about 35 kilograms. Write the abbreviation for kilograms.

14. A rectangular prism has rectangles as its end faces. Which picture represents a rectangular prism?

Boxed information provides an explanation of the structure of the questioning and guides pupils to the relevant places on their worksheets.

SET 1 WORKSHEET

Pupil worksheets

Pupils answer all questions here.

Information and diagrams needed for questions are supplied on pupil worksheet. Each activity is numbered clearly.

1–3

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Extra activities have been added to consolidate work.

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Activity 1. Write the numbers made by adding each group of ones, tens and hundreds. (a) 200 + 30 + 7 =

237

(b) 400 + 70 + 2 =

(c) 300 + 50 + 4 =

(d) 100 + 90 + 3 =

(e) 500 + 10 + 9 =

(f) 600 + 80 + 5 =

(g) 900 + 20 + 6 =

(h) 700 + 8 =

(i) 800 + 40 + 1 =

(j)

400 + 30 =

2. Unjumble the columns to write the numbers. (a) 2 tens, 7 ones, 9 hundreds = (c) 4 ones, 3 hundreds, 6 tens = (e) 7 hundreds, 5 ones, 8 tens = Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

927

(b) 8 ones, 0 tens, 3 hundreds = (d) 0 ones, 7 tens, 8 hundreds = (f) 9 hundreds, 0 ones, 0 tens =

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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CURRICULUM LINKS The activities within the four-book Oral and Mental Maths Activities series are ideal for developing the mental, computational and recording skills required by the following Strands of the Mathematics Curriculum for Ireland: 3rd 4th 5th 6th Class Class Class Class Book Book Book Book

Strand/Strand Unit NUMBER

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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Place value • explore and identify place value in whole numbers, 0-999/9999 • read, write and order 3 and 4-digit numbers and solve simple problems • read, write and order decimals • round whole numbers to the nearest 10, 100 • explore and identify place value in decimal numbers to one/two places of decimals Operations • add and subtract, without and with renaming, within 999/9999 • know and recall addition and subtraction facts • solve word problems involving addition and subtraction • estimate sums, differences, products and quotients of whole numbers • estimate sums, differences, products and quotients of decimals • add and subtract whole numbers and decimals (to 3 decimal places) Multiplication • develop an understanding of multiplication as repeated addition and vice versa • explore, understand and apply the zero, commutative and distributive and associative properties of multiplication • develop and recall multiplication facts within 100 • multiply a one/two/three-digit number by a one/two-digit number • solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving multiplication of whole numbers • multiply a decimal (up to 3 places) by a whole number Division • develop an understanding of division as sharing and as repeated subtraction, without and with remainders • develop and/or recall division facts within 100 • divide a one/two/three-digit number by a one-digit number without and with remainders • solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving division of whole numbers • divide a decimal number by a whole number Fractions • identify fractions and equivalent forms of fractions with denominators 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 and 12 • compare and order fractions with appropriate denominators and position on the number line • compare and order fractions and identify equivalent forms of fractions with denominators 2-12 • calculate a fraction of a set using concrete materials • develop an understanding of the relationship between fractions and division • calculate a unit fraction of a number and calculate a number, given a unit fraction of the number • express one number as a fraction of another number • solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving fractions • express improper fractions as mixed numbers and vice versa and position them on the number line • add and subtract simple fractions and simple mixed numbers • multiply a fraction by a whole number • multiply a fraction by a fraction • express tenths and hundredths in both fractional and decimal form Decimals and percentages • identify tenths and hundredths as fractions and decimals • identify place value of whole numbers and decimals to two places and write in expanded form • add and subtract whole numbers and decimals up to two places • multiply and divide a decimal number up to two places by a single-digit whole number • solve problems involving decimals • understand and use simple percentages and relate them to fractions and decimals • compare and order fractions, decimals and percentages Number theory • identify simple prime and composite numbers • identify and explore square numbers • identify factors and multiples

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CURRICULUM LINKS 3rd 4th 5th 6th Class Class Class Class Book Book Book Book

Strand/Strand Unit ALGEBRA Number patterns and sequences • explore, recognise and record patterns in number, 0-999/9999 • explore, extend and describe sequences • use patterns as an aid in the memorisation of number facts Number sentences • translate a one-step word problem into a number sentence • solve one-step number sentences Rules and properties • know simple properties and rules about brackets and priority of operation

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SHAPE and SPACE

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2-D shapes • identify, describe and classify 2-D shapes: square; rectangle; triangle; hexagon; circle; semicircle; oval and irregular shapes • identify, describe and classify 2-D shapes: equilateral, isosceles and scalene triangle; parallelogram; rhombus; pentagon and octagon • explore, describe and compare the properties (sides, angles, parallel and non-parallel lines) of 2-D shapes • make informal deductions about 2-D shapes and their properties • use angle and line properties to classify and describe triangles and quadrilaterals • identify the properties of the circle • combine, tessellate and make patterns with 2-D shapes • tessellate combinations of 2-D shapes • identify the use of 2-D shapes in the environment • solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D shapes • plot simple co-ordinates and apply where appropriate 3-D shapes • identify, describe and classify 3-D shapes, including cube, cuboid, cylinder, cone, sphere, triangular prism, pyramid • explore, describe and compare the properties of 3-D shapes • explore and describe the relationship of 3-D shapes with constituent 2-D shapes • solve and complete practical tasks and problems involving 2-D and 3-D shapes • identify and examine 3-D shapes and explore relationships, (faces, edges and vertices) Symmetry • identify and draw lines of symmetry in 2-D shapes • identify lines of symmetry as horizontal, vertical or diagonal • use understanding of line symmetry to complete missing half of a shape, picture or pattern Lines and angles • identify, describe and classify vertical, horizontal and parallel lines • identify, describe and classify oblique and perpendicular lines • recognise an angle in terms of a rotation • classify angles as greater than, less than or equal to a right angle • solve problems involving lines and angles • recognise, classify and describe angles - acute, obtuse, reflex, right • estimate, measure and construct angles in degrees

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 1 Question and Discussion

Answer

Look at the group of two-dimensional (or 2-D) shapes on your sheet. They are called 2-D because they have the two dimensions of length (up and down) and width (side to side). Ask the children to stand and move through these two dimensions.

1. A hexagon has six sides and six corners. Which 2-D shape is the hexagon?

F

2. A pentagon has five sides and five corners. Which 2-D shape is the pentagon?

E

3. An octagon has eight sides and eight corners. Which 2-D shape is an octagon?

G

4. I am going to let the stopwatch run for approximately the length of time it takes an Olympic runner to run 200 metres. Close your eyes and estimate, to the nearest five seconds, the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’.

teacher check

(Allow the stopwatch to run for 20 seconds.) Abbreviations are shortened ways of writing things. Many abbreviations are used in mathematics. Choose from the answers on your sheet when answering the next three questions. g

6. Large masses like trucks are measured in tonnes. A car might have a mass of around one tonne. Which abbreviation is used for the word ‘tonnes’?

t

e

5. Small masses are measured in grams. The mass of a tin of baked beans is 425 grams. Which abbreviation is used for the word ‘grams’?

kg

8. What number am I? I have 3 tens and 7 ones.

37

m pl

7. The mass of a person is measured in kilograms. A child of your age might have a mass of about 35 kilograms. Write the abbreviation for kilograms.

+

10. There were 30 children in a class doing a maths lesson. Five children were called out to play in a sports team. How many were left? Circle the symbol you would use to find the answer on your answer line.

sa

9. Jim has three marble bags. In the first he has five marbles, in the second he has four marbles and in the third two marbles. He decides to put them all together in one bag. How many marbles altogether? Circle the symbol he would use to find the answer on your answer line: ‘add’, ‘subtract’, ‘multiply’, or ‘divide’.

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g

The next 4 questions are about the three-dimensional (or 3-D) shapes drawn on your sheet. They are called 3-dimensional because they have the three dimensions of length (up and down), width (side to side) and depth (backwards and forwards). Ask children to stand up and move through these three dimensions.

11. In ancient Egypt the kings (called pharaohs) were buried in giant pyramids built of stone. Which picture on your sheet represents a square pyramid?

C

12. A cube has all its edges and faces the same size. Which picture on your sheet represents a cube?

A

13. Shoe boxes are often in the shape of a square prism. A square prism has its two end faces square. The other faces, however, can be rectangles (unlike a cube which has all faces square). Which picture on your sheet represents a square prism?

B

14. A rectangular prism has rectangles as its end faces. Which picture represents a rectangular prism?

D

15. Look at the abbreviations for the days of the week on your sheet. Use these to answer the next 4 questions. Write the abbreviation for today.

teacher check

16. Write the abbreviation for yesterday.

teacher check

17. Write the abbreviation for the day that is the middle day of the school week.

Wed.

18. Write the abbreviation for tomorrow.

teacher check

19. Choose a child from the class. Ask the children to estimate the child’s height within 20 cm.

teacher check

20. What day will it be two days after tomorrow?

teacher check

Additional Material Needed Stopwatch, something to measure one child’s height (do this before the lesson)

Activity Answers 1. 2. 2

(a) 237 (f) 685 (a) 927

(b) 472 (g) 926 (b) 308

(c) 354 (h) 708 (c) 364

(d) 193 (i) 841 (d) 870

(e) 519 (j) 430 (e) 785

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 1 WORKSHEET ❶

+ ❾

– × ÷ ⓮ + – × ÷ ⓯ ❿

❺ 1–3

A

B

D

⓳ ⓴ 5–7

C

E

F

g kg

15–18

G

Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat.

A

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B

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11–14

gr km t tns

D

C

Activity

1. Write the numbers made by adding each group of ones, tens and hundreds.

(a) 200 + 30 + 7 =

237

(b) 400 + 70 + 2 =

(c) 300 + 50 + 4 =

(d) 100 + 90 + 3 =

(e) 500 + 10 + 9 =

(f) 600 + 80 + 5 =

(g) 900 + 20 + 6 =

(h) 700 + 8 =

(i) 800 + 40 + 1 =

(j) 400 + 30 =

2. Unjumble the columns to write the numbers.

(a) 2 tens, 7 ones, 9 hundreds =

927

(b) 8 ones, 0 tens, 3 hundreds =

(c) 4 ones, 3 hundreds, 6 tens =

(d) 0 ones, 7 tens, 8 hundreds =

(e) 7 hundreds, 5 ones, 8 tens =

(f) 9 hundreds, 0 ones, 0 tens =

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

3


SET 2 Question and Discussion

Answer

The first 3 questions relate to the picture representing a square pyramid on your sheet. Use the letters to answer the questions.

1. Which arrow points to the base?

C

2. Which arrow points to the apex?

A

3. How many faces does a square pyramid have? Remember to count the hidden ones.

5

The next 4 questions are about ‘position words’. Look at the group of pictures on your sheet. Write words for your answers.

4. What is in the middle of the group?

star

5. What is on the far left?

bird/boy

6. What is on the far right?

eye

7. What is second from the right end?

moon kilograms

9. Choose the correct spelling for the abbreviation on line 9, then write it.

grams

10. Choose the correct spelling for the abbreviation on line 10, then write it.

tonnes

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11. Which 2-D shape on your sheet has the biggest surface area?

e

8. Choose the correct spelling for the abbreviation on line 8, then write it.

F ÷

13. Casey is a very clean and orderly boy. He puts his 12 shells in groups of 3 in shoe boxes. Then he counts the groups of three to see how many he has altogether. Circle the operations symbol he is using on the answer line.

×

g

Choose from the seasons to answer the next 2 questions.

sa

12. Butch shares 15 bones fairly among three other dogs. Circle the operations symbol he is using on the answer line.

14. Which season spreads over the end of one year and the beginning of the next?

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winter

15. Which season follows winter?

spring

16. Unjumble the syllables to spell the name of a month.

February

The next 3 questions are about the letters on your sheet.

17. Which letter in group one would look different when flipped sideways?

G

18. Which letter in group two looks different when flipped sideways?

J

19. Which two letters in group three look the same when flipped sideways?

X and Y

20. Within 10 degrees Celsius, estimate the temperature in the classroom at the moment. Write the ‘degrees Celsius’ abbreviation as part of your answer.

teacher check

Additional Material Needed thermometer

Activity Answers 1.

4

(a) summer (b) sunny, warm

(c) weeks

(d) September

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(e) winter

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SET 2 WORKSHEET ❶

+ ⓬

kg = ❽

– × ÷ ⓱ + – × ÷ ⓲ ⓭

g= ❾

t= ❿

A

1–3

4–7 bee B

bird

flower star

e

C

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11

G

16

kilograms tonnes tuns grames kilagrams killograms grams tones garms

g

14–15

F

winter summer autumn spring

tree

8–10

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girl

ru-ry-a-Feb

17–19

Group 1 = O A G Group 2 = H J M Group 3 = X P Y

Activity 1. Use the code to fill in the blanks. Summer

May, June and July are

The weather is usually

School children have a holiday for about six

4 x 12 10 x 6 4 x 7 7 x 4 5 x 2 11 x 4

8 + 40 6 x 10 10 x 3 3 x 10 50 + 50

In

eye

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boy

moon

4 x 12 5 + 5 3 x 12 5 x 10 1 x 10 4 x 7 2 x 2 1 + 9 4 x 11

In Australia, June, July and August are the

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and

months.

40 + 40 1 x 2 4 x 11 20 + 8

8 x 10 2 x 5 8 + 2 2 x 11 4 x 12

.

children go back to school. 8 x 10 6 x 3 6 x 5 25 + 25 7 + 3 24 + 20

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

months.

Code a = 2 n = 30 b = 4 o = 32 c = 6 p = 36 d = 8 q = 40 e = 10 r = 44 f = 12 s = 48 g = 14 t = 50 h = 16 u = 60 i = 18 v = 70 j = 20 w = 80 k = 22 x = 90 l = 24 y = 100 m = 28 z = 110 5


SET 3 Question and Discussion

Answer

The pictures show groupings of materials used to represent numbers. When this sort of material is used, a flat stands for one hundred, a long stands for ten and a short stands for one.

1. In group A the number shown is also the number of weeks in a year. What is the number?

52

2. The number represented in group B is also the number of days in a year. What is the number?

365

Questions 3 to 5 are about lines. Look at Larry’s legs. In one picture they are horizontal, in another they are vertical and in another they are oblique.

3. Larry is the captain of a sailing boat. Before he sets sail he has a rest with his legs horizontal. Which picture shows legs that are horizontal?

C

4. When he is sailing he stands on the deck with vertical legs. Which picture shows legs that are vertical?

A

5. Sometimes the duck pond he sails on gets rough. Larry gets seasick then and his legs are oblique. Which picture shows oblique legs?

B

The next 4 questions are about the 3-D objects. X

7. Which is shaped like a cylinder?

Y

e

6. Which one is shaped like a hemisphere?

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8. Which is shaped like a sphere? 9. Which is shaped like a hexagonal prism?

W Z

The diagram on our sheet is meant to roughly represent an overhead view of your classroom.

10. Write the initials of someone sitting in W.

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11. Write the initials of someone sitting in X. 13. Write the initials of someone sitting in Z.

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14. In which section do you sit?

teacher check teacher check teacher check

g

12. Write the initials of someone sitting in Y.

teacher check

teacher check

The next 2 questions are about the group of capital letters, P, S, U and Y.

15. Which letter is a closed shape?

P

16. Write one of the other letters on the next answer line then add a line to turn it into a closed shape. 17. Write any other capital letter in the alphabet that is a closed shape. 18. A DVD has 180 written on its case as shown in the picture. The 180 stands for the number of minutes it runs for. How many hours is this?

teacher check ABDOQR 3 hr

19. Commercial television allows 17 minutes out of every hour for advertising. How many minutes of actual programme do you see in one hour?

43 min.

20. How many minutes are there in an hour and a half?

90 min.

Activity Answers 1.

6

(a) 386

(b) 679

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 3 WORKSHEET ❶

1–2

3–5

6–9

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e

W= X=

front X

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W Y

Z=

15–16 P S U Y

g

10–14

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A B C

Y=

Z

18

back

Activity

1. Write the numbers represented by the groups of maths apparatus.

(a)

=

(b)

=

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

7


SET 4 Question and Discussion

Answer

The pictures show groupings used to represent numbers. When this sort of material is used, a block represents a thousand, a flat represents a hundred, a long represents a ten and a short represents a one.

1. What number does A represent?

3247

2. What number does B represent?

1224

3. What number am I? Write the information I am about to give then write the number on the answer line. I have 3 tens, 6 hundreds and 9 ones. Now write the number on the answer line.

639

Terry, Jerry and Otto are buying turf to cover their gardens. The diagrams show what their gardens look like when organised into one metre squares. We call a one metre square, ‘one square metre’. Look at the abbreviation for 1 square metre. Now use the abbreviation to answer the following questions. Write the numeral followed by the abbreviation.

4. How many square metres of turf will Terry have to buy?

14 m2

5. How many square metres of turf will Jerry have to buy?

9 m2

6. How many square metres of turf will Otto have to buy?

16 m2

e

Refer to the times in the box to answer the next 2 questions. They are written using ‘digital notation’.

m pl

7. At what time would many people be arriving at school?

8. At what time would many people be getting ready to go home from school?

sa

9. Natalie plants three rows of lettuce. There are eight lettuce plants in each row. How many lettuces does she plant altogether?

10. Circle the number on the answer line that cannot be shared equally among 5 people.

9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 24 59

Refer to the group of lines to answer the next 4 questions. Use the letters to write your answers. B

g

11. Which picture shows a curved line?

C

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12. Which picture shows a broken line? 13. Which picture shows a zigzag line?

D

14. Which picture shows parallel lines?

A

15. Alphonse and Bluto are shown here about to shake hands. They lived in the days before standard measures and sold rope by measuring it in spans. Imagine you are living in their time and want to buy 100 spans of rope. Both charge 1 shekel for 1 span of rope. Whose shop would you go to get more rope for your money? 16. Estimate how many of your own spans it is across your desk. Write your estimate then check it by spanning the desk.

Bluto

teacher check

17. Circle the symbol for ‘difference’ on answer line 17.

An abacus is an instrument used for counting. On abacus A the number 365 is shown.

18. What number is shown by abacus B?

835

19. What number is shown by abacus C?

590

20. What number is shown by abacus D?

409

Activity Answers 1.

8

(a) 253 (f) 240

(b) 610 (g) 198

(c) 321 (h) 172

(d) 956 (i) 507

(e) 869 (j) 735

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 4 WORKSHEET ❶

+ ⓱

30 ❿

45 59

– × ÷

1–2 A

3 B

one square metre = 1 m2

4–6

Jerry

Otto

7–8

g Vi ew in

15–16

A span = the distance from the extended thumb to the tip of the extended middle finger.

Alphonse

Activity

A

9:00 a.m.

Terry

ones

11–14

sa

hundreds

m pl

e

tens

3:00 a.m.

B

9:00 p.m.

C

3:00 p.m.

D

18–20 A

Bluto

B

H

T

U

C

H

T

U

D

H

T

U

H

T

U

Writing Numbers

1. Write the numbers shown by the number expanders.

(a) 2 hundreds

5 tens

3 ones =

(b) 6 hundreds

1 ten

0 ones =

(c) 3 hundreds

2 tens

1 one

=

(d) 9 hundreds

5 tens

6 ones =

(e) 8 hundreds

6 tens

9 ones =

(f) 2 hundreds

4 tens

0 ones =

(g) 1 hundred

9 tens

8 ones =

(h) 1 hundred

7 tens

2 ones =

(i) 5 hundreds

0 tens

7 ones =

(j) 7 hundreds

3 tens

5 ones =

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

9


SET 5 Question and Discussion

Answer

The first 6 questions relate to the pictures of everyday things on your sheet. Each of these is predominantly made up of a well-known 3-D shape. Use the letters to answer the questions and write the names of the 3-D shapes on the lines provided.

1. Which shape is a cylinder?

G

2. Which shape is a cube?

A

3. Which shape is a square prism (but not a cube)?

C

4. Which shape is a square pyramid?

D

5. Which shape is a triangular prism?

F

6. Which shape is a rectangular prism?

B

7. I am going to let the stopwatch run for the amount of time it takes a racehorse to run one kilometre. Close your eyes and count to estimate, to the nearest five seconds, the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’.

teacher check

Allow the stopwatch to run for 60 seconds.

m pl

e

8. Before people had standard measures they used natural measures such as parts of the body. You have already done some work on the natural measure called a ‘span’. The picture shows the natural measure called the cubit. A cubit is the distance from a person’s elbow to his/her outstretched middle finger. Measure your own cubit and write its length on the answer line. Compare your cubit with that of the other children in the class and discuss what you find. Can you see why standard measures are used to measure things?

sa

9. Write the area of the squares on your sheet in square centimetres.

teacher check

9 cm2

To answer the next 6 questions, use the abbreviations for the months shown on your sheet.

10. What is the last month of the year?

Dec.

11. Write the abbreviation for the shortest month of the year.

g

Feb. Sept., Apr., Jun., Nov.

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12. Write the abbreviation for any month that has just 30 days. 13. Write the abbreviation for the ninth month.

Sept.

14. Write the abbreviation for the month in which Christmas day falls.

Dec.

The next 3 questions relate to pictures A, B, C and D on your sheet.

15. An ellipse is an oval shape. Which is the ellipse?

C

16. A semicircle is a half circle. Which is the semicircle?

B

17. A quarter circle is called a quadrant. Which is the quadrant?

D

18. Commercial television allows 17 minutes out of every hour for advertising. How many minutes of advertising do you see in two hours? Write the addition sum on the lines then write your answer on the answer line.

34 min.

19. What number am I? I can be shown with two flats and eight shorts.

208

20. What number am I? I can be shown with 2 blocks and 4 longs.

2040

Additional Material Needed stopwatch, ruler

Activity Answers 1.

10

(a) 4693

(b) 3259

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 5 WORKSHEET ❶

1–6 A B

die

box

C

D

container

F G

pyramid robot’s nose

9

jam jar = 1 cm2

sa

m pl

A cubit is the distance from a person’s elbow to his/her outstretched middle finger.

15–17

g

10–14

tent

e

8

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Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.

May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

Activity

E

A

18

B

C

D

+ =

1. Write the numbers represented by the groups of maths apparatus.

(a)

=

(b)

=

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

11


SET 6 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. Potiphar and Tipotar were builders who lived thousands of years ago in the days before standard measures. They are seen here getting ready to have a friendly arm wrestle. If you wanted a square room 20 cubits by 20 cubits added to your home, and both charged the same, which builder would you use to get better value?

Tipotar

2. What number am I? I can be shown with four flats and six longs.

460

3. What number am I? I can be shown with eight flats, three longs and one short.

831

Refer to the groups of months to answer the next 4 questions.

4. Which group shows the months of summer?

Y

5. Which is the coldest group of months?

Z

6. Which group shows the months of autumn?

X

7. Which group of months shows the season before summer?

W

8. Write the area of the rectangle on the sheet in square centimetres.

18 cm2

e

The local dogs had a race. The picture shows the order in which they finished. Choose from the ordinal numbers on your sheet to answer the next 3 questions.

5th

m pl

9. Where did Alphonse finish? 10. Where did Fang finish? 11. Where did Rover finish?

2nd 1st

12. How many faces does it have? 13. How many edges does it have?

6 12 8

g

14. How many corners (vertices, points) does it have?

sa

On your sheet is a picture of a shoe box. When the lid is closed it becomes a rectangular prism.

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Questions 15 to 18 relate to the diagram showing Neville about to go for a walk on the school playground. As you can see, the playground is divided into squares. For each stroll that he takes, you will need to go back to the starting arrow.

15. Firstly he strolls five right then five up. Write or draw the thing he lands on.

C

16. This time he wanders four right, two up then one left. Where does he land?

B

17. Next he goes six right, three up and one right. Where does he finish?

D

18. The last journey takes him one right, four up and two down. Where does he finish?

banana

19. A film runs for 100 minutes. How long is this in hours and minutes?

1 hr 40 min.

20. In the Bible it says that the rain causing the Great Flood lasted for 40 days. How long is this in weeks and days?

5 wks 5 days

Activity Answers 1.

12

(a) January

(b) Christmas, December

(c) cold, snows

(d) Hedgehogs, squirrels

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(e) Day, January

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SET 5 WORKSHEET ❶

1

4–7 W = February March April X = August September October

Potiphar

9–11

Y = May June July

Z = November December January

Ordinal numbers tell us the order. 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

8

Rover

m pl

e

Tipotar

Fang Spot Butch Alphonse

12–14

15–18

2

sa

= 1 cm2

C

A 3

g Vi ew in

Activity

1

D

B

4

START

1. Use the code to fill in the blanks.

Winter

(a) November, December and

10 + 10 1 x 4 9 x 3 4 x 12 1 + 3 3 x 12 7 x 10

(b)

2 x 3 4 x 4 6 x 6 3 x 6 4 x 10 11 x 4 5 x 5 1 x 4 10 x 4

faith during

(c) Winter weather is

(d)

3 x 2 4 x 7 2 x 12 10 – 1

8 x 2 6 + 6 3 x 3 20 – 5 2 x 6 4 x 4 4 x 7 3 x 5 10 x 4

hibernate during the winter.

(e) New Years

3 x 3 1 x 4 7 x 10

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is on 1st

.

and sometimes it

is celebrated by people of the Christian

3 x 3 2 x 6 2 x 3 20 – 8 5 x 5 2 + 3 6 + 6 4 x 9

are the winter months.

and

.

8 x 5 3 x 9 30 – 2 5 x 11 4 x 10

8 x 5 4 x 8 12 x 4 9 + 9 9 x 4 6 x 6 4 x 3 6 x 4 10 x 4

10 x 2 2 + 2 3 x 9 4 x 12 1 x 4 6 x 6 35 + 35 ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

.

Code a = 4 n = 27 b = 5 o = 28 c = 6 p = 30 d = 9 q = 32 e = 12 r = 36 f = 14 s = 40 g = 15 t = 44 h = 16 u = 48 i = 18 v = 50 j = 20 w = 55 k = 21 x = 60 l = 24 y = 70 m = 25 z = 80 13


SET 7 Question and Discussion

Answer

Before people had standard measures such as centimetres and metres, they used natural measures such as parts of the body. A ‘digit’ was used to measure small lengths. The width of a person’s index finger was referred to as a digit.

1. Measure a length of 10 digits (finger spaces) and check it with your ruler. Write its length in centimetres. Compare your measurement with those of other children in the class. 2. Write the area of the rectangle on your sheet in square centimetres.

teacher check 28 cm2

The next 3 questions relate to the groups of notes and coins on your sheet.

3. What is the total value of A?

€3.55

4. What is the total value of B?

€7.05

5. What is the total value of C?

€10.05

6. When you square a number you multiply it by itself. What is the answer to 2 squared?

4

7. When Rachel broke open her piggy bank she found that it contained 11 five cent coins. How much money is this altogether?

€0.55 1

9. How many edges does it have?

0

e

8. The picture on your sheet shows Spiffo the Clown’s juggling ball. How many curved surfaces does it have?

m pl

10. How many corners or vertices does it have?

11. Spiffo’s ball is really an orange. At the end of the show he cuts it in halves and eats both halves. What is each half called? Use the code to spell out the word.

sa

12. I am going to allow the stopwatch to run for the amount of time it takes for an Olympic swimmer to swim 100 metres. Close your eyes and count to estimate, to the nearest five seconds, the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’. Allow the stopwatch to run for 50 seconds.

Vi ew in

g

13. St. Stephen's Day is on 26th December each year. What is the date on the day before St. Stephen's Day? Write the ordinal number and the word ‘December’.

0 hemisphere teacher check

25(th) December

The tally chart shows the money collected for the 4th Class puppet play at the school fete. To be admitted, people were given the choice of paying with any type of coin they wished. At the end of the show the children tallied the money collected and the results are shown on your sheet.

14. How many €2.00 coins were collected?

4

15. How much money was collected in 5c coins?

50c

16. How much was collected in 20c coins?

€2.00

17. What was the coin ‘mostly commonly tendered’ for the play?

10c

18. How many people went to watch the play?

51

19. How much money did the play take altogether? Do the sum on the lines provided, then write the answer on the answer line.

€21.80

20. Ask the children to estimate the distance from one point to another in the classroom or playground. According to the distance, allow a reasonable leeway for answers. Allow the children to pace the distance and estimate on the basis of knowledge of their stride; i.e. pace one way, make the estimation and write it on the answer line, measure on the way back using a trundle wheel. If you have a trundle wheel that ‘clicks’, make sure that children count actual clicks and don’t get into a rhythmic counting chant instead.

teacher check

Additional Material Needed Trundle wheel, stopwatch, one ruler per pupil

Activity Answers 1. 14

(a) 1

(b) 4

(c) 9

(d) 16

(e) 25

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 7 WORKSHEET ❶

1

2

3–5

8–11

e

CODE H=8 O = 15 V = 22 I=9 P = 16 W = 23 J = 10 Q = 17 X = 24 K = 11 R = 18 Y = 25 L = 12 S = 19 Z = 26 M = 13 T = 20 N = 14 U = 21

m pl

A €2.00 €1.00 50c

1 cm2

sa

5c

B

€5.00

€2.00

C

€5.00

€2.00 €2.00 €1.00

g

5c

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5c

A=1 B=2 C=3 D=4 E=5 F=6 G=7

8 5 13 9 19 16 8 5 18 5

14–19

5c 10c 20c 50c €1.00 €2.00

Activity 1. Count the dots then fill in the answers. Can you see why we call these square numbers?

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f)

12 = 1

22 =

1 x 1 = 1

2x2=

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32 =

42 =

3x3=

4x4=

52 =

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

5x5=

62 =

6x6= 15


SET 8 Question and Discussion

Answer

The first 4 questions are about the shape broken into equal-size pieces on your sheet. We call parts of things broken up in this way ‘fractions’.

1. In a fraction, the bottom number tells us the number of equal-size bits a thing has been broken into. How many equal-size bits has the shape been broken into?

4

2. How many of these bits has been shaded?

1

The top number in a fraction is the number of equal-size bits being spoken about. If I ask what fraction of the shape has been shaded, the top number will be the number of shaded bits and the bottom number will be the number of bits the shape is broken into altogether.

3. Write the fraction of the shape that has been shaded.

1

4. What fraction of the shape hasn’t been shaded?

3

/4 /4

5. Chem and Lem lived in the days before standard measurements. Their hands are on the desk for a class fingernail inspection. Mr Olaf, their teacher, likes them to put a finger space (or digit space) between their words when they copy something from the blackboard. Both boys write their letters the same size but one always uses less of the page when copying from the board. Who uses less space?

Chem

e

A strong wind has come along and blown Harry House’s roof and ceiling off. Answer the next 3 questions about the roof.

m pl

6. How many faces does it have (including the ceiling)? 7. How many edges does the roof have? 8. How many corners (vertices or points) does it have? 10. Write the total amount shown in group B.

sa

9. Write the total amount of money shown in group A.

11. Write the area of the rectangle on your sheet in square centimetres.

5 8 5 €22.05 €50.10 18 cm2

g

12. Choose the correct symbol to complete the formula: Area of a rectangle = length (plus/minus/times/ divided by) width

x

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Choose three children to do the spinning, counting and calling for the next two questions. (say child’s name) is going to flick a coin 20 times. (say second child’s name) is going to call out either ‘heads’ or ‘tails’ according to how the coin lands each time. (say third child’s name) will cross off the numbers on the board after each flick until all have been crossed off.

13–14. Tally the results by putting tally marks on either the ‘heads’ or ‘tails’ lines.

Teacher check

15. Tell the children you have five white and five coloured sticks of chalk. Ask, ‘What is the smallest number I have to pull out to be absolutely certain of having 2 the same colour?’.

3

Demonstrate why this is so. If two pieces of chalk are pulled out there is a chance that both will be the same colour. Equally, there is a chance they will not. If a white and a coloured are pulled out after two attempts then the next pulled out must be either a white or a coloured, thus giving a match.

16. ‘Perimeter’ means the distance around the outside (or boundary) of something. The picture shows Farmer Green’s paddock with Lulu the cow grazing happily in it. The length of each of its four boundary fences is 100 metres. What is the perimeter of the paddock?

400 m

Match the times shown on the digital and analogue clocks when doing the next 3 questions.

17. Which analogue clock matches the time on digital clock A?

Z

18. Which analogue clock matches the time on digital clock B?

X

19. Which analogue clock matches the time on digital clock C?

Y

20. Choose one of the ordinal numbers on your sheet to answer question 20. If you are the ‘runner up’ in a race at the sports day, in which position do you finish?

Additional Material Needed

Activity Answers

The numbers 1 to 20 written on the board so they can be crossed off when doing questions 13 and 14, five white sticks of chalk and five another colour, box to hold chalk, coin

1.

16

(a) spring (d) Lambs

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(b) daffodils, tulips (e) April Fools

2nd

(c) leaves (f) May Day

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SET 8 WORKSHEET ❶

H ⓭

= T= ⓮

5

9–10

6–8 Chem Lem

11–12

16

Length

1 cm

€20

€2

B=

€50

10c

m pl

e

5c

100 m

sa

Area of a rectangle = Length Width + – x ÷

Activity

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

X Y Z

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A = 7:10 B = 7:50 C = 7:40

20

g

17–19

100 m 100 m

A=

Width

2

100 m

1–4

1. Use the code to fill in the blanks. Spring

(a) February, March and April are the months of

(b) Spring bulbs, like

3 x 3 1 + 3 7 + 7 2 x 7 14 + 14 3 x 3 2 x 9 12 x 2 4 x 10

4 x 11 12 x 4 30 – 6 24 – 6 3 x 10 10 x 4

(c) Deciduous trees start to grow

(d)

2 x 12 2 x 2 5 x 5 2 + 3 40 + 0

4 x 6 4 x 3 10 – 6 5 x 10 3 x 4 34 + 6

2 + 2 3 x 10 6 x 6 9 + 9 12 + 12 7 + 7 7 x 4 4 x 7 2 x 12 10 x 4

(f) Many schools and villages celebrate

.

are born on farms.

(e) Many people play jokes on 1st April. This day is called

and

come into flower.

⁄2 of 80 3 x 10 4 x 9 9 x 2 9 x 3 5 x 3

1

Day.

.

Code a = 4 n = 27 b = 5 o = 28 c = 6 p = 30 d = 9 q = 32 e = 12 r = 36 f = 14 s = 40 g = 15 t = 44 h = 16 u = 48 i = 18 v = 50 j = 20 w = 55 k = 21 x = 60 l = 24 y = 70 m = 25 z = 80

5 x 5 2 + 2 10 x 7 15 – 6 1 + 3 7 x 10

by dancing around a maypole.

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

17


SET 9 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. The picture on your sheet shows the natural measurement known as a palm. A palm is the distance across four fingers of a hand (as shown). Measure your own palm and write how wide it is in centimetres on answer line 1. Compare it to those of other children in the class. Tally the three most common sizes in the space provided, then write the most common size on the answer line next to your measurement.

teacher check

The next 4 questions relate to the rectangular shape with some shading on it.

2. How many equal-size bits is the shape divided into?

10

3. How many parts are shaded?

3

4. What fraction of the shape is shaded?

3

5. What fraction of the shape is not shaded?

7

⁄10

⁄10

6. Which letter in the first group of three letters has parallel lines in it?

E

7. Which letter in the second group doesn’t have a horizontal line in it?

D

The special name for the answer we get when we multiply is the ‘product’. Listen to the way these questions are asked then write your answers.

8. What is the product of 5 and 10?

e

50

m pl

9. Write the product of 2 and 8. 10. The product of 2 and 7 is …

16 14

11. How many faces does it have? 12. How many edges does it have?

7 15 10

g

13. How many corners (vertices, points) does it have?

sa

Look at Jim’s house. Its walls are pink and its roof is purple. It is the shape that we call a pentagonal prism.

Vi ew in

14. The picture on your sheet shows Farmer Red’s paddock. The length of its boundaries is written along them. Every morning, Maggie Magpie walks around its perimeter looking for insects to feed her hungry children. How far is her morning walk?

600 m

15. Look at the picture of the factory on your sheet. How many rectangles in it?

5

16. Is the factory symmetrical?

no

17. Mark in the ‘right angles’ and write the number that there are on answer line 17.

23

18. Refer to the analogue clocks on your sheet to answer the last three questions. Which analogue clock shows when you might be at cricket practice?

Z

19. Which analogue clock shows when you might be at break?

X

20. Which analogue clock shows when you might be going into the classroom to begin the day’s lessons?

Y

Additional Material Required 1 ruler per pupil

Activity Answers 1.

18

(a) October

(b) Deciduous, evergreens

(c) Harvest, food

(d) Halloween, spooky

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 9 WORKSHEET ❶

1 Size

palm

2–5

Tally Number of children

6–7 1=AEC 2 = D HT

15–17

e

14

m pl

200 m

100 m

sa

100 m

11–13

200 m

11 12

11 12

1 2

10

3

9 7

Activity

4

3

9 8

6

5

1

10

9

8

4

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8

11 12

1 2

10

g

18–20

7

6

5

7

6

5

2 3 4

X Y Z

1. Use the code to fill in the blanks. Autumn

(a) August, September and

4 x 8 2 x 3 80 – 30 8 x 4 2 + 2 5 + 5 11 x 4

(b)

2 x 4 2 x 5 2 x 3 2 x 9 4 x 2 10 x 6 20 + 12 6 x 10 12 x 4

Many trees are

leaves all year round.

(c) In autumn, we have

for all the

(d) The 31st October is

Children dress up in

, which keep their

Festivals to say ‘Thank you’

4 x 4 1 + 1 11 x 4 30 + 40 5 + 5 12 x 4 25 + 25

6 + 6 20 + 12 50 – 18 4 + 4

trees lose their leaves in this season.

5 + 5 7 x 10 6 + 4 30 + 14 7 x 2 11 x 4 7 + 3 2 + 8 6 x 5 4 x 12

are the autumn months.

we have. .

4 x 4 1 x 2 12 + 12 2 x 12 16 + 16 40 + 40 5 + 5 2 x 5 15 + 15 60 – 12 30 + 6 8 x 4 4 x 8 11 x 2 50 x 2

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Code a = 2 n = 30 b = 4 o = 32 c = 6 p = 36 d = 8 q = 40 e = 10 r = 44 f = 12 s = 48 g = 14 t = 50 h = 16 u = 60 i = 18 v = 70 j = 20 w = 80 k = 22 x = 90 l = 24 y = 100 m = 28 z = 110

costumes.

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

19


SET 10 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. Sham and Shlam lived in the days before standard measurements. Both were slaves in ancient Egypt. Here are their hands. Their master gave instructions to plant the seeds a palm distance apart to allow the plants sufficient room to grow. One slave’s crop did not grow well because the plants were too crowded. Who had the failed crop?

Sham

Volume is the amount of space something takes up. It can be measured in cubic centimetres (like a centicube) or millilitres. (A centicube occupies the same amount of space as a millilitre of liquid.) We are going to do some estimating of volume using the ‘displacement’ method. An object displaces its own volume when it is placed totally in water. We will measure this by seeing how far up the scale the water rises when we place the object in the beaker. (Measure the displacement of some objects.)

2. How much water do you think will be displaced by this object?

teacher check

3. What is the perimeter of Farmer Brown’s paddock? The diagram shows the length of its boundaries.

400 m

4. What is the area of the square on your sheet? Write your answer in square centimetres.

9 cm2

5. Choose the correct word to complete the formula: Area of a square = length (halved, squared or doubled)

squared

The next 5 questions are about the column graph on your sheet. It shows the results of a popularity poll in which 4th Class pupils voted for their favourite clowns. Each shaded rectangle stands for one vote.

6. Who was voted most popular clown by 4th Class?

Snoozy

9. How many more liked Floppo than Flumbo? 10. How many people voted in the poll?

sa

The next 2 questions are about the truck on your sheet.

m pl

8. Which clown was runner up in the vote for most popular?

e

7. Which clown was least popular?

11. How many squares in the picture?

1 25

14 (12 internal and 2 external) 4

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13. How many months are 30 days long?

Boffo

1

g

12. How many right angles can be seen?

Bozo

14. Ahmed goes to swimming training at 4.30 p.m. Two hours later he gets home. What time is it when he gets home?

6.30 p.m.

15. What fraction of the group of marbles is shaded?

⁄10

7

The next 4 questions are about the picture of a jam jar on your sheet. The jar is a cylinder.

16. How many curved surfaces does the jar have?

1

17. How many round faces does the jar have?

2

18. How many edges does the jar have?

2

Edges are the lines that join faces to each other or join faces to curved surfaces as in this shape.

19. How many corners (points, vertices) does the jar have?

0

Discuss corners in terms of corners of your classroom. Ask a child to sit in each corner. Ask where a child asked to sit in a corner of a cylindrical room would go. The child wouldn’t be able to do this in a room of this shape.

20. I am going to allow the stopwatch to run for the approximate length of a television commercial. Close your eyes and count to estimate, to the nearest five seconds, the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’.

teacher check

Allow the stopwatch to run for 30 seconds.

Additional Material Needed

Activity Answers

A beaker scaled in millilitres filled with water, small object that doesn’t float for displacement, some centicubes, a stopwatch.

Sunday – the sun. Monday – the moon. Tuesday – Tiu, the Norse God of the sky and war.

20

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

Wednesday – Woden, king of the Norse gods. Thursday – Thor, Norse God of thunder. Friday – Freia, Norse goddess of love. Saturday – Saturn, Roman god of agriculture. www.prim-ed.com Prim-Ed Publishing


SET 10 WORKSHEET ❶

1

3

150 m

50 m Sham

Shlam

4–5

150 m

6–10

1 cm

50 m

Favourite Clowns

halved

squared

m pl

e

2

doubled

sa

Area of a square = length

15

Activity

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g

11–12

16–19

Bozo

Flumbo Snoozy Floppo

Boffo

13 Thirty days have September, April, June and November. All the rest have thirty-one. Excepting February alone. Which has twenty-eight days clear. And twenty-nine in each leap year.

Days Of The Week

1. Match the day with what it takes its name from. Sunday

• Woden, king of the Norse gods.

Monday

• Freia, Norse goddess of love.

Tuesday

• Saturn, Roman god of agriculture.

Wednesday •

• The moon.

Thursday

• The sun.

Friday

• Tiu, Norse god of the sky and war.

Saturday

• Thor, Norse god of thunder.

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

21


SET 11 Question and Discussion

Answer

The first 3 questions relate to the rocket ship on your sheet.

1. How many angles in the picture (internal angles).

15

2. How many rhombuses in the picture?

2

3. When the rocket ship goes off into deep space, two parts fall off and leave a pentagon shape to continue on. Which parts fall off to do this?

3 and 4

Questions 4 to 12 are about the picture of a classroom drawn from above (a ‘top view’). D

5. Who sits immediately behind H?

I

6. Who sits at the back right-hand desk?

L

7. Who sits closest to the door?

A

8. Who sits closest to the teacher’s desk?

J

9. Who sits immediately to the left of E?

B

10. Who sits immediately to the right of F?

I

e

4. Who sits immediately in front of E?

m pl

11. Which two desks are in the middle of the room?

12. A and D are always talking during lessons. The teacher decides to move D as far away from A as possible. With whom does D change desks?

E, H L

13. Which picture shows a top view of a triangular prism? 14. Which picture shows a top view of a square pyramid?

sa

The next 3 questions are also about ‘top views’. Refer to pictures A, B, C and D when answering.

C A

15. Which picture shows a top view of a triangular pyramid?

g

D

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The last 5 questions are about the graph showing the number of books borrowed by some children in a fortnight. The ‘key’ tells us that each shaded square stands for one book borrowed.

16. Who is probably the keenest reader?

Enid

17. Who probably doesn’t read much?

Elsie

18. Who borrowed the same number of books as Fifi?

Doreen

19. How many books were borrowed altogether in the fortnight?

26

20. Do we know for certain that Enid is a keen reader?

no

There is no evidence to suggest that the books were actually read. Perhaps she only borrowed picture books, had to do a project that fortnight or borrowed to please the librarian. Elsie’s book may have been 500 pages long. We must be very careful of the conclusions we draw from looking at sets of statistics. In the 1940s a cigarette company advertised that they surveyed 113 000 doctors. They went on to say that their brand was the favourite of the doctors surveyed. What conclusion do you think they wanted people to come to when they advertised this? (Probably that this brand was actually good for your health.)

Activity Answers 1.

22

(a) 0.1 (b) 0.2 (c) 0.3 (d) 0.4 (e) 0.5 (f) 0.6 (g) 0.7 2 3 4 5 (h) 0.8 (i) 0.9 (j) 1⁄10 (k) ⁄10 (l) ⁄10 (m) ⁄10 (n) ⁄10 6 7 8 9 (o) ⁄10 (p) ⁄10 (q) ⁄10 (r) ⁄10

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 11 WORKSHEET ❶

1–3

4–12 1

Front

2

3

D

G

J

B

E

H

K

C

F

I

L

4

Door A

Teacher

16–20

A

m pl

13–15

e

Back

= 1 book

Enid

B

C

sa

Elsie

Doreen

D

Mabel

Activity

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g

Fifi

Decimals

With the increased use of computers and calculators, it has become vitally important for us to understand the meaning of decimals. A decimal is another way of writing a fraction.

A decimal is written in this form:

whole things

a dot called a decimal point

0.7

tenths

The decimal point separates whole numbers (counting numbers) from decimal numbers (amounts less than one).

The decimal shown is the same amount as the fraction 7⁄10.

0.7 or 7⁄10 of the cake has icing. 0.3 or 3⁄10 of the cake does not have icing.

1. Write the fractions as decimals. Write the decimals as fractions.

(a) 1⁄10 =

0.1

2 (b) ⁄10 =

3 (c) ⁄10 =

4 (d) ⁄10 =

(e) 5⁄10 =

6 (f) ⁄10 =

7 (g) ⁄10 =

8 (h) ⁄10 =

(i)

⁄10 =

(j) 0.1 =

(k) 0.2 =

(l) 0.3 =

(m) 0.4 =

(n) 0.5 =

(o) 0.6 =

(p) 0.7 =

(q) 0.8 =

(r) 0.9 =

9

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⁄10

1

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

23


SET 12 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. What is the perimeter of Farmer Hay’s paddock?

250 m

The next 2 questions are about the picture of Jim’s house.

2. How many rectangles in the picture?

4

3. What name is given to the roof section labelled A? Use the code to work it out then write your answer on the answer line.

trapezium

Questions 4 to 7 relate to the group of marbles shown on your sheet. 4. What fraction of the group is coloured?

2

5. Write the fraction coloured as a decimal.

0.2

6. What fraction of the group is clear?

8

7. Write the fraction that is clear as a decimal.

0.8

⁄10

⁄10

Look at the picture of the geometric shapes’ picnic attended by the circles, squares and triangles. 7 circles

9. How many squares attended?

6 squares

e

8. How many circles attended?

m pl

10. How many triangles attended? 11. What does A equal? 12. What does B equal?

sa

13. What does C equal?

14. Is it cheaper for Mum to take two children to the cinema together, or to take each child on a separate day? Write ‘2’ for 2 at once, or ‘s’ for a separate day.

A = 469 B = 723 C = 674 2

g

Mum only has to pay for herself once doing this.

8 triangles

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The time line shows Angelo’s school day. Times are shown in digital notation.

15. When did he wake up?

16. How long after this did he arrive at school?

2 hrs

17. How long was break?

30 min

18. How long was the reading lesson?

45 min

19. How long was he at school?

3 1⁄2 hrs

20. Which of the nets shown on your sheet is the net of a cube?

24

7.00 a.m.

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

A

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SET 12 WORKSHEET ❶

1

50

0m

5

2–3

m

A=1 B=2 C=3 D=4 E=5 F=6 G=7

50 m

50 m

A

4–7

e

50 m

20 18 1 16 5 26 9 21 13

m pl

8–10

circles

A = 400 + 9 + 60 B = 3 + 20 + 700 C = 70 + 600 + 4

g

squares

triangles

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Woke up

sa

Tally Shape Number

11–13

15–19

CODE H=8 O = 15 V = 22 I=9 P = 16 W = 23 J = 10 Q = 17 X = 24 K = 11 R = 18 Y = 25 L = 12 S = 19 Z = 26 M = 13 T = 20 N = 14 U = 21

Breakfast

Went into class and started maths

20

Break

7.30 9.00 10.15 11.30 12.30 a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m.

A

B

7.00 8.00 9.30 11.00 12.00 a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. Fed budgie

Arrived at school

Ended maths and started reading

Started spelling test

Went home sick

Activity 1. Rule lines to match the word with its picture. trident

tripod

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triplets

triceratops

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

triangle

tricycle

25


SET 13 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. Within 10 centimetres, write your estimate of the distance around this object. (Hold up the tin, check with tape measure).

teacher check

2. I am going to allow the stopwatch to run for the approximate length of time it takes an Olympic runner to run 800 metres. Close your eyes and count to estimate, to the nearest five seconds, the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’.

teacher check

Allow the stopwatch to run for 110 seconds (1 min 50 sec.) The next 4 questions relate to the picture graph showing the amount of fruit sold by the school canteen in a week. Each picture stands for 10 pieces of fruit sold.

3. How many apples were sold in the week?

30

4. How many bananas did the canteen sell?

50

5. Draw a picture of the fruit that sold 25 pieces.

pear

6. Apples cost 10c each. How much money did the canteen take on the sale of apples?

€3.00

7. How many pieces of fruit did the canteen sell altogether?

105

e

The next 2 questions relate to the room plan on your sheet.

8. What is the area of a rectangular room with a length of 6 metres and a width of 3 metres?

m pl

18 m2

Using a ruler, join dots AB, CD, EF, GH, IJ, KL and MN to show how the shape is broken into 18 squares, the same number as the length multiplied by the width.

9. What is the perimeter of the same rectangle?

18 m 2 kg

11. We are mostly made up of water. If a man weighs 90 kilograms he takes up the same amount of space as what number of litres of water?

90 L

g

sa

10. A litre of water has a mass of one kilogram. If Clarrie drinks 2 litres of water a day to keep his body systems pure, what mass of water is this?

12. Write 175 centimetres as an amount in metres. Write the number of metres, a decimal point and the remaining number of centimetres.

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1.75 m

13. Insects have half a dozen legs. How many legs is this?

6

14–15. Write the next number in each of the patterns on answer lines 14 and 15.

12, 20

We are going to investigate the measurement of area called ‘a square metre’. The sheet I am going to show you has an area of one square metre. It is one metre long by one metre wide. This measurement is commonly used when buying carpet, tiles, linoleum or even turf for a grass lawn. Perhaps you can think of other things that have an area of one square metre.

16. How many of your answer sheets do you think will cover it?

teacher check

17. How many shoes do you think will fit in this area?

teacher check

18. How many children do you think can stand on the square metre?

teacher check

The last 2 questions relate to the picture of Spotto the Wonder Dog.

19. How many ellipses on Spotto?

5

20. How many rhombuses on Spotto?

2

Additional Material Needed A tape measure and a tin, stopwatch, sheet with an area of one square metre (easily made by sticking a few sheets of newspaper together), each child needs a ruler. Show the class the tin.

Activity Answers 1. 2. 26

(a) 1.25 m (b) 1.08 m (c) 2.25 m (d) 1.96 m (h) 1.04 m (i) 2.89 m (a) C (b) D (c) A (d) B

(e) 1.02 m

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(f) 2.45 m

(g) 1.88 m

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SET 13 WORKSHEET ❶

8–9

Each picture = 10 pieces of fruit

3, 6, 9,

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

19–20

L N 3m

Vi ew in

g

2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17,

Activity

A

sa

14–15

K M

m pl

6m

e

3–7

Using decimal notation to write lengths in metres and centimetres 1. Write the measurements below in metres using ‘decimal notation’. Everything to the left of the decimal point is whole metres, everything to the right is leftover centimetres.

Example: 164 centimetres = 1 metre and 64 centimetres = 1.64 metres

(a) 125 cm =

(b) 108 cm =

(c) 225 cm =

(d) 196 cm =

(e) 102 cm =

(f) 245 cm =

(g) 188 cm =

(h) 104 cm =

(i) 289 cm =

2. Which is the net of:

(a) an octagonal prism?

(b) a hexagonal prism?

(c) a triangular prism?

(d) a pentagonal prism?

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

A

C D

B

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

27


SET 14 Question and Discussion

w

Answer

Each face of the tents drawn on your sheet is made from separate sheets of material. The sheets have been sewn together at the edges. Including the bottom sheet.

1. Including the bottom sheet, how many sheets are needed to make tent A?

5

2. Including the bottom sheet, how many sheets are needed to make tent B?

7

Choose from the seasons to answer the next 2 questions.

3. In which season do we have more hours of darkness?

winter

4. In which season do you think most ice-creams are sold?

summer

Match the 3-D shape names with the pictures of everyday objects to do questions 5 to 7. Use the letters to answer.

5. Which everyday object is an octagonal prism?

Y

6. Which is a cylinder?

Z

7. Which is a hexagonal prism?

X

m pl

Choose from the answer choices on your sheet to answer the next 2 questions.

1.91 m

e

8. Write 191 centimetres as metres. Don’t forget to write the number of metres, follow it with the decimal point and finally write the remaining centimetres followed by ‘m’ at the end.

neither (two halves of a whole are exactly the same size)

10. Is what Kasey says correct or incorrect? ‘We went to see the film “Fairies and Goblins”. It was so long that they showed it in two halves. The first half went for one hour and the second went for 50 minutes.’.

incorrect (if the film were shown in halves, each half would be of the same duration)

g

sa

9. A football field runs from north to south with the halfway line running across it. Which half is longer—north, south or neither?

11

12. It is time for the Apple Fairy to plant some seeds. She plants 6 rows with 5 seeds in each row. How many apple trees should grow from this?

30

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11. Question 11 is a number puzzle. Listen carefully to the clues and cross off numbers that don’t belong. You should be able to eliminate at least one number for each clue. In the end you will be left with the mystery number. Clue 1: I’m less than a dozen. Clue 2: I’m more than half a dozen. Clue 3: I’m not a 3 times table answer. Clue 4: I’m more than the number of days in a week. Clue 5: I’m an odd number. You should know me now.

10 (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0)

13. How many different numerals are there in our number system? 14. Kelly goes to bed at 9.00 p.m. and wakes at 7.00 a.m. How many hours does she sleep?

10 hrs

15. 100 plus 75 equals 175 so what does 98 plus 75 equal?

173

Discuss the short cut—98 is 2 less than 100 so the answer will be 2 less than 175. Look at the ‘c’ on your sheet. It has been flipped over. Do the same to the things on answer lines 16 to 20.

16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 28

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 14 WORKSHEET ❶

⓰ O

▲ ⓱

⓳ K

➜ ⓴

1–2

3–4

A

B

10 south

neither

The triangle

5

9

2

6

10

3

7

11

4

8

12

a nut Z

unsharpened pencil

a coin

g

1

Y

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Did you know?

16–20

incorrect

X

sa

11

correct

5–7

e

north

Activity

spring summer autumn winter

m pl

9

⓲ B

= = = = =

is the only shape that cannot be pushed out of shape.

Builders use struts on other shapes to make them into shapes made up of triangles. This makes them very strong.

struts

struts

You can test this using geostrips. 1. Add struts to these shapes to make them stronger. (a)

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

(b)

(c)

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(d)

29


SET 15 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. The picture on line one is of the frame of a building. The builder wants to make it as strong as possible by adding a strut. Rule a line to show where he should put the strut to make the frame rigid.

or

Questions 2 to 9 relate to the calendar on your sheet.

2. What day is the 24th of the month? Use an abbreviation to answer.

Wed.

3. What date is the first Thursday of the month?

4th

4. How many Mondays in the month?

5

5. Jim always goes to a meeting of his sailing club on the third Friday of the month. What is the date of his meeting this month?

19th no (It has 31 days.)

6. Could the month shown be June? 7. What is the last day of the month preceding the month shown on your sheet?

Sunday

8. What is the first day of the month following the month shown on your sheet?

Thursday

e

9. This could be any one of 7 months of the year. Use an abbreviation to write a month that it could be.

Jan. Mar. May Jul. Aug. Oct. Dec.

m pl

Questions 10 to 17 relate to the picture of a cake shown on your sheet. Notice that the cake has been cut into equal-size bits and only some of the bits have icing on them.

10. How many pieces has the cake been cut into? 12. What fraction of the cake has icing? 13. What fraction of the cake doesn’t have icing?

sa

11. How many pieces have icing?

5 2 2

⁄5

⁄5

3

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g

14. Imagine someone cuts the cake with a cut going from X to Y. Rule a line here so you can see what the cake looks like now. How many pieces is the cake cut into now? 15. How many pieces are iced now?

10 4

16. What fraction is iced now?

4

17. What fraction doesn’t have icing now?

6

⁄10 ⁄10

⁄5 and 4⁄10 are different ways of writing the same amount. The amount of cake that is iced is the same. What is different is the way the cake has been cut up.

2

18. These different looking fractions that stand for the same amount have a special name. ’ fractions. Use the code to work out the answer. They are called ‘

equivalent

19. I am going to let the stopwatch run for the amount of time it takes a racehorse to run 800 metres. Close your eyes and count the number of seconds between when I say ‘start’ and ‘stop’.

50

Allow the stopwatch to run for 50 seconds.

20. Write 75 centimetres as an amount in metres. Write your answer step by step. First write the number of whole metres that 75 cm makes (0). Next put the decimal point (.). Now put the number of centimetres left over after the decimal point (75).

0.75 m

Additional Material Needed Stopwatch, each child needs a ruler.

Activity Answers 1. 30

(a) iced 1⁄6, 2⁄12 not iced 5⁄6, 10⁄12 (d) iced 1⁄6, 5⁄30 not iced 5⁄6, 25⁄30

(b) iced 1⁄6, 4⁄24 (e) iced 2⁄5, 20⁄50

not iced 5⁄6, 20⁄24 not iced 3⁄5, 30⁄50

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(c) iced 1⁄6, 3⁄18 not iced 5⁄6, 15⁄18 (f) iced 1⁄3, 4⁄12 not iced 2⁄3, 8⁄12 www.prim-ed.com Prim-Ed Publishing


SET 15 WORKSHEET ❶

2–9

10–17

18

A=1 B=2 C=3

D=4 E=5 F=6

Wed. Thur. 3 4 10 11 17 18 24 25 31

Y

Sat. 6 13 20 27

X

CODE J = 10 M = 13 P = 16 K = 11 N = 14 Q = 17 L = 12 O = 15 R = 18

G=7 H=8 I=9

S = 19 V = 22 Y = 25 T = 20 W = 23 Z = 26 U = 21 X = 24

5 17 21 9 22 1 12 5 14 20

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g

Activity

Fri. 5 12 19 26

e

7 14 21 28

Tue. 2 9 16 23 30

m pl

Mon. 1 8 15 22 29

sa

Sun.

1. Write the fraction of each cake with and without icing.

Cut the cakes by ruling lines from arrow point to arrow point then write the equivalent fractions with and without icing. (a) (b) (c) (d)

Iced

Before

Iced

After

Before

Not Iced

Before

Iced

After

Before

Not Iced

After

Before

After

Not Iced

After

(e)

Before

Before

After

Not Iced

After

Before

After

(f)

Iced

Before

Iced

After

Not Iced

Before Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

Iced

Before

After

Not Iced

After ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

Before

After 31


SET 16 Question and Discussion

Answer

Look at the three shapes on your sheet to answer question 1.

1. If A, B and C are pictures of house wall frames, which is the strongest?

B (because triangles are the strongest rigid shapes)

2. What is the boundary of a circle called? You can find the answer by putting in the code letters on the lines. After you do this, copy the answer on answer line 2.

circumference

The next 5 questions are about the grid on your sheet. Remember that when you write a grid reference you should write the reference going across (horizontally) first and the reference going up and down (vertically) second. The tick on the grid is in position A5, not 5A. B4

4. What is the grid position of the question mark?

F3

5. What is the grid position of the raincloud?

A2

6. What is the grid position of the exclamation mark?

D2

e

3. What is the grid position of the fish?

F1

m pl

7. Where is Ena, the little girl, standing?

20 m2

9. What is the perimeter of the rectangle?

18 m

sa

8. What is the area of a rectangle with a length of 5 metres and a width of 4 metres? Remember to write your answer in square metres. Rule lines AB, CD, EF, GH, IJ, KL, MN. Count the number of squares to check your answer. 10. How many school bags do you think will fit on one square metre?

teacher check

Questions 11 to 15 are about the class timetable on your sheet.

English

g

11. What is the first subject taught every morning?

12. What lesson is taught on Thursdays after lunch?

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Music

13. How many science lessons are there a week?

2

14. The first Art/Design and Technology lesson is changed so the children can learn the language, Swahili. On which day will the children be learning Swahili?

Monday

15. Basil goes to special music lessons after assembly on Friday. The lesson goes until break. What lesson does he miss out on?

English

16. At what time is break at your school?

teacher check

17. What shape is Bert’s head? Use the code to work out the answer then write it on answer line 17.

rhombus

18. What shape are Bert’s ears?

ellipses

19. How many sets of parallel lines in Bert?

2

20. Write 97 centimetres as metres. Remember there are 100 cm in a metre so there are no whole metres.

0.97 m

Additional Material Needed Square metre made of newspaper or ruled in chalk on the floor.

Activity Answers 1.

32

(a) sixty-three (f) fifty-five

(b) thirty-seven (g) ninety-nine

(c) seventy-two (h) sixty-four

(d) forty-six (i) twenty-eight

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(e) eighty-one (j) seventy-three

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SET 16 WORKSHEET ❻

A=1 B=2 C=3

D=4 E=5 F=6

G=7 H=8 I=9

J = 10 M = 13 P = 16 K = 11 N = 14 Q = 17 L = 12 O = 15 R = 18

A B C 1

2

Use the code.

3 9 18 3 21 13 6 5 18 5 14 3 5

3–7

11–15

4

?

3

sa

!

2 X

8–9

D

E

F

A C E

17–19

Use the code. Bert’s head is a

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

His ears are

Activity

C

g

B

Vi ew in

A

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly Assembly English English English English English English English English English English BREAK Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths Maths LUNCH Art/D.T. Science History Music P.E. Art/D.T. Science Geography R.E. P.E.

m pl

5

1

S = 19 V = 22 Y = 25 T = 20 W = 23 Z = 26 U = 21 X = 24

e

CODE

B D F

18 8 15 13 2 21 19

5 12 12 9 16 19 5 19

Word Bank

1. Write the words for the numbers. All the words needed are in the word bank. An example has been done for you. Don’t forget the hyphen. one two three four five six seven eight nine twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety

(a) 63 =

sixty-three

(b) 37 =

(c) 72 =

(d) 46 =

(e) 81 =

(f) 55 =

(g) 99 =

(i) 28 =

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(h) 64 = (j) 73 =

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

33


SET 17 Question and Discussion

Answer

Questions 1 to 5 relate to the map showing a network of roads around Toadtown. Distances shown are in kilometres.

1. How far is it from Happy Hectares to Quack City via Toadtown?

21 km

2. How far is it from Rockville to Dizzy Town via Happy Hectares?

24 km

3. How far is it from Rockville to Dizzy Town via Toadtown?

21 km

4. Maureen lives at Dizzy Town but attends Bananaville Girls’ School. She travels by bus to and from school every day of the school week. The bus takes the shortest route. How far does she travel in a school week doing this (10 trips)?

190 km

5. The daily paper is printed in Quack City. From here a driver drives to each town dropping off bundles of papers to each newsagent before returning to Quack City. Listen to the route he follows and mark it in by tracing over it in colour. Leaving Quack City, he drives to Dizzy Town, Happy Hectares, Rockville, Bananaville, Toadtown then home. How far has he travelled?

60 km

Questions 6 to 9 relate to the picture of a cake on your sheet. Notice that the cake has been cut into equal-size bits and only some of the bits have icing (shading) on them.

6. How many pieces is the cake cut into?

100

e

7. How many pieces are iced?

m pl

8. What fraction of the cake is iced? 9. Write the fraction iced as a decimal.

42 42

⁄100

0.42

sa

Questions 10 to 14 are about Jelly Island. Some flies are planning a family visit to see the sights and taste the treats. To plan the trip carefully they are studying the map and writing down the grid positions of places that sound interesting. Remember that when you write a grid reference the horizontal reference is written first. 1D

11. Ferdinand Fly is the baby of the family. He has never seen a raisin before. Where should he go?

3C

12. Coconut is a favourite with all of the family (especially if it is a little ‘off’). It is next on their plan. Where is it?

7C

13. From here it is quite a long journey into a strong headwind to the nuts. Where are they?

4G

14. Friends have told them that no trip to Jelly Island is complete without a visit to the cream. Where is it?

4D

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g

10. The first place they want to visit is the spoon. What is its grid position?

The next 2 questions are about the square divided into 4.

15. How many squares can you find altogether in the diagram?

5

4 small squares and the main big square.

16. How many rectangles (other than squares) can be found in the diagram?

4

17. Write 66 centimetres as metres. Listen then answer step by step. Write the number of metres that 66 cm makes (0) Write the decimal point (0.) Write the number of leftover cm (0.66) Finally write ‘m’, the abbreviation for metres, after your answer.

0.66 m

Make an ‘educated guess’ if you don’t already know the answers to the last 3 questions.

18. Which circle shows a semicircle shaded? ‘Semi’ can mean ‘part of’ or ‘half of’.

X

19. Which circle shows an octant shaded? Think of some words that begin with ‘oct’. Think of the number linked to them.

Z

20. Which circle shows a quadrant shaded? Think of some words that begin with ‘qua’ or ‘quad’. Think of the number linked to them.

Y

Additional Material Needed Children need a coloured pencil to mark in the route for question 5.

Activity Answers 1. 34

(a) 3 May

(b) Sun.

(c) 8 May

(d) 23 May

(e) Sat.

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 16 WORKSHEET ❶

1–5

10 km

Quack City

10 km

6 km 9 km

8 km

15 km

e

Toadtown

m pl

12 km

13 km Happy Hectares

11 km

G

Nuts

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F E D

Peach

Ice-cream

Spoon

C

15–16

g

Jelly Island

Rockville

sa

10–14

6–9

Bananaville

12 km Dizzy Town

18–20

Cream

Coconut

Raisin

B

Cherry

A 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Activity

Y

Z

MAY 2014

1. Complete the calendar page then answer the questions.

Sun. Mon. Tue. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat.

1

(a) What date is the first Friday?

(b) What day is the 5th of the month?

(c) What date is the second Wednesday of the month?

(d) What date is the fourth Thursday of the month?

(e) What is the first day of June 2014?

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11

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

17 25

35


SET 18 Question and Discussion

Answer

Questions 1 to 7 are about the two groups of marbles, A and B.

1. How many marbles in group A?

4

2. How many marbles in this group are coloured?

3

3. What fraction of group A is coloured?

3

4. How many marbles in group B?

4

5. How many marbles in this group are coloured?

3

6. What fraction of group B is coloured?

3

7. How much is three-quarters of 8?

6

8. We are going to track down a mystery number. Listen to the clues and cross off the numbers that don’t belong as you hear them. After listening to five clues you should know what the mystery number is. Clue 1: I’m more than a dozen. Clue 2: I’m an even number. Clue 3: I don’t end in ‘0’. Clue 4: I’m more than one-and-a-half dozen. Clue 5: When you divide me by three (or share me among three) you are not left with a remainder. I am the number…?

24

⁄4

e

⁄4

m pl

Many of our words come from Latin, the language spoken in ancient Rome. The Roman symbol for 100 was C and the Latin word ‘centum’ meant 100. Now that you know this, the next three questions should be very easy for you.

10. In American currency, how many cents in a dollar?

sa

9. How many years in a century?

11. A Roman centurion was a commander in the army. How many soldiers do you think he was in charge of?

100 100c 100

g

The next 4 questions are about the counting instrument called the ‘abacus’. As you can see, it is set out in place value rows. 5143

13. Add three more counters to the thousands column of B. Write the number the abacus shows after doing this.

7825

14. On abacus C add two counters to the hundreds column and five to the units column. Write the number it shows after doing this.

3669

15. On abacus D add six counters to the hundreds column, two to the tens column and three to the units (or ones) column. Write the number it shows after doing this.

9777

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12. What number do you think is shown by abacus A?

For questions 16 to 18 we are going to match the solid (or 3-D) shapes with the pictures showing their top, front and side views.

16. Which group shows the three views of solid A?

Y

17. Which group shows the three views of solid B?

Z

18. Which group shows the three views of solid C?

W

19. If you have two dice, what is the highest number (outcome) you can roll? (demonstrate 6, 6)

12

20. What is the lowest number (outcome) you can roll with 2 dice? (demonstrate 1, 1)

2

Additional Material Needed Two dice

Activity Answers 1. 36

(a) 9.10 a.m.

(b) 1.00 p.m.

(c) 3.00 p.m.

(d) 1 hr

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 18 WORKSHEET ❶

1–7

8

A B

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 12–15

19 20 21 22 23 24 B

16–18

Solids

e

A

Th

H

T

U

H

T

U

B

C

Front view

W X

D

sa

C

Th

Side view

m pl

Top view

A

H

Activity

T

U

Th

H

T

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Th

g

Y

U

Z

V

GLUG CITY RAILWAY TIMETABLE MONDAY TO FRIDAY

1. Look at the railway timetable and answer the questions.

(a) Clarence lives at Glug. On Mondays he catches the 7.00 a.m. train to Town Hall. When does he get to Town Hall?

STATION DEPARTS DEPARTS DEPARTS

Glug

7.00 a.m.

10.00 a.m.

1.00 p.m.

Bingle

7.15 a.m.

10.15 a.m.

1.15 p.m.

Bloop

7.30 a.m.

10.30 a.m.

1.30 p.m.

Lumpy

8.30 a.m.

11.30 a.m.

2.30 p.m.

Blixen

9.00 a.m.

12.00 Noon

3.00 p.m.

Smooch 9.05 a.m.

12.05 p.m.

3.05 p.m.

(b) On Wednesday he catches the 10.00 a.m. train to City station.

(c) On Friday he catches the 1.00 p.m. to Blixen.

(d) How long does the trip from Bloop to Lumpy station take?

Town Hall

9.10 a.m.

12.10 p.m.

3.10 p.m.

(e) How long does the trip from Lumpy station to Town Hall take?

Beep

9.30 a.m.

12.30 p.m.

3.30 p.m.

City

10.00 a.m.

1.00 p.m.

4.00 p.m.

When does he arrive at City?

When does he arrive at Blixen?

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37


SET 19 Question and Discussion

Answer

To score something is to mark or scratch it. When the game of cricket was first played by English shepherds in the 1600s, they counted the number of runs made by marking (scratching, scoring) them on any stick they found lying in the fields. When a stick had a certain number of runs scratched onto it, it was put aside and a new one was taken and marked in the same way. From this we get the term ‘score’, meaning a certain number.

1. See if you can work out how many a score is by listening to the clues. Cross out the numbers that don’t belong as each clue is given. Clue 1: A score is less than two dozen. Clue 2: A score is more than three lots of six. Clue 3: A score is an even number of things. Clue 4: The smaller number that is remaining is a score.

20

2. Now that you know how many a score is, can you write how many three score is?

60

The next 5 questions relate to the map on your sheet. Write grid locations when answering. Remember to write the horizontal reference before the vertical. A3

4. What is the location of the crossroads on Thimble Avenue, Toad Road and Cross Street?

E3

5. Where is Bill’s Bridge?

B2

e

3. What is the grid location of the school?

m pl

6. What is the location of the picnic ground?

7. Travel along Toad Road in an easterly direction. Cross Bill’s Bridge and continue until you come to a crossroad. Turn south and follow the road until it begins to turn to the east. What is the building on the left-hand side of the road as you travel?

C4 church

sa

The next 7 questions relate to the letters and numbers on your sheet. When you have worked out an answer look for the letter that matches it and write it on the answer line.

g

8. Each month the bank charges €2.00 to operate Spiro’s bank account. How many euro a year does it charge to operate the account? Write the letter that matches your answer.

P R

10. Charles works in a garage. Sometimes people ask him to check the air pressure in all of their tyres. Yesterday seven people did this. How many tyres did he check on that day? (All cars had four tyres and no-one asked him to check their spare tyre.) Write the letter that matches your answer.

O

11. Three chimps ate 20 bananas each at a gorilla’s birthday party. How many did they eat altogether? Write the letter that matches your answer.

D

12. A farrier puts shoes on horses. If a stable has five horses that need shoeing, how many shoes are needed? Write the letter that matches your answer.

U

13. Nine broody hens are each sitting on three eggs. All of the eggs produced fine, healthy chicks. How many chicks were produced? Write the letter that matches your answer.

C

14. Each of the three bears eats two bowls of porridge a day. How many bowls do they eat altogether in a week? Write the letter that matches your answer.

T

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9. Every day Natalie eats an apple in the morning, at lunchtime and in the evening. How many apples does she eat in a week? Write the letter that matches your answer.

15. Write the word spelt by the letters. In mathematics this word means the answer we get when we multiply. 16. Write the next three numbers in the number pattern.

PRODUCT 825, 830, 835

The last 4 questions are about the angles A, B, C and D. Use the code to find their names. Copy the answers onto the answer lines.

17. What kind of angle is A?

A = acute

18. What kind of angle is B?

B = right

19. What kind of angle is C?

C = straight

20. What kind of angle is D?

D = obtuse

Activity Answer 9 38

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SET 19 WORKSHEET ❶

5 11 17 23

6 12 18 24

3–7

5 4

8–15 CODE U = 20 R = 21 P = 24 O = 28 T = 42 D = 60 C = 27 X = 80

3

16

1

School

2

m pl

sa

A

A= B=

B C D

10 + 16 2 x 12

3 + 3

2 + 5

11 x 2

3x3

2 x 9 10 + 10 8 + 11

7x1

2 x 4

7 + 0

3 x 3 14 + 12 13 + 5 10 x 2 9 + 10 1 + 2 + 4

6 x 2

17 + 8

6 + 1

Vi ew in

C=

D=

C

g

17–20

B

6 x 1

4 x 2

W

E S

Bill’s Bridge

TOAD ROAD

800 805 810 815 820 ?

A

N

Picnic Ground THIMBLE AVENU E

4 10 16 22

2 x 11

D

A = 26 B = 25 C = 24 D = 23 E = 22 F = 21 G = 20

CROSS STREET

3 9 15 21

e

2 8 14 20

JIM’S CR EE K

1 7 13 19

BUMBLE STREET

1

Church

E CODE H = 19 O = 12 I = 18 P = 11 J = 17 Q = 10 K = 16 R = 9 L = 15 S = 8 M = 14 T = 7 N = 13 U = 6

Swamp

F

V=5 W=4 X=3 Y=2 Z=1

Activity

How many different combinations can Jim wear? As you can see, he has a red shirt, a blue shirt and a purple shirt, pink shorts, green shorts and orange shorts.

How many combinations of shirts and shorts can he wear?

Can you find another way of working out the answer?

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

39


SET 20 Question and Discussion

Answer

The first 6 questions are about the map of Australia on your sheet. The key below the map tells you what the letters stand for.

1. Which city is located in E8?

Darwin

2. Which well-known natural wonder is located in E5?

Uluru

3. Which city is in H2?

Melbourne

4. What is the grid location of Adelaide?

G3

5. What is the grid location of Perth?

B3 P and B or Perth and Brisbane

6. Which 2 cities are furthest apart? (Just the letters will do.) The next 7 questions relate to the letters and numbers on your sheet. When you have worked out an answer, look for the letter that matches it and write it on the answer line.

S

8. Which number do you multiply 6 by to make 24? Write the letter that matches your answer.

R

e

7. Which number do you multiply 9 by to make 9? Write the letter that matches your answer.

O

10. Which number do you multiply 5 by to make 50? Write the letter that matches your answer.

T

11. Which number do you multiply 10 by to make 60? Write the letter that matches your answer.

C

12. Which number do you multiply 4 by to make 12? Write the letter that matches your answer.

A

13. Which number do you multiply 2 by to make 10? Write the letter that matches your answer.

F

sa

m pl

9. Which number do you multiply 3 by to make 6? Write the letter that matches your answer.

14. Write the letters backwards from answers 13 to 7 to spell a word used in mathematics.

Factors

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g

(A factor is any whole number that can be multiplied with another to make a given number, or any number that divides evenly into another. Factors are usually spoken of as pairs; e.g. 3 and 2 are factors of 6.)

15 -16. Circle the symbols in questions 15 and 16 to make the number sentences true.

>, <

Remind the children that < can be thought of as an ‘L’ leaning over, the ‘L’ standing for ‘less than’. The last 4 questions concern the picture of a road sign on your sheet. Measurements given are in kilometres.

17. How far is it to Broo?

15 km

18. How far is it from Broo to Glug?

10 km

19. How far is it from Glug to Ung Ung?

75 km

20. Which two towns are 7 km apart?

Glug, Heen

Activity Answers 1.

(b)

(c) 7

Tally

Number

Total

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 40

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 20 WORKSHEET ❶

5< ⓰

1–6

> 3 x 2

< > 3 + 2 ⓴

⓯ 6

7–14

8

CODE 1=S 2=O 3=A 4=R 5=F 6=C 7=Y 8=Q 9 = E 10 = T

7 6 AS B

LE

4 P

3

A

BH

S

1

m pl

M

2

e

U

5

17–20

H

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

Activity

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g

sa

KEY A = Adelaide S = Sydney H = Hobart LE = Lake Eyre B = Brisbane AS = Alice Springs M = Melbourne BH = Broken Hill D = Darwin U = Uluru P = Perth

BROO ............. 15 GLUG ............. 25 HEEN.............. 32 UNG UNG...... 100

Probability

1. The chart shows the possible results when a red die and a white die are rolled together. Altogether there are 36 possible ways the dice can fall. Add each pair of numbers to find the total of each roll, and then tally the number of times each total can be rolled: (a) 1,6

7

2,6

3,6

4,6

5,6

6,6

Tally

(b) Number

1,5

2,5

3,5

4,5

5,5

6,5

1,4

2,4

3,4

4,4

5,4

6,4

1,3

2,3

3,3

4,3

5,3

6,3

1,2

2,2

3,2

4,2

5,2

6,2

Total

2

Red die

3 4 5 6 7 8 1,1

2,1

3,1

4,1

5,1

6,1

10

White die

11

(c) Which total has the best chance of being rolled?

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

12 41


SET 21 Question and Discussion

Answer

Time lines can be used to show information. The time line on your sheet shows historical events of the 19th century. Use it to answer questions 1 to 5.

1. When was the first F.A. Cup Final?

1872

2. How many years after the F.A. Cup Final was the telephone invented?

3 yrs

3. What happened first? Listen carefully then use the letter to give your answer. A — the first petrol driven car was built B — the Great Exhibition took place in London

B

4. Was the Penny Black stamp invented in the first or second half of the century?

1st

5. In what year did all children under the age of 10 years legally have to go to school?

1870

6. Picture A shows a desk at Blueberry Primary School. The children in this class like their desks arranged like those in picture B. What is the perimeter of this arrangement?

5m S = 2526 T = 3248

7–8. Write the numerals for the amounts represented by the maths apparatus in groups S and T. 9. 99 plus 85. 10. 98 plus 85.

m pl

The next 4 questions relate to the thermometers, E, F, G and H on your sheet.

e

184 183

H

12. Which shows the temperature of the water boiling in the kettle?

G

13. Which shows the temperature of a block of ice? 14. Which shows the temperature on a chilly winter’s day?

sa

11. Which thermometer shows the temperature on a hot summer’s day?

E F 4 yrs

g

15. The Olympic Games are held every leap year. How many years apart is each Olympic Games?

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Many years ago, bakers were severely punished if their loaves were baked underweight. A baker’s loaves were weighed in batches of a dozen and checked against the required weight. As a result of this, the term ‘baker’s dozen’ came into the language. It was not, however, like a conventional dozen.

16. Listen to the clues and see if you can work out how many things there are in a baker’s dozen. Cross off numbers that don’t belong as you listen to the clues. Clue 1: It is more than a dozen. Clue 2: It isn’t an even number. Clue 3: It doesn’t divide evenly by 5. Clue 4: Its digits don’t add up to 10. Clue 5: It doesn’t end in 7.

13

Some bakers are said to have hidden an extra loaf on their trays so that each batch came up to the required weight. This way many were still able to get away with the practice of selling underweight loaves of bread.

17. Cory bought an ancient Roman coin dated 29 BC. His friend said that the coin must be a fake. Is his friend right?

Yes

People didn’t know that Christ was going to be born.

18. How many 50c coins are needed to make €2.00?

4

19. There is a special name for a period of ten years. Do the puzzle and use the code to find out the special name. Copy it onto the answer line.

decade

20. What does the prefix ‘kilo’ stand for? Use the same code as for 19 and copy your answer onto answer line 20.

thousand

Activity Answers 1.

(a) 1000 g

(b) 2000 g

(g) 7000 g

(h) 8000 g

42

(c) 3000 g

(d) 4000 g

(e) 5000 g

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 21 WORKSHEET ❶

1–5

Queen Victoria born

The Great Exhibition, London

1840

First F.A. Cup Final

1870

1875

First petrol driven car built

The Penny Black A new law says all Telephone 1819 1851 1872 1885 is the world's first children under 10 years invented postage stamp have to go to school

e

7–8

B

T

m pl

S

1m

sa

A

11–14

0ºC

F

G

H

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E

g

50 cm

6

7ºC

100ºC

16

30ºC

19–20

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19.

18 19 20

2 x 2

A=1 B=2 C=3

D=4 E=5 F=6

G=7 H=8 I=9

3 + 2 10 – 7 12 – 11 10 – 6

20.

2 x 10 16 – 8

3 x 5

7 x 3

20 – 1

CODE

J = 10 M = 13 P = 16 S = 19 V = 22 Y = 25 K = 11 N = 14 Q = 17 T = 20 W = 23 Z = 26 L = 12 O = 15 R = 18 U = 21 X = 24 9–4 1 x 1

7 x 2

11 – 7

Activity 1. A kilogram is made up of 1000 grams. Complete the table.

(a) 1 kg =

1000 g

(b) 2 kg =

(c) 3 kg =

(d) 4 kg =

(e) 5 kg =

(f) 6 kg =

(g) 7 kg =

(h) 8 kg =

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43


SET 22 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. If three desks like A were arranged as shown in B, what would the perimeter of the arrangement be?

7m

Questions 2 to 4 concern the tangram picture. Tangrams were popular puzzles in ancient China. The Chinese made many pictures by cutting the shapes and arranging them differently.

2. Of the seven pieces in the tangram, how many are squares?

1

3. How many pieces are triangles?

5

4. Use the code at the top of the page to find the name of the other piece. Copy it onto answer line 4.

rhombus

The next three questions are about triangles X, Y and Z.

5. Which has been ‘flipped’ (i.e. flipped over)?

X

6. Which has been ‘turned’?

Z

7. Which has been ‘slid’?

Y

8. Do the addition on your worksheet then write the total mass on answer line 8.

760 g

9. Do the second addition and write the total mass on answer line 9.

1100 g

e

Questions 10 to 17 involve sharing (or dividing). Use the diagrams to workout the answers. When you have worked out the answer, write the letter that matches it. Q

11. Twenty coins were shared equally among 5 people. How many did each person get? Write the letter that matches your answer.

U

sa

m pl

10. Eighteen marbles were shared equally between two children. How many marbles did each get? Write the letter that matches your answer.

O

13. Twenty pencils were sorted equally into 4 boxes. How many in each box? Write the letter that matches your answer.

T

14. Twenty-four fleas decide to distribute themselves equally among 3 dogs. How many fleas to a dog? Write the letter that matches your answer.

I

15. Mother decides to share 3 lollies among her 3 children. How many lollies does each child get? Write the letter that matches your answer.

E

16. Bridgette shares 18 stamps equally among 3 friends. How many stamps does each friend get? Write the letter that matches your answer.

N

17. Forty drills are shared equally among 8 dentists. How many drills does each dentist receive? Write the letter that matches your answer.

T

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g

12. Six bones were shared equally among 3 dogs. How many did each dog get? Write the letter that matches your answer.

Note that the letters spell the word ‘quotient’. The quotient is the name given to the answer after dividing.

18. Jim’s room is shaped like a ‘trapezium’. Which of the diagrams could be of Jim’s room?

A

19. Alice’s room is shaped like a rhombus. Which picture could be of Alice’s room?

B

20. Use the code at the top of the page to work out the name of the remaining shape. Copy your answer onto answer line 20.

parallelogram

Activity Answers 1.

44

(a) 10.55

(b) 4.57

(c) 7.52

(d) 2.51

(e) 3.59

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SET 22 WORKSHEET ❻

A=1 B=2 C=3

G=7 H=8 I=9

J = 10 M = 13 P = 16 K = 11 N = 14 Q = 17 L = 12 O = 15 R = 18

1m

50 cm

1

D=4 E=5 F=6

2–4

B

A

A E

B

10–17 10

7 + 6 96 – 94

g Vi ew in

8

500 g + 260 g

5–7

F

6 + 13

11

14

Z

7 x 3

13

Y

5 x 3

C D G

12

sa

5–7 X

4 x 2

m pl

3 x 6

S = 19 V = 22 Y = 25 T = 20 W = 23 Z = 26 U = 21 X = 24

e

CODE

9

15 16

17

600 g + 500 g

Code 1=E 2=O 3=R 4=U 5=T 6=N 7=S 8=I 9=Q

B

A

C

16 1 18 1 12 12 5 12 15 7 18 1 13

Activity 1. Match the digital and written times with different-coloured lines.

(a) 5 minutes to 11

(b) 3 minutes to 5

7.52 2.51 10.55 4.57 3.59

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(c) 8 minutes to 8

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(d) 9 minutes to 3

(e) 1 minute to 4

45


SET 23 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. Write one centimetre as metres. Listen and write each part as I say it. • The first thing you write is the number of metres that are in one centimetre (if any). Write this.

0

• Next put the decimal point to separate the metres from the leftover parts of a metre. Write this.

0.

• Next put in the number of tenths of a metre. Ten centimetres makes one tenth of a metre. You might think of this column as the ‘ten centimetres column’. How many lots of ten centimetres are in one centimetre? Write the number.

0.0

• Finally write the number of single centimetres that are left and write the letter ‘m’ after it.

0.01 m

2. In the library the tables are arranged like group X. All desks are like A. What is the perimeter of this arrangement?

6m

3. To measure large areas of land we use a special measurement that occupies 10 000 square metres. A paddock that is 100 metres long by 100 metres wide occupies this area. Use the code to find the name of this special measurement. Copy your answer onto answer line 3.

hectare

4. A couple who have been married for two and a half decades are said to have celebrated their silver wedding anniversary. How many years of marriage is this?

25 yrs

5. Tracey is putting together the tangram puzzle of a dog. Which piece does she still have to add to complete it?

e

6

m pl

Questions 6 to 14 relate to the picture of a cake on your sheet. Notice that the cake has been cut into equal-size bits and only some of the bits have icing on them.

6. How many pieces has it been cut into?

3

sa

7. How many pieces have icing?

10

8. What fraction of the cake has icing? 10. How many bits don’t have icing on them?

7 ⁄10

7

Vi ew in

11. What fraction of the cake doesn’t have icing?

0.3

g

9. Write the amount with icing as a decimal.

⁄10

3

12. Write the fraction without icing as a decimal.

0.7

Imagine someone cuts the cake with a cut going from points X to Y. Rule a line here so you can see what the cake looks like now.

13. How many pieces of cake is 0.3?

6

14. How many pieces of cake is 0.7?

14

Choose a child from the class to help with this activity.

15. Write your estimate of how many seconds, rounded to the nearest five, it will take write the numbers 1 to 20 on the board at normal speed.

(name) to

teacher check

16. Look at the areas written in square metres on your sheet. Write the one that you think is closest to the area of your classroom door.

2 m2

17. What picture is furthest south in the diagram on your sheet?

dog

18. Write 5 minutes to 7 in digital time.

6:55

19. There are 2 capital letters with 4 right angles in them. Write one of them.

E or H

20. Write the number represented by the maths apparatus on your sheet.

1024

Additional Material Needed Stopwatch

Activity Answers 1. 46

(a) 1000 g

(b) 750 g

(c) 950 g

(d) 1100 g

(e) 1250 g

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(f) 950 g

(g) 1100 g

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SET 23 WORKSHEET ❶

2

3

50 cm

1m A

X

5

4

5

6

g

Vi ew in

17

8 – 3 20 –17 2 x 10

10 – 9

9 x 2 20 – 15

16

6–14

X

4 x 2

sa

7

e

3

2

m pl

1

CODE H=8 O = 15 V = 22 I=9 P = 16 W = 23 J = 10 Q = 17 X = 24 K = 11 R = 18 Y = 25 L = 12 S = 19 Z = 26 M = 13 T = 20 N = 14 U = 21

A=1 B=2 C=3 D=4 E=5 F=6 G=7

2 m2

10 m2

20 m2

19

Y

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQ R ST U V W XY Z

20

N

W

E S

Activity 1. Add the masses. Circle those that are less than a kilogram.

(a) 600 g (b) + 400 g

500 g (c) 800 g (d) 300 g + 250 g + 150 g + 800 g

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(e) 500 g + 750 g

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(f)

900 g (g) 750 g + 50 g + 350 g 47


SET 24 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. A classroom’s desks are all like A. Some bright spark thought it would be a good idea to arrange them as shown. What is the perimeter of this arrangement? 2. Muldino is putting together a tangram of Kevin Kangaroo. Which piece does he still have to add?

9m 2

Questions 3 to 10 relate to the map on your sheet. It has a vane showing the various points of direction. Abbreviations have been used for the names of these directions. Use them when answering. Bruce lives in a treehouse right in the middle of Slaphap Island. In which direction must he travel from his treehouse to reach the following destinations?

3. To the library to borrow a book.

N

4. To the fruit shop to buy an apple.

NE

5. To pat his friend Lulu the cow in Farmer Hay’s paddock.

NW

6. To Mr Busby’s hat shop.

W

7. To Bessy Boot’s shoe store to buy football boots.

SE

8. To buy 6 jellybeans from Mr Candy’s sweet shop.

E

e

10. To the rubbish bin to dispose of his sweet wrappers thoughtfully.

SW S

m pl

9. To Molly Binder’s string shop to buy some more string for his collection.

Questions 11 to 20 relate to the picture of a cake on your sheet. Notice that the cake has been cut into equal sized bits and only some of the bits have icing on them. 10

sa

11. How many pieces has it been cut into? 12. How many pieces have icing? 14. How many bits don’t have icing on them?

9 ⁄10

9

Vi ew in

15. What fraction of the cake doesn’t have icing?

⁄10

1

g

13. What fraction of the cake has icing?

1

Imagine someone cuts the cake as follows: from A to B; from C to D; from E to F; from G to H; from I to J; from K to L; from M to N; from O to P; from Q to R. Rule lines so you can see what the cake looks like now.

16. How many equal sized bits is the cake cut into now?

100

17. How many bits have icing now?

10

18. What fraction of the cake has icing now?

⁄100

10

19. How many bits are without icing now?

90

20. What fraction is without icing now?

⁄100

90

Activity Answers 1.

48

(a) 10c (h) 50c (o) 80c

(b) 30c (i) 60c (p) 20c

(c) 40c (j) 70c (q) 40c

(d) 60c (k) 20c (r) 50c

(e) 70c (l) 30c (s) 70c

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(f) 20c (m) 50c (t) €1

(g) 30c (n) 60c

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SET 24 WORKSHEET ❶

50 cm

1

1m

2

A

1

3

2

4

5

6

NW

N

NE

W

E S

SE

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

Vi ew in

g

sa

SW

6–14

m pl

3–10

e

7

Activity

Rounding

1.

Imagine we no longer have 1c, 2c and 5c coins. Many shops now round things in price to the nearest 10c. When rounding to the nearest 10c, the rules are as follows: Amounts ending in 1, 2, 3 and 4 are rounded back to the ten below; e.g. 23c rounded to the nearest 10c is 20c. Amounts ending in 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 are rounded to the ten above; e.g. 47c rounded to the nearest 10c is 50c. Round these amounts to the nearest 10c:

(a) 12c =

(b) 25c =

(c) 43c =

(d) 55c =

(e) 69c =

(f) 15c =

(g) 26c =

(h) 45c =

(i) 56c =

(j) 73c =

(k) 20c =

(l) 31c =

(m) 48c =

(n) 61c =

(o) 75c =

(p) 24c =

(q) 35c =

(r) 52c =

(s) 65c =

(t) 95c =

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

49


SET 25 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. Max wanted to lay tiles in his bathroom. He didn’t want gaps between them. When he went to Mr Tyler’s shop he couldn’t decide between types A or B. Which should he choose? 2. Look at the picture of a square metre. What should the area of the triangle be?

B–Circles don’t tessellate ⁄2 m2

1

Demonstrate this by folding a square piece of paper diagonally. Show how each piece fits exactly over the other. For this to happen both pieces must be exactly the same size. If both pieces of a shape are the same size, they are halves.

3. A piece of carpet is six metres long by one metre wide. How many cuts must be made to cut it into lengths of two metres? 4. Write a capital letter that has 3 acute angles in it.

2 A, M or W

Acute angles are those less than 90°.

5. In a classroom with desks like A, what is the perimeter of the group labelled W?

7m

The next 4 questions are about the road sign. Distances shown are kilometres.

m pl

7. How far from Eggmont to Quack Town?

e

6. It is 2.40 p.m. and Narelle is happy because school will be over in another half hour and she will be going to her ballet lesson. At what time does school finish?

8. How far from Coco to Duckville? 9. How far from Duckville to Quack Town?

sa

10. Which city is closest to Coco?

3.10 p.m.

45 km 14 km 18 km Eggmont

Look at the pictures for questions 11 to 14 on your sheet. Use the symbols to show which have a capacity greater than or less than one litre.

14. Dam

<

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12. Saucer of cat’s milk 13. Cup

>

g

11. Petrol tank of car.

< >

15. Listen carefully because there are two parts to this question. How many is 100 takeaway 40 (pause), take away 7.

53

Point out that this is an effective way to do the subtraction 100 – 47 mentally.

16. Rosalie has almost finished the tangram picture of a cat. Which piece must she add to finish? 17. Christmas Day is on 25 December. The day after it is called St Stephen's Day. Write the date of St Stephen's Day.

6 26(th) December

To answer the last 3 questions, write ‘g’ for ‘good value’ or ‘p’ for ‘poor value’.

18. An apple pie for €10.00.

p

19. A new bike for €75.00.

g

20. A new house for €5000.00.

g

Additional Material Needed Square piece of paper.

Activity Answers 1.

50

(a) 6.21, 6.31 (f) 8.37, 8.47

(b) 5.39, 5.49 (g) 8.11, 8.21

(c) 7.14, 7.24 (h) 7.49, 7.59

(d) (i)

6.46, 6.56 12.03, 12.13

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

(e) 9.23, 9.33 (j) 11.57, 12.07

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SET 25 WORKSHEET ❶

1

2

3

1m

1m

1m

A

6m

B 4

A

11–14 EGGMONT................. 5 COCO ....................... 18 DUCKVILLE.............. 32

W

11

<1L

12

petrol tank of car

3

Vi ew in

2

5

4 7

Activity

13

g

16 1

>1L

sa

QUACKTOWN.......... 50

e

50 cm

1m

m pl

5

ABCDEFGHIJKLMN O P Q R ST U V W XY Z

saucer for cat's milk

14

6

cup

dam

Time

1. Draw the hands on the analogue clocks.

(a) 21 past 6

2. Write the times using digital notation in column A. Write the time 10 minutes later in B.

(b) 21 to 6

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

A

B

(c) 14 past 7 (e)

(d) 14 to 7 (e) 23 past 9 (f) 23 to 9

(f)

(g)

(h)

(i)

(j)

(g) 11 past 8 (h) 11 to 8 (i) 3 past 12 (j) 3 to 12

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

51


SET 26 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. Look at the diagram representing a square with sides two metres long. The area of this square would be 4 square metres. What would the area of the shaded triangle be?

2 m2

2. Bert plays triangle in the school band. He begins his lesson with Mr Scalene at 6.35 p.m. and finishes half an hour later. When does he finish?

7.05 p.m.

Look at the items available at the Happy Harmony School’s canteen. Answer the next 4 questions.

3. Greg has four bananas and one sausage roll. How much does this cost him?

€2.60

4. Danielle has a pie and a pear. How much does this cost her?

€2.10

5. How much does Jeff pay for two pies and three apples?

€4.50

6. Betsy has one of each thing shown. How much does it cost her?

€4.00

The value of the notes used in our currency is shown on your sheet. Write the four notes you would use to make the amounts shown on each answer line. You may use the same note more than once in each answer. Use the same setting out as in the example. €20 + €20 + €20 + €5

8. €110

€50 + €50 + €5 + €5

m pl

e

7. €65

9. €125 10. €170

€50 + €50 + €20 + €5 €50 + €50 + €50 + €20 20

12. Smedley doesn’t like painting. He decides to cover his wall with cork tiles. He wants the tiles to fit together without leaving spaces. Should he choose design A or B?

B

g

sa

11. Look at the 40 crows in Farmer Straw’s paddock. When Farmer Straw came along half of them flew away. Cross off every second crow. How many remained in the paddock?

4 or 7

14. Thumbert is loading up his truck with 1-kilogram bags of sugar. He is carrying a load of six tonnes. How many bags is this?

6000

Vi ew in

13. Which piece must Thelma add to the bird to complete the tangram?

15. Millimetres are used to measure very small lengths. If 10 millimetres make a centimetre, how many millimetres in two centimetres? Write the abbreviation ‘mm’ after your answer.

20 mm

16. Brutus collects string. On his birthday his mother buys him 4 balls, each 25 m long. Do the addition on your sheet and write how long his ball of string is when he joins them all up.

100 m

17. Follow step-by-step to write nine centimetres as a length in metres. • First of all, write the number of metres that nine centimetres make (if any).

0

• Now write the decimal point to separate the metres from the parts of a metre.

0.

• The next column stands for tenths of a metres. 10 centimetres make one tenth of a metre. Write the number of tenths of a metre that nine centimetres make (if any). • Finally write the number of single centimetres left over.

0.0 0.09

18. Listen carefully because there are 2 parts to this question. How many is 100 take away 50 (pause), take away 9. 19. Fred’s birthday is on 26(th) January. What is the date 2 days before Fred’s birthday? Write an ordinal number and the word January as part of your answer. 20. Write the amount shown by the maths apparatus.

41 24(th) January 2503

Activity Answers 1. 52

(a) 200 (b) 300 (c) 400 (d) 500 (e) 600 (f) 700 (g) 800 (h) 900 ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 26 WORKSHEET ❶

2 metres

3–6

€1

7–10

60c 2 metres

40c

50c

€1.50 12

13

€5

€10

€20

€50 1

2

m pl

11

e.g. €70 = €20 + €20 + €20 + €10

e

1

4

A

6

8. €110 9. €125 10. €170

16 25 m 25 m 25 m + 25 m

sa

7

5

3

7. €65

Activity

20

Vi ew in

Janurey Janruary January

19

g

B

Multiplying by multiples of 10

1. Do the addition sums. In each case you are adding 10 lots of the same number. Write answers in the answer spaces and then next to the multiplication number sentences. A B C D E F G H 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

2. Can you make up a rule that works for these multiplications? Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

Number sentences

(a) 10 x 20 =

(b) 10 x 30 =

(c) 10 x 40 =

(d) 10 x 50 =

(e) 10 x 60 =

(f) 10 x 70 =

(g) 10 x 80 =

(h) 10 x 90 = 53


SET 27 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. The picture on your sheet represents a solid made of centicubes. It is two centicubes high by two centicubes wide by two centicubes deep. How many centicubes have been used to make it?

8

2. Round 23 to the nearest 10.

20

3. Look at the square with sides 6 cm long. Its area is 36 square centimetres. What is the area of the shaded triangle?

18 cm2

4. If you know about acute angles you will know the type of stomach pains Adesh had. He told the doctor that he had acute pains. Would these be sharp and sudden or dull and lingering? Choose the word on your sheet.

sharp

Waldo Van Loon calls himself the world’s greatest sculptor. The model he has made on your sheet is called ‘Duck’. Answer the following questions.

5. How many spheres were used?

2

6. How many cones were used?

1

7. How many cylinders were used?

3

8. How many rectangular prisms were used?

3 8000

10. It took the truck driver two and a half hours to load the puddings. If he began at 6.30, when did he finish?

9.00

m pl

e

9. Mother Bear found that she was very good at making Christmas puddings. She went into business making puddings with a mass of 1 kilogram. A truck has just left her cottage with eight tonnes of puddings on it. How many puddings were loaded?

sa

11. Old Sid Snail is slowing down. When he was young he would proudly say how many centimetres he had travelled in a given time. Nowadays, alas, he talks in millimetres. Yesterday he travelled three centimetres in an hour. To make it sound better he converted it to millimetres. How many millimetres is this? Don’t forget to write ‘mm’ after the number.

Vi ew in

g

12. Piece of paper X has been folded into four then cut as shown. Which picture shows what the paper looked like when opened?

30 mm

B

13. An unsuspecting mouse was walking along when it suddenly turned. Which picture shows this?

C

14. The next day in the same place, the mouse was suddenly flipped. Which picture shows this?

B

15. About three weeks later when the mouse had forgotten about the other two dreadful incidents, it suddenly slid. Which picture shows this?

A

In the next 3 questions write ‘g’ for ‘good value’ or ‘p’ for ‘poor value’.

16. A new car for €5000.00.

g

17. A litre of petrol for €10.00.

p

18. A new computer for €100.00.

g

19. Is three a factor of 25?

no

20. Colin collects tiny little bits of string. He ties them together and stores them in balls 25 m long. He currently has eight such balls. Do the addition to find out what length of string this is altogether.

200 m

Activity Answers 1.

54

(a) 400 (b) 600 (c) 800 (d) 1000 (e) 1200 (f) 1400 (g) 1600 (h) 1800

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 27 WORKSHEET ❶

1

3

4

6 cm 6 cm

5–8

20

B

25 m 25 m 25 m 25 m 25 m 25 m 25 m + 25 m

dull

12

A

B

13–15

X

C

Multiplying by multiples of 20

g

Activity

D

sa

C

m pl

A

e

sharp

Vi ew in

1. Do the addition sums. In each case you are adding 20 lots of the same number. Write answers in the answer spaces and then next to the multiplication number sentences. Can you make up a rule that works for these multiplications? A B C D E F G H 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

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ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

Number sentences

(a) 20 x 20 =

(b) 20 x 30 =

(c) 20 x 40 =

(d) 20 x 50 =

(e) 20 x 60 =

(f) 20 x 70 =

(g) 20 x 80 =

(h) 20 x 90 =

55


SET 28 Question and Discussion

Answer

1. The area of a rectangle is 12 square centimetres. If its length is three centimetres, what is its width?

4 cm

Mark in centimetre intervals on the rectangle on the sheet and join them. Count the squares formed.

2. Cars can only travel one way on a roundabout. Choose the correct word from those on your sheet.

clockwise

3. Piece of paper A has been folded into four and cut as shown. Which picture shows what it looked like when opened?

Z

4. Round 55 to the nearest 10.

60

5. Which apples are cheapest, A or B?

A

6. Which two numbers have a product of 12 and a sum of seven? Choose from D, E, F or G.

E

7. At which of the times on your sheet do the hands of an analogue clock form a right angle?

3.00

8. How many blocks are there in the model drawn on your sheet?

12 18 cm

10. What about if they are put together like Y?

16 cm

11. Look at the picture representing a rectangle with a length of four centimetres and a width of five centimetres. The area of such a rectangle would be 20 square centimetres. What would the area of the shaded triangle be?

10 cm2

m pl

e

9. If two set squares like A are put together as shown in X, what will the perimeter of the arrangement be?

12. Which word, ‘base’ or ‘height’, is used to name the bottom of a triangle?

base

13. Which word names the 4-cm line on the triangle?

height

sa

14. Waldo Van Loon, the world’s greatest sculptor, has been at it again. This time he has made the wonderful factory you can see on your sheet. How many cylinders did he use?

3 (2 triangular and 1 rectangular)

Vi ew in

g

15. How many prisms did he use?

3

16. How many spheres?

6

17. Sally shares 25 dolls evenly among seven friends. She decides to keep any that are left over. Each friend gets three but how many are left over for Sally?

4

18. Wangaratta Slim, the famous snooker player; decided to retire. He shared his 34 snooker cues evenly among four friends and kept those that couldn’t be shared. Each friend received eight cues but how many were left over for Slim?

2

19. Alphonse Poodle shared 19 rubber bones evenly among his five best dog friends. Each friend got three bones. He kept the leftovers. How many did Alphonse get?

4

20. How many triangles can you find altogether in the picture on your sheet? B

A C

D

F E

8 (see below)

G H

Activity Answers 1.

56

(a) 100 (b) 20 (c) 10 (d) 13 (e) 12 (f) 1 (g) 1000 (h) 2

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 28 WORKSHEET ❶

1

2

3 clockwise

3 cm

anticlockwise

5

A

c ¤

X

Y

A

6

B

7

D = 6 and 2 E = 3 and 4 F = 12 and 1 G = 5 and 2

m pl

e

8

11–13 4 cm

sa

g

4 cm

cm 5

Vi ew in

3 cm

4 cm

14–16

3.00 6.00 6.20

4 cm

A

X=

3 cm

9–10

Z

Y= 5 cm base height

17

18

19

20

Activity 1. Match the words and numbers. Use a dictionary if you are not certain.

(a) century (b) score (c) decade (d) baker’s dozen (e) dozen (f) unity (g) millennium (h) pair

12 2 10 Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

1000 20 100 13 1

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

57


SET 29 Question and Discussion

Answer

1–5. Use the code to work out the names of the angles.

X = acute Y = right Z = obtuse A = straight B = reflex

6. What name do we give to line B of the triangle?

base

7. How many cubes have been used to make the steps on your sheet?

18

8. Which of the pictures on your sheet is symmetrical?

C draw the cat without its tail

9. Draw the cat with a piece missing so that it is symmetrical. The next 3 questions are about the masses of objects A, B and C.

C

11. Which is most likely to have a mass closest to 1 kilogram?

A

m pl

12. Which is most likely to have a mass closest to 1 tonne?

e

10. Which is most likely to have a mass closest to one gram?

B

The next 5 questions are about the compass points on your sheet. In each question, begin with Loren standing at the centre facing the north. Shade in the area she turns through then name the type of angle it makes.

sa

13. In A she turned from north to the right until she was facing south. What is the name of the angle through which she turned?

straight acute

15. In C she turned from north to the right until she was facing east. What is the name of the angle through which she turned?

right

Vi ew in

g

14. In B she turned from north to the right until she was facing north-east. What is the name of the angle through which she turned?

16. In D she turned from north to the right until she was facing south-east. What is the name of the angle through which she turned?

obtuse

17. In E she turned from north to the right until she was facing south-west. What is the name of the angle through which she turned?

reflex

18. Stanley Star is having a rough time in outer space. In which picture has the galactic wind ‘flipped’ him?

A

19. In which picture has it ‘slid’ him?

B

20. In which picture has it ‘turned’ him?

C

Activity Answers 1.

58

(a) (c) (e) (g)

€20, €20, €20, €5 €50, €10, €10, €5 €50, €50, €50, €10 €5, €5, €5, €5

(b) (d) (f) (h)

€50, €20, €5, €5 or €20, €20, €20, €20 or €50, €10, €10, €10 €50, €50, €20, €20 €10, €10, €10, €10 or €20, €10, €5, €5 €50, €50, €10, €5

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

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SET 29 WORKSHEET ❶ X = ❻ ❷ Y = ❼ ❸ Z = ❽ ❹ A = ❾ ❺ B = ❿

1–5

C

4 x 10

2x5

9 x 2

7 x 2

2 x 8

8x5

22

5 x 8

7 x 6 20 + 18 6 + 4

4 x 9

10 – 8

m pl

sa

7

base apex triangle

6 x 7

10 x 4

21 – 11 2 x 6

2

6

2 x 3

e

X 2 x 1 CODE A=2 J = 20 S = 38 K = 22 T = 40 B=4 Y 9 x 4 C=6 L = 24 U = 42 D = 8 M = 26 V = 44 Z 3 x 10 E = 10 N = 28 W = 46 F = 12 O = 30 X = 48 A 40 – 2 G = 14 P = 32 Y = 50 H = 16 Q = 34 Z = 52 B I = 18 R = 36 6

2 x 7

42

10 + 30

8 x 3 50 – 40 8 x 6

8–9

A

B

C

Vi ew in

g

A

2 x 9

B

10–12

13–17

A = 1 litre of milk

W

B = small car C = flea

N

A NW

NW

W SW

N

C S

NE

D

S

NW

E W SE

SW

B NW

N

W

B

E

A

SW

C

NE

SW

SE

N D S

NE

E

S

NW

E W SE

SW

18–20

NE

E

A

SE

N E S

NE

B

E SE

C

Activity 1. The value of the notes used in our currency are shown here. Write the four notes that could be used to make up the amounts below. (a) €65

¤20, ¤20, ¤20, ¤5

(b) €80

(c) €75

(d) €140

(e) €160

(f) €40

(g) €20

(h) €115

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

€5

€10

€20

€50

59


SET 30 Question and Discussion

Answer

The first 5 questions are about the map on your sheet. Goldilocks lives at point X. She likes to follow her nose. She loves porridge and every day she smells it cooking. She sets out to find it but it isn’t as easy as the fairytales would have you believe. Follow the directions given and write where they lead her. In each case begin at X.

1. Take the first turn right. Follow this until you come to a crossroad. Turn right and go to the end of the street. Where does she finish?

Gingerbread Cottage

2. On Tuesday she is given these directions: Take the first turn to the left. Follow this until you come to a crossroad. Turn right and go to the end of the street. Where does she finish?

First pig’s house

3. On Wednesday she follows these instructions: Take the third street on your right. Follow it on to the crossroad. Turn left at the crossroad and follow the road until you come to a ‘T’ junction. Turn left and follow the road to its end. Where does she finish?

Frog to Prince Pond

4. On Thursday this is what she is told: Take the third street on the right. Follow it to the crossroad and turn right. About halfway along this road you turn left. Where does she finish?

Chicken Little’s

5. On Friday she takes the first 2 left turns she comes to. Where does she finish?

2nd pig’s house

e

On Saturday she didn’t ask anyone. She trusted her nose and followed it right to the porridge. The rest, of course, is history.

X

7. When the three little pigs grew up and married, their wives bore each of them litters of 12 sons. How many sons did they have altogether in these litters?

36

8. Cockatoo Clarrie, the famous pop star, has just recorded another CD. This is his third CD. Each contains 25 of his best songs. How many songs is this altogether?

75

9. Marie bought a bicycle for €75.00. She painted it and sold it for €100.00. The paint cost her €10.00. How much profit did she make on the sale?

€15.00

sa

m pl

6. Piece of paper A has been folded and cut into 4 as shown. Which picture shows what it looked like when opened?

g

The next 5 questions are about the TV guide on your sheet.

10. How long does the news bulletin in the morning last for?

Vi ew in

30 min

11. What amount of time is given to programmes about doctors?

4 hrs

12. What programme comes on 3 1⁄2 hours after ‘The Old Doctor’?

Doctor in Danger

13. How long is the coverage of the basketball?

3 1⁄2 hrs

14. The station does not operate for 24 hours a day. For how many hours does it operate?

18 hrs

Can you match the top views with their objects?

15. Which is the top view of the bottle?

Y

16. Which is the top view of the boy?

X

17. Which is the top view of the cup?

Z

In Australian Rules football a shot at the goal posts is worth six points for a goal and one point for a behind. Refer to the scoreboard to answer these questions. To calculate the scores you must multiply the number of goals by six and add it to the number of behinds.

18. What was Geelong’s score?

45

19. What was Collingwood’s score?

52

20. Which team had the larger number of scoring shots?

Geelong.

(They had 20 shots at goal but only 5 were goals. Collingwood only had 12 shots but 8 of these were 6-pointers.)

Answer Activities 1. 60

(a) 10 (f) 6/10

(b) 4 (g) 0.6

(c) 4/10 (h) 12

(d) 0.4 (i) 18

(e) 6

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

www.prim-ed.com Prim-Ed Publishing


SET 30 WORKSHEET ❶

6

1–5

A

Little Red Hen’s Bakery

Duck pond

3 Bear’s house

3rd pig’s house

Queen’s palace

2nd pig’s house

Gingerbread cottage

15–17

Activity

boy

wizard’s hat

W

X

g

cup

Vi ew in

bottle

W

X

Y

Chicken Little

1st pig’s house

TV GUIDE — SATURDAY Morning News Cartoons Doctor Zeeble The Young Doctors The Old Doctor Midday Movie: How to Sit On a Chair 2.30 Doctor in Danger 3.00 Sports Special: World Marbles Championship 6.00 Documentary: The World Of Chairs 7.00 News 7.30 The Singing Doctor 8.30 Basketball Harlem Globetrotters V Birdsville Bullfrogs 12.00 Station close 6.00 6.30 8.30 9.30 11.00 12.00

e

Frog to Prince pond

Z

m pl

Rapunzel’s castle

10–14

sa

Y

Z

18–20 Collingwood Geelong

Top view

Goals 8 5

Behinds 4 15

1. Look at the picture of a cake. It has been cut into equal-size bits and only some of the bits have icing on them.

(a) How many pieces has the cake been cut into?

(b) How many have icing?

(c) What fraction of the cake has icing?

(d) Write the amount with icing as a decimal.

(e) How many bits don’t have icing?

(f) What fraction of the cake doesn’t have icing?

(g) Write the fraction without icing as a decimal.

Imagine someone cuts the cake with cuts going from A to B and C to D. Rule lines here so you can see what the cake would look like. The cake is now divided into 30 pieces.

(h) Can you count what 0.4 of 30 is?

(i) How much is 0.6 of 30?

Prim-Ed Publishing www.prim-ed.com

A

B

C

D

ORAL AND MENTAL MATHS ACTIVITIES

61


0083IRE Oral and Mental Maths Activities 4th Class