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Economics BSc English BA History BA Law LLB Philosophy BA

Undergraduate Prospectus 2013/2014

Politics & International Relations BSc


Broader, deeper, higher education

Contents 4

Welcome

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Professors & faculty

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Meet some of our students

10 Curriculum 12 Learning experience 14 Careers 16 London 18 The College 20 Where will I live? 24 Student support 25 Student Union 26 Equality & diversity 27 Economics 31 English 35 History 39 Law 43 Philosophy 47 Politics & International Relations 51 NCH Diploma 52 Core modules 53 Professional Programme 54 How to apply 55 What happens after you apply? 56 Fees 57 Scholarships & Exhibitions 58 UoL entrance requirements

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Welcome Study of the humanities provides personal enrichment, intellectual training, breadth of vision, and the well-informed, sharply questioning cast of mind needed for success in life in our complex and rapidly changing world. An advanced education in the humanities focuses on enquiry and shared exploration of ideas and theories, the past, creative works and the texts that embody them, which together constitute the great conversation of mankind. The tutorial method is the gold standard of a humanities education, and provides the deepest insights together with the sharpening of intellectual skills whose attainment is the aim of a higher education. Students are prepared for a University of London Honours degree, choosing a degree subject from Economics, English, History, Law, Philosophy and Politics & International Relations. In addition, they study four modules in one of the other degree subjects as a contextual course. The compulsory core modules for all students include Applied Ethics, Logic & Critical Thinking, and Science Literacy. This is a novel and highly important feature of the education at the College. These modules give intellectual breadth, a genuine understanding of the complex world we face, and the capacities to deal with it. In addition to the degree, contextual and core modules, there is a compulsory Professional Programme aimed at providing students with an understanding of the world of work, including financial literacy, business and employment. The College’s Professional Development Counsellor will help you to arrange internships for work experience, to prepare CVs and to secure interviews with leading organisations as graduation approaches.

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NCH students experience one of the best staff-to-student ratios in UK higher education, with extra contact hours each week and personal guidance in all aspects of study and work, including weekly one-to-one and small group tutorials. The College Registry and teaching facilities are in Bloomsbury, with library, student welfare and union facilities all within walking distance. Higher education is not just about studying. Students can make the most of London with its rich cultural life, theatre, music, exhibitions, museums, art and film festivals, literary events, and much more. The College provides information, helps secure discount tickets for theatre, opera and dance, and arranges private exhibition visits and a programme of visits from authors, performers and artists, as well as social events. There are plans for summer schools and other opportunities for travel. The College awards significant numbers of Scholarships and Exhibitions offering full or part remission of fees to high-achieving applicants. This pro-bono aspect of the College’s provision is very important to its founders and the members of its distinguished Advisory Board. New College of the Humanities is the most exciting innovation in UK higher education for many years. We offer an outstanding intellectual experience and undergraduate education. Your three years at the College will not only be stimulating and a great start to a career, but also memorable and fun. Professor A C Grayling Master of New College of the Humanities

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Professors & faculty Visiting professors

Faculty

■ Professor Vernon

Economics

Professor A C Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA Philosophy

Professor Simon Blackburn BA, MA, PhD (Cantab) Philosophy

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta BSc (Delhi), BA, MA (Cantab), PhD (Cantab), FBA, FAAAS Economics

Professor Richard Dawkins BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRS, FRSL Science Literacy

Bogdanor CBE BA, MA (Oxon), FBA Politics

■ Professor Sir David Cannadine FBA, FRSL, FRHistS History ■ Professor Rebecca

Goldstein BA (Columbia), PhD (Princeton) Philosophy

■ Professor Nicholas

Humphrey BA, MA, PhD (Cantab) Philosophy ■ Howard Jacobson BA (Cantab) English

■ Dr Marianna Koli BSc, Msc,

PhD (University of Manchester)

■ Dr Jungyoon Lee BA

(Cantab), MSc, PhD (LSE)

■ Dr Georgios Zouros BSc, MSc

(Lond), PhD (LSE)

History ■ Dr Suzannah Lipscomb MA,

MSt, DPhil (Oxon)

■ Dr Hannah Dawson MA,

MPhil, PhD (Cantab)

■ Dr Lars Kjaer BA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab)

Politics ■ Dr Hannah Dawson

English ■ Dr Catherine Brown BA

Diploma

(Cantab), MSc, MA (Lond), PhD (Cantab)

■ Dr Charlotte Grant BA

(Cantab), MA (Courtauld Institute), PhD (Cantab)

■ Professor Ken Gemes BA

(Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh)

■ Matthew Batstone MA

(Cantab), MBA with Distinction (INSEAD)

■ Dr Daniel Swift BA (Oxon),

MA, MA, MPhil, PhD (Columbia University, NY)

■ Professor Simon May

Professor Daniel C Dennett BA (Harvard), DPhil (Oxon) Philosophy

Professor Ronald Dworkin QC BA (Harvard), BA (Oxon), MA (Yale), LLB (Harvard), FBA Law and Philosophy

Professor Niall Ferguson MA, DPhil (Oxon) Economics and History Visiting Professor

Professor Lawrence Krauss BSc (Carleton), DPhil (MIT) Science Literacy

■ Professor Barbara

McDonald BA (Syd), LLB (Syd), LLM (Lond) Law

■ Professor Christopher Peacocke BA, BPhil, DPhil (Oxon) Philosophy ■ Geoffrey Robertson QC BA

(Syd), LLB (Syd), BCL (Oxon) Law

■ Dr Anthony Seldon MA

Professor Steven Pinker BA (McGill), DPhil (Harvard) Philosophy and Psychology Visiting Professor 6

Professor Sir Christopher Ricks BA, MA, BLitt (Oxon), FBA English

Professor Peter Singer BA, MA (Melbourne), BPhil (Oxon) Applied Ethics

Professor Adrian Zuckerman Law

(Oxon), PhD, FRSA, MBA, FRHistS History

Law ■ Professor Roger Halson LLB

(Newcastle), MLitt (Oxon), Solicitors Finals (Nottingham Law School)

■ Professor G R Sullivan LLB

(Wales), LLM (London)

■ Dr Tola Amodu BA

(Anglia Ruskin), LLM (Cantab), PhD (LSE)

Philosophy ■ Professor Ken Gemes BA

(Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh)

■ Dr Naomi Goulder BA, MA

(Cantab), PhD (Lond)

■ Dr David Mitchell BA, MA,

DPhil (Oxon), MSc (LSE)

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Meet some of our students Diverse and exceptional, without exception Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds. Their unifying characteristics are that their interests and talents span multiple subject areas, that they have curious questioning minds, and that they possess an unquenchable thirst for knowledge. You can follow our first cohort of students on their journey at the College at www.NCHum.org

Ben

Bobby

Claudia

Jamie

John

Colchester Royal Grammar School

The King’s School, Canterbury

Bedales School

Sixth Form College Colchester

Law LLB with Economics

Law LLB with Politics

History BA with English

King’s College School, Wimbledon

Philosophy BA with Economics and Politics (PPE)

Economics BSc with Law

Equality & Diversity Officer

Events & Activities Officer

Josh D

Josh M

Lizzie

Pacome

Veronica

Rudolf Steiner School

Dauntsey’s School

Ashbourne College

St. Ignatius College

Gresham’s

History BA with Politics

Economics BSc with Philosophy and Politics (PPE)

English BA with Philosophy

Law LLB with Economics

Economics BSc with Politics

Vice President NCH SU

President NCH SU

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A curriculum as expanded as your horizons You will study a total of 19 modules, significantly more than a standard 12-module undergraduate degree, and can choose from 36 subject combinations at the College.

1. Choose one of six undergraduate degrees:

■ Politics & International Relations

■ Economics BSc

■ PPE programmes

■ English BA

■ PPH programmes

Your programme of studies will include your choice of one of our six undergraduate degrees combined with your choice of contextual course. You will also study the College’s core modules: Applied Ethics, Logic & Critical Thinking, and Science Literacy. All students will also complete the College’s Professional Progamme.

■ Law LLB

3. Study the College’s three core modules:

■ Philosophy BA

■ Applied Ethics

■ Politics & International Relations BSc

■ Logic & Critical Thinking

You will graduate with the dual award of your University of London undergraduate honours degree and the NCH Diploma.

■ History BA

■ Science Literacy

2. Combine this with your choice of one of the following contextual courses: ■ Economics ■ English ■ History ■ Law ■ Philosophy

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4. Complete the College’s Professional Programme 5. Attend up to 100 professorial lectures in each year at the College

Your degree The University of London is one of the world’s leading institutions. Since 1858, its degrees have been open to students from all parts of the world. Quality and standards are endorsed by the UK’s independent Quality Assurance Agency. You will study the University of London International Programmes syllabus, and your examinations will be set and marked by the University. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree.

Your NCH Diploma To reflect the greater richness of your studies at the College, you will be awarded the NCH Diploma in addition to your University of London degree. The Diploma sets you apart from other graduates. It marks the greater breadth and richness of your education at the College.

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A more personal learning experience NCH offers unparalleled access to academic staff carefully selected for their expertise and passion for teaching. Our students experience one of the best student-to-staff ratios in UK higher education, with extra contact hours and personal guidance in all aspects of study and work including weekly one-to-one tutorials. Treating each student as an individual is central to the College’s ethos. Staff members are friendly, responsive and committed to building relationships with students, helping them to achieve their academic, personal and professional potential. You’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles with more than 12 quality contact hours each week, dedicated to your individual development. These include: ■ Lectures ■ Classes ■ Seminars ■ Small group tutorials ■ One-to-one tutorials

Having smaller groups in lectures, classes, seminars and tutorials ensures that all viewpoints are accommodated and discussed: there is no chance of one voice getting lost among many at the College. The teaching format of each contact hour is selected to ensure the most positive learning outcomes for that particular subject.

Lectures

One-to-one tutorials

Seminars

Professorial lectures

You will have regular one-to-one tutorials. In a one-to-one tutorial the tutor engages critically with you, entering into your individual point of view and working with you to clarify, challenge, defend and develop your arguments and ideas. You will prepare an essay for every one-to-one tutorial related to one of the degree modules you are studying during that term. Your essay will be the basis of your discussion with your tutor. This form of intellectual engagement is considered to be the gold standard for identifying and drawing out a student’s potential.

Seminars are the main teaching format for the Professional Programme. There are also regular seminars for the Law LLB and Economics BSc. Seminars take the form of small group discussions with a lecturer. You will prepare assignments for every seminar and will regularly submit a written presentation or make individual or group oral presentations in your seminars. The aim of your seminar is to give you an opportunity to develop your understanding, your ability and your writing skills. Seminars also enable lecturers to assess your progress and clarify difficult aspects.

Professorial lecture sessions typically last 90 minutes. Some form the core modules for the NCH Diploma, and are compulsory; some are subjectspecific, but open to all; and some are of general interest to all. From 2013 the College expects to offer approximately 100 professorial lectures in each academic year. Professorial lectures are generally scheduled so that no other lecture or tutorial clashes with them. To make the most of your time at the College, you are encouraged to attend as many of these lectures as possible.

Classes The Law LLB is suited to a mixture of contact hours in a small group environment. So, if you choose to study Law for your undergraduate degree, you will also have regular small group classes. Law classes are interactive lectures that take place in smaller groups of students. These are led by a lecturer and provide the opportunity for you to ask questions.

Small group tutorials Two to four students and your tutor will participate in your small group tutorials. You will be required to read in preparation for each of your small group tutorials and you will also present an argument for a certain number of them. These will be an opportunity for you to discuss and debate with your tutor and your fellow students and to give and receive both praise and constructive criticism.

You will participate in traditional style lectures for your degree, your contextual course and your core modules. Lectures at the College are more intimate than at most universities due to our smaller number of students. This ensures that everyone has the opportunity to participate.

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Careers Professional development

Around 60% of people at the top of their professions in various industries - including CEOs of FTSE 100 companies, top creative industries and professional services organisations and MPs - studied arts, humanities and social science degrees. Humanities and social sciences graduates do well in their careers because many of their skills translate directly to the capabilities you need to perform at a high level in the professional world: intellectual curiosity, building an argument (and understanding the strengths and weaknesses of contrary positions), presenting in a compelling and persuasive manner, understanding how relationships determine outcomes, synthesizing large volumes of data and, critically, valuing creativity and understanding the value that creativity can create. This is why humanities graduates find success in so many industries including media, law, industry, healthcare, accountancy and finance, public administration, civil service and defence, retail, education, business and management and the arts.

At NCH, alongside your academic programme, you will develop the attitudes and behaviours that will set you apart from other graduates, giving you an advantage both in seeking employment and making a good start in your first job. Every student participates in the College’s own Professional Programme which forms part of the NCH Diploma. The Professional Programme was inspired by research conducted by the CBI (Confederation of British Industry), which identified the gap between the level of employability of many UK graduates and the needs of employers. The programme develops in our students the basic capabilities essential for a wide range of different professions, including writing and presenting, numeracy and financial literacy, problem solving, the impact of technology, negotiation, self-management and working in teams.

Swatee Jasoria

Preparing for life beyond NCH

Your Professional Development Counsellor Preparing for the world beyond NCH is a task all students will face and one that the College takes very seriously. Whether or not you know exactly what career you want, the College’s Professional Development Counsellor, Swatee Jasoria, will work with you on a one-to-one basis to help you explore your options. Swatee will help you discover what you want to do by promoting self-reflection, focussing on your aptitudes and interests and providing you with individual support and advice, all in a confidential setting.

Work experience and internships In today’s job market and economic climate, networking, work experience and internships have become a vital part of the learning process and student experience. Swatee will guide you on how best to engage in successful networking so as to maximise opportunities to obtain relevant work experience and internships during your time here at NCH.

Be prepared to be recognized With a solid educational base and strong support, NCH will be the ideal place for you to start your career and have a competitive edge in today’s tough recruitment market. You can enter into almost any career, work abroad or stay in the UK, or even decide to pursue higher education and go on to do a postgraduate degree. The possibilities are endless! We are here to help you navigate them and ensure that you fulfil your career aspirations. In short, NCH will give you the best possible start to a successful career.

In addition, Swatee can assist you with CV and cover letter preparation, filling out application forms, interview preparation, psychometric testing and everything in between.

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Helping you make the most of London Lauren Gasser, our Student Support Adviser, will provide information, help secure discounted tickets and arrange social events. Whether it’s the Secret Cinema hosting monthly screenings in mysterious locations including hotels, boats and graveyards, or independent exhibitions and markets organised by London students, or literary themed party nights, Lauren’s knowledge of the London scene will help you make the most of your leisure time.

Clubs and music London’s social life is second to none. The city has a diverse club scene and much of the action is only a short walk from the Registry. London attracts all the big nationwide and international music tours, with major venues including the O2 hosting the world’s biggest acts.

Sport London has some of the finest sporting facilities in the world, having been enhanced in preparation for the 2012 Olympics. There’s Test Match cricket at the Oval and Lord’s, world-class tennis at Wimbledon, or the beautiful game at one of the five Premier League football clubs; you’ll never be short of quality sport to watch. If you’d rather be a participant, again you’re spoilt for choice. Wednesday afternoons are the focus for University sport and we keep the timetable clear for you to take part. There’s even real-snow skiing less than 30 minutes away by train.

On stage For performing arts, Shaftesbury Avenue and the theatre district are close by, offering modern, traditional and fringe theatre, tragedy and comedy, musicals and experimental shows.

On screen Independent and commercial cinemas thrive in London, with multiplexes and art houses both nearby. Many films are made in London. Senate House itself has been a location for The Hunger, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Spy Game, Sexy Beast and Batman Begins.

Shopping Nearby Oxford Street offers major stores and dozens of specialist shops. In the surrounding streets there is an ever-changing retail mix with dozens of designer boutiques, high street stores, and second-hand and vintage shops.

Get away If you want a break from the city, natural beauty is not far away, thanks to London’s transport links. Possibilities include Henley-on-Thames, a riverside market town, and the Chilterns, with attractive small towns such as Great Missenden and Princes Risborough. The ancient Roman city of Bath, the seaside resort of Brighton and even Paris are easily reached by train for a day trip or a weekend.

Culture on your doorstep For centuries, London has been a melting pot of cultural diversity. There’s a huge variety of ballet and opera houses, bookshops and libraries, art galleries and concert halls for all tastes and some of the finest museums in the world. The British Museum is only two minutes’ walk from the Registry.

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The College The Registry

Senate House Library

Built between 1776 and 1781 and nestled in the heart of Bloomsbury, elegant Bedford Square is one of the best-preserved examples of a Georgian architectural set piece in London and is home to the College Registry. The Registry is our main campus building. It is a Grade I listed five-storey town house, and home to most of the College’s teaching and administrative facilities.

Commissioned in 1931, Senate House Library is the federal library of the University of London, which was founded by Royal Charter in 1836. As the federal library it supports the nineteen colleges and academic institutions in the University and the wider research community. It is one of the top research libraries in the UK, particularly focused on the arts and humanities, and home to more than three million items.

Teaching facilities Most weekly one-to-one and small group tutorials take place in the building’s subject faculty rooms. The Registry also houses seminar rooms in which larger group classes take place. Teaching is also conducted in the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies’ facilities at Russell Square. The Institute’s modern, purpose-built teaching accommodation is iust 200 metres from the Registry.

The NCH Collection has its home in one of the most spacious and beautiful flagship reading rooms within the Senate House Library. The Collection contains classic texts and contemporary commentaries, and will be expanding year on year as the College grows. Senate House Library itself is the largest single-site humanities library in Europe. NCH students have full access to its print and digital services.

Area map

The Senior Common Room (SCR) on the first floor seats up to 90 people and is used for larger College events including Convocation, open days and lectures.

The Mews The two-storey Mews to the rear of the Registry is the social hub for our students. The first floor of the Mews houses the Junior Common Room (JCR). This is a place to chill out, eat lunch with friends or finish an assignment. It is a relaxing, personal space for our students. Below the JCR is additional multi-purpose space dedicated to our students. This is used by the NCH Student Union executive officers for meetings of various clubs and societies, and as an additional study room.

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Where will I live? Opal 3 The Arcade We selected this accommodation for its impressive shared flat facilities, high-quality security features and all-inclusive rent starting at £179.50 per week for 2012/13*. Your rent includes: ■ 10Mbps internet with IPTV ■ Utility bills ■ Flat screen Freeview LCD TV ■ 24/7 on-site laundrette ■ 24 hour on-site staff presence ■ American style fridge freezer 


All residents at Opal 3 The Arcade will benefit from Opal’s unique my Opal experience, with residents’ events where you can meet other NCH students and Opal residents from universities all over London. Bedrooms include: ■ Large study desk, chair and desk lamp ■ Large wardrobe ■ Under-bed storage
 ■ Bedside table ■ Pin board ■ Wash basin ■ Shelves


*Rent for 2013/14 will be confirmed in early 2013.

■ Laminate flooring

Where is it?

Kitchens include:

Opal 3 The Arcade is based just eight minutes’ walk from Holloway Road tube station (Piccadilly line), which is just three stops from Russell Square.

■ Flat screen Freeview LCD TV

Holloway Road is one of north London’s main shopping streets with a myriad of shops, vibrant bars, leisure facilities and a cinema on your doorstep.

■ Sofas and coffee table

What is it like? This newly refurbished development features new bedroom furniture, providing all you need to combine study with leisure time, including a study desk and chair, pin board, internet and wash basin in every room. Students will also benefit from the reassurance of 24 hour manned security with site-wide, high quality digital CCTV. Standard rooms are grouped together to form self-contained flats in clusters of five to six people. You’ll have a flat screen Freeview LCD TV in your kitchen; a spacious American style fridge freezer; two shower rooms and two toilets per flat and a laundrette open 24/7. 


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■ Fitted modern units with plenty of storage space ■ Dining table ■ Electric hob and oven ■ American style fridge freezer with ample space

for each person

■ Toaster, kettle and microwave ■ Iron and ironing board ■ Vacuum cleaner (available upon request

from reception)

■ Fire blanket and extinguishers provided in the

kitchen and smoke alarm in the hall

■ Bright feature wall

Bathrooms include: ■ Two shower rooms and two toilets per five to six

bedroom shared flat

■ Power showers

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Where will I live? Opal 4 Tufnell Park We selected this accommodation for its fantastic communal areas, hassle-free secure living and community feel, with an inclusive rent starting at £200.74 per week for 2012/13*. Your rent includes:

Bedrooms include: ■ Large study desk, chair and desk lamp ■ Wardrobe ■ Shelves ■ Bedside table ■ En-suite wet-room with toilet, shower and

wash basin

■ 10 Mbps broadband internet with IPTV

■ Timer controlled heating


■ Utility bills

■ Under-bed storage

■ Student contents insurance ■ 24 hour on-site staff presence ■ Common room ■ Cinema room ■ Landscaped courtyard with barbecue ■ Bicycle storage ■ Residents’ laundrette ■ Key fob entry to all rooms and throughout

the building

Kitchens/ Living areas include: ■ Lounge area with LCD flat-screen Freeview TV ■ Sofas and coffee table ■ Fitted kitchen with ample storage space ■ Oven and hob ■ Fridge freezer ■ Toaster, kettle and microwave ■ Breakfast bar with stools

■ Site-wide CCTV with video entry

■ Dining table and chairs

■ Secure lockable mailboxes and spy holes in

■ Iron and ironing board

■ Mop and bucket

your front door

■ Smoke detectors and high quality fire doors

throughout ■ Recycling facilities 
 *Rent for 2013/14 will be confirmed in early 2013.

■ Vacuum cleaner ■ Fire blanket and extinguishers provided

in the kitchen

■ Smoke detectors throughout

Where is it? Nestled between stylish Islington and leafy Hampstead and within easy reach of central London, this development provides a perfect base from which to explore the city. Tufnell Park is also just five minutes via tube to vibrant Camden Town, with its rich variety of shops, bars, restaurants and markets. Opal 4 Tufnell Park is based only five minutes’ walk from Tufnell Park tube station (Zone 2) and 11 minutes via tube to the College.

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Student support Lauren Gasser

Dedicated support As a student at NCH your experience is personal, not anonymous. All of our staff members are friendly, responsive and easy to contact. Lauren Gasser, our Student Support Adviser, along with the rest of our staff, helps you make the most of your time in London and all that the College has to offer. The opportunities are endless and include some of the best bars, clubs, restaurants, museums, galleries, concerts and theatres in the world. Lauren can help you with: ■ Finding accommodation ■ Living on a budget ■ Personal support and counselling ■ Information about religious observances ■ Museum and gallery exhibitions

We don’t just help you make the most of your social life. We are also here to assist with all of your questions and concerns. Whatever your worry, there is always someone here to help.

Friendships that last a lifetime The small size of the College’s student body means that we have a close-knit and supportive community of students. You’ll make friends with other students from your first day at the College during Freshers, at lectures and at NCH social events.

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NCH Student Union If you stay in the College’s recommended accommodation, you will be sharing a flat with other NCH students in a building that’s home to students from a variety of London colleges and universities. This gives you opportunities to build strong relationships with other students experiencing the same curriculum and academic environment, while expanding your network of friends to include students from the many other colleges and universities in London.

Your personal tutor Your personal tutor meets you about once a term, and is there to advise on your work, monitor your progress and offer help with issues.

Health Our students register with a very friendly GP practice and an equally friendly dental practice, both based in Holborn, just five minutes from NCH.

The NCH Student Union is the heart of the student body, run by elected union officers and supported by the Student Support Team. The Union exists to provide help, ideas and fun for everyone at the College. Union officers help plan social and extra curricular activities. They also express the opinions of all students and ensure that all voices are heard.

Sports clubs We already have College teams participating in badminton, football, parkour, real tennis, squash and target shooting. NCH students can also train with the ULU teams in the following sports: ■ Archery

■ Karate

■ Athletics

■ Lacrosse – Men

Highlights of the fun-filled programme of events planned by the NCHSU in the current academic year include the Hallowe’en Party, the Christmas Party, film nights in the JCR, Rebel Bingo and our ‘legendary’ pub quiz.

■ Capoiera

■ Polo

■ Cricket

■ Rifle

■ Fencing

■ Rowing

■ Football

■ Shaolin Kung Foo

■ Gymnastics

■ Snowsports

Societies

■ Hockey

■ Sub Aqua

■ Ice Hockey

■ Volleyball

■ Jujitsu

■ Waterpolo

■ Judo

■ Windsurfing

NCH students are encouraged to join one of our many clubs and societies or start their own. Societies are supported by the NCHSU, which can provide funding and general guidance. NCH already has a variety of societies with interests including art, drama, ethics, jazz, law and a newspaper.

Counselling Should you have any problems, the College’s student support team has received introductory training in counselling. In addition, Nightline provides confidential listening, support and practical information for students in London, and our GP also provides a counselling service.

Student union facilities

As students are registered with the University of London International Programmes, NCH students can become associate members of the University of London Union (ULU), which provides full access to ULU’s many facilities, clubs and events. This is currently £20 a year. NCH students can also join the NUS and have the opportunity to sign up for their NUS card during Freshers. The NUS card entitles students to discounts at a wide range of shops and services.

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Equality & diversity Equality & diversity policy The College is committed to providing an environment free from discrimination, bullying, harassment or victimisation, where all members of its community are treated with respect and dignity. It aims to create a culture of diversity within its community, providing a dynamic working and learning environment, where all members are valued for their contribution and individuality. We are committed to providing equality of opportunity for all, irrespective of: ■ Age ■ Disability ■ Ethnicity (including race, colour and nationality) ■ Gender (including gender reassignment,

marital status, pregnancy or maternity)

■ Religion or belief ■ Sexual orientation (including civil

partnership status)

Disability & accessibility We welcome applications from disabled students. The College will make reasonable adjustments to facilitate your access, including advice on, and support with, travel, physical access, special equipment for study and arrangements for examinations. We ask you to tell us about your disability on your application form, so that we can discuss your support needs from the outset. We will also discuss any arrangements that you might require for your interview. When you visit the College for your interview, you will have an opportunity to familiarize yourself with our facilities and services and to discuss your individual needs. We can provide relevant support if you have specific learning difficulties. These should be indicated on the application form and discussed at interview so that the necessary support can be made available before enrolment.

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International students The College welcomes the different perspectives that people from diverse backgrounds and countries can bring. We can assess almost any international qualifications for entry, and we can tell you whether they will allow you to enter the College. You will need to show that you have good written and spoken English. If your first language is not English, we will need evidence of your English ability. Please ask us for details. While we welcome international students, it is not yet clear whether NCH will be able to sponsor students who require international student visas for entry in 2013. We expect to have further information by early 2013. Please check our website for up to date information. You are welcome to apply now or you can discuss your situation with an Admissions Adviser on +44 (0) 20 7637 4550.

Economics “Studying Economics has never been more significant or timely, with the ongoing Eurozone crisis and the fallout of the recession seemingly endless. Economics relates to every aspect of our lives and it is impossible to understand the world in which we live without knowledge of the subject. The small classes that NCH offers students are a big draw to those looking at studying Economics. There is no chance of one voice getting lost among the many at the College.” Dr Marianna Koli

Faculty ■

Dr Marianna Koli BSc, Msc, PhD (University of Manchester), Convenor & Senior Lecturer

Dr Jungyoon Lee BA (Cantab), MSc, PhD (LSE), Lecturer

Dr Georgios Zouros BSc, MSc (Lond), PhD (LSE), Lecturer

Professors ■

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta BSc (Delhi), BA, MA, PhD (Cantab), FBA

Professor Niall Ferguson BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon)


Economics What is the course about?

Course structure

How will I be taught?

What contextual course can I study?

The course provides a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of economics. It begins with economic theory and the basic skills needed to make the most of the subject. Later, it goes into much greater depth, addressing policy issues and the use of economics in other spheres. When you study Economics, you will gain a detailed understanding of how the subject applies in the world economy and in daily life, and the ability to apply your understanding in your career. Over your three years, you will study 12 modules.

In your first year

Treating every student as an individual is central to the College’s ethos. You will have unparalleled access to highly qualified and experienced academic staff who are friendly, responsive and committed to helping you to achieve your academic, personal and professional potential.

In addition to your degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the Economics BSc (Hons) and the NCH Diploma.

You will study four modules: ■ Introduction to Economics ■ Statistics 1 (half module) ■ Statistics 2 (half module) ■ Mathematics 1 (half module) ■ Mathematics 2 (half module) ■ Introduction to International Development

■ Lectures in your degree subject

You will take a total of eight modules, four in each year. These will include the following three compulsory modules:

■ Lectures in your contextual subject

■ Elements of Econometrics

■ Macroeconomics

■ Seminars for the Professional Programme

■ Microeconomics

■ Lectures in the core modules

■ Economics of Labour ■ International Economics ■ Public Economics ■ International Political Economy ■ Managerial Economics ■ Economics of Development ■ Corporate Finance ■ Industrial Economics ■ Monetary Economics ■ Mathematical Economics ■ Economic Geography

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

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NCHum.org/economics

■ Art History NEW FOR 2013*

Studying the Economics BA, you’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles. These include:

In your second and third years

Plus five of the following modules:

Students of the Economics BSc can choose from:

■ One-to-one tutorials in your degree subject ■ Small group tutorials, classes and

seminars in your degree subject

■ Professorial lectures

How will I be assessed? Formative assessment is based mainly on your tutorial essays and your performance in small group tutorials. The marks awarded by NCH academic staff are for guidance only and will not contribute to your degree classification. You will study the University of London syllabus and your examinations will be set and marked by the University of London. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree.

■ Classical Studies NEW FOR 2013* ■ English ■ History ■ Law ■ Philosophy ■ Politics & International Relations ■ Philosophy & Politics (PPE Programme) ■ Psychology NEW FOR 2013*

These modules contextualize your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues.

How does the PPE programme work? If you choose to follow the College’s PPE programme, you will study two Philosophy modules and two Politics modules as your contextual course. You study two of these contextual modules in your first and second years at the College, in addition to your studies for the Economics BSc. Your grades for your contextual modules will contribute to your grade for the NCH Diploma. * Check our website for details.

In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules.

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Economics What do I need to get in? The College is flexible and admissions tutors look beyond grades using written work samples, references and interviews to assess each applicant’s potential to flourish in its rigorous academic environment. As a very general guide for students applying for the Economics BSc, the College typically seeks one of the following: ■ AAA at A-level including Mathematics -

undertaking an Extended Project may be an advantage

■ 36 points (including core points) in the IB Diploma, with a six at Higher Level in Mathematics ■ D3D3D3 in Pre-U ■ AAABB in Scottish Highers including Mathematics ■ Either SAT scores of 700 in each of Mathematics,

Critical Reading and Writing, or a score of 32 in ACT AND either three or more APTs at grade 5 or 700 in three appropriate SAT Subject Tests

■ We can assess most other comparable

international qualifications

To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements are likely to exceed these requirements in nearly every case, so this is not usually an issue.

Why would I choose Economics as my contextual subject? Studying Economics is an opportunity to learn how much of the world’s social systems work. A vast number of specialist fields in Economics are based on the basic theories you will learn at NCH, and you will explore many of these during your studies.

Syllabus To complete Economics as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you are required to take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year. First year ■ Introduction to International Development ■ Introduction to Economics: Macroeconomics

English

The modules that will be taught for Economics as a contextual subject will be confirmed in 2013.

Learning

“Studying English improves your perspicacity, articulacy, and engagement in life. It permanently increases your enjoyment of reading, and it makes you a more penetrating, sceptical and appreciative reader of everything from lyric poetry to literary criticism to newspaper articles to political speeches. This degree introduces you to some of the most complex and beautiful texts that have been written in the English language. It also introduces you to certain influential works of literature in translation, which allow you to place Anglophone literature in the context of European culture. As a graduate of this degree programme you will have a good intellectual and cultural basis for careers in areas such as teaching, journalism, media, politics, and Civil Service, amongst many others. You may also choose to continue to postgraduate study in English or another area of the arts and humanities.” Dr Catherine Brown

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Dr Catherine Brown BA (Cantab), MSc, MA (Lond), PhD (Cantab), Convenor & Senior Lecturer

Dr Charlotte Grant BA (Cantab), MA (Courtauld Institute), PhD (Cantab), Senior Lecturer

Dr Daniel Swift BA (Oxon), MA, MA, MPhil, PhD (Columbia University, NY), Senior Lecturer

Second year

Your lectures will be with students studying Economics for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their contextual course. Your grades for your Economics modules will contribute to your grade for the award of the NCH Diploma.

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Faculty

Professors ■

Professor Sir Christopher Ricks BA, MA, BLitt (Oxon), FBA

Howard Jacobson BA (Cantab)


English What is the course about?

Course structure

How will I be taught?

What contextual course can I study?

The English BA aims to develop your ability to engage with literature in English. Whilst the programme is carefully structured, you are also encouraged to pursue your own interests.

In your first year

■ Renaissance Comedy: Shakespeare & Jonson

In addition to your degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the English BA (Hons) and the NCH Diploma.

There are modules on American literature, Anglophone literature not originating in the British Isles or the United States (‘postcolonial’ literature), and genres such as drama.

Treating every student as an individual is central to the College’s ethos. You will have unparalleled access to highly qualified and experienced academic staff who are friendly, responsive and committed to helping you to achieve your academic, personal and professional potential.

For each non-dissertation module, you attend two lectures per week for 10 weeks and attend weekly one-to-one or small group tutorials.

You will study two modules from the following:

You study four modules: ■ Explorations in Literature ■ Approaches to Text ■ Introduction to English Language

In your second year ■ Literature of the Later Middle Ages
 ■ Renaissance & Restoration
 ■ Augustans & Romantics


Plus two modules: ■ Victorians
 ■ Moderns

In your third year You will study four modules: ■ American Literature ■ Drama since 1860 ■ The Novel
 ■ Postcolonial Literatures in English

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

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Studying the English BA, each week you’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles throughout the College’s dynamic programme of teaching including: ■ Four lectures in your degree subject ■ Two lectures in your contextual subject ■ One one-to-one tutorial in your degree subject ■ One small group tutorial ■ One seminar for the Professional Programme ■ Core subject lectures ■ Professorial lectures

How will I be assessed? Formative assessment is based mainly on your tutorial essays and your performance in small group tutorials. The marks awarded by NCH academic staff are for guidance only and will not contribute to your degree classification.

Students of the English BA can choose from: ■ Art History NEW FOR 2013* ■ Classical Studies NEW FOR 2013* ■ Economics ■ History ■ Law ■ Philosophy ■ Politics & International Relations ■ Psychology NEW FOR 2013*

These modules contextualize your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues. * Check our website for details.

You will study the University of London syllabus and your examinations will be set and marked by the University of London. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree. In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules.

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English What do I need to get in? The College is flexible and admissions tutors look beyond grades using written work samples, references and interviews to assess each applicant’s potential to flourish in its rigorous academic environment. As a very general guide for students applying for the English BA, the College typically seeks one of the following: ■ AAA at A-level including English - undertaking

an Extended Project may be an advantage

■ 36 points (including core points) in the IB

Diploma, with a six at Higher Level in English

■ D3D3D3 in Pre-U ■ AAABB in Scottish Highers including English ■ Either SAT scores of 700 in each of Mathematics,

Critical Reading and Writing, or a score of 32 in ACT AND either three or more APTs at grade 5 or 700 in three appropriate SAT Subject Tests

■ We can assess most other comparable

international qualifications

To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements are likely to exceed these requirements in nearly every case, so this is not usually an issue.

literary writers; the peculiar capacities and limitations of verbal art are underlined by its comparison with visual and sonic art; the peculiar capacities and limitations of the English language can be best appreciated by its comparison with other living languages; literature in English bears the marks of its influence by Classical literature; creative writers frequently show great penetration of human psychology and religious experience. Literary criticism demands and develops skills in close reading, including the identification of rhetorical, obfuscatory, and contradictory uses of language, which will enhance the accuracy and penetration of your reading of any kind of text. Reading English as your contextual subject broadens and deepens your culture, and makes you simultaneously a more demanding and more appreciative reader and auditor of the English language in use.

Syllabus To complete the English course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will be required to take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year. First year ■ Explorations in Literature ■ Renaissance Comedy: Shakespeare

Why would I choose English as my contextual subject? Literature concerns every aspect of human life. Therefore its study complements work in all other arts and humanities subjects. Your feel for historical period can be improved by reading its literature; philosophical ideas can be held in suspension in an aesthetic structure; your analysis of case law can be improved by an understanding of the structures of narrative; the economic and political behaviour of humans is often represented and reflected upon by

34

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and Jonson

Second year The modules that will be taught for English as a contextual subject will be confirmed in 2013.

Learning Your English lectures will be with students studying English for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their contextual course. Your grades for your English modules will contribute to your grade for the award of the NCH Diploma.

History “The study of history is one of the most lifeenriching pursuits in academia. History is the sum of human experience and the study of the human condition, of the great highs that humanity has achieved and of the great lows to which we have stooped. Studying history can take you from the lofty exploits of the Roman Empire to the bloody battles of the Crusades, or from the intellectual endeavours of the Enlightenment to the civil rights movement in 1960s America. It is an endlessly fascinating subject that demands analytical rigour, precision of thought, the capacity for empathy and the ability to communicate clearly - skills that mean it also prepares you well for the world of work beyond your degree. We hope and believe that you will find your History degree engaging, absorbing and enjoyable.” Dr Suzannah Lipscomb

Faculty ■

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb MA, MSt, DPhil (Oxon), Subject Convenor and Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History

Dr Hannah Dawson MA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab), Senior Lecturer in the History of Ideas

Dr Lars Kjaer BA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab), Lecturer in Medieval History

Professors ■

Professor Sir David Cannadine FBA, FRSL, FRHistS

Professor Niall Ferguson MA, DPhil (Oxon)

Dr Anthony Seldon MA (Oxon), PhD, FRSA, MBA, FRHistS


History What is the course about? The BA History course broadly offers the opportunity to study the history of the West Britain, Europe and America - from AD 300 to 1997, although two modules allow students a chance to explore non-Western history. The course approaches the past in all its guises: economic, political, social, cultural and intellectual history. The diverse subject matter ranges from an introduction to medieval history to the lives of eighteenth century women, and from the social and cultural history of sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe to twentieth century America. The first-year modules provide a general introduction to the subject and its methodology. In subsequent years, you will study your chosen areas in more detail. The BA History consists of 12 modules, studied over three years.

Course structure In your first year You study the following modules: ■ The Birth of Western Christendom, AD 300-1215 ■ The Rich Tapestry of Life: A Social & Cultural

History of Europe, c. 1500-1780

■ Republics, Kings & People: The Foundations

of Modern Political Culture

■ History & Meanings (half-module) ■ British Social & Economic History, 1945-97

(half-module)

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In your second year You will study: ■ British History, 1485-1649 ■ Modern Political Ideas

Plus two modules from: ■ British History 1770-1990 ■ Modern Times: International Economic History

c. 1901-1990

■ Twentieth-Century World History ■ US History Since 1877

How will I be taught?

What contextual course can I study?

Treating every student as an individual is central to the College’s ethos. You will have unparalleled access to highly qualified and experienced academic staff who are friendly, responsive and committed to helping you to achieve your academic, personal and professional potential.

In addition to your degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the History BA (Hons) and the NCH Diploma.

Studying the History BA, each week you’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles throughout the College’s dynamic programme of teaching including:

In your third year

■ Four lectures in your degree subject

You will study:

■ Two lectures in your contextual subject

■ The Crusades & the Eastern Mediterranean

■ One one-to-one tutorial in your degree subject

1095-1291

■ One small group tutorial

■ Experience, Culture & Identity: Women’s

■ One seminar for the Professional Programme

Lives in England 1688-c.1850

You will also study one Special Subject (a double module), for which you will write a 10,000-word dissertation in addition to your exams. You may choose from: ■ Blasphemy, Irreligion & the English

Enlightenment 1650-1720

■ Martin Luther King & the Civil Rights

Movement in the US

■ The Clash of Powers & Cultures:

Sino-American Relations During the Cold War Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

■ Core subject lectures ■ Professorial lectures

How will I be assessed? Formative assessment is based mainly on your tutorial essays and your performance in small group tutorials. The marks awarded by NCH academic staff are for guidance only and will not contribute to your degree classification. You will study the University of London syllabus and your examinations will be set and marked by the University of London. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree. In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules.

Students of the History BA can choose a contextual course from: ■ Art History NEW FOR 2013* ■ Classical Studies NEW FOR 2013* ■ Economics ■ English ■ Law ■ Philosophy ■ Politics & International Relations ■ Philosophy & Politics (PPH Programme) ■ Psychology NEW FOR 2013*

These modules contextualize your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues.

How does the PPH Programme work? If you choose to follow the College’s PPH programme, you will study two Philosophy modules and two Politics modules as your contextual course. You study two of these contextual modules in your first and second years at the College, in addition to your studies for the History BA. Your grades for your contextual modules will contribute to your grade for the NCH Diploma. * Check our website for details.

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37


History What do I need to get in? The College is flexible and admissions tutors look beyond grades using written work samples, references, personal statements and interviews to assess each applicant’s potential to flourish in its rigorous academic environment. As a very general guide for students applying for the History BA, the College typically seeks one of the following: ■ AAA at A-level including History - undertaking

Diploma, with a minimum six at Higher Level in History

■ D3D3D3 in Pre-U ■ AAABB in Scottish Highers including History ■ Either SAT scores of 700 in each of Mathematics,

The study of history complements all of the other degree subjects available at NCH. In each case, the study of history will set the scene for your degree studies, and introduce you to a way of using evidence and analyzing events that will enhance your understanding and prove, we believe, engaging, absorbing and enjoyable.

an Extended Project may be an advantage

■ 36 points (including core points) in the IB

Why would I choose History as my contextual subject?

Critical Reading and Writing, or a score of 32 in ACT AND either three or more APTs at grade 5 or 700 in three appropriate SAT Subject Tests

We can also assess most other comparable international qualifications. To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements exceed these requirements in nearly every case, so this is not usually an issue.

Syllabus To complete the History course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year. First year ■ The Rich Tapestry of Life: A Social &

Cultural History of Europe, c. 1500-1780

■ Republics, Kings & People: The

Foundations of Modern Political Culture

Second year The modules that will be taught for History as a contextual subject will be confirmed in 2013. Your lectures will be with students studying History for their undergraduate degree as well as fellow students studying the module as their contextual course. Your grades for your History modules will contribute to your grade for the award of the NCH Diploma.

Law “Studying Law at NCH will give you a high quality legal education delivered by established academics with the aim of encouraging individual development and intellectual ability. The Law programme aims to instill in each student an analytical approach to legal problems, clear thinking and the ability to develop coherent arguments and defend them. NCH students are distinguished from most other graduates by their broader intellectual perspective since, in addition to legal studies, they take core modules in Applied Ethics, Logic & Critical Thinking and Science Literacy. Students also study four modules in another degree subject and follow the College’s Professional Programme. The Law LLB is a Qualifying Law Degree recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board of England and Wales. If you decide not to develop a legal career, the knowledge and skills you have acquired are readily transferable to other fields of employment, including government, politics, finance and business.” Dr Tola Amodu

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Faculty ■

Dr Tola Amodu BA (Anglia Ruskin), LLM (Cantab), PhD (LSE), Convenor & Senior Lecturer

Professor Roger Halson LLB (Newcastle), MLitt (Oxon), Solicitors Finals (Nottingham Law School), Professor of Contract Law

Professor G R Sullivan LLB (Wales), LLM (London). Professor of Criminal Law Professors

Professor Ronald Dworkin QC BA (Harvard), BA (Oxon), MA (Yale), LLB (Harvard), FBA

Professor Adrian Zuckerman

Professor Barbara McDonald BA (Syd), LLB (Syd), LLM (Lond)

Geoffrey Robertson QC BA (Syd), LLB (Syd), BCL (Oxon)


Law What is the course about? This is the LLB degree in its traditional three-stage format. It provides you with a solid grounding in the concepts and frameworks of the English legal system, focusing on those core components necessary to help you to think like a lawyer. The LLB helps you to develop an understanding of the values and ideas within the legal system as a means to acquire the skills necessary to act effectively as professionals. The focus on the core substantive elements of legal reasoning will therefore be accompanied by a strong emphasis on critical thinking, research and communication skills. You will study a total of 12 modules.

You will also take two modules from the options below: ■ Administrative Law ■ Civil & Criminal Procedure ■ Commercial Law ■ Company Law ■ Criminology ■ EU Law (EU Law is a required course by the

professional bodies in England and Wales for the LLB as a Qualifying Law Degree)

■ Evidence ■ Family Law ■ History of English Law ■ International Protection of Human Rights

Course structure

■ Introduction to Islamic Law

In your first year

■ Public International Law

■ Labour Law

You will study four modules: ■ Common Law Reasoning & Institutions

In your third year

■ Criminal Law ■ Elements of the Law of Contract

You will take a further four modules, comprising the two remaining compulsory modules:

■ Public Law

■ Law of Trusts*

In your second year You will take two compulsory modules:

■ Jurisprudence & Legal Theory

■ Land Law*

And your choice of two modules from the list below:

■ Law of Tort*

■ Conflict of Laws ■ Intellectual Property ■ Succession ■ Dissertation *These modules are required for the Qualifying Law Degree.

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

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How will I be taught? The teaching of the Law LLB at the College focuses on your individual development through close personal contact with our highly qualified and experienced academic staff. You’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles, chosen to ensure that you experience the best possible learning environment for each module. In a typical week of Michaelmas and Hilary terms you will experience a dynamic programme of teaching that includes: ■ Lectures in your Law modules ■ Small group classes and seminars in your

Law modules

■ Lectures in your contextual subject ■ A seminar for the Professional Programme ■ Core module lectures

In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules. A Skills Portfolio must be submitted to the University of London in your third year to satisfy the requirements for obtaining a Qualifying Law Degree. If you plan to use your degree to pursue a career as a solicitor or barrister in a different jurisdiction (other than England and Wales), you need to check the rules for that jurisdiction, especially required modules and other points, such as the maximum number of times that you can sit the examinations. It will be your responsibility to meet these requirements, so you should check with the regulator in the jurisdiction where you hope to qualify as a lawyer before you apply.

■ Professorial lectures

What contextual course can I study?

How will I be assessed?

In addition to your degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the Law LLB (Hons) and the NCH Diploma. Students of the Law LLB can choose from:

Formative assessment is based mainly on your seminar presentations, your essays and your answers to problematic questions or discussion pieces in your seminars and classes. The marks awarded by NCH academic staff are for guidance only and will not contribute to your degree classification. Summative assessment is provided in each subject by a three-hour unseen written paper examination set and marked by the University of London. The LLB requires you to pass all of the examinations for each part or stage in a single examination sitting. If you fail one or more of the examinations in a part or stage, you will be required to take all the examinations for that part or stage again. You can sit the examinations a maximum of four times. You will study the University of London syllabus, and your examinations will be set and marked by the University. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree.

■ Art History NEW FOR 2013* ■ Classical Studies NEW FOR 2013* ■ Economics ■ English ■ History ■ Philosophy ■ Politics ■ Psychology NEW FOR 2013*

These modules contextualize your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues. * Check our website for details.

NCHum.org/law

41


Law What do I need to get in? The College is flexible and admissions tutors look beyond grades using written work samples, references, personal statements and interviews to assess each applicant’s potential to flourish in its rigorous academic environment. As a very general guide for students applying for the Law LLB, the College typically seeks one of the following:

Why would I choose Law as my contextual subject? Law as a contextual subject provides an induction to some of the principles used in the subject. You will engage with some of the concepts and will gain a basic knowledge of the legal framework as it applies in some legal subjects.

■ AAA at A-level - undertaking an Extended

First year

■ Common Law Reasoning & Institutions

Project may be an advantage

■ 36 points (including core points) in the IB

Diploma, with six at Higher Level

■ Elements of the Law of Contract

■ D3D3D3 in Pre-U

Second year

■ AAABB in Scottish Highers

The modules that will be taught for Law as a contextual subject will be confirmed in 2013.

■ Either SAT scores of 700 in each of Mathematics,

Critical Reading and Writing or a score of 32 in ACT, AND either three or more APTs at grade 5 or 700 in three appropriate SAT Subject Tests

We can also assess most other comparable international qualifications. To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements exceed these requirements in nearly every case, so this is not usually an issue.

Learning Your lectures will be with students studying Law for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their contextual course. Your grades for your Law modules will contribute to your grade for the award of the NCH Diploma.

Philosophy “The study of philosophy draws you into conversation with some of the most searching, creative and influential thinkers of the past two-and-a-half thousand years. What is reality? What is justice? What is beauty? What is the relationship between the mind and the world? In considering these questions you will be asked not only to interpret, but also to participate - to analyze and assess the ideas and arguments of others and to formulate and defend your own. This will demand rigour and imagination from you, and the course will develop your clarity, depth and independence of thought. Philosophical questions arise at the limits of other disciplines, so philosophy is connected in myriad ways with other subjects at the College. It is hoped that you will take opportunities to discover and explore such connections not only in lectures and tutorials but also informally with faculty and with each other.” Dr Naomi Goulder

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Faculty ■

Professor A C Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA, Master of the College

Professor Ken Gemes BA (Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh), Professor of Philosophy

Dr Naomi Goulder BA, MA (Cantab), PhD (Lond), Convenor & Senior Lecturer

Dr David Mitchell BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon), MSc (LSE), Senior Lecturer

Professor Simon May

Professors ■

Professor Simon Blackburn BA, MA, PhD (Cantab)

Professor Daniel C Dennett BA (Harvard), DPhil (Oxon)

Professor Rebecca Goldstein BA (Columbia), PhD (Princeton)

Professor Nicholas Humphrey BA, MA, PhD (Cantab)

Professor Christopher Peacocke BA, BPhil, DPhil (Oxon)


Philosophy What is the course about?

Course structure

How will I be taught?

What contextual course can I study?

The course provides a thorough grounding in the central debates of philosophy. In the first year all students are introduced to core topics in ethics, the theory of knowledge and logic. In later years, optional modules enable you to focus on areas such as philosophy of mind, political philosophy and aesthetics.

In your first year

Treating every student as an individual is central to the College’s ethos. You will have unparalleled access to highly qualified and experienced academic staff who are friendly, responsive and committed to helping you to achieve your academic, personal and professional potential.

In addition to your degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the Philosophy BA (Hons) and the NCH Diploma.

Over the full three years, you take 11 modules and write a dissertation. For each non-dissertation module, you attend two lectures per week for 10 weeks and attend weekly one-to-one or small group tutorials.

In your second year

You will take the following four modules: ■ Introduction to Philosophy ■ Epistemology ■ Ethics: Historical Perspectives ■ Logic

You will take four of the following modules: ■ Ethics: Contemporary Perspectives ■ Greek Philosophy: Plato & the Pre-Socratics ■ Modern Philosophy: Descartes, Locke, Berkeley

& Hume

■ Two lectures in your contextual subject ■ One one-to-one tutorial in your degree subject ■ One small group tutorial

■ Methodology: Induction, Reason & Science

■ One seminar for the Professional Programme

You will write a Compulsory Dissertation and take three of the following modules: ■ Aesthetics ■ Continental Philosophy: Hegel, Schopenhauer

& Nietzsche

■ Greek Philosophy: Aristotle ■ Modern Philosophy: Spinoza, Leibniz & Kant ■ Philosophy of Language ■ Philosophy of Mind ■ Philosophy of Religion ■ Political Philosophy

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

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■ Four lectures in your degree subject

■ Metaphysics

In your third year

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Studying the Philosophy BA, each week you’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles throughout the College’s dynamic programme of teaching including:

■ Core subject lectures ■ Professorial lectures

How will I be assessed? Formative assessment is based mainly on your tutorial essays and your performance in small group tutorials. The marks awarded by NCH academic staff are for guidance only and will not contribute to your degree classification. At the end of term, you will have a Collection in which you will receive verbal feedback from all of your Philosophy tutors. Your summative assessment for all modules except the dissertation will be by examinations in the Trinity term. Summative marks contribute to your degree classification. Exams typically last two hours and papers are set and marked by the University of London. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree. In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules.

Students of the Philosophy BA can choose a contextual course from: ■ Art History NEW FOR 2013* ■ Classical Studies NEW FOR 2013* ■ Economics ■ English ■ History ■ Law ■ Philosophy ■ Politics & International Relations ■ Economics & Politics (PPE Programme) ■ History & Politics (PPH Programme) ■ Psychology & Politics (PPP Programme)

NEW FOR 2013*

■ Psychology NEW FOR 2013*

These modules contextualize your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues.

How does the PPE programme work? If you choose to follow the College’s PPE programme, you will study two Economics modules and two Politics modules as your contextual course, in addition to your studies for the Philosophy BA.

How does the PPH programme work? If you choose to follow the College’s PPH programme, you will study two History modules and two Politics modules as your contextual course, in addition to your studies for the Philosophy BA.

* Check our website for details.

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Philosophy What do I need to get in? The College is flexible and admissions tutors look beyond grades using written work samples, references, personal statements and interviews to assess each applicant’s potential to flourish in its rigorous academic environment. As a very general guide for students applying for the Philosophy BA, the College typically seeks one of the following: ■ AAA at A-level - undertaking an Extended

Project may be an advantage

Why would I choose Philosophy as my contextual subject? Philosophical questions arise at the limits of other disciplines, so philosophy is connected in myriad ways with other subjects at the College. It is hoped that you will take opportunities to discover and explore such connections not only in lectures and tutorials, but also informally with faculty and with each other.

■ 36 points (including core points) in the IB

Diploma, with six at Higher Level

■ D3D3D3 in Pre-U ■ AAABB in Scottish Highers ■ Either SAT scores of 700 in each of Mathematics,

Critical Reading and Writing, or a score of 32 in ACT AND either three or more APTs at grade 5 or 700 in three appropriate SAT Subject Tests

We can also assess most other comparable international qualifications. To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements exceed these requirements in nearly every case, so this is not usually an issue.

Syllabus To complete the Philosophy course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year. ■ Introduction to Philosophy ■ Ethics: Historical Perspectives ■ Epistemology

Politics & International Relations

NCHum.org/philosophy

Professor A C Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA, Master of the College

Dr Hannah Dawson MA, MPhil, PhD (Cantab), Senior Lecturer in the History of Ideas

■ Modern Philosophy: Descartes, Locke,

Berkeley & Hume

Learning Your lectures will be with students studying Philosophy for their undergraduate degree as well as your fellow students studying the module as their contextual course. Your grades for your Philosophy modules will contribute to your grade for the NCH Diploma.

“Politics is both an art and a science. Your study of ‘the art of the possible’ offers insights into how humans live together, how they use power and how it is used on them, as citizens of countries and of the world. You will explore freedom and tolerance, justice and democracy, and their limits. International relations broadens your outlook to consider policies that transcend lines on the map, where terrorism, the environment, trade, hunger and high finance all play their parts. You will compare the strategies of nations and learn to see the bigger picture in the day-to-day actions of governments and peoples.” Professor A C Grayling

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Faculty

Professors ■

Professor Sir Partha Dasgupta BSc (Delhi), BA, MA, PhD (Cantab), FBA, FAAAS

Professor Vernon Bogdanor CBE BA, MA (Oxon), FBA, Visiting Professor


Politics & International Relations What is the course about?

Course structure

How will I be taught?

What contextual course can I study?

Politics is the study of the forms and methods of organisation by which societies manage their collective life. It addresses questions about the relation between individuals and the state, the source of state authority, forms of government, the institutions and constitutions of political society, and the aims and values that these latter are intended to serve. There are two aspects to any formal study of politics: ‘political philosophy’ looks at theories of the best organisation of society in the light of the values regarded as best for their members, while ‘political science’ looks at institutions, constitutions, power, systems and associated matters.

In your first year

Treating every student as an individual is central to the College’s ethos. You will have unparalleled access to highly qualified and experienced academic staff who are friendly, responsive and committed to helping you to achieve your academic, personal and professional potential.

In addition to your degree studies, you will study four modules in another degree subject as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum leading to the dual award of the Politics & International Relations BSc(Hons) and the NCH Diploma.

International Relations is the study of the interactions between states both historically and in the present. It examines intergovernmental and non-governmental cross-state relations, and takes into account the economic, diplomatic, trading, military and ideological factors that influence the way states and international non-governmental agencies behave with respect to one another. The University of London degree provides a thorough introduction to both Politics and International Relations, and explores the connections between them.

You will study four modules: ■ Introduction to International Relations ■ Introduction to Modern Political Thought ■ Introduction to Political Science ■ Introduction to International Development

You will study a further four modules:

Studying the Politics & International Relations BA, each week you’ll enjoy a varied but integrated range of teaching and learning styles throughout the College’s dynamic programme of teaching including:

■ Comparative Politics

■ Four lectures in your degree subject

In your second year

■ International Political Theory ■ Nationalism & International Relations ■ Democracy & Democratization

■ Two lectures in your contextual subject ■ One one-to-one tutorial in your degree subject ■ One small group tutorial ■ One seminar for the Professional Programme ■ Core module lectures

In your third year You will study four modules from a range of courses, which are likely to include: ■ World History Since 1945 ■ Global Environmental Problems & Politics ■ Economics of Development ■ Public Economics ■ Public Law

Depending upon staffing and faculty availability, not all modules will necessarily be available in all years. All programme structures are subject to confirmation in the 2013-2014 Programme Regulations to be published by the University of London. University of London International Programmes syllabus reproduced with permission.

■ Professorial lectures

Students of the Politics & International Relations BSc can choose from: ■ Art History NEW FOR 2013* ■ Classical Studies NEW FOR 2013* ■ Economics ■ English ■ History ■ Law ■ Philosophy ■ Economics & Philosophy (PPE Programme) ■ History & Philosophy (PPH Programme) ■ Psychology & Philosophy (PPP Programme)

NEW FOR 2013*

How will I be assessed?

■ Psychology NEW FOR 2013*

Formative assessment is based mainly on your tutorial essays and your performance in small group tutorials. The marks awarded by NCH academic staff are for guidance only and will not contribute to your degree classification.

These modules contextualize your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues.

You will study the University of London syllabus and your examinations will be set and marked by the University of London. On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded a University of London degree. In order to be awarded an honours degree, you are required to have been examined in, and to have completed to the satisfaction of the University of London, the equivalent of 12 full modules.

How does the PPE programmes work? If you choose to follow the College’s PPE programme, you will study two Economics modules and two Philosophy modules as your contextual course, in addition to your studies for the Politics & International Relations BSc.

How does the PPH programme work? If you choose to follow the College’s PPH programme, you will study two History modules and two Politics modules as your contextual course, in addition to your studies for the Politics & International Relations BSc. * Check our website for details.

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NCHum.org/politics

NCHum.org/politics

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Politics & International Relations What do I need to get in? The College is flexible and admissions tutors look beyond grades using written work samples, references, personal statements and interviews to assess each applicant’s potential to flourish in its rigorous academic environment. As a very general guide for students applying for the Politics & International Relations BSc, the College typically seeks one of the following: ■ AAA at A-level - study in History and

undertaking an Extended Project may be an advantage

■ 36 points (including core points) in the IB

Diploma, with six at Higher Level In History

Why would I choose Politics as my contextual subject? To complete the Politics course as a contextual component of your NCH Diploma, you will take four modules: two in your first year and two in your second year.

Syllabus The University of London degree provides a thorough introduction to both Politics and International Relations, and explores the connections between them. First year

■ D3D3D3 in Pre-U

■ Political Concepts & Theories

■ AAABB in Scottish Highers, including History

■ Democratic Government & Politics

may be an advantage

■ Either SAT scores of 700 in each of Mathematics,

Critical Reading and Writing, or a score of 32 in ACT AND either three or more APTs at grade 5 or 700 in three appropriate SAT Subject Tests

We can also assess most other comparable international qualifications. To enrol for the University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the University of London entrance requirements. In practice the College’s entrance requirements exceed these requirements in nearly every case, so this is not usually an issue.

(half module)
 (half module)

■ Republic, Kings & People: The Foundation

of Modern Political Culture

Second year The modules that will be taught for Politics & International Relations as a contextual subject will be confirmed in 2013.

Learning Your lectures will be with students studying Politics & International Relations for their undergraduate degree as well as fellow students studying the module as their contextual course. Your grades for your Politics modules will contribute to your grade for the NCH Diploma.

NCH Diploma “In addition to your degree studies, you will study seven further modules as part of the College’s broader liberal arts curriculum. This includes four modules from another degree syllabus, our three core modules of Applied Ethics, Logic & Critical Thinking, and Science Literacy, and the College’s Professional Programme. These courses contextualise your learning in your degree subject and are of particular interest to students whose interests and talents span different subject areas and issues, and who have curious questioning minds and a thirst for knowledge.” Professor Ken Gemes

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NCHum.org/politics

Faculty ■

Professor Ken Gemes BA (Syd), PhD (Pittsburgh), Convenor for Core Modules

Professor A C Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRSL, FRSA, Master of College

Matthew Batstone MA (Cantab), MBA (INSEAD)

Visiting Professors ■

Professor Richard Dawkins BA, MA, DPhil (Oxon), FRS, FRSL

Professor Lawrence Krauss BSc (Carleton), DPhil (MIT)

Professor Peter Singer BA, MA, (Melbourne), BPhil (Oxon)

Professor Simon May


Core Modules All students at the College study three compulsory core modules in addition to their other undergraduate studies. Your studies in these modules will contribute to your grade for the NCH Diploma which is awarded alongside your degree.

Applied Ethics The aim of this module is to introduce you to the principal theories of ethics including their historical and conceptual foundations, and to explore their application to important questions in private and public life. The module covers: ■ Theories of ethics ■ Problems and debates in business ethics

Professional Programme Logic & Critical Thinking The aim of this module is to introduce the methods and principles of good reasoning. It will develop the ability to identify truth-preserving patterns of argument, evaluate evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. The module covers: ■ Concepts and techniques of formal logic ■ The tropes of informal logic ■ Critical thinking

Professor A C Grayling and Professor Ken Gemes teach this module through participative lectures.

Science Literacy

■ Public ethics


The aim of this module is to develop an intelligent insight into central areas of science. This module is designed for non-scientists and requires minimal mathematical skills. This module covers:

■ Civil liberties and human rights


■ Cosmology

■ The nature of the good and the good life

■ Fundamental Physics

■ Environmental ethics
 ■ Medical ethics

Professor A C Grayling, Professor Peter Singer and Dr Naomi Goulder teach the Applied Ethics module through participative lectures.

■ Biological Evolution ■ Genetics ■ Human Evolution and Dispersion

Professor Richard Dawkins FRS and Professor Lawrence M Krauss teach this module through participative lectures.

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Every student participates in the College’s Professional Programme which forms part of the NCH Diploma. This was inspired by research conducted by the CBI (Confederation of British Industry), which identified the gap between the level of employability of many UK graduates and the needs of employers. Part of the module is project based, and in addition there will be guest lecturers from both the business sector and public service. The Convenor for the Professional Programme is Matthew Batstone MA (Cantab), MBA (INSEAD). The programme develops the basic capabilities essential for a wide range of different professions, including writing and presenting, numeracy and financial literacy, problem solving, the impact of technology, negotiation, self-management and working in teams. The Professional Programme is designed to prepare you for the world of work and aims to give you a head start and a competitive edge in finding enjoyable and rewarding work after graduation. We intend it to be stimulating and enjoyable as well as useful.

Syllabus The programme is taught through seminars, projects and assignments in all three years. It includes topics such as: ■ Writing and presenting ■ Negotiation ■ Financial literacy ■ Working in teams ■ Marketing ■ Research methods ■ Entrepreneurship and innovation ■ Core principles of strategy, planning

and decision-making

■ Statistics ■ Technology and the world of work ■ Project Management

Learning The combination of teaching by practitioners, with a one-to-one and small group focus, and its development as a result of close collaboration with industry, make this programme unique in the UK.

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How to apply

What happens after you apply?

The College is not part of UCAS and your application can be made directly to the College in addition to your five UCAS choices. Your first step in applying to the College is to complete and submit our application form online.

Our Admissions Advisers are dedicated to ensuring that your application is processed swiftly. You are welcome to call or email at any point to get an update on the progress of your application.

Places to study at the College and financial awards are limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis, so we recommend that you apply early to have the greatest chance of an offer and an Exhibition or Scholarship. For details of the latest deadlines, please contact us.

After you have completed your application, we will contact your referee to request a written reference, along with predicted grades for any future examinations. We will also ask you to submit a recent sample of your written work. Once your application is complete, it will be passed to the admissions tutor for your chosen course who will review it and decide whether to invite you for an interview.

Our Admissions Advisers are happy to talk to you informally before you apply. This is not part of the selection process, so feel free to call for a chat or email any questions.

Your interview Two of our academic staff will meet you for the interview. They will want to find out if you have the intellectual capability, knowledge and potential to flourish at the College. You will have plenty of time to ask our Admissions Advisers any questions you may have and to take a tour of the Registry. You are welcome to bring your parents, a friend or other adviser with you. They are also welcome to discuss any questions or concerns with our admissions staff, although they cannot join you for the academic interview.

We welcome the full range of qualifications for entry But remember: ■ You need to meet the University of London minimum

entrance requirements (this is not usually an issue if you meet the College’s entry requirements)

■ You should usually be at least 18 years old on the first

day of your first term (please contact us if you will be under 18); there is no upper age limit

■ Individual course requirements may vary, so please

check the individual page for your course, or our website for the most up to date information

■ You must be fully competent in English and if English is

not your first language we may require you to take a test in English language such as IELTS or TOEFL

If you are over 21, you are just as welcome as younger students. We consider your application on its merits. We can help by being flexible on entry requirements.

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Fees Broadening participation New College of the Humanities is open to all students of high ability, from any background. We have a strong commitment to maintaining accessibility to higher education and in particular the study of the humanities. The College’s Scholarships and Exhibitions ensure that finance should not be a barrier to any talented student who wants to apply. More than a third of NCH students in 2012 had all or most of their fees paid for them through a Scholarship or an Exhibition. As an independent college, NCH does not receive government funding. We have three fee levels. 1. Full fees are £18,000 per year 2. Exhibitions are £7,200 per year 3. Scholars pay no fees Tuition fees are the same for UK, EU and international students. Fees include: ■ Expert tuition, including small group teaching

and at least 12 hours’ contact time each week

Scholarships & Exhibitions Other costs such as accommodation, books, stationery, computers, optional summer school, optional University of London Union subscription (currently £20 a year), University examination fees, personal expenses, food, entertainment and pocket money are not included.

Deposit All students, with the exception of Scholars, pay a deposit of £2,500. The deposit is payable when you submit your College registration form. It can be paid by bank transfer or by debit or credit card.

Paying fees You can choose from a range of payment options for fees: ■ You can pay fees termly by credit or debit card ■ You can choose our monthly instalment plan ■ You can benefit from a 1% allowance for

Scholarships Scholarships are means tested and will be awarded on the basis of academic merit. They cover the full cost of tuition over a full three-year undergraduate programme of study at the College (nil fees) and the cost of College and University examination fees. To apply for a Scholarship you will need to complete a financial questionnaire. Applicants will need excellent academic qualifications and references (usually at least one A* predicted at A-Level, or the equivalent for other qualifications).

Exhibitions

All students who apply to NCH will be automatically assessed for an Exhibition. You do not need to apply separately. They are not means tested and there is no need to complete a financial questionnaire.

Government funding We are working to gain approval for our students to be entitled to loans and grants through Student Finance England. It is not yet certain of whether these will be available for the 2013/14 academic year. Please check our website for up to date information.

Exhibitions are based solely on academic excellence and the potential to excel during your time at NCH. Exhibitions are worth £10,800 a year, reducing the total fees to only £7,200 a year - a net fee lower than almost all UK universities.

payment one year in advance

■ You can benefit from a 3% allowance for

payment three years in advance

Full details of payment amounts and schedules are available at NCHum.org

■ Preparation for the NCH Diploma in addition to

your undergraduate degree

■ Student and pastoral support from a dedicated

team of staff

■ The University of London application handling

fee and initial registration fee

■ Library subscription ■ Careers services ■ College examination fees ■ Some study materials

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University of London entrance requirements To enrol for a University of London degree, you will have to produce evidence that you meet the following requirements: ■ Normally be at least 17 years old ■ Satisfy the General Entrance Requirements ■ Satisfy the relevant Specific Course Requirements

University of London general entrance requirements These are minimum University of London requirements and in practice, if you meet the College’s entry requirements, you are almost certain to meet the University’s minimum requirements. ■ EITHER passes in two subjects at GCE A-level + at least three further subjects at GCSE or GCE O-level (at not less than grade C or a ‘pass’ if taken prior to 1975) ■ OR three subjects at GCE A-level (with one A-level at not less than grade D) ■ OR three subjects at GCE A-level + one further subject at GCSE or GCE O-level (at not less than grade C) ■ OR two subjects at GCE A-level + two further subjects at AS-level

Notes 1. In all instances where an A-level examination is specified, two AS-level examinations can be accepted as equivalent to, and will replace, one A-level. 2. 3. 4.

The same subject may only be offered once and at one level. There are many other acceptable qualifications both from the UK and overseas that the University of London will accept instead of British GCSEs and A-levels. Please ask us for details. A Graduate Entry Route may be available if you already hold a full first degree. Please ask us for details.

5. The University has a Special Admissions Panel that will consider an application from you if either: ■ You have passed examinations that would give you admission to an acceptable university outside the UK, or ■ You have obtained an appropriate qualification/s other than a degree from an acceptable institution, or ■ You have a professional qualification/s (gained by examination) that admits you to membership of an acceptable professional body, or ■ If you do not meet the normal minimum age requirement for registration.

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Special Admissions Panel The Special Admissions Panel considers every aspect of the application including all qualifications, relevant work experience and reasons for study. You are asked to note, however, that applications are rarely accepted on the basis of extensive/ relevant work experience alone. Evidence of a qualification obtained since leaving secondary/high school is also invariably required. Having considered your application, the Panel may decide that you must obtain an additional qualification(s) before an offer of registration for the University of London International Programmes can be made.

Prospectus This document is prepared ahead of the academic period to which it relates in order that potential applicants can have an overview of the programme for which they are applying. As a result, some changes are inevitable, such as courses being amended or certain fees that students are required to pay increasing. NCH reserves the right to make such alterations or amendments as necessary. The information it contains is correct at the date of publication (November 2012).

These requirements are in addition to the General Entrance Requirements.

Any offer of a place is made on the basis of current terms and conditions, and it is important that you are aware of these terms before accepting your offer. If you are unclear about any of the terms or conditions you must ask an Admissions Adviser before you confirm your acceptance. By accepting a place at NCH you are agreeing to abide by the rules and regulations of New College of the Humanities Ltd. This document is for guidance only and does not form part of any contract. It is subject to change without notice.

For all courses:

© New College of the Humanities 2012.

Note: the College’s requirements are significantly higher than these; if English is not your first language, please ask us for details. University of London Specific Course Requirements

Have either passed GCSE/GCE O-level in English Language at Grade C or above, or, within the last three years, have passed at the required standard a test of proficiency in English that is recognised by the University of London; for example, International English Language Testing System (IELTS) when an overall score of at least 6 is achieved with a minimum of 5.5 in each sub-test; or Test in English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 580 plus the Test of Written English (TWE) with a score of 4.5.

■ Some other tests of English proficiency are acceptable; please ask us for details. Additional requirement for BSc Economics: ■ Demonstrate competence at least equivalent to a pass in the GCSE/GCE O-level at Grade C or above in Mathematics. (Note: the College requires at least A-level Mathematics) Additional requirement for BA English: ■ Demonstrate competence at least equivalent to a pass in the GCE A-level in English.


Term Dates for 2013/14 Freshers 18-22 September 2013 Michaelmas Term 23 September - 13 December 2013 Hilary Term 6 January - 28 March 2014 Trinity Term 28 April - 13 June 2014

Term Dates for 2014/15 Freshers 17-21 September 2014 Michaelmas Term 22 September - 12 December 2014 Hilary Term 5 January - 27 March 2015 Trinity Term 27 April - 12 June 2015

19 Bedford Square London WC1B 3HH United Kingdom www.NCHum.org info@NCHum.org +44 (0) 20 7637 4550

November 2012


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