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Clarkson University

A Freshman Guide to the First Year 2012-2013 Academic Calendar

Brought to you by Student Life & Engagement

studentengagement@clarkson.edu facebook.com/clarksonstudentlife twitter.com/clarksonstulife


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Table of Contents

Welcome To Clarkson

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Meet Our Orientation Leaders

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Involvio

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Freshman Checklist

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Living At Clarkson

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Roommate Conflicts

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College Students and Homesickness

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Transportation

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Eating at Clarkson

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Student Life

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Professional Organizations

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Volunteering

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Greek Life

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Getting Involved On Campus

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Indoor and Outdoor Recreation

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Clarkson University Athletics

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Campus Activities and Events

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Academic Calendar

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Family Education Rights and Privacy Act

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How to Talk to Your Professor

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Important Campus Departments

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Clarkson Traditions

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Campus Map

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Class of 2016 Freshman Guide Congratulations on your decision to attend Clarkson University! We’re excited to have you, and look forward to not only what we are able to bring to you in terms of your college career, but also what you are able to bring to us. This Freshman guide has been developed to give you a behind-the-scenes look at Clarkson as a member of the Class of 2016. Keep this document close to you at all times. You’ll find this information useful in your coming months. This booklet also incorporates valuable information about the Potsdam community. Allow the following pages to guide you in your new adventure, and be sure to take advantage of the resources now at your fingertips. Best wishes as you begin your journey!

Orientation Leaders consist of individuals who are involved on campus, as well as Student Life and Engagement Staff in order to help you adjust to the first few days of college life. They are here to help you with any questions or concerns you might have, no matter how big or small. They too have been through the Orientation process and moving away from home, so they know what it is like being at college for the first time. Feel free to reach out to them at any point during Orientation, or even after, if you have questions.


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Meet Our Orientation Leaders Kory Beth Ancona is a senior majoring in Chemical Engineering and this is her third year with the Peer Educating Program. She enjoys volunteering with her co-ed service Fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega. She is also involved in the pep band, belly dance club, and Clarkson’s radio station. She interned at Mylan Technologies in their transdermal drug research and development center. Jesse Brigden is a Senior Mechanical Engineering student. He has been involved in campus life as well as excelling in academic requirements. This is his third year as a Peer Educator and also worked as a TA in differential equations. Most of his free time is spent with Clarkson’s SAE SPEED team, designing and fabricating racecars. He has also participated in GE’s Co-Op and Internship program. Megan Burke is a Junior social science major from Potsdam. She was voted “friendliest” in her senior year of high school. She loves sports, music and dancing. On campus, she has been involved in CUSA, the Clarkson Goldies dance team, yearbook, and she is a member of a Sorority, Theta Phi Alpha. She works for admissions, the Student Success Center, Career Center, and Student Administrative Services on campus. Megan also interned at three popular radio stations in St. Lawrence County, and she volunteers at Renewal House as well as the animal shelter.

Jake Earl is A Senior majoring in Civil Engineering. This is his third year with the First Year Seminar program, and first as a master peer. Jake has been the captain of the Timber Bridge SPEED Team at Clarkson, and was also involved in the ALCOA Fellows Program. He is also a member of Chi Epsilon and the Associated General Contractors of America club. In his free time, he likes to exercise and be outdoors as much as possible.


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Meet Our Orientation Leaders Nicholas Grzymala is a Junior majoring in Biology and PreDental with a minor in Cognitive Neuroscience. This is his second year as a Peer Educator, and First as a Master Peer. Nick was born and raised in Syracuse, New York. He is a member of the Men’s Basketball team and is also an active member of the Zeta Nu Fraternity. He is very excited to be at school, and is probably the coolest Master Peer ever, so feel free to approach him with any questions or concerns!

Courtney Johnson is a Senior majoring in Applied Mathematics and Statistics as well as Global Supply Chain Management. She is from Liverpool, NY and is involved in countless organizations on campus. Academics are her highest priority, but in her spare time she is an RD, Phalanx Historian, Peer Educator, Student Coordinator, CUSA senator and class secretary, President of Beta Gamma Sigma, member of Delta Zeta, TA for statistics and plays on the Women’s Rugby Team. She thrives on keeping herself busy and taking advantage of all the wonderful opportunities Clarkson has to offer. Lateefah Morse is a 20-year-old Political Science major at Clarkson University. Travelling from Portland, Oregon, Lateefah chose Clarkson to explore the fields of law and environmental science. She is currently Programs Chair for the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, and the Treasurer for Organized Chaos, our Step Team. This is Lateefah’s second semester working with Student Life & Engagement. Domonique Powell is 20 years old, and is a dual major in Applied Math and Statistics and Finance. He is a junior originally from New York City and Puerto Rico. Domonique is currently the President of Alpha Kappa Psi, and the Vice President of Organized Chaos. He has been working with Student Life & Engagement for one year.


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Meet Our Orientation Leaders This is Tamera Rizk’s fifth year working at Clarkson University. Prior to her position in Student Life, Tamera has worked for Residence Life and Institutional Diversity Initiatives. Her current position as the Director of Student Life and Engagement includes planning new student orientation, family/homecoming weekend, coordinating themed housing, and advising the freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior classes.

Megan Rolewicz is a Senior double majoring in Computer Engineering and Mathematics. At Clarkson, she is involved in a wide variety of activities including Greek Life, Dance Ensemble, and Intervarsity Christian Fellowship and also holds multiple on campus jobs. During her time at Clarkson, she has had a co-op with GE, multiple internships, and travelled to Ireland with the Global Business Program. Clarkson has allowed her to meet many people who she plans to stay in touch with for the rest of her life and has given her many experiences she will never forget.

Mon ica Schroeder is a Senior majoring in Psychology and will be graduating a semester early, in December 2012. When she is not in class, she is involved in many different activities such as Greek Life, First Year Seminar, plays intramural sports, and is a bartender for the campus bars. She has been involved in philanthropy and volunteers at Reachout, the crisis intervention hotline in Potsdam. Ultimately, Clarkson has allowed her to experience many different things and meet many new people all while pursuing a degree.


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Meet Our Orientation Leaders Scott Stuart is a Senior studying Global Supply Chain Management. He originally came to Clarkson to study Chemistry, but with the help of Faculty and Staff here, he found the career path that fit him. Scott plays on the Varsity Men’s Soccer team and is also involved in the First Year Seminar program, Value U, and CUSA. He is looking forward to meeting all of you during Orientation and around campus!

Stacey W en is a junior Business major here at Clarkson University. She is 19 years old and is from Albany, New York. She enjoys arts and crafts and everything pink. Stacey is currently on both the Dance and Step team at Clarkson and is serving as Co-Social Chairman of Alpha Kappa Psi. Her interest in meeting new people during fun evens is what drew her to working with Student Life & Engagement.

CU

Orientation leader

If you need anything during orientation, just look for these Tee Shirts, and feel free to ask any question you may have!

C Clarkson Move-In Crew


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Involvio 1) Grab your smartphone and download the free app to get connected with what is going on during orientation! Ø iPhone users: Download from the app store and log in with your Facebook account. Ø Other smartphone users: Download the web app from involvio.com to start. 2) After downloading your app, type in “Clarkson University” when prompted. 3) Select “First Year Student Orientation” 4) Select “back” to access the agenda.

Now your screen should look like this.

5) Click on Agenda, and all of your events should be in one place! Your Facebook events as well as ones listed on Involvio will be synced together for easy organization.

Don’t be left out of the loop! Grab your phone and see what’s happening on campus!


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Freshman Checklist Room Essentials þ Bed Sheets and blankets (Twin XL – mattress is 36”x80”) þ þ þ þ

Pillow Trash can Towels Toiletries (shower caddy, shower shoes) þ Personal fan

þ þ þ þ þ

Things to Help You Work General school supplies Desk organizer Desk lamp with CFL bulb Pencil sharpener Floor lamp

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Electronics Cell phone EPEAT-certified computer and flash drive. Laptop computer recommended (takes up less space and provides a mobile work environment) Ethernet cable/TV cable Appliances such as mini-fridge, microwave, TV, and DVD player

þ Power strip and extension cords þ Entertainment (music and games)

þ þ þ þ

Miscellaneous Laundry bag and detergent Sewing and tool kit First aid kit Coffee/travel mug/water bottle

þ þ þ þ þ

Plastic bowl/plate/utensils Closet organizers & hangers Plenty of storage containers Batteries Sticky tack to hang posters

Disallowed Items (Subject to Change) Air conditioner, halogen lamp, toaster oven, full-size refrigerator, space heater, “zip” cord, waterbed, grills, candles, incense.


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Living At Clarkson Lasting Friendships begin in our residence and dining halls for as many reasons as there are individuals. We strive to help you make your residence days and nights as rewarding as your classroom experiences and believe there is as much to be learned outside the classroom as there is in the classroom. As a first-year student, you’ll live in one of our fully networked residence halls. All the rooms are double occupancy and fully furnished with carpets and drapes. Clarkson houses all Freshmen in the “Quad” which consists of Cubley, Reynolds, Ross and Brooks. This enhances the First Year Experience and promotes cohesiveness of the class.

Clarkson currently offers six options for themed housing that include Healthy Living, FIRST Robotics, Outdoor Enthusiasts, Intensified Study, Professional Women, and Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE). The goal of Theme Housing is to bring students together because of common interests to cultivate lasting friendships. Living on a Themed floor is advantageous because residents of these floors interact with faculty outside of the classroom, and get to enjoy social activities such as trips, volunteer activities, and movies.

Residents of the WiSE Themed Floor studying together.


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Roommate Conflicts Talk to your Resident Advisor (RA). Your RA can be a helpful resource when trying to solve a roommate conflict. RA’s are student leaders who are trained to assist with problems such as these. Clarkson also has Area Coordinators (AC’s) who are full-time Get off to a good start with your professional staff who are also available roommate. You don’t have to be best friends, but you’ll feel a whole lot more at to mediate conflicts. home in your room if you two get along. Some helpful roommate etiquette tips Be your own advocate. The roommate include: conflict is yours to solve, not your Ø Clean up after yourself – keeping parent’s. Residence Life does not your room neat can seem “prioritize” roommate conflicts when unimportant when you’ve got exams parents are involved versus when parents and more things to do, but this isn’t are not. They are all important to us. your room alone and being a slob is Residence Life Staff also will not take rude. sides in a roommate conflict and both students involved will be equally Ø When your roommate wants quiet, be supported. The staff will work toward a quiet. Doing otherwise is very rude. peaceful compromise. When your roommate is studying, you can go chat with your friends elsewhere. See the Residen ce Life Office. As a last resort, if you cannot resolve the Ø Be reasonable about visits from conflict after talking with your “special” friends. Visits from boyfriends and girlfriends can cause roommate, speaking to the RA or AC, you can turn to the Residence Life Office. serious roommate conflicts. Make Sometimes, moving students to a sure your roommate is okay with different room may be the answer to visits. solving the conflict. The “good” person Ø Don’t use your roommate’s in a conflict may need to be the one to belongings without permission, move. We rarely force someone to move including food. against his or her will, but in some cases, both students may be relocated. We cannot guarantee that a student will be Have a one-on-on e Talk with your able to move “down the hall,” sometimes roommate about your concer ns. Does there just isn’t the space to do that. your roommate know what has been bothering you? If not, they probably cannot change it. Communication can be the key to resolving a conflict, so make sure you talk to your roommate before doing anything else. Roommate conflicts are a normal part of college life. For many, this is the first time they have had to share a room with another person.


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College Students & Homesickness Starting your freshman year of college can be very exciting, but once Mom and Dad drive away, many students feel overwhelmed and homesick. At the same time that students are confronted with academic and social challenges, the support system they have known their whole lives is under a different roof.

Communicate (in moderation) with your family. Your family has not left your life. Call and e-mail them and talk about how you are feeling. Remember, being a parent of a college freshman can be an emotionally difficult experience as well. At the same time, don’t use your family as a crutch.

What’s the best way to deal with homesickness? Here are some ideas.

Talk to your Resident Advisor (RA). Every dorm floor has a student in charge that can help students get adjusted to college. If you feel overwhelmed, stop by for a chat.

Allow yourself to feel homesick. Some students may not want to admit how much they miss home. They may perceive their feelings as immature and get angry with themselves. If you feel homesick, give yourself a break and understand that your feelings are normal and not immature. No matter how old people get, major life changes are traumatic, and you are going through a major life change. Keep Busy. Throw yourself into college life and you’ll find yourself missing home less. Finding things to keep you busy won’t be hard to do! Take part in freshman orientation week activities. Get off to a good start in your classes. Find out what kinds of student activities are available and attend some meetings. Make Friends. College campuses can be very lonely places if you don’t know anyone. It may take a while for you to meet people you truly bond with, but in the meantime, make an effort to get to know as many people as you can.

If needed, talk to a counselor. If homesickness is making it difficult for you to function in college, or if you are suffering from depression, take advantage of the Counseling Center. Homesickness is a common problem, and college counselors know how to help. Decor ate! If your room is cozy and comfortable, it will feel more like home. Give yourself time. It may take a semester or even more before you stop feeling homesick. It takes time to adjust to major life changes like this one. Hang in there!


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Transportation If you’re looking for a way to get home for a long weekend or holiday break, check out the Trailways bus service online at trailwaysny.com for ticket prices. This is especially helpful for students who life in New York City or Buffalo. You can even plan a day out with friends in Watertown or Syracuse! For fare and schedule information, or to order tickets by mail, you can contact a representative directly by calling (800) 776-7548

Yet another way to get a ride home is to post on the Ride Board. Clarkson students looking for a ride home can post on the website. Students who want to offer a ride home to other students can also post on here. The website connects students who live nearby so they can carpool. Check out more information at clakson.edu/clarkson_community/carpool

Recently introduced to Clarkson, Zipcar is a cost-effective and convenient transportation option available to all students 18 and older. Zipcars are self-service and can be reserved 24 hours a day. For $35 a year, you get access to the cars anytime, plus gas, insurance, and maintenance are all included for free! For more information on Zipcars visit clarkson.edu/zipcar.


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Eating At Clarkson Offering everything from pizza and pasta to salads and vegetarian dishes, students can dine together at several different campus locations. Flexible meal-plan options help you adjust to your eating habits and daily schedule. Our meal plans include: Ø The Golden Knight meal plan provides you with 3 meals a day along with $25 in Declining Balance to use at any retail location on campus. Ø The All Northern meal plan provides you with an average of 2 meals per day along with $75 in Declining Balance. Ø The Platinum meal plan provides an average of 7 meals per week and $225 in Declining Balance. Ø The Sandstoner meal plan provides 1 meal per day with an extra 50 meals per semester as well as $275 in Declining Balance. Ø The Emerald meal plan is for those who prefer 5 meals per week, with more frequent snacks or ala carte meals. It also provides $425 in Declining Balance.

Students gather to eat lunch in the Student Center eating area.

There are seven dining locations on campus and they include: Ø The Student Center Servery offers Pizza, Pasta, Mongolian, Grill, Soups and Sandwiches. Their hours of operation are Monday-Sunday 11AM-8PM. Ø Java C ity offers a variety of hot, cold, and blended specialty beverages, pastries, salads, and sandwiches. Their hours of operation are Monday-Sunday 7:30AM-10PM Ø The POD is a convenience store with snacks and drinks that you can purchase with Declining Balance. Their hours of operation are Monday-Sunday 11AM-9PM. Ø Empire Diner is a diner where you can get burgers, pizza, sandwiches, and fries. Their hours of operation include MondayFriday (Lunch) 11AM-2PM, Monday-Friday (Dinner) 4:30PM7PM, Saturday & Sunday (Dinner) 4:30-7PM, and Monday-Friday (Late Night) 8PM-Midnight. Ø Ross Brooks Din ing Hall is an all you care to eat dining hall that offers a variety of American entrees, vegetarian selections, and much more. Their hours of operation include Monday-Friday 7AM-8PM and Saturday-Sunday 9AM-8PM. Ø Main Street Café offers Subway, and Smokehouse (homestyle meats and mashed potatoes). Their hours of operation include Monday-Friday 10AM-8PM. Ø Concrete C afé is designed for students who are in a hurry for soup, sandwiches, or coffee. Their hours of operation are MondayFriday 8AM-3PM.


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Student Life

Student Life is how you spend your time at Clarkson. We encourage you to take this opportunity to test your boundaries, meet new people, and try new things. Entertainment via musicians or comedians are provided most Friday and Saturday nights in the Student Center Forum sponsored by the Clarkson Union Board (CUB), and a plethora of game shows and other fun events are held by our Residence Life Staff and Student Life and Engagement throughout the year. Speak to either of these groups about making your special entertainment interest happen!

Additionally, Clarkson boasts around 100 CUSA-recognized student organizations. If you can’t seem to find the right club for you, starting your own is easy! Sue Conto in the CUSA Office in the 1st floor of the Student Center will help guide you in starting this process.  

Clubs & Organizations Clarkson clubs and organizations provide students with opportunities to explore your interests, build your résumé, and meet people at Clarkson. They can also provide opportunities for mentorship and networking. For a comprehensive list of the CUSA funded, recognized, and affiliated organizations, visit cusa.clarkson.edu/pages/sponsored_clubs.php


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Professional Organizations Ø Ame rican Indian Science & Enginee ring Socie ty (AISES) is a national, nonprofit organization that nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational program, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology areas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES’ ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. o For more information: clarkson.edu/pipeline/societies/aises.html Ø National Society of Black Enginee rs (NSBE) is the largest student run organization in the nation. Its mission is to increase the number of culturally responsible Black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community. NSBE promotes academic and technical excellence while giving students the opportunity to develop professionally. o For more information: people.clarkson.edu/~nsbe/ Ø Socie ty of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) promotes the development of Hispanics in engineering, science and other technical professions to achieve educational excellence, economic opportunity and social equity. o For more information: people.clarkson.edu/~shpe/ Ø Socie ty of Profe ssional W omen (SP W) is a student organization at Clarkson whose mission is to serve college women to prepare them for a dynamic work environment, and provide support during their studies at Clarkson University. o For more information: people.clarkson.edu/orgs/spw Ø Socie ty of W ome n Engineers (SWE) is a non-profit educational and service organization of graduate engineers and women with equivalent engineering experience. The objectives of SWE are to inform young women, their parents, counselors, and the general public of the qualifications and achievements of women engineers and the opportunities open to them, to serve as a center of information on women in engineering, and encourage women engineers to attain high levels of education and professional achievement. o For more information: web2.clarkson.edu/projects/swe


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Volunteering

Volunteering and raising money for local non-profit organizations are significant parts of Clarkson’s campus culture. You can volunteer by joining either Circle K or Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed service Fraternity. There are also many local organizations who are looking for volunteers. Attending volunteer fairs to meet people who run local non-profit organizations that need volunteers is another great way to get involved. Some community opportunities include, but are not limited to, Adopt-A-Bear Cub Mentoring Program, American Red Cross, Canton-Potsdam Hospital, CORC Thrift Store, Head Start, Hospice and Palliative Care, Planned Parenthood, Potsdam Humane Society, Potsdam Rescue Squad, Reachout, Renewal House, and St. Lawrence NYSARC.

Clarkson Circle K at the Activities Fair

If you are interested in volunteering, make sure you check out these organizations at the Volunteer Fair Monday, August 27 th ! For more information on how to get involved, see Tamera Rizk, Director of Student Life and Engagement in the Student Affairs suite on the first floor of the ERC. You can also visit clarkson.edu/campus_life/clubs/ volunteering.html for full details.


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Greek Life Greek Life is a vibrant part of Student Life at Clarkson University. Clarkson is home to 14 Fraternal Organizations. Members of Greek Life make up about 15 percent of the total student body. Our Fraternities and Sororities organize activities that embrace the academic mission of the University and create an environment of responsible leadership and service. Today, Fraternities and Sororities at Clarkson focus on their founding principles of leadership, scholarship, philanthropy, friendship, and personal growth. Although they vary, groups expect that their members will become leaders within the community, abide by the rules and traditions of the chapter and the University, and adhere to the higher academic standards of their organization. Clearly, hazing and substance abuse are not consistent with the values that have been founded on and have no place within our organizations. Fraternities have been a part of the Clarkson community since 1903 and Sororities since 1977.

Fratern ities Male students who are sophomores and have a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average are eligible to join a fraternity. Our Fraternities include: Ø Alpha Chi Rho Ø Delta Sigma Phi Ø Delta Upsilon Ø Omicron Pi Omicron Ø Phi Kappa Sigma Ø Sigma Chi Ø Sigma Delta Ø Sigma Phi Epsilon Ø Tau Epsilon Phi Ø Zeta Nu Soror ities Female students are eligible to join a sorority during their second semester at Clarkson if they have attained a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average and are in good academic standing. Our Sororities include: Ø Ø Ø Ø

Delta Zeta Kappa Delta Chi Phi Sigma Sigma Theta Phi Alpha

For more information about joining a Fraternity or Sorority, visit clarkson.edu/ofsa or speak with the Associate Dean of Students for Student Organizations in the first floor of the Student Center.


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Getting Involved On Campus Planning to get involved with an oncampus activity or organization? It is a great way to meet like-minded people, find a niche on a big campus, and build up your entry-level résumé for when you graduate. When choosing activities, be selective. In high school, you probably had more time for extracurricular activities and could do the whole smorgasbord – sports, band, school newspaper, student government or whatever sparked your interest. In college, you’re going to be a lot busier with you classes so you’ll want to choose a main course and maybe an appetizer or two, but there’s no time for a smorgasbord. The trick is to choose wisely. Find activities that you enjoy the most, and that will fill other functions as well – like helping you build a résumé. On a résumé or graduate/professional school application, you can demonstrate commitment by getting involved in one activity for a long time – especially if you take on leadership roles in that organization. Here are some tips for choosing the best campus activities for you. Campus Activities & Time Commitment Ø Time is a valuable commodity when you are a student, so before committing to a campus organization, figure out how much time you’re going to need to commit, and ask how much time you actually have to give.

Multi-Tasking Campus Activities Ø Choose activities that serve several purposes. For example, you can choose an activity that allows you to have fun, meet people, and also helps you build your résumé and make contacts for future jobs. If you are interested in law or politics, get involved in Student Government. If you’re interested in writing, join the Integrator – Clarkson’s newspaper. In addition, many majors offer a professional organization on campus that will help you network with students and professionals in the field. Ø Aside from building your résumé, you can also “multi-task” by finding activities that are social and also allow you to do things you would do otherwise. For example, you can join a sports-related club or team that allows you to exercise and have fun. Finding Your Niche on Campus Ø One of the best reasons to join a club or campus organization is that it will help you find your niche. Look at groups that reflect your interests or values. Maybe try a bunch of new things, and then narrow down your list to the ones you really like. Be sure to check out all of the clubs and organizations at the Activities Fair August 28th!


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Indoor & Outdoor Recreation Intramural Sports After a long day in the classroom, the Clarkson campus offers all kinds of opportunities to run, jump, dive, kick and swing. Our fiercely fun, not-so-competitive intramural teams attract more than 80 percent of Clarkson students. Show off your stick work in roller hockey, shoot hoops in the pool with water basketball or score a touchdown in touch football. There are more than 100 teams to choose from! Ø For more information visit clarkson.edu/intramurals Schuler Indoor Recreation Center and Deneka Fitness Center Whether you’re a tennis player, a jogger or enjoy taking fitness classes, Clarkson offers a variety of facilities to ensure that there is something for everyone. The Indoor Recreation Center houses a gym, 25-meter swimming pool, indoor track, a field house for tennis, volleyball or basketball, racquetball courts, weight room, locker rooms with Jacuzzi and sauna, and a fitness center. The Deneka Family Fitness Center, located within the IRC, offers a full workout facility with an assortment of cardiovascular machines, a weight room and a list of classes including yoga, zumba, and aikido.

Outdoor Recreation If you like adventure in the great outdoors, Clarkson has one of the best locations you’re ever going to find. Our 640-acre campus sits on the edge of a village where the rolling foothills of the Adirondack Mountains meet the St. Lawrence River Valley. The Clarkson Outdoor Recreation Program manages the multiuse trail system on campus and the Adirondack Lodge, provides support and guidance to the outdoor-oriented student clubs, and runs the outdoor program that exposes students to the natural areas of the Adirondack region. Organizations like Ski Club, and Bike Club make it easy to find people who share your adventurous spirit. Clarkson’s Outing Club, one of the largest and most active student groups on campus, organizes excursions near and far that enable you to take advantage of the recreational possibilities in this spectacular environment.


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Clarkson University Athletics With 19 Varsity teams, there is plenty of opportunity to enjoy collegiate rivalries. Clarkson’s men’s women’s hockey teams, which compete in the Division I, East Coast Athletic Conference Hockey League, are the perennial powerhouses at the national level. The men’s team finished second in the ECACHL in 2006-07 season and received a third seed in the 2007 NCAA Tournament.

Clarkson also offers 17 Division III sports that compete in the Liberty League, with the Alpine and Nordic ski teams belonging to the United States Collegiate ski Association. The Golden Knights have had athletes compete in the USCSA National Championships for 21 consecutive seasons. Clarkson also had more than 60 student athletes named to the Liberty League All-Academic team.

The Men’s Hockey team celebrating a win over their rivals, St. Lawrence University


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Campus Activities & Events Clarkson University, in cooperation with the Clarkson Union Board (CUB) and Student Life and Engagement, works to provide activities that support every aspect of your life. With events ranging from book discussions and guest lectures to concerts and comedians, there is always something going on. Almost every weekend, there are fun programs and sporting events to attend. The Men’s and Women’s hockey teams host many Division I games to attend throughout the semester. CUB offers entertainment each weekend when there is not a hockey game, and Student Life and Engagement provides “Late Knight” programs, which are a series of fun and social events on Friday and Saturday nights. Many students are involved in clubs and organizations on campus. It is a great way to meet new friends and have fun as soon as you arrive on campus.


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Academic Calendar CLARKSON UNIVERSITY Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. and Recesses begin at the end of the last scheduled class on the day listed. ACADEMIC YEAR: 2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

Event Graduate Business Program Classes Begin New Student Check-in Returning Student Check-in Classes Begin Fall Recess Begins* Classes Resume Family Weekend Begins Midterm Grades Due to SAS 12:00 noon Enrollment for Spring Begins Thanksgiving Recess Begins* Classes Resume December Graduation Recognition Exams Begin Exams End Final Grades Due to SAS 12:00 noon

Fall 2011 22-Aug M 25-Aug TH 28-Aug SU 29-Aug M 30-Sep F W 5-Oct F 21-Oct W 26-Oct W 9-Nov 22-Nov TU 28-Nov M 11-Dec SU 12-Dec M 16-Dec F 19-Dec M

Fall 2012 20-Aug M 23-Aug TH 26-Aug SU 27-Aug M 28-Sep F W 3-Oct F 26-Oct W 24-Oct W 7-Nov 20-Nov TU 26-Nov M SU 9-Dec 10-Dec M 14-Dec F 17-Dec M

Fall 2013 19-Aug M 22-Aug TH 25-Aug SU 26-Aug M 27-Sep F W 3-Oct TBA W 23-Oct W 6-Nov 26-Nov TU M 2-Dec TBA M 9-Dec 13-Dec F 16-Dec M

Fall 2014 18-Aug M 21-Aug TH 24-Aug SU 25-Aug M 26-Sep F W 1-Oct TBA W 22-Oct W 5-Nov 25-Nov TU M 1-Dec TBA M 8-Dec 12-Dec F 15-Dec M

New Student Check-in Returning Student Check-in Classes Begin February Break Begins* Classes Resume Midterm Grades Due to SAS 12:00 noon Spring Recess Begins* Classes Resume Enrollment for Fall Begins Exams Begin Exams End Final Grades Due to SAS 5:00 p.m. Commencement

Spring 2012 10-Jan TU 11-Jan W 12-Jan TH 15-Feb W 20-Feb M 12-Mar M 16-Mar F 26-Mar M 4-Apr W 30-Apr M 4-May F 6-May SU 12-May SA

Spring 2013 TU 8-Jan W 9-Jan 10-Jan TH 13-Feb W 18-Feb M 11-Mar M 15-Mar F 25-Mar M W 4-Apr M 29-Apr F 3-May SU 5-May 11-May SA

Spring 2014 TU 7-Jan W 8-Jan TH 9-Jan 12-Feb W 17-Feb M 10-Mar M 14-Mar F 24-Mar M W 2-Apr M 28-Apr F 2-May SU 4-May 10-May SA

Spring 2015 TU 6-Jan W 7-Jan TH 8-Jan 11-Feb W 16-Feb M M 9-Mar 13-Mar F 23-Mar M W 1-Apr M 27-Apr F 1-May SU 3-May SA 9-May

Summer Session I- Begins Summer Session I- Ends

21-May 23-Jun

M SA

20-May 22-Jun

M SA

19-May 21-Jun

M SA

18-May 20-Jun

M SA

Summer Session II- Begins Summer Session II- Ends

2-Jul 4-Aug

M SA

1-Jul 3-Aug

MA SA

30-Jun 2-Aug

MA SA

29-Jun 1-Aug

M SA

Reunion

12-15 Jul

*Recess begins at the end of the last scheduled class on this day

11-14 Jul

TBA

Copyright © 2006 Clarkson University ® All Rights Reserved. 8 Clarkson Ave., Potsdam, New York 13699 I 315-268-6400

TBA

as of August 1, 2011


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Family Education Rights & Privacy Act As you enter college, you are recognized as an adult, and are entitled to rights as such. The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) extend to you as you enter college, limiting the parents’ right to view personal grades without consent. The purpose of FERPA is to grant students the right to inspect and review their own education records. What is FERPA? Ø The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is a federal privacy law that gives parents certain protections with regard to their children’s education records such as transcripts, disciplinary records, and class schedules. Parents have the right to review your education records and to request changes under limited circumstances. We do not share information about grades, even with parents, unless we have written consent from the student allowing us to discuss grades with their parents. The student may sign a form that states parents can access grade information through SAS, but not online. Unless you, as a student, sign this form located on the CU and Me website, your parents cannot access your grade information. Does FERPA give your parents a right to see your education records? Ø When a student turns 18 years old or enters a postsecondary institution at any age, all rights of your parents under FERPA transfer to the student. However, FERPA provides ways in which a school may (but is not required to) share information from an eligible student’s education records with parents, without the student’s consent. Who else gets to see my education records? Ø To protect your privacy, schools are generally prohibited from disclosing personally identifiable information about you without your written consent. Questions? Ø Contact the Student Administrative Services Office at (315) 268-6451 Ø Read more information about FERPA at inside.mines.edu/FERPA Ø Call the Department’s Family Policy Compliance Office at (202) 260-3887 or e-mail them at FERPA.Customer@ED.Gov


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How to Talk to Your Professor Clarkson is a small community and as such it is very easy to build relationships with faculty. You are encouraged to talk with your professors outside of the classroom on a regular basis. They are not scary and are interested in your success. We know that talking with a faculty member can seem intimidating – especially for new students. Veteran students can feel that nervous twinge, too. The guidelines below appeared in a National On-Campus Report article called, “Helping New Students Make the Most of Meetings with Faculty,” (1993). We hope you find this information helpful.

Step 1: Make an appointment Ø Review the syllabus for your instructor’s office hours. Ø If you’re uncertain of your instructor’s office hours, ask for them. Ø If your schedule conflicts with the office hours, tell your instructor why you can’t make the scheduled office hours. Ø Tell him/her about your specific concern. Ø Set up a specific time to meet with your instructor. Be sure to indicate the amount of time you think you’ll need. Step 2: Establish r apport Ø Be on time for your appointment. Ø When you arrive: be pleasant, smile, introduce yourself again (include your name and class), and shake hands if appropriate. Step 3: Present your concern Ø Focus on the specific questions you’ve identified as problematic. Ø Have your questions or problems written out so that the instructor can see where your difficulties are.


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Step 4: Provide background infor mation Ø Briefly tell your instructor about your high school background and preparation for the course – if relevant to solving the problem. Ø Explain the study strategies you’ve used to understand the material. Step 5: Redirect for clarification Ø If the instructor’s explanation isn’t clear, redirect their attention to the specific point where you became confused. Ø “Talk through” your problem so that the instructor hears your reasoning. Step 6: Summarize resolution of the problem Ø “I was missing this step in ______” or “I need to apply _____ formula” Step 7: Thank your instructor Ø Ask to come back or meet again if necessary.


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Accommodative Services Phone: (315) 268-7643 Clarkson University assures equal educational opportunities by providing accommodations and services for qualified students with documented disabilities in accordance with Federal Law. We determine, coordinate and provide reasonable accommodations, educate and advocate for an accessible and hospitable learning environment, and promote responsibility and self-advocacy on the part of the individuals we serve. The Office of Accommodative Services is located in the Student Success Center in the Educational Resources Center (Suite 1400). For more information visit clarkson.edu/oas

Campus Safety & Security Phone: (315) 268-6666 The office of Campus Safety & Security consists of a team of people working with the campus community to promote a safe environment in which to live, learn, and work. Campus Safety Officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day. They are responsible for the enforcement of University rules and regulations. Some specific services provided include: Ø Issuing student room keys Ø Unlocking room doors (in accordance with University policy guidelines) Ø Registering all vehicles for parking on campus Ø Providing night escort between campus facilities Ø Issuing University ID’s For more information visit clarkson.edu/campussafety Career Center Phone: (315) 268-6477 The Clarkson Career Center is more than just a great resource for finding a job after graduation. The staff assists both current Clarkson students and alumni with every step of career planning and preparation. Through the Career Center, you can: Ø Use KnightLink to gain access to targeted job, co-op and internship listings, as well as schedule on-campus interviews and attend career workshops. Ø Get rewarding real-world experience through a co-op, internship, or study abroad exchange. Ø Receive one-on-one career advising, job search assistance, graduate school advising, résumé and cover letter preparation, and interview training. Ø Access valuable networking resources like the alumni mentoring program. For more information visit clarkson.edu/career


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Counselin g C enter Phone: (315) 268-2327 Clarkson University Counseling Services assists students in reaching their full potential for social and emotional development. Counseling is a proactive way to manage challenges and difficulties, gain perspective, and take responsibility for your emotional welfare. The counselor-student relationship provides a unique opportunity to explore important issues and identify resources that will lead to personal growth. Students seek counseling for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to: Ø Relationship issues Ø Adjustment to change Ø Loss and bereavement Ø Sexual assault or harassment Ø Anxiety and depression Ø Self-esteem issues For more information visit clarkson.edu/counseling

First Year Advising Phone: (315) 268-3948 All incoming Freshmen have, in addition to their professional advisor, access to a first-year advisor who works with them toward making satisfactory academic progress and personal adjustment, as well as monitoring and identifying any other problems they may be experiencing as early as possible. The type of concerns that typically arise during the first year might consist of stress due to classes, roommate, change of environment, academic uncertainty, etc. Feel free to stop by the First Year Advising Office, located in the Student Success Center, ERC 110. For more information visit clarkson.edu/firstyear Residence Life Phone: (315) 268-6642 Clarkson is a residential University. Implicit is the belief that the residential experience plays a vital role in the overall education and development of all students. Residence Life at Clarkson seeks to establish an enriching living-learning community that support the main mission of the University, especially in the areas of creating academic excellence, promoting diversity, and alumni engagement. The residential program for first year students is designed to facilitate a healthy and positive transition to Clarkson. Residence Life strives to meet the varied needs of all students while providing the opportunity to build a vibrant community and promoting a safe and secure environment. For more information visit clarkson.edu/residencelife


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Student Administr ative Services (SAS) Phone: (315) 268-6451 Clarkson University is unique in combining administrative services usually associated with registrar, bursar, and financial assistance offices into one centrally located office: Student Administrative Services. Each student is assigned to one representative. Therefore, students have one person to whom they can turn for most of their administrative needs. What can students do at SAS? Ø Ask about financial aid and student loans Ø Pick up and drop off academic and financial aid forms Ø Complete Check-in each semester Ø Add/drop courses Ø Obtain information about student employment Ø Much more! For more information visit clarkson.edu/sas Student Health Center Phone: (315) 268-6633 All full-time undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for unlimited visits to the Health Center. Most services at the Health Center are free because they are paid for through your facilities user fee. Some specific services that are available include Ø Outpatient care (treatment of routine illnesses, first aid, and sports injuries) Ø Laboratory tests Ø Limited medications Ø Reproductive Health Care is available for men and women In an emergency, you will be seen as soon as possible. Otherwise, we request your cooperation with our appointment system, which is designed to minimize waiting time. For more information visit clarkson.edu/healthcenter Student Organ izations Phone: (315) 268-2345 The Clarkson experience goes far beyond what you learn in the classroom – there are countless opportunities to get involved on campus with over 60 student-operated groups on campus. From Student Government to Belly Dance Club, Clarkson offers something for everyone. If you don’t see a club that sparks your interest, and you want to start a new club, you can contact the Student Organizations Office. For more information visit clarkson.edu/campus_life/clubs


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Student Success Cen ter Phone: (315) 268-2209 Studying at the University level may be very different for you than studying was in high school. If this is the case, do not hesitate to ask questions. You can go to the Student Success Center, located on the first floor of the ERC, to get tips on how to study, how to get a tutor, how to utilize your text books and how to effectively manage your time. Do not be afraid to ask for help. You came to Clarkson because it is rigorous and you want to succeed. Ask for assistance as soon as you recognize that you need it. For more information visit clarkson.edu/ssc University Book stor e Phone: (315) 268-3862 The bookstore is located within walking distance from campus at 39 Market Street in downtown Potsdam. At the bookstore, students can shop for their textbooks for all their classes. The University Bookstore also has a wide variety of general reading books, gifts, and apparel. There is also a cafĂŠ located within the University Bookstore. For various Clarkson apparel, there is a spirit shop located inside Cheel Arena. For more information visit clarkson.bkstr.com


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Clarkson Traditions Clarkson has over 100 years of rich history and tradition. Participation in Clarkson tradition reminds us that we are part of something so much larger than ourselves. These annual events connect our students with over 35,000 living alumni and weave a fabric of the common Clarkson experience. We have highlighted a few of our Clarkson traditions. Convocation: Convocations are gatherings of students and faculty at academic institutions, usually to share new ideas and renew campus spirit. In its early days, Clarkson held Convocations weekly, but that custom fell away during World War I. Since 1991, convocation has been held at the beginning of the academic year. It is now a time for bringing together the community of scholars to explore some fundamental theme, and for the faculty to welcome students to the campus. Legendary Joe Bushey: In 1921, some letters appeared in Clarkson’s student newspaper, the Integrator, referring to a student by the name of Joe Bushey. The phantom Joe has been a recurring presence on campus ever since. He was first believed to be a member of the Class of 1923. In 1933, the Integrator reported that Joe had been awarded a lifetime scholarship to Clarkson. His picture is purported to have shown up in the 1930 yearbook, and at a 1949 alumni dinner, a recorded speech by Joe was played for the audience. Who knows when and where Joe Bushey, or perhaps one of his grandchildren, may again make an appearance at Clarkson? Orientation and “Holcroft Night”: The opening days of the academic year offer the opportunity for new students to be welcomed, introduced to the Clarkson lore, and helped to become acclimated to campus life. It is a time of forging new friendships and building cooperative bonds for facing the academic and personal challenges ahead. It is a time for letting go and looking forward. The newest Orientation tradition is “Holcroft Night.” This offers new students a time for putting their voices behind some traditional Clarkson cheers and the Alma Mater, and for a true celebration of their new status as first-year students at the University. Fall Family Weekend: Over the past century, parents and families have gradually come to play an increasingly significant role in the life of higher education. Held each fall, Clarkson’s Family Weekend provides an opportunity for parents and other family members to visit students on campus and participate in a variety of events: shared meals, meetings with faculty and staff, theater productions, and athletic


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Student Life & Engagement studentengagement@clarkson.edu facebook.com/clarksonstudentlife twitter.com/clarksonstulife

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