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SEA CHANGE WHERE TO DINE

FROM CATFISH TO TROUT, CEVICHE TO SUSHI, OYSTERS TO OCTOPUS, HERE ARE SOME OF THE BEST SPOTS FOR DEVOURING GREEN COUNTRY’S BRINY BOUNTY

W H AT TO D O

WHERE TO FIND IT

WHEN IT’S HAPPENING

NOVEMBER 2018

CREATIVE CHEMISTRY

SOAPMAKING IS INSPIRING HANDMADE-MOVEMENT ENTHUSIASTS AND ENTREPRENEURS

BRUSHES WITH FAME

JOHN HAMMER’S COMMISSIONED WORK CONTINUES TO BE HIGHLY COVETED

SILVERY SALVATION 25 CLEVER USES FOR DUCT TAPE

Embrace the seasonal change and Thanksgiving with our guide to get you over some common hurdles

PREVIEW918.COM

KITCH POP CULTURE EXPO ELMER’S BBQ VILLAGE INN WHITE CHRISTMAS JUSTIN THOMPSON

J U S T V I S I T I N G ? L I V I N G LO C A L? W E ’ V E G OT YO U C OV E R E D.


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Roller Coaster

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Bumper Cars

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Spring Town

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Mini-Bowling

Lost in Space

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XD Theater

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Glow Golf

Frog Hopper

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Go-Karts

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Laser Tag

Choco Cups

All-You Can-Eat Buffet

8314 E. 71st Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 I 918-294-8671 www.lncrediblePizza.com


M FROM THE MAYOR As mayor of Tulsa, it is my honor to welcome you to our great city. Whether you’re visiting, or have deep roots here, I invite you to take time to explore our beautiful city and discover all the things that set us apart from other cities.

Tough bike racing, the Tulsa Run, the Route 66 Marathon and the NCAA basketball tournament. The Tulsa area offers more than 80 miles of pedestrian and bicycle trails for a great way to see Tulsa.

I highly recommend Preview 918 as your go-to guide to navigate our incredible city. For more than 30 years, Preview has covered the 918, offering Tulsans and visitors alike the inside scoop to area restaurants and cafés, lodging, local attractions and events, world-class entertainment venues, tourist destinations and unique shopping venues that are bound to please and delight. Our city is home to the world’s greatest collection of western art at the Gilcrease Museum as well as Italian Renaissance displays at the Philbrook Museum. It’s a treasure trove for lovers of architecture from mid-century modern housing to the downtown Art Deco District and our iconic BOK Center, designed by the internationally acclaimed architect César Pelli.

Tulsa is also a city on the move. In 2018, we opened the Gathering Place. The Gathering Place is a world class riverfront park designed to welcome all to a vibrant and inclusive public space that engages, educates and excites. I’m pleased so many of you have made your home in Tulsa. If you’re visiting our city, please enjoy your stay here. I also want to invite you to come back often to experience opportunities you won’t find anywhere else. In the meantime, you can find out more about Tulsa by visiting cityoftulsa.‌org.

Sports spectators can look to the University of Tulsa or Oral Roberts University athletic programs, Tulsa Oiler hockey games, and Tulsa Roughnecks soccer. Or, time a visit to coincide with special events, such as Tulsa

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | DIRECTOR OF BRAND AND STRATEGY Chris Greer chrisg@previewgreencountry.com MANAGING EDITOR/ SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Michele Chiappetta michele@previewgreencountry.com CREATIVE DIRECTORS Jared Hood jared@previewgreencountry.com Beth Rose beth@previewgreencountry.com

4 N0VEMBER 2018

PREVIEW918.COM

For over 30 years, Preview 918 magazine has been the best resource for discovering Tulsa, Green Country and locating the perfect place to eat, visit, shop and be entertained, whether you are here on business or just enjoying a few days away from the grind. Located in the heart of Oklahoma, Tulsa is a year-round destination for shopping, dining, entertainment, scenic views, hikes and adventure. The rich history of Tulsa and its surrounding areas is reflected in the diversity of its museums, landmarks, history, wildlife, attractions, fine dining and friendly locals. In Tulsa, situated on the Arkansas River at the foothills of the Ozark Mountains, enjoy a performance or sporting event at the BOK Center, fish in one of the area’s many lakes, check out the sharks in the state’s only freestanding aquarium, explore any of the lush parks or break out the clubs and tackle any of the 16 public golf courses. Considered by many to be the cultural and arts center of Oklahoma, Tulsa offers full-time professional opera and ballet companies and one of the nation’s largest concentrations of art deco architecture. Regardless of your personal tastes or budget, Tulsa offers a down-home, yet cultured experience for all ages.

In over 100 area Hotels and Motels

Preview 918 is proudly displayed in the rooms, lobbies and/or front desks of over 100 hotels and motels in the Tulsa and surrounding Green Country communities. Copies are also available at hundreds of other locations including Oklahoma travel information centers, Tulsa International Airport visitor displays, Expo Square, office complexes, hospitals, Cancer Treatment Centers of America and in over 200 area restaurants. You can also find Preview 918 at participating QuikTrip, Reasor’s, CVS Pharmacies and Panera Bread locations as well as in Preview 918 yellow boxes throughout the Tulsa area.

For a night on the town, Tulsa serves up family entertainment at the Guthrie Green and Tulsa Drillers baseball at ONEOK Field. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center attracts Broadway musicals, renowned musicians and excellent local theater productions, and is home to the Tulsa Ballet.

FACEBOOK.COM/PREVIEW918

VOL. 32, NO. 11

Best regards, G.T. Bynum, Mayor of Tulsa

Tulsa’s unique entertainment and shopping districts provide enjoyable experiences for the entire family. From an art crawl in the Tulsa Arts District, to a concert at the historic Cain’s Ballroom, to a trip to the Tulsa Zoo or a leisurely drive along Route 66 — there’s no end to what you can experience here.  

LIKE US!

PREV EW

FOLLOW US! PREVIEW918

G.T. Bynum

FOLLOW US!

@PREVIEWTULSA

MANAGING PHOTOGRAPHER Marc Rains marc@previewgreencountry.com

FIELD OPERATIONS MANAGER Stephen Hurt stephen@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Greer, Michele Chiappetta, Tiffany Duncan, Donna Leahey, Rob Harmon, G.K. Hizer, Gina Conroy, Lindsay Morris, John Tranchina, Lindsey Mills, TravelOK.com

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Ann Murphy ann@previewgreencountry.com

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Marc Rains, Chelsi Fisher, Sarah Eliza Roberts, Valerie Grant, Kelli Greer

ROUTE DISTRIBUTION Rachel Blanchard, Cory Blanchard, Garrett Rinner SENIOR CONSULTANT Randy Dietzel PUBLISHERS Robert and Amy Rinner robert@previewgreencountry.com

READ US!

WWW.ISSUU.COM/PREVIEWMAGAZINETULSA Local advertising and business inquiries: 918-745-1190. Copyright 2018 by Preview 918. Preview 918 is an affiliated publication produced by Fore Today Media Group. All rights reserved. Preview 918 is published 12 times a year. Reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to Preview 918 ’s right to edit. While Preview 918 makes every reasonable effort to provide accurate and errorless information, it can’t be responsible for the consequences of any erratum or inadvertence. Preview 918 claims no credit for any images published in this issue unless otherwise noted. Images are copyright to their respective owners. The workouts, exercises and advice provided in Preview 918 and preview918.com are for educational and entertainment purposes only. Consult a physician before performing any exercise program. Preview 918, 10026-A S. Mingo, Suite 322, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74133 preview918.com info@previewgreencountry.com © Fore Today Publications LLC


See our feature on page 54

PREVIEW918.COM 5


TABLE OF CONTENTS NOVEMBER 2018

C ON THE COVER

F FEATURES 20 SMELLS LIKE BEAN SPIRIT

Although the Descendents have notoriously been a band to repeatedly go on hiatus and reform, the band has been relatively active since 2010, progressively getting busier and still looking for the perfect cup of coffee.

22 BRUSHES WITH FAME

John Hammer’s distinctive, colorful, pop art painting style is striking and attention-grabbing, and his commissioned work is highly coveted. Which is even more incredible seeing how he’s only been doing it for about six years.

68 38 DUCT TALES

Is there anything duct tape can’t do? It’s probably easier to list the things it can’t do.

76 WORTH A DEEP DIVE

Whether you’re going crabbing, oyster-bar hopping, searching for fried catfish or tucking into our epic sushi scene, you’re going to enjoy each of these seafood experiences.

82 WHEN IT TAKES A VILLAGE

Village Inn is the casual, homestyle type of restaurant that’s there for you any time of day or night when you need waffles, a Reuben, or some sweet and chocolaty French Silk pie.

26 SPRINGING INTO ACTION

Tulsa Pop Culture Expo is not merely an annual convention celebrating all things pop culture; it is also a springboard for making a positive impact on Tulsa throughout the entire year.

86 DELIGHTED TO MEAT YOU

At Elmer’s BBQ on Brookside, you’ll find plenty of old-school Oklahoma barbecue, top-notch sides, rowdy blues, a Badwich, and nothing that resembles foo foo.

28 PLEASE PASS THE ETIQUETTE

28

Twenty tips to help everyone mind their manners and not fight over the wishbone.

November is supposed to be a joyous time wherein relatives young and old gather for an epic feast, convivial conversation, sports, shopping, watching nature change, entertainment options and general family togetherness. Some of the time, however, it’s a completely dysfunctional and chaotic month from which you’d like to escape. For those of you needing some guidance, we’ve come up with a few tried-andtrue tips to surviving and retaining your sanity.

32 YULE HAVE A BLAST

90 GOURMET ON THE GO

36 TALK TURKEY TO ME

92 CHANGING COURSES

Following closely to the storyline of the beloved 1954 movie starring Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney, White Christmas is returning to the TPAC for a limited engagement of only eight performances. The sides may be on point, the desserts delectable and that certain uncle can be on his best behavior. But if the turkey is more foul than fowlicious, your Thanksgiving meal may be a bust.

20

36

Bernadette Feickert’s passion for food is inspired not just by the breakfast, lunch, cake and pie offerings at Kitch, but also by the sweet treats offered at her other Jenks hot spot, Cookiedoodle.

D DEPARTMENTS

18

8 $91.80 in 48 Challenge 10 Music + Concerts +

46 Sports Central

64 Taken With Tulsa

49 Downtown Locator

68 Eats + Treats

50 Tulsa Locator

70 Restaurant + Bar Finder

52 Green Country Scene

72 Food for Thought

54 Style + Shopping

90 Masters of Flavor

20 Sound Check

56 Health + Fitness

92 Get to Know

40 Homegrown Heroes

58 Weigh-In

94 Shelf Life

42 Sports Schedule

62 Launch Pad

96 Showtime

Comedy

76 COVER CREDIT

Photographer: Sarah Eliza Roberts Model: Ana Vela

Clothes: Jules Boutique

6 NOVEMBER 2018

Justin Thompson’s Trial & Error book is meant to help home chefs achieve the taste they hope to ace when they cook their favorite restaurant dishes in their own oven. But it’s also a look at how food impacts our lives.

12 Happenings 14 Street Talk 16 Conversation Starter


www.jtrgroup.com www.jtrgroup.com


918 $91.80 IN 48 CHALLENGE

SO, PROVIDING AN ENVELOPE OF CASH AND TELLING PEOPLE TO SPEND IT IN 48 HOURS ISN’T EXACTLY A CHALLENGE, BUT IT MAKES THIS ASSIGNMENT SOUND A LOT MORE INTERESTING.

STOP #1

We started the $91.80 Challenge wandering around downtown. The first place that caught my eye was Boomtown Tees. I was pleased with the different colors and styles that featured Tulsa and Oklahoma very well. These T-shirts are made on-site, which is awesome. They also have a nice $10 shelf of Oklahoma shirts. From clothes to hats and handmade jewelry — we were sure to leave with a couple things. My sister, Lety, and I each got a T-shirt. Mine said, “Living the Vida OKLA.” By the way, it’s a very nice fit and comfortable. We also got a cute love key necklace that is sure to go with everyday outfits. COST $48.83

The mission posed to Nancy Hernandez was to spend $91.80 (we used the local area code for the amount) in two days. And if she could find fun and free activities … bonus.

For lunch, we decided on something light and fresh. Jason’s Deli was our choice. They have an excellent menu with a lot of options. It was my sister’s first time, and she fell in love with their fantastic food. Their unlimited salad bar is a must — always so fresh and so many dressings and toppings to choose from. Their salad bar alone would make anyone return, but they also have amazing sandwiches too. I had one of my favorites — the California Club. It’s a mouthful of goodness. For my side, I had the fruit with creamy, sweet but not too sweet, fruit dip. (I could eat the dip all day.) The manager was very nice and friendly, making sure we enjoyed our meal. Did I mention free ice cream? It’s the perfect way to end a delicious meal. You can choose from chocolate, vanilla or twist. COST $16.91

STOP #3 For our last stop, we decided to try something fun and sweet. We went for Ida Red. What a nice surprise to find an old-fashioned soda bar as we were walking through the Tulsa Arts District. There are so many cute Tulsa/Okie things and unique items. There is a wide and fun assortment of sweets with plenty of homemade sodas, ice cream, milkshakes, coffee, and more. The prices are very reasonable too. My children (Christian, Daniel, and Ayleen) loved the cookies and cream milkshake, and the birthday cake flavor was insane. I had the Dr Pepper float — it was perfect. I enjoyed every last bit. It is one of our new favorite places to go to for sure.

The only catch was that she had to spend it at places, events or shops profiled in the October 2018 issue of Preview 918.

COST $24.67

THINK YOU CAN BLOW OUR CASH IN INTERESTING WAYS? 8 NOVEMBER 2018

STOP #2

Like us on Facebook and drop a message with some of your ideas. We might just lace your pockets with green and turn you loose.


PREVIEW918.COM 9


H HAPPENINGS NOVEMBER LIVE MUSIC VENUES 5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa

BLACKBIRD ON PEARL

1336 E. 6th St. | Tulsa

BOK CENTER

200 S. Denver Ave. | Tulsa

BRADY THEATER

105 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

MUSIC+CONCERTS+COMEDY 1 PAPADOSIO 2 RAY LAMONTAGNE

CROW CREEK TAVERN

3534 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa

2-3

DOG IRON SALOON | CHEROKEE CASINO 20900 S. 4200 Road | Claremore

GUTHRIE GREEN

111 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

3

IDL BALLROOM

230 E. 1st St. | Tulsa

INNER CIRCLE VODKA BAR 410 N. Main St. | Tulsa

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

4

1000 Buffalo Run Blvd. | Miami

RIFFS | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA 777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

THE SHRINE

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

BEN RECTOR

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Brady Theater | Tulsa

KIX

CAT & NAT

IDL Ballroom | Tulsa

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

ERIC JOHNSON

FRANKIE VALLI & THE FOUR SEASONS

17 GENERATION AXE

Brady Theater | Tulsa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

DESCENDENTS

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

THE TEN TENORS

Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

COHEED AND CAMBRIA

13 BASTILLE

21 TEXAS HIPPIE COALITION Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

ANNUAL LEFTOVER 23 13TH TURKEY Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

14

Brady Theater | Tulsa

GRADY NICHOLS

Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

JASON BONHAM’S LED ZEPPELIN EVENING Brady Theater | Tulsa

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS

28 CHVRCHES

KACEY MUSGRAVES

29 CELTIC THUNDER

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

LITTLE STEVE AND THE DISCIPLES OF SOUL

15

Brady Theater | Tulsa

8

27 JEWEL

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa

THE COLONY

River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

CASEY DONAHEW

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

SOUL CITY

409 N. Main St. | Tulsa

ALABAMA

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

CLOSE TO YOU: THE MUSIC OF THE CARPENTERS

5 6 BLUES TRAVELER 7 DAWES

112 E. 18th St. | Tulsa

SOUNDPONY

AARON WATSON

River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

OKLAHOMA JAZZ HALL OF FAME

PEORIA SHOWPLACE | BUFFALO RUN CASINO & RESORT

10

CHRISTINA AGUILERA

1747 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

9

Brady Theater | Tulsa

MERCURY LOUNGE

PARADISE COVE | RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

STEVIE WONDER

16 JOE BONAMASSA

Brady Theater | Tulsa

NF

8330 Riverside Pkwy. | Tulsa

5 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Cox Business Center | Tulsa

CAIN’S BALLROOM

BOK Center | Tulsa

SCOTTY MCCREERY

FAB FOUR: THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

15 TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

Brady Theater | Tulsa

Brady Theater | Tulsa

CABIN CREEK | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA 423 N. Main St. | Tulsa

8 LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

River Spirit Casino Resort | Tulsa

TLC

GARY CLARK JR.

30 PARKER MCCOLLUM

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

2809 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa

THE FUR SHOP

520 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa

SOUL CITY GASTROPUB RESIDENT SHOWS AND EVENTS

THE HUNT CLUB

224 N. Main St. | Tulsa

THE JOINT | HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa

THE VANGUARD

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa MONDAY: CLOSED // TUESDAY-FRIDAY: 4 P.M.-MIDNIGHT // SATURDAY: 1 P.M.-MIDNIGHT // SUNDAY: 1 P.M.- 10 P.M.

TUESDAYS:

222 N. Main St. | Tulsa

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

102 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa

WOODY’S CORNER BAR

325 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa

YETI

417 N. Main St. | Tulsa

10 NOVEMBER 2018

LIVE EVENT TRIVIA NIGHT (7 P.M.)

WEDNESDAYS:

THURSDAYS:

RANDY BRUMLEY

ROBERT HOEFLING

FRIDAYS: SUSAN HERNDON

DON AND STEVE WHITE

THE BEGONIAS

SCOTT MUSICK AND FRIENDS

(5 P.M.)

(8 P.M.)

(5 P.M.)

(8 P.M.)

(5:30 P.M.)

(BI-WEEKLY AT 8 P.M.)

SUNDAYS: DUSTIN PITTSLEY TRIO GOSPEL BRUNCH (2 P.M.) BRUNER AND EICHER (6:30 P.M.)


NOVEMBER

2&3

SATURDAY

11.10

STEVIE WONDER

8PM

CAT & NAT

8PM

SUNDAY

11.25

THURSDAY

11.8

THURSDAY

11.15

THE ULTIMATE QUEEN CELEBRATION STARRING MARC MARTEL

LIGHTING IT UP SCAN TO PURCHASE TICKETS

Schedule subject to change.

6PM

SCOTTY MCCREERY

8PM

TLC

8PM


AI ALSO IN NOVEMBER NOV. 1

DISNEY JUNIOR DANCE PARTY ON TOUR Brady Theater | Tulsa NOV. 1-2

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS ARTS FESTIVAL Living Arts of Tulsa | Tulsa NOV. 1-3

PUMPKIN FESTIVAL Shepherd’s Cross | Claremore

NOV. 2-4

WILL ROGERS DAYS Will Rogers Memorial Museum | Claremore

FALL HOME EXPO Expo Square | Tulsa

Center | Tulsa

COLOR BREED CONGRESS Expo Square | Tulsa

Center | Tulsa

NOV. 3

BASSNANZA Kerr Lake | Sallisaw

SOVEREIGNTY Tulsa Performing Arts

WORLD WAR II BIG BAND HANGAR DANCE Tulsa Tech | Tulsa

NOV. 2

NOV. 4

NOV. 1-4

Center | Tulsa

FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL Tulsa Arts District | Tulsa NOV. 2-3

CHEROKEE HERITAGE DAYS Har-Ber Village Museum | Grove

12 NOVEMBER 2018

THE MOTH MAINSTAGE Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

TULSA POP CULTURE EXPO Renaissance Hotel | Tulsa

BARNUM: THE MUSICAL Tulsa Performing Arts

LOVE NEVER DIES Tulsa Performing Arts

GLENN BECK Brady Theater | Tulsa

Henryetta

NOV. 2-10

NOV. 1-4

NOV. 15

TERRY DON WEST BULL RIDING SCHOOL 31965 Arbeka Road |

NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA AUTOCROSS Expo Square | Tulsa NOV. 6

SPAMALOT Performing Arts Center | Broken Arrow

LIGHTS ON! Downtown Jenks NOV. 15-16 NOV. 7-11

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL’S CRYSTAL BOK Center | Tulsa NOV. 8

ELVIS & JOHNNY The Coleman Theatre | Miami NOV. 9-10

TULSA BEAD MARKET Expo Square | Tulsa NITRO ARENACROSS TOUR Claremore Expo Center | Claremore

ALICE IN WONDERLAND Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 16

TULSA BALLET: PETER AND THE WOLF Studio K | Tulsa LISA GENOVA Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 16-17

DICKENS ON THE BOULEVARD Downtown Claremore

NOV. 10-11

WANENMACHER’S TULSA ARMS SHOW Expo Square | Tulsa

NOV. 16-18

NOV. 13

NOV. 17

DAVID SEDARIS Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

NOV. 14

LET THEM SEE YOU Mabee Center | Tulsa

AN AFFAIR OF THE HEART Expo Square | Tulsa FAITH PRINCE Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

BOARE’S HEADE FEASTE The Castle of Muskogee | Muskogee


ALSO IN NOVEMBER AI NOV. 17-18

HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS IN CONCERT Tulsa Performing Arts Center |

NOV. 23-DEC. 31

PHILBROOK FESTIVAL Philbrook Museum of Art | Tulsa

Tulsa

NOV. 23-JAN. 6

ROUTE 66 MARATHON Downtown Tulsa

NOV. 24

WINTERFEST Downtown Tulsa

NOV. 20-25

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS PARADE Buffalo Theater | Pawnee

Tulsa

NOV. 25

IRVING BERLIN’S WHITE CHRISTMAS Tulsa Performing Arts Center | NOV. 20-DEC. 30

FANTASY LAND OF LIGHTS Johnstone Park | Bartlesville NOV. 21-JAN. 1

RHEMA CHRISTMAS LIGHTS Rhema Bible Church | Broken Arrow

THE ULTIMATE QUEEN CELEBRATION Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa | Catoosa

NOV. 29

CIRQUE MUSICA HOLIDAY PRESENTS WONDERLAND Brady Theater | Tulsa

Where the locals have been going since 1975!

NOV. 22-25

USA BMX GRAND NATIONAL PRO SERIES FINAL Expo Square | Tulsa NOV. 22-DEC. 31

CASTLE CHRISTMAS The Castle of Muskogee |

NOV. 29-DEC. 2

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Coleman Theatre | Miami SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION Tulsa Performing Arts Center | Tulsa

Muskogee

NOV. 23-DEC. 23

WOOLAROC WONDERLAND OF LIGHTS Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve | Bartlesville

NOV. 30

FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS CHRISTMAS PARADE Downtown Sand Springs

Daily ls Lunch Specia am 11 at Open Saturday Monday thru ay Closed Sund

918.622.2668

www.ricardostulsa.com 5629 E. 41st • Tulsa, OK PREVIEW918.COM 13


DO YOU FEEL ENVY OR THANKFULNESS MORE OFTEN?

ST STREET TALK

I definitely feel thankfulness more often. When I look at where I am and compare my life to others, I am thankful. Perhaps it’s because I’m more optimistic or maybe because when I look back on my life, I see how blessed I have been.

Unfortunately, I probably feel envy more often, although I know I should be more thankful for what I have. Envy seems to be my more natural state, so I have to consistently remind myself to be more thankful.

I’m usually too busy focusing on other things than to be focusing on that stuff. I have what I have, and if I want something else or more, I get it.

Shannon

Elizabeth I envy other people’s thankfulness.

Thankfulness but that wasn’t always the case.

Allen

Amanda

Mike I feel more thankful. I have so many good people in my life.

Thankfulness.

Robbie

Daryle

Thankfulness, although it’s not automatic. I have to purpose to be thankful for people and for life and for what I have, but it keeps at bay things like envy, bitterness, or even sadness.

I’m not sure how often I feel much of either. I mean when I see things I want, I may wish I had it, but I don’t know that I’m envious of it. I certainly might not be thankful as often as I should be.

Being envious of others doesn’t feel good. Neither does having others feel envious of me. As I’ve aged, I’ve learned to feel grateful every day and let go of envy.

Jade

Ryan

Michele C.

I feel more thankful. I’m humbled by God’s blessings.

Cathy

I am more thankful because of all the wonderful people in my life, and for what the Lord has planned for me.

Sara

Thankful for everything I have in my life.

Thankfulness. Being surrounded by good friends and such makes it my default basically.

Thankful for the way I was raised to understand what the future holds for me.

David

CJ

Kim

Envy first. Then I have to stop and turn it into something better like thankfulness or ambition.

I’m thankful I’m not envious. Everything is better than I deserve. Thank you, Lord.

Adrean

Michele P.

WANT TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION? 14 NOVEMBER 2018

WE’LL POST A QUESTION ON OUR FACEBOOK EACH MONTH. GIVE US AN ANSWER AND PHOTO, AND YOU MIGHT END UP IN OUR MAGAZINE.


“A HOLIDAY CARD COME TO LIFE!” - DAILY NEWS

See our feature on page 32

“AS ENCHANTING AS A FIRST SNOW” - SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

NovEMBER 20 - 25

TULSA Performing Arts Center 918.596.7111 • CelebrityAttractions.com Groups of 10+ save! Call 918.796.0220

/BwayTulsa

PREVIEW918.COM 15


FRANKIE VALLI HAS BEEN THE MUSCULAR VOICE AND THE TALENT BEHIND HIT MUSIC FOR SIX DECADES AND SHOWS NO SIGN OF SLOWING DOWN. BY DONNA LEAHEY PHOTO BY BRAD TRENT

16 NOVEMBER 2018

FRANKIE VALLI AN THE FOUR SEASON

CS CONVERSATION STARTER


voice created a unique sound that led the Four Seasons to a string of hits, starting with the No. 1 hit “Sherry,” which displays Valli’s falsetto to full advantage.

2 and is still popular in media today. In recent years, Valli has been seen on small screens and large, most notably as mobster Rusty Millio on the HBO series The Sopranos.

His first solo single, 1967’s “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” hit No.

The biographical musical Jersey Boys opened in 2005,

telling the story of the Four Seasons and shedding light on some of Valli’s highs and lows. The success of Jersey Boys has reignited interest in Valli and the Four Seasons, making hits like “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Walk Like a Man,” and “Rag Doll” hip again.

A. The play doesn’t even

A. I didn’t want to sing

do with myself if I wasn’t touring. I’ve tried a few times where I’ve said that I’m going to cut back on my schedule. And then after a month or so, I go crazy. You get so into it, I just don’t know what to do with myself if I’m not touring.

Q. WHO WERE SOME OF YOUR MUSICAL INFLUENCES?

A. I really started out loving

jazz. Groups like the Four Freshmen and Stan Kenton. I liked Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey. My father listened to classical music, but I was a big Frank Sinatra fan. Then I began to like a lot of very early R&B before it was rock ‘n’ roll: The Flamingos, The Clovers, The Harptones, The Ravens. I loved Jimmy Smith, Shirley Scott, and there was Jack MacDuff. I did a lot of singing around the house when nobody was around, and as soon as somebody would catch me singing, I would stop because my parents were not into that. My father never went into bars and neither did my mother, so they didn’t appreciate the music I was into.

Q. YOU SAW

SINATRA PERFORM WHEN YOU WERE YOUNG. WHAT DID THAT MEAN TO YOU?

Q. YOU’VE DONE

SOME ACTING, PROBABLY MOST NOTABLY ON THE SOPRANOS. HOW DOES ACTING SATISFY YOUR ARTISTIC IMPULSES, AND WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO IT MORE OFTEN?

A. David Chase wrote that

cover all the darkness. I didn’t just lose one kid, I lost two, and got a divorce, all in six months. I started drinking, doing a lot of things I shouldn’t. I got through it; I met somebody else. We got married and I straightened my life out. I stopped drinking. I stopped smoking. I threw all the substances away and I said, “I never want my kid to see me do anything like this.” It’s hard for me; you’re not supposed to lose your children. You’re supposed to go first. I’ve had a wonderful life, with all the ups and downs, all the disappointments, all the accolades that come with success. I wouldn’t change anything, except to have my children back.

Q. “CAN’T TAKE

MY EYES OFF YOU” IS part for me. I’d auditioned for The SUCH A GREAT SONG. Sopranos, and he said he didn’t WHAT CAN YOU TELL think the part was right for me. US ABOUT IT? Then four years later, he calls me and says, “I wrote a part for you. I want you to play this captain in this family.” And I thought it would be easy, because I’ve known all these captains. I did an episode of Hawaii Five-O, and I’d like to do more cameos and TV and movies.

Q. JERSEY BOYS

HAS BEEN A GREAT SUCCESS BUT DOES SHOW SOME OF THE LOWEST POINTS OF YOUR LIFE. HOW DOES THAT AFFECT YOU?

A. It’s probably the

song that’s made the biggest impact for me and my career. It was designed for me. It was written for me by Bob Gaudio and Bob Crewe. It’s a favorite, but they’re all favorites in different ways. I like doing every kind of music, as long as it’s done well.

Q. YOUR FALSETTO ON “SHERRY” AND SOME OF YOUR EARLIER SONGS IS SO IDENTIFIABLY YOU.

like that my whole life, but we were looking for a sound, and “Sherry” was that sound. Once we established the sound, the plan was that I would do some things I really wanted to do, like solo records. Some of my favorites like “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You,” “Swearing to God” and “My Eyes Adored You,” have none of that falsetto. But to start with, we wanted a sound where if the radio station was playing our song, you’d know who it was.

Q. WHY DO

YOU THINK YOUR MUSIC REMAINS SO IMPACTFUL DECADES LATER?

A. I think it was the way

our songs were written. We say things the way that blue-collar guy, the trucker, the cab driver, the construction guy, the way he might want to say it. Girls liked us; guys liked us. We related, but we never tried to be anybody else but who we were.

FRANKIE VALLI AND THE FOUR SEASONS Paradise Cove | River Spirit Casino Resort 8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 888-748-3731 riverspirittulsa.com

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A. I don’t know what I would

time seeing any performer, let alone someone that big, I knew that’s what I wanted to do. But I had no idea how to get there. I learned by listening to other people sing and trying to sing like them. There are things no one can ever teach you, like phrasing. Sinatra made you feel that everything he sang had happened in his life.

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HEADING BACK OUT ON TOUR AFTER SO MANY DECADES?

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Q. WHAT KEEPS YOU A. A little kid for the first

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THE FOUR SEASON

Roughly 84 years ago, Francesco Stephen Castelluccio was born to a blue-collar family in Newark, N.J.. A lot of miles, years, ups and downs, and hard work have transformed that baby into cultural icon, Frankie Valli. His unparalleled falsetto and emotionally powerful chest

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Nov. 10: 8 p.m. Must be 21 or older to attend

PREVIEW918.COM 17


SCOTTY MCCREERY

CS CONVERSATION STARTER

THE ROAD FROM THE 10TH SEASON OF AMERICAN IDOL LED STRAIGHT TO A NO. 1 DEBUT ALBUM FOR SCOTTY MCCREERY, WHO HAS TAKEN MORE CONTROL OF HIS RECORDINGS AND ELVIS INFLUENCE. BY G.K. HIZER PHOTO BY JEFF RAY

When Scotty McCreery first appeared on the country music scene, it wasn’t without a major splash. As the winner of American Idol’s 10th season in 2011, he had a springboard to massive audience exposure and debuted as the youngest male artist in any genre and first country music artist to debut at No. 1 on the Billboard top 200 chart with his first album, Clear as Day. His 2013 sophomore release, See You Tonight, climbed to the top of the country charts

18 NOVEMBER 2018

as well, yet the young artist with five hit singles — five of which went platinum and one gold — found himself embroiled in a protracted battle with his label, Mercury Nashville. That’s not to say McCreery’s life was on hold during that battle. The young country star who had been previously tabbed as Country Music’s Hottest Bachelor and Sexiest Man in Country Music found his

love and got engaged and married to his now-wife, Gabi, in the interim. He also co-wrote every song on his latest album, Seasons Change, and even scored a No. 1 radio hit by independently releasing “Five More Minutes” before he had found a new label. With another No. 1 album under his belt, along with a world of new experiences, McCreery is back on the road and bringing his music to fans everywhere.


A. We were still getting

outside songs, but once I started More than anything, I think writing, I got into this head space where the best part of American Idol was a platform the process was writing songs for exposure and for people to recognize me. I mean, it was huge that meant something to me. It seemed like early on, I knew I for me — it was the biggest show wanted to write a very personal on television at the time and I record and tell my story, so really didn’t expect to get as far it kind of naturally went that as I did, much less win. Based direction. We still got a lot of on where I was coming from, great songs sent to us from mainly singing other people’s outside writers, and I’ll probably songs, as opposed to others who use other writers on the next played instruments as well and record, but I feel like I was on a were starting to write their own path with this one that I needed songs, it was a good experience, but it didn’t really influence how I to follow. approach music. I think getting to YOU’VE WORKED Nashville and touring music row and seeing how things really work WITH A LOT OF GREAT had more of an influence on how I WRITERS IN THE PAST, BUT YOU SEEM TO write and approach things.

MOVING TO A NEW LABEL CHANGED THINGS FOR YOU AND HOW YOU APPROACHED MAKING THE NEW ALBUM?

A. It was a really welcome

change in my eyes. My old label had a more corporate feel and was all business. Triple Tigers is more musician and artist friendly and is really supportive of what I want to do. I just wrote and wrote until I had a set of songs we all unanimously liked. The whole process just felt more natural and authentic for me. Looking back, there was a legal battle with the other label that basically took all of 2016 away, but I was still able to accomplish a lot personally and I put a book out. So yeah, it was frustrating, but without going through that, I wouldn’t be where I am today.

Q. WHAT MADE

YOU WANT TO TAKE

ON THE TYPE OF VENUE AND DO YOU HAVE A PREFERENCE?

A. Honestly, I probably do

[approach them differently], but I don’t really think about it. I think a theater is a little more songwriter friendly and lets you explain how the songs come about. At least that’s how it works in my mind. It feels like I have more time to explain where I was or what I was thinking

Q.

HAVE FOUND A SPECIAL BOND OR CHEMISTRY WITH FRANK ROGERS, WHO CO-WROTE A NUMBER OF SONGS AND PRODUCED THIS LATEST ALBUM. HOW HELPFUL OR INSPIRING WAS HE AS YOU PUT THIS RECORD TOGETHER?

A.

Q. WITH YOUR

LATEST ALBUM, YOU’VE GOTTEN A LOT OF GREAT REVIEWS AND A LOT HAS BEEN MADE OF YOUR ‘90S COUNTRY INFLUENCES Yeah, Frank really took me COMING THROUGH.

under his wing with this one. He understood what I wanted to do and was really helpful in getting that accomplished. Mostly, he let me do what I wanted and needed to do and helped me focus and pull it all together for this record.

Q. YOUR APPROACH TO THE VIDEOS HAS BEEN A LITTLE DIFFERENT SO FAR WITH THIS RECORD. WHAT COMPELLED YOU TO DO THAT?

A. It all just came about

kind of naturally. We had other

A. You know, I try to stay out

of listening to what’s supposed to be popular and where the trends are going. If you want to be relevant, you really can’t play that game. Growing up, my mom listened to people like Conway Twitty and Ronnie Millsap. Also, Elvis was a good one for me. Just his style and the way he sang. I may not sound like him, but I think you can hear a little nuance of that in what I do.

Q. DO YOU

APPROACH SHOWS DIFFERENTLY BASED

when I wrote a song, where the big shows are more about the concert experience and keeping the crowd pumped up. I like both. There’s no rush like it when you’re playing in front of a big arena or stadium crowd. With the smaller shows, it feels like you get to know the audience a little better and it’s more personal. It’s just a different energy.

SCOTTY MCCREERY

The Joint: Tulsa | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa 777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 918-384-ROCK (x7625) hardrockcasinotulsa.com

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Q. HOW HAS

ideas pitched to us for the videos, but I just thought that if so much of this is about me, I just couldn’t see using anyone else in the videos. Also, I like having a personal tie to the music and the fans. I feel like people like to see and maybe get to know you as a person a little bit. It might just be me, but I think as a fan I’d get a little kick out of it and find it more interesting to see something a little more personal, so I kind of approached it that way.

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A.

MORE CONTROL OVER THE SONGS THAT YOU WROTE?

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DO YOU FEEL LIKE AMERICAN IDOL INFLUENCED YOUR CAREER?

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MCCREERY

Q. HOW MUCH

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SC SOUND CHECK

Although the Descendents have notoriously been a band to repeatedly go on hiatus and reform, the band has been relatively active since 2010, progressively getting busier and still looking for the perfect cup of coffee. BY G.K. HIZER

PHOTOS BY KEVIN SCANLON

Although much has been made of Tulsa’s music scene, that attention has mostly focused on the historic Tulsa Sound with artists like Leon Russell, J.J. Cale and Dwight Twilley, our roots in R&B with The Gap Band, and the pop success of Hanson. Much of the current attention is turned toward a largely Americana and blues-based movement often referred to as the New Tulsa Sound in a nod to its roots in Tulsa’s ‘70s movement. What often gets overlooked is a flourishing punk movement

20 NOVEMBER 2018

with a flurry of shows at The Fur Shop, Barkingham Palace, and an annual punk festival built around the Fourth of July which just celebrated its sixth year. What most people don’t realize is that Stephen Egerton, guitarist for seminal California punk bands the Descendents and All, is a Tulsa resident who previously ran Armstrong studios, which saw bands like MXPX stop in to record while passing through Tulsa on tour. Although the Descendents have notoriously been a band

to repeatedly go on hiatus and reform, the band has been relatively active since regrouping for some one-off shows in 2010, progressively getting busier and not looking back. With this year’s tour winding down, we were able to catch up with Egerton before the band plays a long-awaited show in Tulsa at Cain’s Ballroom Nov. 17. “Yeah, the last time we played Tulsa was 22 years ago,” Egerton says. “Playing a city the size of Tulsa is harder than you might

think for a band our size. We usually play about 50 shows a year, so we have to hit the more obvious markets, where we know we do well. We finally got an offer to play Tulsa, so we’re looking forward to coming back.” Although the Descendents were originally based out of California, Egerton and bassist Karl Alvarez grew up in Utah and played together in the Salt Lake City based Massacre Boys. “I was living in Washington D.C., not really playing out


“Yeah, that’s a big part of our thing,” Egerton shares. “For Bill, it goes back to when he and his buddies made this godawful instant brew, but we’re all four coffee fiends. That was part of our ritual before practice: we’d all go to Dunkin’ Donuts and get the biggest coffee we could, get all wound up and let it out at rehearsal. That’s all kind of woven into our music. Some bands are more beer bands, but the Descendents is a coffee band.”

So Good.

Christina aguilera nov 4 frankie valli & the four seasons nov 10 kacey musgraves nov 15 alabama nov 16 jo koy dec 7 mannheim steamroller christmas dec 8 little big town dec 13 bad company dec 28 ron white dec 31 Live Music 7 Nights a Week And at 9pm in 5 o’Clock Somewhere Bar and 10 pm every day in Margaritaville! Visit margaritavilletulsa.com for a complete schedule.

DESCENDENTS Cain’s Ballroom | Tulsa

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Once in Tulsa, Egerton founded and ran Armstrong Studios with Ryan Wallace, recording a number of local bands as well as some national bands. After running Armstrong Studios for roughly 10 years, Egerton closed the studio, citing the growing number of quality recording studios in the Tulsa area.

The band’s latest album, Hypercaffium Spazzinate, while addressing more adult themes of love and relationships, growing old, and dealing with illness, is also a nod to both the band’s frenetic energy and part of an ongoing in-joke that goes back to the band’s early recordings and the group’s love for coffee.

paradise never sounded

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When asked what brought him to Tulsa, Egerton explained that, “We had toured again and everyone was starting families. My wife, Natalie, is from here and grew up in Tulsa — she was born in Australia, but her family moved to Tulsa when she was 11, so she grew up here. We had our daughter, Sophie, in Colorado, but the band was less active and she had family here and we had grandparents here to help with the kids, which can’t be under-valued, so we moved here and settled into Tulsa.”

“After that, Milo figured he could play a certain number of shows a year, so we started taking on a few more. At some point, we decided to record a new album and we’re having a blast now.”

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“We did our first tour shortly after that. We recorded in ’86 and toured all of 1987. Then Milo went to study for his PHD so we changed singers and became All. We toured and did our laps with All and after Milo was done with school, he wanted to take a year off and spend with the band, so we recorded Everything Sucks at the end of ’96 and toured in ’97, then Milo was off to tend to personal issues and live his normal life.”

“As time went on, I moved more to mixing, because it was something I could do at home, so I moved into mixing and working on TV music. Eventually, All started playing shows again, but Bill had a couple of major health issues. Once the dust settled and Bill was better and functional, we got a substantial offer for some Descendents shows. We took three shows and added another and we really had a blast.

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much and studying classical music, trying to learn all I could about music. My oldest friend, Karl — we’ve been friends since junior high — found out the Descendents needed a bass player and went to audition. When he found out they needed a guitar player too, he called me to come out as well. Karl and I were both huge fans, so it was a dream come true just to come out and jam with them. I think Bill [Stevenson] and Milo [Aukerman] thought, ‘Well, these guys are friends and already have some chemistry and know the songs’ so they hired us both.

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Brushes with Fame JOHN HAMMER’S DISTINCTIVE, COLORFUL, POP ART PAINTING STYLE IS STRIKING AND ATTENTION-GRABBING, AND HIS COMMISSIONED WORK IS HIGHLY COVETED. WHICH IS EVEN MORE INCREDIBLE SEEING HOW HE’S ONLY BEEN DOING IT FOR ABOUT SIX YEARS. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS

22 NOVEMBER 2018


If you’re from Tulsa, you probably are quite familiar already with John Hammer’s name. But even if you’re not, you’ve likely seen his art around town. He’s designed imagery for the Tulsa American Film Festival, and exhibited his work around Green Country at places like the Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery, OSUITOkmulgee, the Woody Guthrie Center, the Will Rogers Memorial and Museum, and the BOK Center.

But in fact, he’s only been painting for about six years — though he’s pursued art of different types since he was a young child. “I’ve always been into art and always done it, and it’s always been a part of my life,” he says. His earliest memories of creating art go back to elementary school. “I remember drawing and getting a response from people,” he says. “I drew all the time. I would try to copy all the pictures of MAD magazine, and album covers like KISS.” (He’s a big fan of the band.)

which is a horrible thing to tell anybody,” says Hammer, remembering those early years. “So I went into graphic design with the idea that I would someday pursue art.” His commercial graphic design work was successful, and it’s something he doesn’t regret doing. “I’m glad I did it,” he says. “I love design, and I think it has molded who I am as an artist today.”

Hammer’s distinctive, colorful, pop art painting style is striking and attentiongrabbing. Look at it, and you’ll see his influences — the graphic approach of Andy Warhol, Van Gogh’s brush strokes and colors, Norman Rockwell’s way of telling a story in pictures. It looks like he’s been painting and perfecting his craft for years.

“It didn’t ever pop into my head that I had to figure out what I was going to do with my life,” he says. “I just knew there were people who were out there who paint pictures, so I always knew I was going to head in that direction.

Then, a few years ago, a whole new world of opportunity opened up for his creative side. “I never really painted, just did pen and ink for projects I worked on,” he says. “Then, six years ago, I picked up a paint brush for the first time. It was fairly new to me, but I enjoyed the heck out of it.”

“I got talked into the graphic angle, the ‘you can’t make a living as an artist’ speech,

At the time, he hadn’t settled firmly into painting as a second career. In fact,

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he thought he would go in a different direction. “I did some linoleum cuts and screen prints, and I thought that’s what I was going to pursue. I even took some workshops in it.” So, how did that change to painting? Hammer credits his family. “My wife had been bugging me for a while to join in with arts and crafts with the grandchildren. I finally agreed. We were out on the back deck and painted flowers.” At that point, he realized a couple of things — he enjoyed painting, and he was pretty good at it. “It was a fluke thing. But I kept painting more and more.” That decision to paint has been a good one, as it turns out. Hammer’s commissioned work has been highly

24 NOVEMBER 2018

coveted. His most recent piece is a mural commemorating Claremore, his hometown these days. The mural, his first ever, was unveiled in October 2018, and it showcases both what makes Claremore great and what makes Hammer’s art so cool. “The city of Claremore approached me because they’re trying to clean up the alleyways and bring life to downtown. And a way to do that is murals,” Hammer explains. “I picked the wall not thinking I would do the whole thing, but then I decided to do the whole wall. It’s an homage to Claremore, which is my hometown now.” The mural’s imagery is structured around the theme, “Travelers of Both Time and Space.” It features a portrait of a local

astronaut from our area, Stuart Roosa, in his NASA outfit, as well as a depiction of Apollo 14 (which Roosa flew on), a portrait of Will Rogers, the Route 66 highway sign, and a quote from Will Rogers about traveling. The bright, almost neon shades of orange, blue, green and red pop and draw the eye. “It was a lot of fun and a challenge and a good learning experience,” says Hammer. “I will probably do it again in the future.” Hammer’s future plans include expanding his artwork regionally and doing more print making. In fact, he’s done a print image of the Meadow Gold sign that says “Stay Gold” in honor of The Outsiders restoration project house. “It’s available as a fundraiser for them,” he says.


See our feature on page 86

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all brating le e c n entio act al conv ive imp u it n s n o a p n ga ely a N r makin o ot mer f n d is HARMO r o a B p o O x b R E g Y e in B ur pr op Cult also a s ar. is it ; e Tulsa P r e u y pop cult ut the entire things o h g a throu Tulsa Pop Kids, the on Tuls

Supergirl once said, “If I’m going to be a hero and prove to everyone that I know what I’m doing, I’m going to need practice. Start small, get better. And to do that, I’m going to need your help.” After talking to Arthur Greeno, co-founder of the Tulsa Pop Culture Expo (T-Pop), and Emilee Waite, one of the convention’s most ardent supporters, we’re pretty sure this sums up Tulsa’s fastest growing pop culture convention. After a small, but highly successful first go in 2017, T-Pop looks to make a splash on the entire pop culture convention scene in its second year at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center Nov. 2-4. “I wasn’t alone,” Greeno says about the convention origins. “It’s not only my fault.” Greeno, a local businessman and owner/ operator of multiple Chick-fil-A locations in the Tulsa area, says that he and a couple other pop culture enthusiasts — including Ron Veit and Pat Loveless — saw the need for a large convention that was locally driven and decided to do something

26 NOVEMBER 2018

about it. Considering how other similar conventions have chosen to come to Tulsa and at other times not to, Greeno and his friends thought about building something that was, without question, committed to Tulsa and not entirely about the bottom line or flashy movie and television star guests. To start with, Greeno and the group see the organization not merely as an annual convention celebrating all things pop culture, but as a springboard for making a positive impact on Tulsa throughout the entire year. Waite, who has only missed one or two volunteer meetings since the early planning stages of last year’s expo, says that it’s the volunteers and the organization’s focus on serving Tulsa that separate the conference from others. “I couldn’t be prouder,” Waite says. “We spread love and plant a seed around town that makes others want to work with us. It brings something unique to Tulsa that the other conventions haven’t. Others blow into town, make a ton of money, then blow out, and it kind of leaves behind nothing. With T-Pop, the expo is just an extension of what we’re doing for kids throughout the year through T-Pop Kids.”

organization’s benevolent arm, sends cosplayers dressed as superheroes to raise the spirits of sick children at local hospitals. They also organize comic book drives, donating thousands of comics every year to schools to promote literacy. Their army of volunteers will be providing convention support throughout the weekend in many facets, including the contribution of cosplayers who will be giving the expo the kind of atmosphere required that every good pop culture convention should have. This year’s T-Pop Expo certainly plans to pack a Hulk-sized punch in the three-day event. The event partners Tulsa Pop Kids with two other pop culture organizations: XPO Game Festival and OKPOP. The XPO Game Festival is providing the convention’s eSports tournament, as well as an assortment of indie game competitions and retro game participation opportunities. A cool streaming lounge will be available for entrants, as well as innovative gaming workshops and panel sessions related to streaming and creative game development. OKPOP (aka Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture), the exciting project looking to open in 2020 across from Cain’s in the Tulsa


Another notable comic artist visiting T-Pop is critically acclaimed novelist and Eisner Award-nominated comic book writer Christopher James Priest. Although Priest has been in the comic book industry for close to 40 years, he has risen to new heights in popularity

Possibly the most unique guest appearance at any pop culture convention in recent years will be the appearance of C. Thomas Howell, star of one of the most famous movies ever shot in Tulsa, The Outsiders. Howell and the expo are offering an “Outsiders House Movie Tour” where Howell himself will narrate a VIP tour, guiding ticket holders around town to various film locations, including the house where much of the film was shot.

John Schneider

TULSA POP CULTURE EXPO Renaissance Hotel 6808 S. 107th E. Ave. | Tulsa tulsapopcultureexpo.com

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In 2007, Erwin was inducted into the Oklahoma Cartoonists Hall of Fame in The Toy & Action Figure Museum in Pauls Valley, Okla., after a career in the industry, stretching back to the mid-1980s. Erwin has contributed his art to some of the comic book versions of Star Trek as well as a Terminator comic series. In 2015, Erwin penciled the art for Citizen of the Galaxy, the first ever adaptation of a Robert Heinlein book into the graphic novel form.

Summer Glau

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One of those talented people is Steve Erwin, comic book creator for DC Comics.

But this year’s Tulsa Pop Culture Expo guest list is not limited to comic book industry stars. In fact, the names of the guests planning to attend T-Pop this year have been so big, conventiongoers from all over the country are coming to catch a glimpse of or take a picture with their favorite stars. One big guest is John Schneider, star of The Dukes of Hazzard, Smallville and The Haves and Have Nots. Another is Zach Callison, the voice of Steven Universe. Other notable stars include Karen Gillan (Dr. Who, Guardians of the Galaxy), Summer Glau (Firefly, Sarah Connor Chronicles, Arrow), Sean Gunn (Gilmore Girls, Guardians of the Galaxy), Butch Patrick (Eddie Munster from The Munsters), as well as Larry Wilcox, Robert Pine and Erik Estrada from the TV series CHiPs.

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Arts District, expects to educate attendees on the creative spirit that Oklahomans have exhibited in pop culture over the years. Many forms of pop culture, including film, music, video games, graphic novels and comic books have been contributed to by countless talented Oklahomans (some of whom will be in attendance at the expo), and OKPOP plans to highlight those people during the expo this year.

Karen Gillan

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for one of his latest contributions, the Black Panther series, which has served as the platform for the 2018 major motion picture of the same name.

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Twenty tips to help everyone mind their manners and not fight over the wishbone.

Please Pass the

Etiquette 28 NOVEMBER 2018


Showing grace is just as important as saying grace at your Thanksgiving meal. Knowing the proper

RSVP Let your host know right away if you can come or not. If you received a “family” invitation, let your host or hostess know how many of you can come.

Offer to contribute to the meal — but don’t dictate the menu Your best bet is to make your offer open-ended and follow your host’s direction. If you or your party have special dietary needs, it’s very gracious to offer to bring a dish that meets those needs. “Jen is a vegetarian — I’d love to bring a dish for her if that’s OK with you.”

mealtime etiquette makes the right impression on family and friends at your traditional gathering. Good

Don’t show up with uninvited guests There is usually room for one more at Thanksgiving, but this is something you must discuss with your host ahead of time.

Never have more than one cocktail before dinner There’s absolutely no excuse for being tipsy — or drunk — during dinner.

manners are also expected of children and young adults. Give them a few lessons in the days and weeks leading up

to the gathering. Correcting them at the table is too little too late, and will only disturb the other guests.

Avoid discussing controversial or painful family subjects

Wait Do not begin the meal until everyone at the table has been served theirs, and until the host or hostess has taken his or her first bite.

The cutlery that is furthest from the center of your plate is the cutlery you use first

This is a day to be together in a spirit of generosity and thankfulness for all you do have. Let it be so. Likewise, do not talk about your health — good or bad.

Stay at the table When you have finished your meal, don’t push your plate or chair away from the table. Be patient.

For instance, if your meal begins with soup or salad, the soup spoon or salad fork will be http://field5.com/en/freebies/ furthest to the right or left of the plate. Following this, you work your way toward the center. http://field5.com/en/freebies/ Respect your elders The dessert fork and spoon are http://field5.com/en/freebies/ Wait for the eldest adult to take generally found above the plate their seat at the table first. or served with dessert.

Offer to help with the cleanup

Dress appropriately At the very least, make sure your clothes are clean and pressed. As a true sign of consideration, dress one notch up. Your hosts are probably going all out, and your attire can either say, “I appreciate the effort you are making for all of us,” or “I thought you were ordering takeout.”

Napkins After being seated, simply unfold your napkin discreetly under the table and place it in your lap. Do not open your napkin by shaking it, and never tuck your napkin into your shirt.

Don’t blow it Never blow on your food — just wait until it cools. Also shake your salt and pepper on to your food, and never into the palm of your hand.

Don’t overstay your welcome Art of the pass

Posture perfect Sit up straight — avoid slouching, leaning or putting your elbows on the table. http://field5.com/en/freebies/

Family or non-family, this is one day where it is a great idea to pitch in.

Pass food to the right, and always pass the salt and pepper http://field5.com/en/freebies/ together. (They should stay on the table together throughout the meal.)

Pay attention to cues and hints about when it’s time to leave (but never depart without offering to help, and without thanking your host and/ or hostess).

Arrive on time Yes, it is a day of feasting, but that turkey is going to be done at some point and your hosts are trying to plan around that magic moment. If you arrive late, don’t expect anyone to wait for you.

Say thank you Unplug Put your cellphone away at the dinner table. You can check texts and Facebook and scores after the meal.

Hold your glass properly Tumbler glasses are held near the bottom, stem glasses are held by the stem, and a goblet is held by the bottom of the bowl.

A phone call or, better yet, a handwritten note of thanks to your hosts shows your appreciation for all their hard work.

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Tulsa's #1 Antique Mall Since 1996! I-44 Antique and Collectibles Mall has been Tulsa's #1 Antique Store since 1996. Come and see what our more than 50 vendors have to offer in our 9,000 square feet of dealer space.

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Following closely to the storyline of the beloved 1954 movie starring Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney, White Christmas is returning to the TPAC for a limited engagement of only eight performances. By Lindsay Morris Photos by Jeremy Daniel

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Oklahomans will undoubtedly connect to the storyline in White Christmas, Surratt says. “Oklahomans in particular are going to love it. [It reflects] the kind of people we are. We’re supportive of each other and uplift each other. I think you’ll find that in the characters in the script.” Before Surratt joined the cast of White Christmas, she was a dance major at Oklahoma

Dance continues to be a way of life for Surratt. “To me, choreography has always been a universal language; a way for me to express myself,” she says. For this Oklahoma girl, White Christmas will be a reunion of sorts. “It’s sort of a homecoming to be able to perform White Christmas. It’s a show I love so much, and it’s also coming home to Oklahoma, where family and friends who live there will be able to come to see me there rather than having to come all the way to New York.” It will be easy for the audience to follow along to the familiar

storyline and loveable characters. “Audiences love it; hearing all those familiar songs and being able to tap your toe,” Surratt says. The New York Times describes Irving Berlin’s White Christmas as “a cozy trip down memory lane that should be put on your wish list.” White Christmas features music and lyrics by Berlin, book by David Ives and Paul Blake, and is based upon the Paramount Pictures film written for the screen by Norman Krasna, Norman Panama and Melvin Frank.

IRVING BERLIN’S WHITE CHRISTMAS Tulsa Performing Arts Center 110 E. 2nd St. | Tulsa 918-596-7111 tulsapac.com

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Surratt is no stranger to Oklahoma. She credits her roots in dancing to Tulsa, where she spent her first six years of life and started dancing as a tyke. “You have no idea how excited I am to come back to Tulsa, where I originally discovered my talent for dancing,” she says.

City University and went on to become a Rockette from 2005-14. “There’s always been a Christmas show in every season of my life whether it was ‘White Christmas,’ Yuletide Magic at OCU, or the Rockettes.”

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If you have a sister, you haven’t truly bonded until you’ve hung Christmas stockings around the fireplace while singing the holiday tune “Sisters” from White Christmas. Now is your chance to see that magical song performed in person. And in case you don’t know the song, “Sisters,” surely you know Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas” and can appreciate

“The feeling you get from White Christmas is such a joyous experience,” says Karilyn Ashley Surratt, an ensemble member. “The storyline does a good job expressing that joy and laughter and carrying it into the New Year.”

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White Christmas tells the story of a song-and-dance team putting on a show in a cozy Vermont inn who fall for a stunning sister act in the process. The show is packed with dancing, laughter and some of the greatest songs ever written, including “Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep,” “Happy Holiday,” “Sisters,” and “Blue Skies.”

the Yuletide cheer that exudes from that age-old tune.

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Christmas isn’t Christmas unless there’s snow on the ground, right? Well, typically, our chances of a white Christmas in Oklahoma are pretty slim. But if you’re ready to get in the Christmas spirit a month early, hop on the closest one horse open sleigh — or your car — to see Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, coming to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center Nov. 20-25.

Nov. 20-21: 7:30 p.m. Nov. 23-24: 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Nov. 25: 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m.

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PREVIEW918.COM 35


Talk to Me

Turkey THE SIDES MAY BE ON POINT, THE DESSERTS DELECTABLE AND THAT CERTAIN UNCLE CAN BE ON HIS BEST BEHAVIOR. BUT IF THE TURKEY IS MORE FOUL THAN FOWLICIOUS, YOUR THANKSGIVING MEAL MAY BE A BUST. BY DONNA LEAHEY

It’s Thanksgiving and the family has gathered. The grandparents are there with gramma’s traditional sweet potato casserole topped with toasted marshmallows. All the uncles and aunts are there, and the kids’ table is already full of youngsters eyeing the side table laden with pie, cake, and brownies. Your cousin has brought her roommate and a vegan side dish; your other cousin has brought his fiancé and a green salad. The table is set and covered with bowls and platters full of stuffing, gravy, cornbread, mashed potatoes and cranberry sauce. The wine is decanted, the candles are lit, and the guests are

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hungry. All that’s lacking is that perfect, golden brown turkey to reign over the feast. This would be the worst time to discover your turkey didn’t defrost all the way and isn’t fully cooked. Fortunately, someone has your back. You have experts with more than 30 years of experience helping hosts through turkey emergencies. “The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line has more than 50 food experts behind you to help quickly,” says Sue Smith, co-director of the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line. “The No. 1 question that the Talk-Like receives every year pertains to how to thaw a turkey.” The answer to that question is important both for food safety and for a delicious feast. The recommended method is also the slowest. Put your frozen bird in the refrigerator, breast side up, still in its wrapper and resting in a shallow tray. A frozen turkey takes about one day

per 4 pounds to thaw, so your 20-pound turkey will take five days. If you don’t have that kind of time, you can defrost your turkey in cold water. “Again, leave it in the wrapper,” says Smith. “This time breast side down, for 30 minutes per pound. Be sure to change the water every 30 minutes.” So, using the coldwater method, your 20-pound bird will take 10 hours to defrost. And if you didn’t remember that you needed to defrost your bird until a few hours before it was supposed to go in the oven? “It’s not ideal, but you can cook it from frozen. It will take another few hours to cook, but you can,” she says. If you’ve got questions, like how much longer it will take, the Turkey-Talk Line can answer that question for you. If you prefer to avoid questions of defrosting entirely, Butterball has ready-to-roast turkeys that

go straight from the freezer to the oven, and fresh turkeys that haven’t been frozen. Fresh turkeys will have a “sell by” date that should be observed, but they do allow you to bypass the defrost step entirely. Whatever defrost or turkey choice you make, “Your meat thermometer is your best friend,” says Smith. “A properly cooked turkey should be 170 degrees in the breast and 180 degrees in the thigh.” Food safety isn’t a step you want to skip, and the Talk-Line Experts can help you with those questions as well. Spending the holiday weekend suffering from food poisoning is no one’s idea of a festive holiday. What’s the best way to cook your bird? There’s always a new trend for cooking method. You might prefer yours smoked, or deep-fried, or cooked inside an oven bag, or slathered in Twinkie filling (yes, that’s a thing


people do). While the experts at the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line would never want to squash your creativity expressed through turkey, “We recommend roasting your turkey in a shallow pan in a 325-degree oven. We think that’s the best cooking method. We’ve never tested the Twinkie method,” Smith says with a laugh. “People have asked us about White Castle Sliders, too.” Another common question has to do with the turkey taking longer to cook than expected. “Usually, we find out they’re opening the oven frequently to baste. Every time you open the oven, you let out the heat, and it increases the cooking time. It really doesn’t need to be basted,” says Smith. “Just brush it with vegetable oil before you put it in. We also recommend using aluminum foil to shield the breast after about two-thirds of the cooking time, to keep it juicy and moist while the rest of the turkey cooks.”

If you’re in need of help from the experts at Butterball Turkey Talk-Line, there are so many ways to reach out to them. You can get help through Facebook and Twitter. You can text your question to 844-877-3456. And for more than 30 years, they’ve been a phone call away. The Turkey Talk-Line experts are not just knowledgeable and helpful; they’re creative too. “If people realize they don’t have a rack, we can advise them to put carrots or celery under the turkey or make a rack from balls of aluminum foil. Anything to elevate the bird, get airflow underneath it.” You work hard to make your Thanksgiving celebration wonderful. Never forget you’ve got the Butterball Turkey TalkLine experts behind you to help you through big crises or small. “We’ll be there through Dec. 24,” says Smith, “empowering them to host like a boss.”

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IS THERE ANYTHING DUCT TAPE CAN’T DO? IT’S PROBABLY EASIER TO LIST THE THINGS IT CAN’T DO. By Rob Harmon

The origin of duct tape, like any legend, is a bit fuzzy and maybe a tad controversial. Some say it was the heating and cooling industry in the 1940s that came up with what people now consider the most versatile tool for fixing things. They used it to patch up connections between ductwork, hence the term “duct tape” and the silver color. Others claim that what became known as “duct” or “duck” tape was around long

before the 1940s, when long strips of cotton material called “duck cloth” were used to make shoes stronger in the early 1900s.

GADGET POUCH

has got to have a place to put handheld game consoles. Using Velcro and the duct tape color design of your choice, keep all your games together with a handy gadget pouch. Customize the size to match the number of game gadgets you have, or make it a bit bigger so your next Christmas present fits in as well.

In an age of the Nintendo 3DS, the Switch or the Sony PlayStation Vita, a gamer

Perhaps the most interesting story involves a worried mother of two Navy sailors during World War II. Vesta Stoudt, concerned about her sons’ safety, wrote a letter to President Roosevelt asking him to employ something she discovered in her factory that she called

HAIR AND LINT REMOVAL

Pet hair and other dust particles floating throughout the house or apartment always settle somewhere. The chairs, the couch or the clothes laid out for Saturday night seem to be easy targets. Duct tape is an excellent tool for removing

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“adhesive fabric tape.” After Stoudt explained how it would keep ammunition from getting wet, the president ordered Johnson & Johnson’s Permacel division to mass produce it. The fact that it helped objects become waterproof is supposedly where soldiers came up with the name “duck tape.” Whatever the real story is, one thing we do know for sure is that we’ve been using the stuff

all those clingers-on. Either roll up a ball of tape or put a couple pieces back to back and begin the extraction.

HANGING CHRISTMAS LIGHTS

The Christmas season will be here before you know it and duct tape can be a big part of it. Perhaps taping presents with duct tape is a little too much, but a more subtle and effective use could be to hang the holiday house lights. Using red and green tape can add some Christmas cheer to any set of lights where the old hooks or clips are simply nondescript.

Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

nonstop ever since. The racing industry’s been using it to repair the fiberglass bodies of race cars for over 40 years. NASA has stored it on every space mission since the Gemini missions of the 1960s. And, yes, we know it’s supposed to be a guy thing but women, men and children alike have discovered many uses for it, especially since it now comes in all kinds of colors. Here’s some uses you may not have thought of.

REPAIR A WINDSHIELD

This isn’t a permanent fix, but sticking duct tape to the inside of a broken windshield can keep the shattered glass in place long enough to drive the vehicle to an auto repair shop — as long as the tape and damage doesn’t compromise your ability to see.

HIDING EXTRA KEYS

Spare keys can be hidden and secured with a good piece of duct tape. If you’re likely to lose your keys somewhere, having an extra set is always smart. But where do you keep them? A good place to keep an extra car key is the driver’s side undercarriage. Duct tape


CLOSING CHIP BAGS Chip clips are all right, but sometimes hard to find. Having a roll of duct tape is like having unlimited chip clips. It’s simple, we know, but the smallest piece of duct tape can keep an opened bag of chips fresh and tasty until the next time you need a midnight snack. is waterproof and heatproof and can be peeled back and reapplied fairly easily. Find a spot outside your home and tape an extra house key for the occasion you lock yourself out. It’s much cheaper than a locksmith.

CHILDPROOFING

Use duct tape as a cheap, easy electrical outlet cover. Stick a small section over each outlet to keep little fingers out. The tape is sticky enough that a toddler shouldn’t be able to remove it.

OPEN A JAR

Stick one end of a section of duct tape to the top and side of a hard-to-open lid. Pull the loose hanging bit to the right, and the lid should open.

PANTS REPAIR

Holes in jeans have been a “thing” for a long time, but sometimes rain, wind and the elements floating around make you wish your favorite pairs of jeans didn’t have so many holes. Good thing we have duct tape. Depending on the style and color of the jeans, the oldfashioned silver duct tape is just fine. However, with all the new colors and patterns of tape you can find out there, choosing the right design to patch your jeans can make a fashion statement.

PEST CONTROL

Hang a few foot-long strips of duct tape to catch pesky flies and mosquitoes midair. Then roll up the tape and toss it in the trash for chemical-free pest control. Duct tape also can be laid out on the ground to catch mice, crickets or even small snakes.

SUNGLASSES CASE

These days, a lot of sunglasses are cheap, breakable and easy to lose. But whether you choose to buy disposable shades or you splurge on the $200 designer eyewear, a case is a good way to keep track of them. Find a color of duct tape you like and cut it to fit a bit larger than the measurements of your glasses. Add some Velcro for a cover flap and felt on the inside for a nice soft surface, and you’ve got your sunglasses case.

• Tape cords down on the floor • Tape wires together after splicing • Reattach rear view mirror

REMOVING SPLINTERS

Take a visit to the hardware store and purchase a measuring tape along with whatever fun, funky color or design of duct tape you can find, and you’ll be on your way to making slap bracelets. Depending on the style of tape, anyone can enjoy wearing these. Take the measuring tape and remove the metal at the end with a screwdriver. Cut a 6-inch piece of the measuring tape, rounding the ends. Cover it with your choice of duct tape, and you’ll be ready to slap that bracelet on.

• Decorative book cover • Twist a long piece into rope

Gather free carpet samples from vendors or home improvement stores, then duct tape the undersides together to make an inexpensive, funky area rug.

SLAP BRACELETS

• Hanging posters

• Repairing tail lights

HOME DÉCOR

Whether you’re a woodworker or you do a lot of work outdoors, splinters happen. One thing duct tape is useful for is removing small splinters. If you don’t have any tweezers readily available, duct tape is so sticky, it actually can pull out that little speck of wood that hurts like the dickens. Tape a small piece over the area where the splinter is, then slowly peel it off.

OTHER CLEVER IDEAS

• Patch ripped jackets

FIX A WATER BOTTLE

A strip of duct tape can permanently seal a cracked water bottle or pierced hydration bladder. Just be sure to dry the surface before taping your patch. You also can wrap plastic water bottles with duct tape before using them to prevent cracking and leaking.

WALLETS AND BELTS

Wallets and belts are easy to make and can match the rest of your clothes if you pick the right color of duct tape. For the belt, purchase a set of belt rings from your local fabric store, loop the duct tape through and cut to fit. Wallets in the classic silver or gray are the best. They’re flashy and make a statement when it comes time to pull out the credit card to pick up the check with buddies or on a first date.

• Hide wallpaper seams • Fix hoses • Fix fan belts • Use as art • Fix old book bindings • Bandage for deep cuts • Attach leg splint to broken leg • Wallpaper a room (expensive, but makes an interesting look) • Reinforce threering binder pages • Cover up empty drive bays • Fold in half and use as bookmark • Insulate ventilated biking shoes during cold weather • Set drinks in a roll. • Mend broken branches of plants and trees

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HH HOMEGROWN HEROES

Tulsa Pop Kids works with the pop culture enthusiast communities in Green Country to promote literacy through raising funds and awareness. And the organization has big plans for making it all happen. BY ROB HARMON || PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS Tulsa Pop Kids has a clear objective: to educate children through the arts and entertainment world of pop culture. With that solely in mind, the organization works with the pop culture enthusiast communities in Green Country to promote literacy through raising funds and awareness. And T-Pop Kids has big plans for making it all happen. For example, since its inception in 2017, it has donated thousands of comics to schools through book drives and individual donations. Other events, such as multiple visits to children in hospitals throughout the year, exciting movie premiere fundraisers, comic book giveaways, the Tulsa Pop Culture Expo (the second annual expo is this month, Nov. 2-4) and local scholarships have brought scores of pop culture lovers together to volunteer for the common cause of changing the lives of children in northeast Oklahoma. Perhaps the most enthusiastic volunteer of Tulsa Pop Kids is one of its co-founders, Arthur Greeno, who as a child experienced his own challenges in education. “When I was growing up, my family life wasn’t great. My mom was an alcoholic, my dad moved from job to job, and by the time I made it to 10th grade at Union, I had been through nine different school systems,” he recalls. “So, I was horrible at school, mainly because I had a horrible home life.”

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Throughout all those turbulent years, Greeno says he was always more likely to pick up a comic book over a text book. Fast forward a few decades, and Greeno and his pop culture brigade — many of whom are successful entrepreneurs, artists, restaurant owners and long-standing pillars in the community — have come together to pass along that same love of comics to the next generation of children in the Tulsa area. T-Pop’s annual convention, Tulsa Pop Culture Expo, brings in Christopher James Priest this year, famed Black Panther series creator, precursor to the 2018 movie of the same name, to not only be a part of the Expo, but also to visit north Tulsa’s Monroe Demonstration Academy to pass out Black Panther comics and encourage the students through his art and life. Through T-Pop Kids’ influence and a relationship built with Marvel Comics, every student will receive a comic and a ticket to visit the Expo. Another passionate volunteer of Tulsa Pop Kids, Emilee Waite, a veteran in the fashion industry as well as event-planning, says that once people see what the organization does, they become huge champions of the cause of encouraging children to read. “People have come out of nowhere to help us with our comic book drive. People have given us their entire

collections after seeing that we’re constantly out making a difference and it’s been such an overwhelming response.” Waite also says that in spite of a certain stigma comics have had in regards to hurting children’s reading ability, the opposite, in fact, is true. Over a decade of recent research shows that comics and graphic novels are a great way to reach reluctant readers. Tufts University studies as well as other studies developed at Rice, Harvard, and Ohio State University all suggest that the comic book

and graphic novel formats of literature are very useful for teaching new readers. Greeno says that through the organization’s hard work to promote literacy through comics and after doing their own research, they’ve found that most comics are written at college-level reading, which gives young readers who access comics an advantage over other children who don’t pick up a comic over the summer. “If you think about it, they don’t have Spiderman for second grade through sixth grade and


HOMEGROWN HEROES HH

Arthur Greeno

then another issue for sixth through 12th. It’s all basically adult-level writing.” “Children look at pictures and are able to figure things out better,” says Waite. “That’s what you get in comics. Children use their imagination and learn quicker.” Another natural byproduct of the efforts Tulsa Pop Kids has made in northeast Oklahoma, says Waite, is the internal changes made in the lives of many of its cosplaying volunteers. “We have a lot

of volunteers,” says Waite, “who probably wouldn’t have come out of the house, or the bedroom, or whatever. Now they have a family, a safe place to be themselves and serve the community at the same time. When we’re passing out comics and kids see their favorite superhero, they don’t know that it’s not that person [but, in fact a cosplayer]. They think it’s real, and it’s huge to these kids.” The volunteers get great personal satisfaction from serving the kids, says Waite, and it allows people a first-hand way to change a child’s life forever.

In addition to making a huge impact on literacy in schools and communities, the cosplaying volunteers of T-Pop visit hospitals at least once a month. “These children who are sick in the hospital, really fighting, battling illnesses,” says Waite, “when we visit them, dressed in our superhero costumes, it tends to give them a break from their everyday worries and life in the hospital.” After making such an impact on Tulsa’s kids through literacy advocacy, and a monthly effort to visit children’s hospitals,

the organization is now setting its sights on arts and entertainment scholarships and grants to the younger volunteers among its ranks. “We want to eventually support kids who want to draw comic books,” says Greeno. “If we can do this right, T-Pop Kids will eventually do things like provide scholarships to kids who want to shoot the next comic book movie or, on that note, music for the comic book movie. What if we can connect them to the school and the financial resources that will make that happen?”

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SS SPORTS SCHEDULE

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FOOTBALL

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL

Nov. 3 | @ Texas Tech | TBA Nov. 10 | vs Oklahoma State | TBA Nov. 17 | vs Kansas | TBA Nov. 23 | @ West Virginia | 7p

Nov. 3 | @ Baylor | TBA Nov. 10 | @ Oklahoma | TBA Nov. 17 | vs West Virginia | TBA Nov. 24 | @ TCU | TBA

Home games are played at Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium (Norman)

Home games are played at Boone Pickens Stadium (Stillwater)

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA FOOTBALL

DALLAS COWBOYS

Nov. 4 | vs Connecticut | TBA Nov. 10 | @ Memphis | TBA Nov. 17 | @ Navy | 2:30p Nov. 24 | vs SMU | TBA

Nov. 5 | vs Tennessee Titans | 7:15p Nov. 11 | @ Philadelphia Eagles | 7:20p Nov. 18 | @ Atlanta Falcons | Noon Nov. 22 | vs Washington Redskins | 3:30p Nov. 29 | vs New Orleans Saints | 7:20p Dec. 9 | vs Philadelphia Eagles | 3:25p Dec. 16 | @ Indianapolis Colts | Noon Dec. 23 | vs Tampa Bay Buccaneers | Noon Dec. 30 | @ New York Giants | Noon

Home games are played at H.A. Chapman Stadium (Tulsa)

Home games are played at AT&T Stadium (Arlington, Texas)

TULSA OILERS

Home games are played at BOK Center (Tulsa, Okla.) Nov. 1 | vs Rapid City | 7:05p Nov. 2 | vs Rapid City | 7:05p Nov. 3 | vs Rapid City | 7:05p Nov. 7 | @ Idaho | 8:10p Nov. 9 | @ Idaho | 8:10p Nov. 10 | @ Idaho | 8:10p Nov. 16 | @ Allen | 7:05p Nov. 17 | vs Allen | 7:05p Nov. 20 | vs Wichita | 7:05p Nov. 21 | @ Wichita | 7:05p Nov. 24 | vs Wichita | 7:05p Nov. 25 | vs Kansas City | 4:05p Nov. 27 | vs Allen | 7:05p Nov. 30 | @ Kansas City | 7:05p Dec. 1 | @ Kansas City | 7:05p Dec. 4 | vs Wichita | 7:05p Dec. 7 | @ Toledo | 6:15p Dec. 8 | @ Kalamazoo | 6:30p Dec. 9 | @ Fort Wayne | 4p Dec. 12 | @ Cincinnati | 6:35p Dec. 14 | @ Indy | 6:35p Dec. 15 | @ Indy | 6:35p Dec. 21 | @ Kansas City | 7:05p Dec. 22 | vs Kansas City | 7:05p Dec. 27 | vs Wichita | 7:05p Dec. 28 | vs Kansas City | 7:05p Dec. 30 | @ Wichita | 4:05p Dec. 31 | @ Allen | 6:05p Jan. 4 | vs Allen | 7:05p Jan. 5 | vs Idaho | 7:05p Jan. 6 | vs Idaho | 4:05p Jan. 11 | @ Rapid City | 8:05p Jan. 12 | @ Rapid City | 8:05p Jan. 16 | @ Utah | 8:05p Jan. 18 | @ Utah | 8:05p

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KANSAS CITY CHIEFS

Home games are played at Arrowhead Stadium (Kansas City, Mo.) Nov. 4 | @ Cleveland Browns | Noon Nov. 11 | vs Arizona Cardinals | Noon Nov. 19 | vs Los Angeles Rams* | 7:15p Dec. 2 | @ Oakland Raiders | 3:05p Dec. 9 | vs Baltimore Ravens | Noon Dec. 13 | vs Los Angeles Chargers | 7:20p Dec. 23 | @ Seattle Seahawks | 7:20p Dec. 30 | vs Oakland Raiders | Noon * Estadio Azteca Stadium (Mexico City, Mexico)

OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER

Home games played at Chesapeake Energy Arena (Oklahoma City, Okla.) Nov. 1 | @ Charlotte Hornets | 6p Nov. 2 | @ Washington Wizards | 7p Nov. 5 | vs New Orleans Pelicans | 7p Nov. 7 | @ Cleveland Cavaliers | 6p Nov. 8 | vs Houston Rockets | 7p Nov. 10 | @ Dallas Mavericks | 8p Nov. 12 | vs Phoenix Suns | 7p Nov. 14 | vs New York Knicks | 7p Nov. 17 | @ Phoenix Suns | 8p Nov. 19 | @ Sacramento Kings | 9p Nov. 20 | @ Golden State Warriors | 9:30p Nov. 23 | vs Charlotte Hornets | 7p Nov. 24 | vs Denver Nuggets | 7p Nov. 28 | vs Cleveland Cavaliers | 7p Nov. 30 | vs Atlanta Hawks | 7p

ALL TIMES CENTRAL // GAME DATES/TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE


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SC SPORTS CENTRAL

WATCHING OR TOSSING THE PIGSKIN WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY HAS BEEN AS MUCH OF A THANKSGIVING TRADITION AS PUMPKIN PIE AND STUFFING SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY.

BY JOHN TRANCHINA

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For many people, the Thanksgiving holiday is not complete without turkey, stuffing, and yes, football! With the late November holiday taking place in the midst of football season, and with the fall weather usually perfectly fitting for playing it, the sport has been interwoven with Thanksgiving for over a century. In addition to watching NFL games on TV, either as a prelude to the feast or while wallowing in a tryptophaninduced coma afterward, a lot of people have created their own football traditions

featuring family and friends on their own. President Abraham Lincoln first declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863. And historical data shows there have been football games being played on Thanksgiving for as long as the sport has existed, going back to one of the first games ever contested, between Yale and Princeton in 1876. The Universities of Michigan and Chicago also built a famous holiday rivalry, and by the late 1890s thousands of football games were taking place each Thanksgiving. Some of these


F r e n zy traditional matchups still continue to this day. When professional football leagues first caught on around the turn of the century, they immediately adopted the Thanksgiving Day tradition. Many saved the holiday for their title games or other big matchups, but when the National Football League was founded in 1920, it began hosting as many as six Thanksgiving contests each year. Some of the NFL teams that played on Thanksgiving Day in the 1920s-30s include the Frankford Yellow Jackets, Pottsville Maroons, Canton Bulldogs, and Buffalo All-Americans. The Detroit Lions began hosting games in their first NFL season in 1934, eventually becoming the league’s only one once Thanksgiving games were reinstated following World War II in 1945. In 1966, the Dallas Cowboys joined the Thanksgiving fun, thus beginning the ongoing standard of the Lions hosting the early game and the Cowboys playing at home in the mid-afternoon, except for two years in the ‘70s when St. Louis took over the second slot. Eventually, with more teams wanting in on the action, the NFL added a third prime-time game in 2006, with the participants

rotating around the league, thereby allowing other clubs more opportunities to play, and host, a Thanksgiving Day match. The NFL isn’t the only football being regularly contested on Thanksgiving, though. For example, there’s an annual high school game between Kirkwood and Webster Groves High School in the St. Louis area that has been played in most years since 1928, while many other states hold their high school state championship games on the holiday. In fact, that annual high school contest in St. Louis prompted the NFL to abandon its idea to have that city replace Dallas as the host for the second Thanksgiving game. The St. Louis Cardinals held games in 1975 and 1977 instead of Dallas, but local support for the high school match (which was played at the Cardinals’ stadium at the time) caused them to scrap the plan. Additionally, regular people across the country have adopted their own football traditions of playing their own contests. For a number of years, my family used to hold our own 4-on-4 or 5-on-5 touch football game out in the backyard before eating dinner, and it was always a lot of fun. We still talk about my gamewinning interception return for a touchdown back in the 1997 contest (well, I still do, anyway). We haven’t had the game every

year due to various family members’ health issues and other logistical issues, but it was always a fun, memory-making experience when we’ve done it. For those interested in establishing your own Turkey Bowl game, the first thing you need are players. Eight people, for a 4-on-4 game, is probably the minimum you can start with, but preferably more. Try to set the teams up somewhat evenly, separating any serious athletes on different teams, or have captains choose their players. You also need a football field, or something resembling one — a nearby park, a big backyard, even a low-volume suburban street would work. It doesn’t have to be regulation size. In fact, it probably shouldn’t be, as most participants will probably not be super-fit athletes ready to run 100 yards. At minimum, you only need a space that’s 50 feet long by maybe 25 feet wide. Determine where “out of bounds” is on both sides. You’ll then need to decide how far “10 yards” is on your field, or how far each team needs to go for a first down. It probably shouldn’t be 10 real yards, especially if your playing surface is only 50 feet (which is only about 30 yards) long. Make it so you need to go at least three or four first down distances before you score a touchdown — that will make it a little more challenging.

Then you need to determine the rules. Most of the games I’ve played in, and that I’ve heard about, are the standard “touch” football rules, with either one-hand touch or two-hand touches on the ball carrier counting as a tackle. Once the format is set, there are plenty of other details to attend to. How will you keep score? Since most people won’t be able to kick field goals (and most makeshift fields don’t have goalposts), extra-point kicks aren’t really feasible, so six points for a touchdown or seven? Or attempt two-point conversions after each score? Will “kickoffs” really be kicked, or punted, or just thrown? Should teams just start new possessions on the fictional 20-yard-line? How long will you play? Set a clock or just go until someone reaches 21 (or some other arbitrary number)? Is the car parked up the street out of bounds? Does the losing team pay for beer afterward? Try to answer as many of these types of questions as possible beforehand, to minimize arguments during the game, because we all know how competitive people get in the heat of the action. Good luck, don’t get injured and then enjoy the turkey and stuffing afterward while watching the games on TV.

PREVIEW918.COM 47


48 NOVEMBER 2018


PREV EW

PEORIA

LANSING

75

5TH 7TH

ORT

IN

NKF

6TH

T

I

33

MAI

8TH

N

3

TH

8

TH

9

TH

7

23

NS

10

TH

11

12TH

TH

RI V

13TH

75

13TH

AS

14

64

51

TH

E

15

R 1

31

11TH

1H

TCC

64

KA

14

4TH

FRA

ELG

NAT

TON

CIN

ROI

CIN

BOS

R

6

LDE

A

TH

Courthouse

15

3RD

12

75 AR

TH

5

Central Library

NE

OSU Medical Center

H

YEN

B

4T

BOU

Cox Business Center

D

CHE

Civic BOKCenter

R 17 3

4

O

BOK Center

HRIE GUT N STO HOU

C

2

14

1

DET

ND

6

Jazz Hall of Fame

Performing Arts Center

DEC

1

E B L UM E DO

2ND

KENOSHA

VER City Hall

ST

R

13

10

N

12

20

OOD ENW GRE

Brady Theater

MAI

DEN OOD ELW

244

Woody AR Guthrie Center

244

ONEOK Field

CHE

DY

51

D

N ERO CAM Guthrie Green DY BRA

OOD

11

BRA

64

19

5

ENW

16

Greenwood Cultural Center

GRE

Cain’s Ballroom

412

E

TULSA LOCATOR TL

DOWNTOWN TULSA

2

3

30

TH

2 4

32

51

CHERRY 5

ENTERTAINMENT

DINING

SHOPPING

THE BOXYARD

BOK Center | 2C-6 Tulsa Performing Arts | 3D-15 Tulsa Drillers | 3E-15 Tulsa Roughnecks | 3E-15

Albert G’s Bar & Q | 3D-13 Baxter’s Interurban Grill | B1-23 Caz’s Chowhouse | 2D-10 Chimi’s | 5A-2 Jason’s Deli | 5A-30 Juniper | 3D-1 Mexicali | 2D-11 MixCo | 2C-17 PRHYME | 2D-12 Sabores | 3D-33 Sisserou’s | 2D-20 Soul City | 5B-31 SMOKE. | 5A-32 Tavolo | 3C-3 Ti Amo | 2C-4

Abelinas | 3D-33 Beau & Arrow | 3D-33 Boomtown Tees | 3D-14 Dwelling Spaces | 3D-33 Garden Deva’s | 5D-37 Ida Red | 3D-33 Landella | 3D-33 Modern Mess | 3D-33 STEMcell | 3D-33 Sweetboutique | 3D-33 The Market Store | 3D-33 The Steel Horse | 3D-33

Abelina’s Boutique | 3D-33 Beau & Arrow | 3D-33 Blank Med Spa | 3D-33 Blue Sky Bank | 3D-33 Landella | 3D-33 Okie Dokie | 3D-33 Riley’s Wine & Spirits | 3D-33 Rose Rock Microcreamery | 3D-33 STEMcell Science Shop | 3D-33 Sabores | 3D-33 Sweet Boutique | 3D-33 The Steel Horse | 3D-33 Tonsorial | 3D-33

BARS Caz’s Pub | 2D-16 Club Majestic 2D-19 Mixco | 2C-17

PREVIEW918.COM 49


TL TULSA LOCATOR TULSA AND SURROUNDING AREAS

G

PREV EW

SPERRY

40

7

86TH N

OWAS

76TH N

56TH N

F

75

28

2 Chandler Park

Philbrook Museum of Art7

36

LEWIS

PEORIA

44

48

16

40 Oklahoma Aquarium

42

34 70 4

14

111

TH

5

46

81ST

64

18

91ST

7

33

101ST

71

9

20

BIXBY 71 6

129TH E.

2

51

61ST

GARNETT

121ST

38

MEMORIAL

3

29

MEMORIAL

50 NOVEMBER 2018

2

64

65

49 23

Oral Roberts Univ. Mabee Ct. 58

25

15

54

62 30

SHERIDAN

1

97

YALE

SAPULPA

2

LaFortune 80 Park

97

83

32

66

56

HARVARD

JENKS

41ST

St. Francis Hospital

41 61 24 59

A

31ST

97 Hicks Park

31

5

21

Jones Airport

22

68

169

MINGO

B

35

44

Turkey Mountain Park

65 44

97 51

23

93 21ST

Expo Square

91Whiteside Park

3

75

26

6

MIDTOWN

RIVERSIDE

94

UNION

244

ARKANSAS RIVER

C

Tulsa State Fairgrounds

12 29

Woodward Park St. John Med. Ctr.

11TH

129TH E.

27

GARNETT

Of 21 1Univ. Tulsa

48 MINGO

30

50

APACHE

PINE

MEMORIAL

DOWNTOWN BOK Ctr.

SAND SPRINGS

169

PINE

SHERIDAN

11

17 YALE

OSU Tulsa

75

LEWIS

D

Crawford Park

UTICA

412

11

26TH N / APACHE

PEORIA

51

GILCREASE EXPY

36TH N

Tulsa Air & Space Museum

HARVARD

Gilcrease Museum

Tulsa Zoo

36TH N MARTIN LUTHER KING

KWY ALE P TISD

GILCREASE MUSEUM

E

46TH N MINGO

19 Tulsa Botanic Garden

66

Mohawk Park Lake Yahola


TULSA LOCATOR TL 96TH N PRESENTED BY:

SSO

Redbud Valley Nature Preserve

52

CATOOSA 55

10

412

244

DINING

COUNTY LINE / 193RD E. 209TH E.

BROKEN ARROW 40 81

1ST ASPEN

23

COUNTY LINE

7

63 LYNN LANE

MAIN ELM

13

360 Home | D4-21 Antique Restoration | D4-11 Children’s Orchard | A5-18 Drysdales | 5C-65, 6B-65 Edible Arrangements | 4C-7, 5A-7, 6G-7 I-44 Antique Mall | 4C-3 Ida Red | 4C-50 Jules Boutique | 5A-14 Miss McGillicutty’s Antiques | 4A-54 The Plaster Paint Company | 8E-55 Tulsa Stained Glass | 5C-56 Ziegler Art & Frame | 4D-17

1

53 177TH E.

73

53 66

161ST E.

145TH E.

1ST

SHOPPING

Albert G’s Bar & Q | 4C-91 Amazing Thai Cuisine | 7B-63 Bistro At Seville | 5A-34 Brownie’s Burgers | 4D-29, 5B-29 Cafe Olé | 4C-35 Celebrity Restaurant | 5C-68 Chimi’s | 5B-2, 4C-2, 4D-2 Dave and Buster’s | 6B-44 El Chico | 6D-93 Fat Daddy’s Pub and Grille | 5B-64 Flo’s Burger Diner | 4D-1, 8D-1 Fuji | 5B-20 George’s Pub | 4A-61 Goodcents Deli Fresh Subs | 5A-9 Harden’s | 5D-48, 6B-48 Hooters | 5B-49 In The Raw | 4C-23, 5B-23, 7B-23 Incredible Pizza | 5B-46 Jason’s Deli | 4D-30, 5B-30 Jim’s Coney Island | 4D-26 Kitch | 4A -42 Lanna Thai | 5B-71 Los Cabos | 6G-40, 4A-40, 7B-40 Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar | 4A-58

Molly’s Landing | 8E-52 Mondo’s Ristorante Italiano | 4C-94 Napa Flats | 4A-25 ol’ Vine | 4A-5 Pizza Express | 4A-15 RibCrib | 4D-12 Ricardos | 5C-31 Rozay’s Wingz |5C-22 Rustic Gate | A4-32 Shiloh’s | 7B-73 SMOKE. | 4D-27 Tandoori Guys | B7-13 Ti Amo |5B-80 The Tropical |5C-62 Waterfront Grill | 4A-70 Wild Heart Marketplace & Cafe | 8E-53, 8D-53 Village Inn | B5-97, C5-97, C4-97

ENTERTAINMENT Circle Cinema | 4D-28 Dave and Buster’s | 6B-44 Got Wood | A4-24 Incredible Pizza | 5B-46 Loony Bin Comedy Club | 5B-38 POSTOAK Lodge and Retreat | 2E-66 Xtreme Racing and Entertainment | 7B-81

CASINO Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa | D7-10 Osage Casino | E3-19 River Spirit Casino Resort | 4B-83

EVERYTHING ELSE Blue Cottage | 4A-59 GrassRoots Health Care | 5A-33 Indigo Spa & Salon | 4C-36 Shears | 4A-41 spa810 Tulsa |5A-16

8

PREVIEW918.COM 51


GC GREEN COUNTRY SCENE

SCENTS OF PRIDE

FROM YESTERYEAR PIONEER CHORE TO MODERN DAY ARTISANAL ADVENTURE, SOAPMAKING IS INSPIRING HANDMADE MOVEMENT ENTHUSIASTS AND SOAPING. BY JENNIFER ZEHNDER Once upon a time, soapmaking was just another homestead task carried out by frontier families who tended to wood-fired cauldrons filled with a mixture of rendered lard or tallow, water, and wood-ash lye. As noted in Colonial Soapmaking — Its History and Techniques by Marietta and Arthur Ellis, soapmaking was often a seasonal affair timed around the fall butchering of food animals when resources were plentiful. On farms where butchering was not done, it was a spring effort that utilized winter ash and accumulated cooking grease waste. Today, thanks to modern manufacturing and distribution, access to a bar of soap is not nearly as labor intensive. However, some

52 NOVEMBER 2018

are rethinking the true cost of automation and convenience and opting for a handmade alternative — where the connection between craft and maker are not so distant. In the article, “Why Handmade Matters,” author Donna Maria Coles Johnson contends that handmade is the new American manufacturing — one that gives value to creative spirit; where items are handcrafted in an environment of joy, honor, and respect. These items can’t be duplicated and bring with them more beauty when crafted with heart. Such is the lure of soapmaking as technology gives folks both awareness of and access to handmade possibilities — makers, mentors, enthusiasts, ingredient suppliers, and future clientele.

Cody Miller

SOAPMAKING BY THE NUMBERS 1-2 hours to make one batch 1-3 weeks to cure (hot process) 4-6 weeks to cure (cold process) 5 pounds of soap per batch 4-5 ounces per bar of soap 16 bars of soap per batch 8 in-stock scents with others on the way $8 cost per bar $35-55 cost of ingredients used in one batch of soap Source: Cherokee Crow Soapery


GREEN COUNTRY SCENE GC soapmakers, there are two definitive methods — cold process and hot process. A mixture of an alkali (lye), liquid (distilled water, Aloe Vera juice, goat’s milk, etc.), and base (oils, fats) is used in cold process soapmaking. The chemical reaction that occurs when these ingredients are combined is called saponification, or making of soap. Once the mixture is saponified, it is no longer oils, fats and lye, but soap. In hot process soapmaking, heat is added to accelerate saponification, which reduces the cure time to one to three weeks. “Cold process soapmaking is where I started, and it’s where I’ll stay,” Miller says. “Cold process allows me to get as creative as I want with my soap bars, including more intricate designs. For me, the longer cure period is worth the wait.” For her, post saponification — when the mixture is still liquid — is when the real fun begins. Miller incorporates colorants, exfoliants, and scents into the mix. Pouring and pattern making techniques also help her to make each batch a work of art. After the soap is poured into its mold (container), it will rest for 24 hours, after which it is then cut into individual bars to cure for four to six weeks. Miller’s advice to others considering the soapmaking craft? It was love at first sight for Cody Miller when she saw the handmade soaps at a local boutique. The Tahlequah native was smitten with how unique and artistic these everyday products could be, and made it a goal to learn the craft. A short year later, Miller had a newfound appreciation for the art of soapmaking, as well as the start of a creative and profitable side gig. “I started researching soapmaking online and bought a few things at a time until I could finally make my first batch. I began sharing my soaps with family and friends. They all loved them, and soon I was getting messages asking when my next batch would be ready,” she says. “So, I decided to continue making it and have turned it into a business — Cherokee Crow Soapery.” For many, soapmaking offers a unique mix of chemistry and creativity. For true

“Do your research before purchasing and trying your first batch. There are many great online resources — soapqueen.com, brambleberry.com, YouTube, etc. Don’t get discouraged if it doesn’t work out in the beginning,” she says. “I researched for a good month straight trying to learn the lingo and science behind it all before I attempted my first batch. Even then, there was soap on every surface in the kitchen when I was done.” Once you master the chemistry, the creativity of soaping never gets old, Miller contends. “I love how I can turn something no one really thinks about, but uses every day, into a work of art. I enjoy offering people a way to feel good about what they put on their skin and the opportunity to know where their soap comes from.”

ALL ABOUT THAT BASE The following are some common bases used in soapmaking recipes. Avocado Oil: Makes a soft bar of soap; rich in vitamins A, B, D, and E. Castor Oil: Thick oil from the castor bean plant; draws moisture to the skin; creates amazing lather. Cocoa Butter: Solid and hard at room temperature; adds a luxurious and moisturizing feeling. Coconut Oil: Super cleansing and produces large bubbles; can be drying. Grapeseed Oil: Silky smooth feel; lightweight, thin texture; high in linoleic acid, antioxidants. Flaxseed Oil: Lightweight, rich source of fatty acids. Lard: Rendered pig fat, produces firm bars, stable lather. Olive Oil: Thick oil that moisturizes the skin, creates creamy lather. Palm Oil: Unique feeling to cold process soap; helps harden bars; creates lather paired with coconut oil. Rice Bran Oil: Rich in vitamin E, antioxidants; thick, moisturizing consistency similar to olive oil. Shea Butter: Luxurious, moisturizing on the skin; helps harden cold process soap. Safflower Oil: Mild, skin-loving oil; similar to canola or sunflower oil. Sunflower Oil: Rich in essential fatty acids, vitamin E; one of the more costeffective oils; conditioning lather for skin. Sweet Almond Oil: Full of fatty acids; lightweight, moisturizing consistency. Tallow: Fat rendered from meat other than pork; produces firm bars, stable lather. Source: Soapqueen.com

PREVIEW918.COM 53


SS STYLE + SHOPPING You’ve probably seen them — the lively, whimsical, metal statues of children adorning the Ronald McDonald House, or the lighted mandala candle statue greeting you at Yale Manor Apartments, or the ornate benches on the recently renovated Osage Trail. Maybe you’ve stepped into a local shop like Boomtown Tees and seen cheerful little metal magnets in the shape of the Blue Dome and other Tulsa icons. Or perhaps you’ve taken the chance to step into the gallery where these metal pieces and many, many others have their origin. Yes, we’re talking about Tulsa’s own Garden Deva — a shop, gallery, and artist’s dream spot that showcases the work of local artist Lisa Regan. Regan founded the shop as a way to promote her metal art, which she has been making for close to 35 years. Garden Deva has undergone a bit of a change in this past year, bringing in new partners in the form of Greg and Penny Hackbarth, and their daughter, Kari. The Hackbarths manage the business, while Regan continues to create art. But the overall purpose of Garden Deva and its team — to foster an artistic community and give Tulsa beautiful, happy art — is still as strong as ever.

torkComisos Art and Soul aokCoarisos A SHOP AND GALLERY, GARDEN DEVA OFFERS WHIMSICAL GARDEN AND HOME DÉCOR, PRIMARILY FROM THE CREATIVE MIND OF LISA REGAN. BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA & PHOTOS BY SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS 54 NOVEMBER 2018

“Garden Deva’s metal art is whimsical garden and home décor, all positive and hippie type art for your garden,” says Kari, who is a graduate of Oral Roberts University and a member of the local musical group The Lonelys in the off hours when she’s not serving as Garden Deva’s gallery manager. “It’s evolved over the last 20 years as Lisa has evolved in her artistry.” Kari and her parents became involved in helping Garden Deva on the business side out of love for Tulsa and Regan’s art. “My dad, Greg, runs the shop. He makes sure we have enough inventory, manages the team that handles


AR TH

STYLE + SHOPPING SS

B CK A H KARI

For those interested in seeing what’s on display, Garden Deva invites you to stop in anytime

“Garden Deva has always been known for fun events that bring

Among Garden Deva’s plans for the future are more community events and more artwork, of course. “Lisa has been expanding into painting and wood mediums, which is way different from what we’ve done in the past,” says Kari. “Tulsans can also expect to see the work of more artists — traditional art as well as innovative.”

GARDEN DEVA SCULPTURE COMPANY 1326 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa 918-592-3382 gardendeva.com

R

In addition, Garden Deva is dedicated to fostering a sense of community. At the beginning of this month (Nov. 2–3), Garden Deva will host its 19th annual studio party. More than 40 artists from all over the country, and more than 30 musicians, will be showing their stuff over the two-day period. There will also be food trucks in Garden Deva’s parking lot, fire dancers, and other entertainment.

people together, and we plan to continue doing those throughout the years,” says Kari.

TO

Regan’s upbeat, whimsical artwork can be seen all over the area. “We did the Bees on Brookside, and the fence paneling for Youth Services in the Pearl District. Almost every school in Tulsa has our work peppered inside and out, cheerful kids waving and all kinds of little sculptures,” says Kari, listing off some examples that you’ve probably seen as you’ve gone about your local doings.

“It’s such an amazing place where people can just come by and say, ‘I want this cool thing for my house.’ Our designers can then create it,” says Kari. While much of the artwork on display is Regan’s, Garden Deva also is open to displaying and selling the art of other local artists. Between Regan’s creativity and the other artists on display, the gallery’s art is always changing, so it’s fun to stop in often and see what’s new.

the doors are open. “We have a gallery full of art — from cute little holiday pieces to large, ornate metal sculptures and everything in between,” says Kari. Popular items and great gifts are available for indoor or outdoor display, including Christmas trees, elves, reindeers, rein-dogs, rein-cats, magnets, and OU and OSU themed objects. “Our gifts can be customized with names and dates, so they’re great for weddings and birthdays,” says Kari.

CA

“It’s really turned into a partnership between Lisa and us,” she adds. “Lisa is our creative director. We manage the shop and gallery and help manage events, so she has more time to dedicate to her artistry.”

Of course, Garden Deva produces artwork for individuals too, some on a commission basis, and some as retail items available at the gallery and at a few select local shops like Boomtown Tees. The gallery, located at Third Street and Peoria Avenue, is open to the public so shoppers can browse, make a purchase, or place a special commission.

LO

stock, and makes sure building is in running order. My mother is the queen of creative marketing ideas. She helps us reach out to new people, nonprofit groups and people our art can be beneficial for. I manage the gallery and office,” says Kari.

Monday-Friday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday: Closed

PREVIEW918.COM 55


HF HEALTH + FITNESS

Preventing Suicide THERE ARE NO EASY ANSWERS FOR HELPING SOMEONE STRUGGLING WITH DEPRESSION. BUT HERE ARE SOME TIPS FROM EXPERTS. BY ROB HARMON

What would you say if you were told that in every single day of 2017, one passenger jet plane crashed somewhere in the United States, killing an average of 123 people on board? Every day of the year — 123 people killed in a plane crash. And what would you say if out of all those 45,000 or so people from last year, only a few of them were mentioned in the news because they were famous? If you knew that to be true, you’d probably be outraged and demand steps taken to prevent 2018 from being a repeat of the previous year. Many times, when someone commits an act of suicide, there seems to be more questions than answers. Fortunately, what experts know about the issue can help provide us hope that we can make a difference in preventing many tragedies in the future. Of course, there are many risk factors that play a part in suicidal thoughts and behavior. These don’t automatically cause suicide but can certainly increase the risk. Depression, anxiety, substance abuse, chronic pain, family violence, combat, firearms in the home, physical abuse, as well as mental and sexual abuse, can

56 NOVEMBER 2018

all be contributing factors. Certainly, any one of us can have some of these factors in our life and never consider suicide, but the numbers out there tell us that the more aware we are the better we can take care of ourselves and those around us. There are steps that every one of us can take to safeguard ourselves, those around us that we love and our fellow citizens. As we become more aware of the issue, let’s take a look at some answers to questions Tulsans can use to help each other.

WHY DO PEOPLE ATTEMPT SUICIDE? Typically, those who attempt suicide don’t do it because they want to die, but because they are in so much pain psychologically that it feels like the only solution. Sometimes people who think of suicide describe it as an internal struggle comparable to tug-ofwar between the hopeful part of them that wants to live and the hopeless part of them that wants to die. Julie Summers, director of outreach and prevention at Mental Health Association Oklahoma (MHAOK), says that it’s all about hope. “The goal in working with someone who is feeling suicidal,” says Summers, “is to tap into hope by offering support and options — that is, to help someone get to a mental health professional for evaluation.”

IS IT POSSIBLE TO PREDICT SUICIDE?

“Yes and no,” says Summers. “Though some people hide their suicidal thoughts deep inside, most of the time, if someone is feeling suicidal, it’s scary enough that they want to talk about it. Usually, someone who is suicidal will exhibit some of the warning signs that they may be in danger.” Some warning signs include depression, as well as withdrawing from friends and activities they typically thrive doing. Sometimes using euphemistic references to death like “ending it all” or wanting to “disappear” are expressed by those with suicidal thoughts. Suddenly giving away prized possessions or engaging in highrisk behavior with little or no concern for their safety can also be signs. If you notice someone displaying any of these warning signs, it’s important to ask how they are doing, express concern and ask the question, ‘Are you feeling like hurting yourself?’

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF SOMEONE SAYS THEY’RE THINKING ABOUT SUICIDE? Asking the question, ‘Are you feeling like hurting yourself?’ might actually make someone more likely to attempt it, right? No. Not true. That’s a false notion that can do more harm than good. The truth is that opening up about a person’s internal struggle usually brings more relief than despair. Most people

with suicidal thoughts are yearning to open up and get help. “Listening to someone patiently; with no judgment, can make it easier to persuade a person who is suicidal to get help,” says Summers. “Going with them or sending them with a loved one to talk with a mental health professional means helping them get to a therapist, a mental health crisis center, or an emergency room. Preventing suicide means taking the risk of asking the question, then helping someone get to the help they need.” In recent years, an evidencebased practice model for preventing suicide has emerged called QPR that trains mental health professions as well as members of the general public on how to prevent suicide. Just like the life-saving technique of CPR, QPR is intended to teach individuals how to recognize the warning signs of suicide.

WHAT IS QPR? Q stands for Question. Contrary to a popular notion, asking a person if they are thinking about suicide does not increase the possibility of that person committing the act. In fact, asking someone about potential suicidal thoughts is an important first step in prevention. P stands for Persuade. Persuading a person to seek help is the important next step. You don’t have to be a professional to persuade someone to get help;


the only requirement is listening. Saying things like, “Let me help,” or “Let’s go get some help,” and then taking the next step is all you need to do. R stands for Refer. There are professionals standing by at the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK. Local, trained mental health professionals with the Mental Health Association Oklahoma are ready to answer your call at 918585-1213 or 405-943-3700. QPR is not a treatment in itself. It is just an important starting point in preventing suicide through taking action that leads to hope for a vulnerable person.

WHAT ARE OTHER WAYS TO HELP PREVENT SUICIDE? Helping to prevent suicide can come in many forms. Helping people build connections with others and reaching out to people who seem to be marginalized in society can provide hope in a powerful way. Being conscious of how much a smile, a kind word, or a small

gesture of compassion may help someone who is feeling low is important because you never know who may be struggling with thoughts of hopelessness. Reaching out to someone who appears to be lonely, connecting others who seem to be isolated with other people, helping home-bound people get out into the community—all of these are ways to have transforming impact on people who may be considering suicide. Kellie Wilson, co-director of Employment First at MHAOK, sees such a transforming effect of hope through a pan-handler outreach program sponsored by the city of Tulsa, United Way and MHAOK, called A Better Way. “When individuals are given the opportunity to work and get connected with life-changing services,” says Wilson, “such as housing and physical and mental health care, they are given hope. That hope helps them feel more connected with their community and helps them see a path to recovery and a better life.”

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r e t s n o M d l u o The Sh WI WEIGH-IN

You can’t force yourself to do something simply by invoking “should,” even though most of us do it so often we don’t even notice.

By Tiffany Duncan Should-ing is something I’ve been dealing with pretty strongly lately, as the year begins to wind down and I still have yet to drop 11 the last 20 pounds I was hoping to lose before Dec. 31 (at the time of writing, this it’s the beginning of October). I’ve lost 10 since January, and luckily am sustaining that mark, but not much more. This is prime ground for thoughts like “I should be farther along” to creep in, and creep in they certainly have.

Getting back out there on Riverside Drive.

“You can’t ‘should’ yourself into anything,” and “stop ‘should-ing’ on yourself ’” are phrases often heard around the counseling office I go to once a week. It’s a mindset switch our counselors try to imbed into us counselees, meaning that you can’t force yourself to do something simply by invoking “should,” even though most of us do it so often we don’t even notice. Think about it. Running in the background of most people’s heads at all times are thoughts like: I should be farther along in life by now; I should be trying harder; I should stop smoking; I should be waking up earlier; I should not eat Oreos; I should run every day; I should eat more salad; I should be skinnier; I should, I should, I should… Most of those things don’t seem so bad, right? Ah, but that’s precisely

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where the trouble comes in. Taking things that we are told are good for us and framing it with the word “should” will always only do two things. The first is that we will immediately feel shame that we are not doing those things currently, and the second is that our brains immediately rebel against whatever we are “shoulding” ourselves with, because no one likes to feel shame and we are always trying to return to a place of perceived calm. The word “should” is a true monster of a word. The instant we tell ourselves we should be doing something is the same instant we are likely going to do the exact opposite of that thing. In order to achieve real, lasting change, the impetus must come from a place of self-acceptance — not judgment — or you’re dead in the water before even beginning.

But it isn’t fair to put myself under the “should” microscope without considering what else has happened this year: having to share space with another family for over five months while our home was under renovation; walking through a debilitating

Proof that I ran two days in a row.

month of severe, untreatable vertigo; and starting a new job that has been so stressful, my brain and body physically couldn’t handle anything else at the end of the day. Grace for yourself and personal circumstances always, always need to be a part of the equation. Another way to think about should-ing is a concept called “secret rules” I heard about recently on a podcast. Jon Acuff, a New York Times bestselling author, was on the That Sounds Fun podcast talking about his new book, Finish, in which he discusses what he believes holds people back from achieving their deepest goals and dreams. He thinks it comes down to what he


WEIGH-IN WI

FOUR THOUGHTS I USE TO FIGHT THE “SHOULD” MONSTER Framing thoughts from a place of gratitude I get to run and use my two functioning legs; I get to breath in fresh air and be thankful for healthy lungs. I once heard someone say something like, “Someone out there is desperately wishing for the exact thing you are complaining about.” Powerful.

in the face and call it out for what it was: a lie. So I signed up for my first official 5k, because 3 miles is much more attainable to a scared new runner than 13 miles. And guess what — I’ve been able to work out because the debilitating pressure is no longer there! Well, for the most part, anyway. It’s still hard to show up and slow down the Should Monster before every workout. But at least I’m coming at it from a place of selfacceptance — from accepting my beginner fitness level without shame — and working upward from there.

Let your “end game” be your motivation Instead of should-ing and shaming yourself into an overwhelming, blind goal, decide instead what your own personal end game is: I want to run a 5k to prove to myself what I’m capable of; I want to try a yoga class so I can overcome my fear of looking silly in front of others; I want to quit smoking to improve my lung capacity. I want to feel healthy and energetic; I want to not quit on myself for once.

This could look like anything — a mom never taking time for herself because perhaps a secret rule she’s come to believe is that doing anything for herself is selfish, therefore she lives burnt out and exhausted. Or someone else staying in a job he hates rather than pursuing one he loves because he believes that the “right” job is the one that brings home the most bacon. It could also look like never attending a fitness class because you believe it’s for “those kind of people,” or that people will laugh at you (personal experience with this one). For me, I realized the “secret rule” that’s been driving me this year

is that the culmination to all this work should be (you notice that? “should”?) running the Route 66 half-marathon in November, even though I have never run anything close to 13 miles, ever. The farthest I’ve ever run was 8 miles during cross-country in high school, and that was over 11 years ago. Yet I’ve been shoulding myself to death over this halfmarathon, thinking that nothing else is a sufficient enough goal. But guess what this secret rule has led to? Me eagerly rising before work each morning to fit in 5-8 miles for months so I’ll be ready? Nope. More like feeling so much debilitating pressure and intimidation at the thought of 13 miles that I wasn’t running at all. In this situation, “should” only led to shame, and shame to one place: nowhere. I’m not sure why or how running the half became the standard for success in my head, but it did. So I decided to look my secret rule

It’s amazing what can happen when you simply let yourself off the hook.

Instagram handle:

rightyes_rightno_918 Blog handle:

rightyesrightno918.com

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“Never compare your beginning with someone else’s middle” is a quote I repeat to myself over and over and over. I like to pretend I have those blinders on that horses wear to keep their eyes focused forward, because one glance, one thought in the wrong direction, and it’s all over.

terms “secret rules” we all live by. Secret rules are a set of beliefs — often unexamined and privately held — that define how we live our life, but in reality are actually total lies we unnecessarily burden ourselves with.

What have you been should-ing yourself with? What secret rules are you living by that are keeping you from actually starting? Once you can answer this, you will be amazed how quickly the practical steps to change will present themselves.

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Never, ever, EVER compare yourself to others

Work hard, play hard. No way was I missing out on this mac and cheese grilled cheese with buffalo chicken at the Tulsa State Fair.

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I begin a workout with thoughts like “No matter how little or how far I run today, I’ve already done the hardest part, and that’s showing up at all.” Praising yourself for the smallest things paves the path to building sustainable habits. Remember, shame only ever leads to our minds rebelling and shutting down.

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Motivating myself not from a place of shaming pressure, but a place of celebrated progress

Utilizing as many free and cheap resources as she can find in the 918 area, routinely forsaking her fitness comfort zone to discover effective workouts, and cooking more intentionally from home, Duncan is publicly documenting her progress in each issue as she works to lose 30 pounds in 2018.

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TULSA ARTS DISTRICT

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Live Music

Check Website for Dates!

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LP LAUNCH PAD

AN UNEXAMINED MINDSET IS NOT A GOOD PLACE FROM WHICH TO RUN YOUR BUSINESS. ALL THOSE UNRULY DOUBTS AND “I CAN’TS” CAN SINK YOU. By Michele Chiappetta Mindset. The dictionary defines it as a mental attitude. An inclination. I’ve even seen it defined as an intention — like the yoga practice of focusing your thoughts, will, and energy on what you want to see manifest in your life. In church terms, it’s like a determined prayer that won’t let go until it gets an answer. However you define it, mindset is key to success. So, how do successful entrepreneurs, freelancers, and small business owners maintain the right mindset for what they do?

KNOW YOURSELF Begin with knowing your why — your values and your end goal for owning your business. Your why is what’s going to get you out of bed when you’re feeling tired, and handling the work when a project goes haywire. It will move you through the valley of low income and sustain you on the peak of too much work, too little time.

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Your why will be unique to you. That’s good, because your personal drive and goals make you and your business stand out from the crowd. Embrace it, because it’s going to help you. And honestly, the reasons people launch into working for themselves are many, but the result is the same — feeling like you’re doing what you were meant to do is a wonderful place to inhabit. My own why is simple, yet motivating — freedom. I work for myself because I love helping others, and I want to do that while being able to work when I want, from anywhere. This freedom gives me a fuller life than I have when I’m working for an employer 9 to 5. Andrea Neil, a Tulsa area yoga instructor and co-founder of Three Point Author Services, explains her drive to work for herself this way: “I want to find a way to do what I truly love,


while making a good living — on my own terms. I couldn’t see how to do that within a corporate structure.”

setbacks, and resets to keep moving forward into the success you want. You must believe you can do it. Or you’ll never do it.

Both Andrea and I are among the group of people who have spent years working for traditional employers before leaping into our own businesses. Other people start their entrepreneurship early in life.

EXAMINE YOUR MINDSET

Lollie Moore of Girl About Tulsa says, “I work for myself as an influencer and content creator. I’ve been self-employed since college and began working with a local startup a month ago. I feel like I live in the best of both worlds. I work out of 36 Degrees North with the brand and have a home office as basecamp for my adventures.” Kersten Anderson of Speakeasy Market Strategies and The Marketing Dame says, “I started working in my field and found it difficult to find opportunities specifically in the area I wanted to specialize in,” she says. “So I took a job, and it was the poor treatment I got there that pushed me over the edge to quit.” Anderson was 25 at the time. She says that as she searched for a corporate job, a mentor suggested she start her own business, which she did. It’s still going strong six years later. “I’ve always known I would be an entrepreneur [since I was raised by them], but didn’t realize I would start at such a young age,” she says. Running her own business, she says, allows her to think out of the box and mentor others to do so as well.

GET RID OF “I CAN’T” What all these stories share is the idea that running a business for yourself is possible — if you want it to be. And that means jettisoning the words “I can’t” from your mindset. It helps to be in the right frame of mind for pursuing your own business, because it’s going to take plenty of hard work, discipline, late nights, sacrifices,

The Greek philosopher Socrates once said, “An unexamined life is not worth living.” In terms of working for yourself, let’s adapt that saying. An unexamined mindset is not a good place from which to run your business. All those unruly doubts and “I can’ts” can sink you. So, you can’t allow them rent-free time in your head.

YOUR TASK THIS MONTH: Start examining how you think about yourself and your business. Identify areas where you tend to think small or put limits on yourself: “I don’t know enough about marketing. I hate selling myself. I’m no good at networking.” Rewrite these ideas into positive goals you can achieve: “I can learn about marketing or hire an expert. My business helps people, so it’s important to tell others about it. With practice, I’ll become better at making connections.” Spend a little time each day meditating on how you want to see yourself and your business. And notice how your mindset affects your productivity. Soon, you’ll be much faster at seeing when you’ve rolled back into limiting thinking, and more equipped to switch to that growth mindset that’s so useful for tackling the challenges of running a business.

I’d love to hear your suggestions for what I should investigate over the next several months in terms of entrepreneurship in Tulsa. Feel free to message your ideas to Preview 918 on Facebook (which I can see anytime), or email me, or share ideas on Twitter or Instagram with the hashtags #lovethe918 or #tulsasmallbusiness.

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IT’S EASY FOR US TO BE IMMUNE TO THE EFFECTS OF A PLACE WE LIVE SO NEAR, BUT PROXIMITY DOESN’T MEAN DECREASED VALUE. ROUTE 66 IS A PRIME EXAMPLE. By Lindsey Mills

America’s Main Street was born in 1926. Well, 1926 is the generally agreed upon time for the birth year of the famed highway. It would take many years and many re-routes, however, before reaching true completion. Then, it would evolve to include or exclude different streets and lengthen to stretch farther west. Then, it would nearly meet its end. As modern day interstates twisted their way through the country, travelers began to choose the much faster roads for long trips, and Route 66 began seeing more tumbleweeds than

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vehicles. Businesses closed and signs were taken down. I’m reminded of a scene from the children’s movie Cars: Lightning McQueen finds himself in what’s practically a ghost town. Residents still wander the mostly empty streets, now lacking the charm and energy from its heyday when visitors would travel from all over just to cruise through the legendary highway and visit unique destinations. Interstate travelers didn’t know what they were missing out on. Today, of course, Route 66 has been revived. You may have seen

the Historic Route 66 signs when traveling around Tulsa. Visitors still travel from all over the world to embrace the iconic road, to visit the towns it passes through and to snap photos while visiting legendary landmarks. I’ve been on parts of the highway before, I’ve certainly seen the signs around town, but I wondered what it would be like to cruise the Mother Road as originally intended. Turns out that’s quite difficult because there have been so many changes over the years. However, Google Maps highlights where the current Route 66 snakes through the country, and it’s easy

enough to follow the modern-day route. I zoomed in on the map and spent a few hours driving Main Street America. I had some coffee, stopped in some stores, and admired the murals dotting many buildings. In one store, I chatted with a woman about the many Route


in admiration at the things we see all the time. It’s easy for us to be immune to the effects of a place we live so near, but proximity doesn’t mean decreased value. I thought about the lady’s skeptical attitude of why foreigners would be drawn to the road that passed just outside her door. I thought of my own rolled eyes when I noticed tourists buzzing around my own hometown when I was young. Perhaps tourists see something that the locals have become blind to.

What do we do now? I want to hear your suggestions, whether you’re a native Tulsan or a newbie like us.

ast, Breakf & Dinner Lunch

of Hom Five Genera tio emade Goodn ns ess!

Homemade Hot Rolls Made Us Famous!

Seeing it through new eyes Oftentimes, we take the things nearest to us for granted. We roll our eyes while others gawk

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Why not travel around the world to visit a famous stretch of road that is home to iconic places and pit stops filled with character? Why not take a drive down that road and give business to little restaurants and local shops? Why not flaunt your tourist status, take photos of all the landmarks and purchase novelty souvenirs?

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I agreed with her, commenting that a lot of the time it’s just the novelty of something different that draws foreigners somewhere new. As I paid for my books and left, though, I found myself a little sad that we could so easily downplay the historical significance and overall attraction of the famous Route 66.

Are you looking for a way to spice up a Saturday night, or shake up your Sunday afternoon? Roll the windows down, crank the music, and go check out what you might have taken for granted.

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66 travelers she sees regularly. “I ask them why [they are traveling],” she says. “A lot of the people who come in are from overseas, and I wonder why they would come to see this, of all things?”

Travelers are drawn to Route 66 from all corners of the world, people longing to drive the scenic highway and experience everything it represents: freedom, restlessness and adventure. I tried to remember that and hold on to that same longing as I made my day trip across Tulsa.

We want to know where to hang out, pig-out, shop ’til we drop, and everything in between. If you know a place with a great story, share it with us so we can go check it out. Every day is an adventure with our little family, and I’m sharing our story because I think some people can relate. Follow us on Instagram and/ or search #TakenWithTulsa or #NewInTtown to check out our latest adventures as we seek out new experiences and share our advice on how to embrace Tulsa.

Grandma’s Cooking Keeps You Coming Back!

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ET EATS + TREATS

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Y MEALSGIVING. E K R U T ITIONALLS THIS FRIEND D A R T E N ON THWOW YOUR PA I P S Y L ULD IEND PUT A FCRIPES THAT SHO SE RE ITH THE

S R E N T R PA I N E N DI

Since the traditional Thanksgiving meal is usually reserved for immediate family, it doesn’t leave much room to celebrate with anybody outside of that circle. But luckily, “Friendsgiving” has become a holiday all on its own over the past couple of years. If you are unfamiliar with the term, it’s exactly as it sounds — a meal spent with good friends. Friendsgiving is typically a much less formal version than the sit-downaround-the-turkey type spent with family, and it generally includes lots of tasty comfort foods and some good craft beer or wintery cocktails. Here are a few recipes to help you throw your own delicious Friendsgiving, or to take to a friend’s house to celebrate.

MULLED WINE

Adapted from sweetandsavorybyshinnie.‌com Warm, spiced, and full of comfort, mulled wine is the perfect way to welcome your guests in from the cold. INGREDIENTS:

 cup cranberries, fresh or frozen ½ 1 orange 1-2 cinnamon sticks 10 cloves, whole ½ cup sugar 1 cup orange juice 1 bottle red wine, dry DIRECTIONS:

by TIFFANY DUNCAN photos by CHELSI FISHER

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1. Cut orange in half, then quarter one half. Push two or three cloves into the outer skin of the quartered oranges. 2. In a large pot, combine all ingredients except for wine. 3. Turn the heat up to mediumhigh and slowly heat the mixture, stirring occasionally until the sugar is dissolved. 4. Once sugar is dissolved completely, bring mixture to a boil and cook until it is thickened and reduced by half, about 15-20 minutes. 5. Reduce the heat to low and pour in wine. Simmer until wine is heated through, but do not let it boil (wine will evaporate). 6. You can strain the wine and pour into a crockpot to keep it warm. Serve garnished with a twist of orange peel, extra cranberries, and cinnamon stick if desired.


BACON-WRAPPED POTATO BITES WITH SPICY SOUR CREAM DIPPING SAUCE Adapted from thekitchn.com Crunchy bacon combined with oven-baked rosemary potatoes…this is the dangerously addictive side dish you never knew you were missing out on. INGREDIENTS:

1 pound small or medium red potatoes 1 pound thick-cut bacon 1 ½ tsps. minced fresh rosemary 1 Tbsp. olive oil kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 8 oz. sour cream 1-3 tsps. hot sauce of choice salt and pepper, to taste DIRECTIONS:

1. Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 400 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. 2. Wash and dry the potatoes. Chop them into 1-inch pieces, keeping the chunks roughly the same size even if they aren’t exactly the same shape. 3. Put potatoes in a medium pot, cover with salted cold water, and bring to a boil. Once the water begins to boil, cook the potatoes until just fork tender, 3-4 minutes (you want them to be almost, but not quite, fully cooked through so they won’t fall apart in next steps). 4. Drain the potatoes and put them in a large bowl. Add the rosemary, olive oil, kosher salt, and freshly ground pepper, to taste. Toss until potatoes are evenly coated. 5. Cut the strips of bacon into thirds, widthwise. Wrap each potato bite in a piece of bacon, securing with a toothpick. Place potatoes on baking sheet an inch or two apart (may need to do more than one batch to fit them all). 6. Cook the potatoes for 15 minutes, then flip each piece. Cook for another 15 minutes until the bacon is cooked through and as crispy as you like it. 7. Mix the sour cream and hot sauce in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Serve.

EATS + TREATS ET ICEBOX CHAI PIE

Adapted from passthesushi.com This recipe is a bit time-consuming and very hands-on, but it is absolutely worth every bit of effort. With butter, cinnamon, cream, and toasty hazelnuts and almonds, combined with the warmth of black chai spices, this pie is autumn dessert heaven. (*Note that this recipe calls for at least two hours in the freezer.) HAZELNUT CRUST INGREDIENTS:

½ cup raw hazelnuts, toasted and finely chopped ½ cup raw unsalted almonds, toasted and finely chopped ¾ cup graham crackers, crushed 3 Tbsps. brown sugar 4 Tbsps. butter, melted CINNAMON PUDDING INGREDIENTS:

3 Tbsps. cornstarch ¾ cup brown sugar (or sugar in the raw) 2 eggs, beaten and set aside in a mediumsized bowl 3 cups milk

 tsp. cinnamon ½ 1 Tbsp. butter 1 ½ tsps. pure vanilla extract

CHAI WHIPPED CREAM INGREDIENTS:

¾ cup liquid chai concentrate, sweetened and chilled

1 cup heavy whipping cream

DIRECTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Place nuts on a baking sheet and toast for about 10 minutes, checking them often. Remove from oven and allow them to cool and remove the skins from the hazelnuts. Finely chop both hazelnuts and almonds. 3. Place the graham crackers in a resealable bag and crush into fine crumbs using a rolling pin or bottom of a glass. 4. In a medium-sized bowl, mix the graham cracker crumbs, chopped nuts (reserve some of the hazelnuts for a finishing garnish), brown sugar, and melted butter until well combined. Press the mixture firmly into the bottom and sides of a greased springform pan. Bake for 12 minutes, or until golden. Remove from heat and let cool. 5. In a heavy-bottomed, medium-sized saucepan, mix together the cornstarch and brown sugar. Add one cup of cold milk and mix well until no clumps remain. Turn on medium heat and gradually add the rest of the milk, stirring constantly and cooking until bubbly (but not boiling). Cook for 2 more minutes and remove from heat. Add cinnamon and stir.

6. In the bowl set aside with the beaten eggs, gradually add one cup of the milk mixture and mix until combined. Pour the egg mixture back into the remaining milk mixture in the saucepan. Cook the pudding mix until almost bubbly, but don’t allow to boil. Reduce heat and cook for two more minutes, then remove from heat. 7. Add in the butter and vanilla, and stir. Pour the pudding mix into the pie crust, and place in the freezer for a couple of hours, until frozen through. 8. When you are ready to make the chai whipped cream, place the cream, chai concentrate, mixing bowl and whisk attachment in the freezer for at least 10 minutes. 9. Remove ingredients from freezer and pour the whipping cream and chai concentrate into the chilled bowl. Beat on high until weak peaks are formed, about 1 minute. 10. Spread whipped cream over the pudding layer and garnish with extra toasted hazelnuts or graham cracker crumbs. Store in the freezer, allowing to thaw for at least 20 minutes before serving.

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RB RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER

We are tapped into what’s trending and delicious, giving you a first-hand look at where to go, what to eat, where the best cocktails are, and how to map out your culinary adventures in the 918. Whatever your mood, whatever you crave, the 918 has a restaurant or bar sure to satisfy. From local classics to chain favorites, a variety of options catering to every palate and pocketbook are available. For those on the move, search our website database with over 200 restaurants and bars in nearly 20 categories.

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CATEGORIES AMERICAN ASIAN BAKERY BARBECUE BARS + PUBS BREAKFAST BRUNCH COFFEE DELI FINE DINING GLOBAL ITALIAN MEDITERRANEAN MEXICAN PIZZA SEAFOOD SPECIALTY STEAK SWEETS 70 NOVEMBER 2018

FEATURED LISTINGS ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q 2748 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-4799

SEE AD | PAGE 37

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA

777 W. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 800-760-6700 SEE AD | PAGE 11

BUFFET

5320 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-749-7755

SEE AD | PAGE 67

ALBERT G’S BAR-B-Q

421 E. 1st St. | Tulsa 918-728-3650 SEE AD | PAGE 37

AMAZING THAI CUISINE 1232 E. Kenosha St. | Broken Arrow 918-258-8424 SEE AD | PAGE 25

BAXTER’S INTERURBAN GRILL

717 S. Houston Ave., Suite 100 | Tulsa 918-585-3134 SEE AD | PAGE 89

BROWNIES

2130 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-0320 SEE AD | PAGE 89

CAFE OLÉ

3509 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-745-6699 SEE AD | PAGE 99

CAZ’S CHOWHOUSE

18 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-588-2469 SEE AD | PAGE 60

CAZ’S PUB

21 E. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-585-8587 SEE AD | PAGE 60

CELEBRITY RESTAURANT

3109 S. Yale Ave. | Tulsa 918-743-1800 SEE AD | PAGE 81

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

6709 E. 81st St. | Tulsa 918-960-2723

1304 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-587-4411 SEE AD | PAGE 67

HWY. 66 DINER

SEE AD | PAGE 67

DAVE & BUSTER’S

6812 S. 105th E. Ave. | Tulsa 918-449-3100 SEE AD | PAGE 35

MCGILL’S ON 19 REPLAY RIFFS

EL CHICO

9825 E. 21st St. | Tulsa 918-663-7755

SALSA

SEE AD | PAGE 31

SLICE

FAT DADDY’S PUB AND GRILLE

8056 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-872-6206 SEE AD | PAGE 35

FLO’S BURGER DINER 19322 E. Admiral Place | Catoosa 918-739-4858 SEE AD | PAGE 34

FLO’S BURGER DINER 2604 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-398-7102 SEE AD | PAGE 34

FUJI

8226 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-250-1821 SEE AD | PAGE 31

GEORGE’S PUB

108 N. 1st St. | Jenks 918-296-9711 SEE AD | PAGE 74

CHIMI’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

FLIP SIDE

GOODCENTS DELI FRESH SUBS

8222 E. 103rd St. | Tulsa 918-364-7827 SEE AD | PAGE 35

THE PERFECT CUP TOBY KEITH’S I LOVE THIS BAR & GRILL

HOOTERS

8108 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-250-4668 SEE AD | PAGE 42

IN THE RAW

3321 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-1300 SEE AD | PAGE 98

IN THE RAW

6151 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-524-0063 SEE AD | PAGE 98

IN THE RAW

216 S. Main St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-6111 SEE AD | PAGE 98

INCREDIBLE PIZZA

8314 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 539-302-2681 SEE AD | PAGE 3


RESTAURANT + BAR FINDER RB JASON’S DELI

8321 E. 61st St. | Tulsa 918-252-9999 SEE AD | PAGE 35

JASON’S DELI

1330 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-599-7777 SEE AD | PAGE 35

MOLLY’S LANDING

3700 N. Old Hwy 66 | Catoosa 918-266-7853 SEE AD | PAGE 34

MONDO’S RISTORANTE ITALIAN 3410 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-561-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 98

JIM’S CONEY ISLAND 1923 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-744-9018

SEE AD | PAGE 66

JUNIPER

324 E. 3rd St. | Tulsa 918-794-1090 SEE AD | PAGE 7

LANNA THAI

7227 S. Memorial Drive | Tulsa 918-249-5262 SEE AD | PAGE 63

LOS CABOS

300 Riverwalk Terrace #100 | Jenks 918-298-2226 SEE AD | PAGE 9

LOS CABOS

151 Bass Pro Drive | Broken Arrow 918-355-8877 SEE AD | PAGE 9

LOS CABOS

9455 N. Owasso Expressway | Owasso 918-609-8671 SEE AD | PAGE 9

MARYN’S TAPHOUSE AND RAW BAR

400 Riverwalk Terrace, Suite 180 | Jenks 918-946-2796 SEE AD | PAGE 74

MEXICALI BORDER CAFÉ 14 W. M.B. Brady St. | Tulsa 918-582-3383 SEE AD | PAGE 61

MIXCO

3rd and Denver | Tulsa 918-932-8571

VISIONS BUFFET

NAPA FLATS WOOD‑FIRED KITCHEN 9912 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa 918-948-6505

SEE AD | PAGE 81

OL’VINE FRESH GRILL

3523 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-747-9463 SEE AD | PAGE 99

TAVOLO

427 S. Boston Ave. | Tulsa 918-949-4498 SEE AD | PAGE 7

ROSE ROCK MICROCREAMERY

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St, #35 | Tulsa 918-396-8001

THE BISTRO AT SEVILLE 10021 S. Yale Ave., #103 | Tulsa 918-296-3000 SEE AD | PAGE 81

SEE AD | PAGE 45

ROZAY’S WINGZ AND THINGS

2627 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-271-5051

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO 6024 S. Sheridan Road | Tulsa 918-499-1919

SEE AD | PAGE 81

SEE AD | PAGE 65

RUSTIC GATE CREAMERY

101 W. Main St. | Jenks 918-528-6227

TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO 219 S. Cheyenne Ave. | Tulsa 918-592-5151 SEE AD | PAGE X

SEE AD | PAGE 74

PRHYME: DOWNTOWN STEAKHOUSE 111 N. Main St. | Tulsa 918-794-7700 SEE AD | PAGE 7

RICARDOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5629 E. 41st St. | Tulsa 918-622-2668

SEE AD | PAGE 13

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO RESORT

8330 Riverside Parkway | Tulsa SEE AD | PAGE 100

5 O’CLOCK SOMEWHERE BAR FIRESIDE GRILL

SABORES

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., Unit 27 | Tulsa 918-212-9065 SEE AD | PAGE 43

SHILOH’S

2604 N. Aspen Ave. | Broken Arrow 918-254-1500 SEE AD | PAGE 65

SISSEROU’S CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT 107 N. Boulder Ave. | Tulsa 918-576-6800

LANDSHARK BAR MARGARITAVILLE 918-995-8080

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE

918-995-8600

SEE AD | PAGE 7

S COREBOARD SPORTS BAR

8125 E. 49th St. | Tulsa 918-895-6433 SEE AD | PAGE 63

VILLAGE INN

2745 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa (918) 742-3515 SEE AD | PAGE 66

VILLAGE INN

3302 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa (918) 622-5015 SEE AD | PAGE 66

SEE AD | PAGE 61

SMOKE. WOODFIRE GRILL

1542 E. 15th St. | Tulsa 918-949-4440 SEE AD | PAGE 66

JOHNNY ROCKETS

TROPICAL RESTAURANT & BAR

SOUL CITY

1621 E. 11th St. | Tulsa 918-582-7685 SEE AD | PAGE 30

SWEET BOUTIQUE

The Boxyard | 502 E. 3rd St., #13 | Tulsa 918-900-2238 SEE AD | PAGE 43

TANDOORI GUYS

2039 W. Houston St. | Broken Arrow 918-893-2450

VILLAGE INN

5230 S. Yale Ave. | Tulsa (918) 496-1207 SEE AD | PAGE 66

VILLAGE INN

8320 E. 71st St. | Tulsa (918) 254-7623 SEE AD | PAGE 66

WATERFRONT GRILL

120 Aquarium Drive | Jenks 918-518-6300 SEE AD | PAGE 9

WILD HEART CAFÉ

501 S. Cherokee St. | Catoosa 918-739-4754 SEE AD | PAGE 34

SEE AD | PAGE 37

TIKI DINER

PREVIEW918.COM 71


FT FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Serve

th

Brining has plenty of advocates, and understandably so. It’s a flexible technique that makes a remarkable difference in the moistness of the turkey meat, especially the breast. BY TIFFANY DUNCAN PHOTOS BY CHELSI FISHER 72 NOVEMBER 2018


Bird

FOOD FOR THOUGHT FT

at

Maybe this is your first year to make the turkey, and you are envisioning yourself holding that triumphantly cooked bird aloft, John Cusack Say Anything style. Or maybe you are looking to impress your in-laws and are going for that perfectly goldenbrowned, Norman Rockwell style bird. Or maybe this year you just want to cook a turkey that isn’t as dry as the Gobi desert for once. Whatever your reason, we’re here to help. Turkey is not the most forgiving dish to make (there’s a reason most of us only cook it once a year), but for better or worse it has seemed to become a rite of passage. Depending on who you talk to, one person will swear by a certain cooking method while another sticks to something totally different, making it all the more confusing. Here we will talk about one tried-and-true method — brining — that will help you to prepare a turkey delicious enough that hopefully Aunt Carol will be too busy chewing to nag for once (aren’t the holidays just swell?).

You’ve probably heard the term brining before, but maybe it occupies those obscure, intimidating echelons of cooking terms that leave you withering in fear. Or perhaps it calls to mind pirates scuffling around on a salty ship deck. But all brining really means is infusing salt into the turkey before cooking it to tenderize the muscle and make it juicy. There are two kinds of brining: wet and dry. Wet brining is

the method most people are probably familiar with, which involves totally submerging the bird in salted water for 12-24 hours prior to cooking. The water should be around 6 percent salt by weight — about 1 ¼ cups kosher salt per gallon. Some people will add aromatics like rosemary, orange peel, cranberries, etc., or some will submerge the bird in chicken stock rather than water. Some of the muscle proteins are dissolved by the penetrating salt, which will result in far less moisture loss once the turkey is cooked, leading to a much juicier, plumper, more tender bird.

There are a couple of problems associated with the wet brining method, however, The first is actually creating real-estate in the fridge for such a large pot to keep the turkey submerged and cold while brining — a difficult feat during the peak of holiday food prep. You may also use an ice chest for this method, but again it must stay cold for food safety purposes, and adding a fresh bag of ice or frozen water bottles every few hours is not the most ideal. The second issue is that, yes, the turkey will be juicy and moist, but it will also likely be relatively bland due to so much water retention. Instead of the flavor of turkey, you may just get the flavor of tap water. Not appealing, right? Some people seek to remedy this by adding the aromatics to the brining solution, or using chicken stock instead. But both of these efforts can be fruitless (and

expensive — that’s a lot of stock) because the only molecules small enough to really pass through the membrane of the skin is salt. The large and flavorful molecules of aromatics like onions, carrots, celery, and spices do not actually make it into the meat. Moving away from the more traditional method of wet brining, dry brining has become a much more popular method in recent years. Dry brining allows the meat to retain moisture while also not being watered down. According to seriouseats. com, here’s a trusted method for dry brining that you may be interested in trying out this year:

You will need H  alf a cup of Diamond Crystal kosher salt (or 6 Tbsps. of Morton’s kosher salt) 2 Tbsps. baking powder*

Directions 1. Pat down your turkey with paper towels (salt will adhere to drier meat better). Combine the salt and baking powder in a bowl. 2. Generously sprinkle the salt mixture on all surfaces by picking up the mixture between your thumb and forefingers, holding it 6-10 inches above the bird, and letting the mixture shower down over the surface of the turkey for even coverage (you may not need all of the salt; in some cases, depending on bird size, less than half will be OK).

Turkey Your turkey does not have to be completely thawed before brining (either by wet or dry). You may allow it to finish thawing as it brines or, if you prefer, it can be totally thawed (a totally thawed turkey will be OK in the fridge for up to two days before roasting). If you plan to brine, do not purchase a turkey that says “Kosher,” “Enhanced,” or “Self-Basting;” as all of these have already been salted. If using a rub or herbed butter to flavor, make sure to actually massage it under the skin, not just on top of. Another good way to impart flavor is to make slits in the turkey’s skin and insert whole garlic cloves to roast along with the bird. Instead of putting your aromatics in a wet brine solution, choose instead to place the neck bones and gizzards (those little beauties found inside the cavity of the turkey, many times to the shock of a first-timer), along with an array of diced root vegetables in the roasting pan to flavor the pan drippings. For extra decadent, drippy deliciousness, toss veggies in maple syrup or honey before roasting. Once you remove the turkey from the oven, allow the meat to rest for at least 20 minutes before cutting; this will allow the meat to retain more of its juices as it cools.

3. Transfer the turkey to a rack set in a rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate uncovered, for 12-24 hours. 4. Without rinsing, roast the turkey (see seriouseats.com for recommended methods), omitting any additional salting steps called for in your chosen recipe. *Adding baking powder to the salt rub will improve the turkey’s roasted skin. Not only does the baking powder work to break down protein in the skin, causing it to crisp and brown more efficiently, but it also combines with the turkey juices to form microscopic bubbles that add surface area and crunch to the skin as it roasts.

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J JENKS See our feature on page 92

74 NOVEMBER 2018


J JENKS

PREVIEW918.COM 75


h t r o p wa dee e v i d BY MICHELE CHIAPPETTA AND ROB HARMON

76 NOVEMBER 2018

Whether you're going crabbing, oyster-bar hopping, searching for fried catfish or tucking into our epic sushi scene, you're going to enjoy each of these seafood experiences.

Would you believe that Tulsans don’t eat as much of the seafood they should to maintain a healthy diet? It’s true. In fact, nearly nine out of 10 Americans don’t eat the recommended amount of fish from the official USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans. But we really don’t have any excuse to miss out on this lean, healthy protein here in Green Country — because it can be incorporated into our diet pretty easily, in a lot of ways. Fresh seafood is shipped to this part of the country within a day of being caught. And wild-caught seafood is available at most grocery stores year-round. Quick and easy seafood recipes abound in most cookbooks at home or can be found on the internet for some surprisingly tasty meals. In addition to cooking it yourself, Preview 918’s favorite restaurants around town provide such amazing tasting seafood that we really should be indulging ourselves by eating on the healthy side more often. From hand rolled sushi to plump, juicy shrimp, or buttered lobster to melt-inyour-mouth, Alaska-caught salmon, Atlantic cod or mahi mahi from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico — all of these and more are waiting to land in your belly at these excellent restaurants around Tulsa and northeast Oklahoma.


Amazing Thai

Amelia's

1232 E. KENOSHA ST. B ROKEN ARROW

Ask people what Thai cuisine is, and they’ll probably talk noodles or brothy soups like pho. And that’s true. But seafood is very much a part of Thai cuisine like you’ll enjoy at the relaxed, homey Amazing Thai, which is owned by a great chef with roots in Thailand. Add shrimp to their many already tasty dishes, such as the Pad Thai. For appetizers, try the deep-fried squid or the tod mun — a fish cake made with ground fish and shrimp. If you like spicy soups, get the Tom Yum, made with shrimp, mussel, squid, fish, and spices.

122 N. BOSTON AVE. T U LSA

For a touch of class and entertaining dining near Guthrie Green, stop in at Amelia’s. Guests can sit at the chef ’s counter and watch as dishes are prepped and cooked on the unique Grill Works Argentinian style grill. Enjoy wines from around the world, as you savor some amazing seafood delights — house-cured king salmon lox, surf and turf satay, grilled Scottish king salmon, and campfire rainbow trout during dinner. Don’t forget to enjoy the salmon Nicoise salad too, available at their Saturday brunch.

Celebrity Restaurant 3109 S. YALE AVE. T U LSA

Bluestone Steakhouse and Seafood 10032 S. SHERIDAN ROAD T U L SA

Tucked in the corner of a small shopping area on the corner of 101st Street and Sheridan Road in south Tulsa, Bluestone may fly under the radar of many Tulsans. But once you’ve walked in and eaten there, you’ll happily be back again and again. With its soothing low lighting and elegantly laid back vibe, excellent drink menu and superior service, you’ll enjoy high-class dining with a comfortably easy feel, perfect for a special dinner with family and friends. The lobster bisque is delightfully flavorful. The crab and shrimp-topped halibut is perfectly cooked. Finish off your meal with one of their tasty, moist cakes large enough to serve at least two people.

Artichoke Restaurant 2610 N. 3RD ST.

L A NGL EY

The drive out to Langley, Okla., is completely worth it for a chance to visit the Artichoke Restaurant. This world-class dining establishment is just off highway 82, in an old cozy farmhouse not far from Grand Lake. With every visit, you get superior service and excellent cuisine. Their robust seafood menu makes them the unrivaled cream of the crop in northeast Oklahoma. Yummy crab cakes, mouthwatering trout, tasty tilapia and succulent salmon — it’s all more than one person can expect to enjoy in one sitting. That’s why people come from miles around to visit again.

As a part of Tulsa’s history — the place where visiting musicians and Tulsa’s elite have dined over the years — Celebrity continues to deliver superb meals and excellent service. It’s a favorite for many families, especially during the holidays when just about every inch of the restaurant is decorated with holiday décor and lights. Among some of their most popular dishes are their signature shrimp cocktail and the fried catfish, lightly breaded and seasoned to perfection. You can also enjoy salmon and halibut. Save room for their Caesar salad, made tableside.

Fuji 8226 E. 71ST ST. T U L SA

Where better to enjoy fresh fish than at a sushi restaurant? Fuji has served sushi and other authentic Japanese delicacies in delightful style for many years. Sushi rolls, nigiri, sashimi, hand rolls, makimono, sushi burritos, ramen and more — you can get it all here and leave satisfied in mind and belly. Try the spicy hot Nobu’s five fish roll (lobster salad, fried shrimp, scallops, bass, tuna, and more). If raw sushi isn’t your thing, don’t worry. Fuji has plenty of other seafood options, like tempura fried soft-shell crab, baked scallops, baked mussels, coconut shrimp, teriyaki salmon, and more.

George's Pub 108 N. 1ST ST. J ENKS

Want to chill out with some great beers and ales along with your seafood meal? Head down to Jenks, and stake out a table or spot at the bar at George’s Pub. Grab $2.50 domestics during happy hour, Monday–Friday (4–7p.m.). Hang with the Sooner Gooners to watch Arsenal soccer (aka, the real football to its fans). Snack on everything from batter-fried cheese cubes and housemade queso to their signature Guinness battered fish and chips and their variety of fish tacos — spicy Thai, grilled, blackened, or traditional.

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Juniper 324 E. 3RD ST. TULSA

Known for its bright, modern atmosphere and farm-to-table sensibilities in every dish, Juniper features a lot of intriguing tastes that are worth exploring. The sweet carrot soup is a fan favorite, so order some, and then settle in to tasting the seafood options on their menu. Grilled shrimp with lime ginger marinade, king crab cakes with apple napa slaw, seared ahi tuna salad, king salmon with corn edamame succotash, brown butter trout with French onion schmear, and seared halibut with sundried tomato wild rice — it’s all a delight.

Lanna Thai

Maryn's Taphouse & Raw Bar

7227 S. MEMORIAL T U L SA

A long-standing favorite for Thai food in the Tulsa area, Lanna Thai offers traditional regional Asian dishes served with loving attention to detail. The atmosphere is relaxed and welcoming, so you can chill comfortably with pals and dig in to some delicious food. Start with the Goong Hom Pah, marinated shrimp wrapped in wonton wrappers and deep-fried, or the Poh-Taek, a spicy and tart soup with shrimp, scallops, calamari and salmon. Enjoy the Tum Talay, a salad made with shrimp, scallops, calamari, salmon and vegetables.

In the Raw 3321 S. PEORIA AVE. TULSA 6151 S. SHERIDAN ROAD TULSA 216 S. MAIN ST.

B ROKEN ARROW

Hip and happening, In the Raw is known for its fun, electric atmosphere, great views from the hill at its Sheridan location, and of course, amazing sushi. You can’t go wrong with any of their signature rolls. From simple, traditional yellowtail and salmon rolls to decadent combination rolls like the Jobé Roll (tempura shrimp, crab, asparagus and eel, topped with tuna, salmon, yellowtail and avocado), you can’t make a bad choice. If you like a more traditional fish entree, try their blackened salmon or the tasty macadamia halibut.

Los Cabos 300 RIVERWALK TERRACE

J ENKS

9455 N. OWASSO EXPRESSWAY 151 BASS PRO DRIVE

OWASS O

B R OK EN A R R OW

Sometimes, you just want to sit by the water and pretend you’re on a beach somewhere. While that’s not exactly easy to do in land-locked Oklahoma, Los Cabos comes as close as they can to creating a beachy feel to their atmosphere as they serve up great drinks, live music, and tasty food. The seafood enchiladas are a popular choice — crab, shrimp, scallops and fresh avocado rolled into corn tortillas. They serve a nice ceviche that combines shrimp, scallops and tilapia. Another favorite is the camarones alambres — jumbo shrimp stuffed with pepper jack cheese and jalapenos, then wrapped in bacon and grilled.

400 RIVERWALK TERRACE JE NKS

Hand-crafted cocktails, 40 beers on tap, a raw oyster bar — Maryn’s is a little gem worth going out of your normal routine to experience. Definitely try their thick cut bacon flight (chocolate covered, black peppered, hickory smoked, and cinnamon crusted options). Also check out their oysters — raw on the half shell; chargrilled with garlic butter and Parmesan cheese; or smothered in lobster, spinach and cream cheese, then breaded and broiled. They also serve a host of other seafood dishes — lobster rolls, po’boys, tuna nachos, fish tacos, ceviche, crab cakes, salmon picatta, sesame crusted tuna and more.

Molly's Landing 3700 N. OLD HWY. 66

C ATOOSA

Laid back and eclectic, Molly’s Landing is a lot like a superbly casual resort restaurant after a day spent playing at the lake. Walk past the garden where they grow herbs and vegetables for cooking, then enter the kitschy lodge interior and enjoy great service and reliably good meals every time. Molly’s flies in fresh seafood so you’re guaranteed the best. Right now, they’re featuring wild isles salmon from the Shetland Islands (Scotland), as well as bigeye swordfish, fresh cod, lobster, tilapia, spicy Guajillo shrimp, halibut, outstanding crab cakes, shrimp cocktail, and more.

78 NOVEMBER 2018


Napa Flats Wood-Fired Kitchen 9912 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY TULSA

Napa Flats Wood-Fired Kitchen’s Costa Rican white fish, farmed in the country’s rainforest, is a delectable menu item. This light and flavorful dish is healthy and delicious and sure to become one of your go-to meals when you eat at this relaxed spot overlooking the Arkansas River near River Spirit Casino Resort. Napa Flat’s grilled salmon in garlic sauce, with a side mound of veggies, is a memory maker. Or just enjoy drinks and a starter at the sports bar, like the conburi shrimp. It’s spiced perfectly and served over a heaping helping of slaw — six fried shrimp so good, you’ll request an additional order to enjoy it some more.

Nola's 1334 E. 15TH ST. T U L SA

Seafood will always fit somewhere in between Creole and cocktails. Need we say more? Cold or hot oysters for appetizers always gets the ball rolling. And pan seared blue lump crab cakes make the perfect addition. But at Nola’s, that’s only just the beginning. Crawfish, boudin or shrimp starters are also an excellent way to settle into a great meal at this Cherry Street restaurant with a New Orleans kick. For dinner, try the Dauphine Street Red Fish or the lobster mac and cheese, and you’ll be bound to pass a good time, my friend.

PRHYME Downtown Steakhouse 111 N. MAIN ST. T U LSA

PRHYME Downtown Steakhouse is the whole package. Fantastic service. Fine-dining ambience. Spectacular dishes. An upscale dining experience par excellence. Enjoy five-star seafood dishes at this Tulsa Arts District establishment anytime you’re downtown for drinks, a date, a family celebration, or a night at the BOK Center. The restaurant’s 10-ounce broiled lobster tail is a buttery, sweet delight of epic proportions, served with chanterelles, Gruyere cheese, and haricots verts. But no matter what you order, you’ll never forget your PRHYME experience.

ol'Vine Fresh Grill 3523 S. PEORIA AVE. TULSA

For insanely creative seafood dishes, look no further than ol’Vine Fresh Grill on Brookside. From their woodgrilled menu, pick the sugar cane shrimp skewers. A Caribbean-influenced dish, it’s basted with an absolutely gorgeous dark rum glaze, caramelized to infuse the shrimp to complete perfection. Or try their seared Ahi tuna for a magical experience. With an intensely tasty miso-sake sauce on top, it’s the bomb. Pair your order with a wine from the carefully selected drink menu. Great location. Great seafood. We’d say ol’Vine has both.

Sabores THE BOXYARD | 502 E. 3RD ST. T U LSA

You can’t find too many places that have both authentic Mexican food and outstanding seafood, but this place has it. The spiced salmon with Mexican style risotto, sundried tomato jalapeño sauce and zucchini is so flavorful that you’ll wonder where it’s been all your life. Or try the shrimp diablo with rice and beans, and you’ll think you’ve been transported to Veracruz or some other Gulf Coast fantasy location.

Sisserou's Caribbean Restaurant 107 N. BOULDER AVE. T U LSA

Sisserou’s Caribbean Restaurant lives up to its name. If you’ve never been to this Tulsa Arts District treasure at the corner of Archer and Main, you’ll truly feel like you’ve arrived at a Dominican kitchen in the middle of the Caribbean Sea. It’s the smell of fantastic spices and herbs upon entering the place that absolutely takes you away to another time and place. Sit down and enjoy some delicious accras (cod fish cakes) for an appetizer or the Jamaican themed Escovitch red snapper dish for a completely full meal.

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Also Check Out Bodean Seafood Restaurant 3376 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA

Bonefish Grill 4651 W. KENOSHA ST. | BROKEN ARROW

Doc's Wine & Food 3509 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

Fish Shack

SMOKE. Woodfire Grill 1542 E. 15TH ST. T U L SA

SMOKE. Woodfire Grill is a one-of-a-kind, spectacular place to get seafood at its best. One of our absolute favorite dishes is the sea scallops — juicy scallops with lemon-herb gnocchi, all smothered in a smoked tomato cream sauce that tantalizes the taste buds every time. You’ll have a difficult time saving room for dessert. The crab stuffed catfish is also to die for, especially with the andouille gumbo that comes with it. This Cherry Street restaurant has made a name for itself and its seafood.

11319 S. HWY. 51 | COWETA

Hammett House 1616 W. WILL ROGERS BLVD. | CLAREMORE

427 S. BOSTON AVE. T U LSA

1413 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

McGill's 1560 E. 21ST ST. | TULSA 6058 S. YALE AVE. | TULSA 777 W. CHEROKEE ST. | CATOOSA

Mid-American Grille 101 COBBLESTONE DRIVE | PRYOR

Palace Cafe 1301 E. 15TH ST. | TULSA

Peacemaker Lobster & Crab Co.

The Tropical

Tavolo

Kilkenny's Irish Pub

Tavolo on Fourth Street and Boston Avenue is a special treat, not just because of its excellent service and sublime atmosphere, but because the food is so delicious, you’ll forget everything else. You’ll have a difficult time finding a better pan seared trout anywhere else. The flavor of this dish hits all the senses before it even touches the tongue. Perfectly cooked in white wine butter, with tenderly steamed squash and zucchini, the trout will become your favorite instantly.

313 E. 2ND ST. | TULSA

Polo Grill 2038 UTICA SQUARE | TULSA

Redrock Canyon Grill 9916 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA

Ruth's Chris Steak House 8330 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA SAM’S SOUTHERN EATERY 5015 S. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA

Sterling's Grille 2905 E. FRANK PHILLIPS BLVD. | BARTLESVILLE

Stonehorse Cafe 1748 UTICA SQUARE | TULSA

Sushi Hana 9904 RIVERSIDE PARKWAY | TULSA 3739 S. PEORIA AVE. | TULSA

The Parrot Steakhouse and Grill 2530 S. MAIN ST. | GROVE

8125 E. 49TH ST. T U LSA

It may be hidden just off Memorial and north of 51st Street, but The Tropical is no surprise to those who have visited there again and again. A sister restaurant to Lanna Thai, this place has some of the best Asian seafood you’ll find absolutely anywhere. Just walking in, your taste buds will begin to jump. Shrimp, calamari, scallops and salmon can be added to every single dish on the menu. And trust us, every item on this menu is special. Order the level of spiciness to your taste, and enjoy a fantastic festival of seafood flavor.

The Bistro at Seville 10021 S. YALE AVE.

T U L SA

The Bistro at Seville is a unique place for seafood, and one you’ll visit again and again after trying it once. Fresh Hawaiian seafood flown in fresh daily is the reason. Tilapia, trout or salmon — you truly cannot go wrong with any of them. The jumbo scallops stir-fry will be a pleasant surprise, a dish you’ll want to save to take home for later. Or just visit The Bistro for drinks and appetizers, like the amazing jumbo shrimp cocktail or the succulent crab cakes. You’ll probably order a couple of rounds of each.

The Spudder 6536 E. 50TH ST. | TULSA

Villa Ravenna 6526 E. 51ST ST. | TULSA

White River Fish Market 1708 N. SHERIDAN ROAD | TULSA 1105 E. KENOSHA ST. | BROKEN ARROW

Wild Fork 1820 UTICA SQUARE | TULSA

Yokozuna 309 E. 2ND ST. | TULSA

80 NOVEMBER 2018

Waterfront Grill 120 AQUARIUM DRIVE J ENKS

It’s always a party at Waterfront Grill, and the seafood is a huge part of it. First of all, if the weather’s fine, sit out on the waterfront patio, enjoy the Arkansas River and imagine being at the ocean. The appetizers alone are a seafood treat. Calamari, crab and seared Ahi tuna are the kind of appetizers you’ll almost be too jealous to share. For dinner, try the Japanese sea bass or the shrimp and scallop stack, cooked to perfection, and you may never want to go anywhere else for seafood.


wines AND patio bar BOUTIQUE

steaks AND fresh fish HAND-CUT

WOOD-FIRED

pizza

918.948.6505

9912 SOUTH RIVERSIDE DR. | TULSA, OK 74137

www.napaflats.com

R E S T A U R A N T

918.743.1800

3109 S Yale

www.CelebrityTulsa.com

A Tulsa favorite for over 50 years! • Steak • Lobster • Seafood • Chicken • Famous “World-Class” Caesar Salad made Tableside PREVIEW918.COM 81


When it Takes a Village Inn is the casual, homestyle type of restaurant that’s there for you any time of day or night when you need waffles, a Reuben, or some sweet and chocolaty French Silk pie. By Donna Leahey Photos by Sarah Eliza Roberts

Ultimate Breakfast

82 NOVEMBER 2018


Ultimate Skillet

It’s 9 a.m. and you want a burger. It’s midnight and you’ve got a taste for pie. It’s Saturday morning at 3 a.m. and you need some pancakes. Or maybe it’s dinner time and you want to relax and let someone else serve the pot roast. Head to one of Tulsa’s Village Inn locations and they can satisfy whatever your craving might be. And with four locations, there’s a Village Inn near you in Tulsa. Village Inn has been serving Tulsa since a store opened in the Camelot Hotel. “We started here in 1968,” says Anowar Kamal, training general manager for the Tulsa area. “This is our 50th year in Tulsa.” Assistant general manager of the Tulsa area, Bonnie Scanlon explains, “We’re a casual dining, American, homestyle type of restaurant. We serve breakfast all day.” Everything on Village Inn’s menu is tasty and sure to satisfy whatever urge your tummy has. They are especially proud of their pie, for good reason. The sign on the wall says, “The Best Pie in America,” and they have the blue ribbons to back up that claim. “Legendary Baking makes all our pies,” says Kamal. At the 2018 American Pie Council Championships in Orlando, [Fla.], Legendary Baking’s pies took home 22 blue ribbons in the commercial division. So, you’ve got the reassurance of the American

All-World Double Cheeseburger

Pie Council that the slice of pie that Village Inn will proudly serve you is, in fact, America’s best.”

then the whole thing is topped with real whipped cream and drizzled with chocolate sauce, caramel and pecans.

“We’re the biggest pie pushers in Tulsa,” adds Scanlon.

If you prefer fruit pies, Village Inn’s Cherry is sweet, tangy, and full of plump cherries. The classic Country Apple pie has won 10 APC blue ribbons and is a popular choice. If you like some tart with your sweet, strawberry rhubarb might be your jam. Its perfect blend of flavors and generous berry filling has won it seven APC blue ribbons. There’s also a triple berry, a peach lattice, and a decadent Caramel apple a la mode.

Their most popular pie is the French Silk. This smooth, creamy, chocolaty treat hits all the right notes. “And who doesn’t love chocolate?” asks Scanlon. The silky-smooth chocolate filling is topped with real whipped cream and chocolate curls. Whether you’re enjoying it as a sweet finisher to your meal or on its own, the French Silk is a must try at Village Inn. It’s been awarded 10 APC blue ribbons, and it won’t take more than one bite to understand why. French Silk may be the flagship of Village Inn’s fleet of pies, but you should take a look at some of the other options as well. The cream pie selections include a banana cream and a coconut cream as good as gramma used to make. The lemon meringue is full of bright tangy flavor nestled under a layer of cloudy meringue. A decadent, rich choice is the Caramel Pecan Silk Supreme. Made of layers of goodness, it has won nine APC blue ribbons. This treat starts with Legendary Baking’s awardwinning pastry crust. Then they pile in a layer of caramel and pecans. On top of that is a rich and creamy supreme filling layer. A layer of classic French Silk adds chocolaty goodness and

Village Inn features seasonal pies, and this fall, they’re going for a classic: pumpkin pie, with or without real whipped cream. For the pie lovers who also love free stuff, be sure to stop by Village Inn on Wednesdays between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. “Purchase anything on the menu and get a free slice of pie with it,” says Scanlon. You can carry home a whole pie for your next gathering. Walk in, buy a pie, walk out, be a hero. If you want a large order, you might consider giving some advance notice, but the pie case is usually full and ready for you to take home your favorite. It’s a great choice with the holiday season getting into full swing. Grab a pumpkin, a cherry, and don’t forget that French Silk.

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Lemon Artichoke Chicken

Village Inn takes care of your special needs with a kid’s menu, a gluten-sensitive menu, and

a large-print braille menu. Nutrition information is available if you’re counting calories or concerned about allergens. And whether you had an omelet, skillet, burger, sandwich, or a plate of delicious comfort food, make sure you save room for that blue-ribbon-winning pie. You won’t regret it.

VILLAGE INN 5230 S. Yale Ave. | Tulsa 918-496-1207 villageinn.com

84 NOVEMBER 2018

CA LO

CA LO

Sunday-Thursday: 6 a.m.-Midnight Friday-Saturday: Noon-Midnight

Sunday-Thursday: 6 a.m.-Midnight Friday-Saturday: 6 a.m.-3 a.m.

TO LO

CA

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VILLAGE INN 8320 E. 71st St. | Tulsa 918-254-7623 villageinn.com

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VILLAGE INN 3302 S. Memorial Dr. | Tulsa 918-622-5015 villageinn.com

CA

Village Inn’s All-World Double Cheeseburger is a popular choice. It’s two burgers, American and Swiss cheese, topped with bacon, onion rings, and Thousand Island dressing. “We sell a lot of Reubens,” says Kamal. “It’s not pre-sliced like lunchmeat, it’s hand-shredded corned beef.”

Sunday-Monday: 5 a.m.-Midnight Tuesday-Saturday: Noon-Midnight

LO

The Ultimate Skillet is another bestseller. This Village Inn original is a hearty and generous start to your day. It’s two eggs cooked however you like crowning a generous serving of bacon, sausage, ham, mushrooms, green peppers, onions, tomatoes, and melted cheese all on top of country potatoes.

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VILLAGE INN 2745 S. Harvard Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-3515 villageinn.com

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Now that you’ve considered your dessert options first, don’t forget Village Inn has breakfast, sandwiches, salads, and dinners. Breakfast all day means you can have omelets for supper, pancakes for lunch, or a hearty skillet at midnight. The most popular breakfast option is the Inncredible V.I.B. with your choice of four items including eggs, meats, breakfast sides, and griddle favorites. You could have a two-egg cheese omelet with sausage links, chocolate-chip pancakes, and country potatoes. Or scrambled eggs with bacon, French toast, and fresh fruit. For a small extra charge, you can substitute a supreme item like chickenfried steak with sausage gravy.

If you’re in the mood for comfort food, check out the ever-popular Village Inn pot roast. The generous portion of tender roast beef slices comes with red-skin mashed potatoes, a buttermilk biscuit, and your choice of side.

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“Last November, we sold over 5,000 pies in Tulsa,” says Kamal.

Sunday-Thursday: 6 a.m.-Midnight Friday-Saturday: 6 a.m.-3 a.m.


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four-meat dinner 86 NOVEMBER 2018


Delighted to

Meat You

At Elmer’s BBQ on Brookside, you’ll find plenty of old-school Oklahoma barbecue, top-notch sides, rowdy blues, a Badwich, and nothing that resembles foo foo. By Donna Leahey

Photos by Marc Rains

It be bad. The story goes that back in the 1970s a lady was enjoying a delicious meal at Elmer’s BBQ. Elmer himself stopped by to make sure she was enjoying her food. She looked up at him with a smile and said, “It be bad!”

wife George Ella,” says Jimerson. “She was instrumental in running the place for 20 years.” After Elmer and George Ella passed, their grandsons tried to keep the Brookside icon going, “but it was more than they could handle, and it closed.”

“Back in the ‘70s, ‘bad’ meant ‘good,’” says Keith Jimerson, owner of Elmer’s BBQ. “The lady said that to him and it stuck.” That phrase, “It be bad!” adorns the signs, the front window, the catering truck, the menus, even the staff ’s shirts, letting you know that Elmer’s is the baddest.

Enter Jimerson, who stepped in to reopen Elmer’s BBQ in 2004. “Going to Elmer’s was a treat for me. It was always packed. If you wanted to come, you’d have to call an hour ahead, and you’d probably still have to wait after you got here,” says Jimerson, who was an industrial engineer before taking on Elmer’s. “It wasn’t my intention to run a restaurant. I planned to hire a manager, but I went through several people and eventually took it over full time and that’s been the last 15 years.”

Elmer’s sits at the heart of Brookside, at 41st Street and Peoria Avenue. It’s been a neighborhood staple since 1982. “It was originally run by Elmer Thompson and his

Elmer’s is a generous and spacious location with a classic black and white tiled floor. Stepping inside feels like you’ve entered a small town’s barbecue shack. An old-fashioned counter with stools sits at one side of the dining room. The savory, tempting scent of smoke and flavorful meats fill the air. Blues memorabilia cover the walls, like vinyl records, guitars, clarinets, a cymbal, trumpets, and pictures of blues legends like B.B. King and Buddy Guy. An old, upright piano sits against the wall as if a blues band is going to come out and play at any moment. The crowning touch to the feel of the place is the genuine blues playing over the speakers.

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BADWICH

Keith Jimerson

Elmer’s smokes its meats using hickory with a little bit of oak and pecan. “Hickory is the best for smoking,” Jimerson says, “But it’s expensive because only old-timers are cutting it these days. You find a supplier who seasons it properly, splits it a certain

88 NOVEMBER 2018

Speaking of side items, Elmer’s sides are not afterthoughts. There’re chunks of rib meat in the green beans, the coleslaw is seriously creamy and slightly sweet, and the baked beans are loaded with chunks of beef. If you’re looking for a healthier option, Elmer’s has smoked salmon waiting for you. “We take a whole side of salmon and smoke it. It’s got a nice following. It’s really good,” says Jimerson. But what about the sauce? Listen, these smoked meats don’t need sauce, but

Elmer’s loves to cater. “We’ve done groups, businesses, churches, weddings, graduation, even a divorce party. We’ve done up to 2,000 people.” Give Elmer’s a call if you’re looking for some seriously good, Oklahoma-style food for your next event. The restaurant itself can host big or small parties, and they offer dine in and carry-out.

ELMER’S BBQ 4130 S. Peoria Ave. | Tulsa 918-742-6702 elmersbbqtulsa.com

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He’s achieved that goal. Elmer’s baby back ribs are fall-off-the-bone tender, full of smoky goodness and so tasty and juicy you don’t have to drown them in sauce. The brisket is moist and hearty, earning its place at the center of that plate.

If it’s your first visit to Elmer’s, try the Badwich. As the menu says, “It’s got it all!” You can get this platter of goodness served on a bun as a sandwich, or with Texas toast and enjoy it as a plate. The Badwich comes with one of Elmer’s fantastic ribs, a generous helping of chopped brisket, a layer of the Oklahoma classic smoked bologna, and your choice of hot links or smoked sausage. The Badwich comes with two of Elmer’s side items.

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There is no foo-foo food on an Elmer’s plate, that’s for sure. Jimerson believes that at any barbecue place the ribs and the beef must be right. “They’re center of the plate items. They’re the staples.”

“Consistent” is something of a buzz word for Jimerson. He wants his customers to know that they’ll get the same quality meats and sides with each visit. “We’re all about the quality,” he says. “Our hot links are from Mountain View. They’re the best we’ve tried, and they’re made in Oklahoma.”

of course Elmer’s brings it. The sweet sauce is honey-sweet with enough tangy to balance it. It’s especially good on the smoked bologna. The hot sauce is not kidding around. It adds a serious kick. The mixed sauce would be Goldilocks’ favorite; the perfect blend of the sweet and hot is just right. And all the sauces are available for sale for you to take and enjoy at home.

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“I’m trying to recapture the feel of authentic Oklahoma barbecue. It’s not fancy. It’s pure barbecue on a plate. It’s good food, not doctored up. Like the food at grandmother’s house. This is old-school Oklahoma barbecue. Not Texas, not Memphis. Oklahoma people like plain, really good food. Not overly pricy. Not foofoo food.”

way, who can bring it to you consistently, the way you like it.”

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“We started with jazz,” says Jimerson, “But jazz is too laid back. Blues is more rowdy. We put the artists on the wall and play their music. Lots of kids come in and do papers over the artists. Customers bring things in and we put them on the walls. It’s been fun piecing it all together.

Sunday-Monday: Closed Tuesday-Wednesday: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-8 p.m.


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MF MASTERS OF FLAVOR

Justin Thompson’s TRIAL & ERROR book is meant to help home chefs achieve the taste they hope to ace when they cook their favorite restaurant dishes in their own oven. But it’s also a look at how food impacts our lives. By Michele Chiappetta

90 NOVEMBER 2018

Photos by Valerie Grant


What do you do with your time after you’ve opened multiple restaurants and decide to take a little well-earned time off to do something for yourself? If you’re Tulsa chef and restaurateur Justin Thompson of the JTR Group, you create a cookbook — Trial & Error: Recipes and Lessons Learned by a Chef and Restaurateur.

Take cooking a steak at home — an endeavor most people perform on the grill because it’s all they know how to do. But there are other options, totally doable in your kitchen, if you understand not just what good steak tastes like, but the steps that lead to a good steak, like choosing the right cut and preparing it properly. Thompson’s cookbook hits those topics — like what seasoning goes well with what type of meat, and how to create a restaurant steak in your kitchen.

Of course, Thompson wasn’t exactly planning to write his cookbook (which is now on sale) when he first decided to take a month off work. He genuinely planned to relax — or so he thought. “It was in February of this year, and I was sitting in Tavolo with my sister having a late lunch when I decided I was going to take a month off work and relax,” he says cheerfully, recalling the start of his project. “The past few years have been crazy.” Crazy in this context includes opening and overseeing five restaurants, along with being But I made sure they were executable in your home kitchen.” a single dad. “I’m not the kind of person who can sit still for long without doing anything,” says Thompson. “So I decided to work on the cookbook.” He gathered his team around him, including Evan Wei-Hass [coordination and promotion], Valerie Grant [photography], and Jeremy Luther [layouts]. And then he set to work. If you’ve never thought about how a cookbook is made, it starts — of course — with cooking, testing out recipes and perfecting them. For a chef like Thompson, who has worked in kitchens for many years, it involved not just digging up old and new dishes he’s made, it also meant adapting past recipes to his current style and philosophy of cooking. And it also required thinking about how to make the recipes accessible to the average home cook. In other words, Thompson didn’t just sit around while taking that month “off.” But he loved the process of putting into long-lasting print a set of recipes and stories from his life that he’s been sharing with fellow Tulsans for years. “Each recipe has a paragraph or so about its origin, or where I was when I made it up, or my experience of the restaurant at the time,” Thompson explains. “The introduction talks about the start of my career, restaurants I’ve opened. There’s quite a bit of personal recollections, and 45 or so recipes for the entire thing — recipes that I spent the entire month cooking tons of times over my career.

What kind of recipes can you expect to find in the cookbook? For starters, fans of any of the restaurants Thompson has been a chef at (like the Brasserie) or the JTR Group of restaurants he runs (MixCo, PRHYME, Juniper, 624 Kitchen & Catering and Tavolo) can expect to see some of their favorites in print and spelled out for making at home. There’s the sweet carrot soup, for example — a highly popular dish at Juniper. And of course, there’s a version of the famous chocolate pie available at all the JTR Group restaurants. (Tip: try a piece sometime, because it is amazing.) “I picked recipes that were kind of highlights of my career at different restaurants. At the same time, they’re not the same exact recipes,” he explains. “My cooking has grown and my recipes have changed over time, so the current recipes are evolutions.” The recipes mix genres of cuisine to reflect Thompson’s full career, “some Italian, some French, some New American, Southern cuisine,” he says. Beyond sharing his favorite recipes, Thompson also had to put himself into the headspace of home chefs, who usually don’t have the equipment or experience of professional restaurant chefs. But that was part of the challenge, says Thompson, and he enjoyed the process. “I took the recipes and pared them down to manageable sizes for the home cook, making sure that I was using techniques the average home, cook could feel they could do.”

In this sense, Trial & Error is educational, meant to help home chefs achieve the taste they hope to ace when they cook their favorite restaurant dishes in their own oven. But it’s also a look at how food impacts our lives. And in that vein, Thompson shares comfortably about his experiences in the kitchen over the years, which taught him a lot about relationships and about life, as well as about food. “I talk a lot about how I started cooking with my dad when I was 14,” he explains, calling it “a good catalyst” for strengthening their bond. “I built Juniper with my dad, physically. Food can be a foundation for building relationships. Food is always there when we’re celebrating. Food can either enhance your experience with those milestones or detract from it.” And of course, Thompson shared his many stories from years in the restaurant business — which are entertaining, and highlight his enterprising nature. There’s the time he got himself a job in the kitchen by building it. That’s how he ended up at Ciao — he helped with the construction first. And then there’s his story about learning to cook French dishes at The Brasserie. “I had no clue how to cook French cuisine,” he says, “so I realized I had to start learning as much as I could. I spent months just nonstop learning, cooking, and perfecting techniques.” To promote the book, Thompson will do a signing at Magic City, most likely between Thanksgiving and Christmas (the date is still being nailed down). And there’s a release party Nov. 8 at 624 Kitchen & Catering. “Come buy a book, have some hors d’oeuvre, chat, and get your book signed,” he says. “It makes a great gift for the holidays — available at all our restaurants for purchase, at Magic City, and online,” he says.

THANKSGIVING DINNER, THOMPSON STYLE If you’re craving all the comforts of a Thanksgiving dinner, but you don’t want to cook, not to worry. You can place an order for a traditional turkey feast served up by the pro team over at 624 Kitchen & Catering. The meal needs to be preordered for pickup, and it contains just about everything you can dream of to

celebrate your Thanksgiving in style —salad, turkey, ham, stuffing, veggies, rolls, pies, you name it. Place your order at 624 Kitchen’s website (624catering.com). And if you’re wanting to treat yourself and loved ones to an elegant holiday dinner out, consider the harvest

dinner at Juniper. “It’s usually a five-course dinner that highlights local spirits and wines,” Thompson says. It’s taking place Nov. 11, and it’s for charity. “For each ticket we sell, we donate a whole turkey to Iron Gate, and the supplier matches our donations,” he says.

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GK GETTING TO KNOW

Courses BERNADETTE FEICKERT

Bernadette Feickert’s passion for food is inspired not just by the breakfast, lunch, cake and pie offerings at Kitch, but also by the sweet treats offered at her other Jenks hot spot, Cookiedoodle. A bright spot of mid-century modern bliss, Kitch is a food endeavor launched by Bernadette Feickert, co-owner of the restaurant with her husband, Toby. She’s also the brainchild behind Jenks’ well-known gourmet cookie, gelato and cake shop, Cookiedoodle, which is located adjacent to Kitch and shares open dining space with the cookie shop.

by MICHELE CHIAPPETTA photos by

92 NOVEMBER 2018

SARAH ELIZA ROBERTS

“I’m an entrepreneur, a creative person, a person who is fueled by coming up with new ideas and executing them, and seeing it all come to life. So that’s what fuels the idea,” says Feickert. She and her husband tossed around several ideas for their next new food place before settling


The focus for the morning rush will be speed with Kitch’s system that allows customers to order to-go, drive up, and have their meal or drink handed to them with ease as they go about their busy day. “We encourage our customers to text their orders and pull up in front,” she says.

Many of the dishes feature favorites from Miss Addie’s, like the tortilla soup. “But we’re also trying to stay on top of current food trends.” A special treat for everyone who eats at Kitch is the popover served with fresh strawberry butter. “We have chef ’s specials every day too.” Kitch features some unique sweets of its own. “We have some different things,” says Feickert. “There’s been a calling for pies for a long time. And the only day we ever did pies [at Cookiedoodle] is the day before Thanksgiving. We bake five different pies, hundreds of them.” (Those pies are available for preorder at Cookiedoodle.) At Kitch, though, fresh pie is a regular menu item. “We have a couple of fresh pies on the counter that we’re cutting from every single day,” she says. “And cakes. We’re doing a big deal with cakes. We’re doing triple-layer cakes. The cakes come in several flavors, including orange crunch, death by chocolate, apple maple, and strawberries and cream. They are huge slices. I don’t think our guests will be able to finish them while they’re here. They’re presented in a to-go box because we’re sure they’re going to be too big for you to eat.”

KITCH

377 E. Main St. | Jenks 918-528-6766

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The breakfast menu is fast casual, Feickert says, offering breakfast sandwiches, crepes, quiche, street tacos, burrito, avocado toast and similar items. “We also have an espresso bar with blended iced mochas, smoothies, you name it. We have a specialty espresso menu.”

Feickert says her passion for food is inspired not just by the menu at Kitch, but also by the sweet treats offered at Cookiedoodle. “The decorated cookies that Cookiedoodle does just fuels creativity,” she says. “Every day, you’re just acting on your creative instincts. And food in all aspects, I think, is the same way. It just fuels my creativity. It’s very fulfilling.”

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The Feickerts knocked down the wall and opened up the space so that customers can wander between Cookiedoodle and Kitch at their convenience. Kitch’s atmosphere is open and bright, featuring a midcentury modern, 1960s feel, with bright orange vinyl counter seats, molded plastic dining chairs, a flowery white hanging light fixture, and starry Pyrex-style decorations on the wall. It all feels light and fun, perfect for brightening up your day before or after shopping or dropping the kids off at school.

Kitch will also do catering off their menu, great for breakfast or lunch meetings. “We’re happy to do platters of our sandwiches,” says Feickert.

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The Feickerts owned the popular café and pub Miss Addie’s in Muskogee for 27 years before deciding to do something different. “We closed it about six months ago, when my husband retired,” she says. “So, we had a lot of restaurant equipment, a lot of things we could use to do Kitch. That, combined with the fact that the neighbor to Cookiedoodle was moving out and his space was available, we said OK let’s do one of these ideas we’ve had for so long.”

In terms of lunch, Kitch offers fresh menu items such as pork or smoked chicken ranchero street tacos, banh mi, Reubens, and muffulettas. “And then we’re doing some of the things that are traditional lunch meals like a club sandwich, tortilla soup, a soup of the day, a power bowl salad, a blue cheese wedge salad,” says Feickert. “I’m really proud of our chicken salad recipe. I really think it’s going to score.”

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on Kitch. “It seemed like everything was lining up to make this happen,” she says.

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SL SHELF LIFE

NONFICTION

LITERARY/ CONTEMPORARY

ROMANCE

MYSTERY, THRILLER AND SUSPENSE

NOV. 6

NOV. 6 NOV. 6

A GUIDE TO CREATING SPACES YOU NEVER WANT TO LEAVE BY JOANNA GAINES

Joanna Gaines walks you through how to create a home that reflects the personalities and stories of the people who live there. Using examples from her own farmhouse as well as a range of other homes, this comprehensive guide will help you assess your priorities and instincts, as well as your likes and dislikes, with practical steps for navigating and embracing your authentic design style.

ALSO LOOK FOR:

NOV. 6

NINE PERFECT STRANGERS

PARIS ECHO

BY LIANE MORIARTY

BY SEBASTIAN FAULKS

American historian Hannah intends to immerse herself in World War II research in Paris, where a youthful misadventure once left her dejected. But a chance encounter with Tariq, a Moroccan teenager, disrupts her plan. Hannah takes Tariq in as a lodger, forming an unexpected connection with him. Yet as Tariq begins to assimilate into the country he risked his life to enter, he realizes that its dark past and current ills are far more complicated than he’d anticipated. And Hannah uncovers a shocking piece of history that threatens to dismantle her core beliefs.

Staying at a remote health resort to get a reboot on life is Frances Welty, a formerly best-selling novelist, who is nursing a bad back, a broken heart, and an exquisitely painful paper cut. She’s immediately intrigued by her fellow guests, especially the resort’s strange, charismatic owner/director. Could this person really have the answers Frances didn’t even know she was seeking? Should Frances put aside her doubts and immerse herself in everything Tranquillum House has to offer — or should she run while she still can?

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THE FERAL DETECTIVE BY JONATHAN LETHEM

Phoebe Siegler first meets Charles Heist in a shabby trailer in east Los Angeles. She’s looking for her friend’s missing daughter, Arabella. A laconic loner who keeps his pet opossum in a desk drawer, Heist intrigues the sarcastic and garrulous Phoebe. Reluctantly, he agrees to help. The pair find that Arabella is caught in the middle of a violent standoff that only Heist can end. Phoebe’s trip to the desert was always going to be strange, but it was never supposed to be dangerous.

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ALSO LOOK FOR:

Let Her Fly: A Father’s Journey By Ziauddin NOV. 6 Following the death Yousafzai NOV. 13 of her young son A moving and and the shocking loss of her husband inspirational story soon after, Pagels that traces Ziauddin examines how, for Yousafzai’s journey better and worse, from an unconfident religious traditions stammering little boy living in a have shaped how mud hut to a man we understand who has broken ourselves; how with tradition we relate to one and proven there another; and how are many faces to get through of feminism. the most difficult challenges we face. Why Religion? By Elaine Pagels

94 NOVEMBER 2018

Once a Midwife By Patricia Harman Fox 8 Winter of Summers By George Saunders By Michael Faudet NOV. 13

A fox teaches himself to speak “Yuman” by hiding in the bushes outside a house and listening to children’s bedtime stories. The power of language fuels his abundant curiosity about people.

NOV. 20

Faudet’s latest book explores the fine line between love and loss, the fragility of relationships, selfempowerment, and social commentary — all exquisitely captured in a thought-provoking collection of poetry, prose, and short stories.

NOV. 6

The women of Hope River trust midwife Patience Hester. But though the Great Depression is behind them, troubles are not, for Europe is at war and it can only be a matter of time before the U.S. enters the fray.

Solace Island By Meg Tilly NOV. 6

Dumped on the eve of her wedding, Maggie Harris joins her sister on Solace Island. What she doesn’t need on her road to recovery are her sister’s efforts to fix her up with their mysterious and alluring neighbor, Luke Benson, even if he is incredibly handsome and desirable.

Past Tense By Lee Child NOV. 5

Family secrets come back to haunt Jack Reacher. As the vigilante who fights for the little guy explores his father’s hometown, he makes a shocking discovery that the present can be tough, but the past can be tense and deadly.

The Colors of All the Cattle By Alexander McCall Smith NOV. 6

In this latest installment of the beloved and best-selling No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, Precious Ramotswe finds herself running for office, much to her dismay.


SHELF LIFE SL

SCIENCE FICTION, FANTASY AND HORROR

SELF-HELP AND INSPIRATIONAL

YOUNG ADULT AND MIDDLE GRADE

CHILDREN

NOV. 13 NOV. 6

NOV. 6

NOV. 6

HOW TO BE ALONE

VITA NOSTRA

BY LANE MOORE

BY SERGEY DYACHENKO

When Sasha meets the mysterious Farit, his domineering mentorship propels her to enter the remote Institute of Special Technologies. As she quickly discovers, the institute’s “special technologies” are unlike anything she has ever encountered. The books are impossible to read, the lessons obscure to the point of maddening, and the work refuses memorization. Yet despite her fear, Sasha undergoes changes that defy the dictates of matter and time; experiences which are nothing she has ever dreamed of and suddenly all she could ever want.

A former writer for The Onion, Lane Moore reveals her powerful, entertaining journey in all its candor, anxiety, and ultimate acceptance. How to Be Alone is a must-read for anyone whose childhood still feels unresolved, who spends more time pretending to have friends online than feeling close to anyone in real life, and who tries to have genuine, deep conversations in a roomful of people who would rather you not.

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GIRLS OF PAPER AND FIRE

BY NATASHA NGAN AND JAMES PATTERSON

Lei is a member of the Paper caste, living in a remote village with her father, where the decade-old trauma of watching her mother snatched by royal guards for an unknown fate still haunts her. Now, the guards are back and this time it’s Lei they’re after — the girl with the golden eyes whose rumored beauty has piqued the king’s interest. In the opulent, oppressive palace, Lei and eight other girls learns the skills and charm that befit a king’s consort. Then she falls in love. Her forbidden romance becomes enmeshed with an explosive plot that threatens her world’s entire way of life.

INKLING

BY KENNETH OPPEL

The Rylance family is stuck. Dad’s got writer’s block. Ethan promised to illustrate a group project at school even though he can’t draw. Sarah’s pining for a puppy. And they all miss Mom. Enter Inkling — an ink spot that leaps off the page. This small burst of creativity is about to change everything. And it’s not until Inkling goes missing that this family has to face the larger questions of what they and Inkling truly need.

Release dates are subject to change.

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ALSO LOOK FOR: ALSO LOOK FOR:

Hazards of Time Travel By Joyce Carol Oates

The Art of Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald By Dermot Power NOV. 16

Curated by concept artist Dermot Power, and filled with NOV. 27 unique insights from A recklessly Stuart Craig and idealistic girl fellow artists, this dares to test the book takes you on perimeters of her a thrilling journey tightly controlled through a design future world and is process every bit punished by being as wonderful as sent back in time that encountered 80 years. Cast by Newt, Tina, adrift in the past, Queenie, and she cannot resist Jacob in the falling in love. Wizarding World.

Let’s All Make the Day Count: The Everyday Wisdom of Charlie Daniels By Charlie Daniels

NOV. 6

NOV. 13

In Who Moved Daniels has written My Cheese?, Hem and Haw were for Elvis, played faced with change for Bob Dylan, toured the country, when their cheese disappeared. Haw and delighted set off in search of fans. More new cheese. Hem important, he’s remained stuck dedicated his life where he was. Out to helping others, including children, of the Maze reveals what Hem did next. troubled teens, His discoveries will and veterans. help you unlock the riddle of whatever mazes you may be facing in your own life. NOV. 6

Rox’s Secret Code By Mara Lecocq and Nathan Archambaul

Out of the Maze: An A-mazing Way to Get Unstuck By Spencer Johnson Skyward By Brandon Sanderson

No Slam Dunk By Mike Lupica NOV. 6

At every practice and game, Wes Since she was a tries his best to be little girl, Spensa a good basketball has imagined player and a good learning to fly, in teammate. But not spite of her pilot everyone on his father’s desertion years ago. No one team has the same idea. All-star player will let Spensa Danilo “Dinero” forget what her father did, but she Rey seems is determined to fly. determined to hold the spotlight and the ball. NOV. 6

Rox is happy to More Than a spend the whole Princess day on her laptop By E.D. Baker inventing awesome NOV. 6 robots, but her Aislin is more than dad wants her to just a princess — clean up! When she’s half-fairy and the Chorebot she half-pedrasi, with designs gets a mind magical gifts from of its own and tries each side of her to organize the heritage. One day, whole city, Rox and she is mistaken for her neighbor Amar a human, captured, race to recode and becomes a Chorebot in time to pawn in a war save the day. between kingdoms.

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S SHOWTIME NOV. 2

BOY ERASED

The son of a Baptist preacher is forced to participate in a church-supported gay conversion program after being forcibly outed to his parents. Cast: Lucas Hedges, Nicole Kidman, Joel Edgerton RATING: R

TIGER

A practicing Sikh is banned by the boxing commission for refusing to back down from his religious beliefs. Through racial profiling and stereotypical threats, he does what any strong American would do and fight back. Cast: Mickey Rourke, Janel Parrish, Marshall Manesh RATING: PG-13

THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS

A young girl is transported into a magical world of gingerbread soldiers and an army of mice. Cast: Keira Knightley, Mackenzie Foy, Eugenio Derbez RATING: PG

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

The film follows the rise of the band Queen, the period where Freddie Mercury attempted a solo career and reinvigoration at Live Aid in 1985. It also documents Mercury’s diagnosis with AIDS. Cast: Rami Malek, Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee

A PRIVATE WAR

One of the most celebrated war correspondents of our time, Marie Colvin is an utterly fearless and rebellious spirit, driven to the front line of conflicts across the globe to give voice to the voiceless. Cast: Rosamund Pike, Jamie Dornan, Stanley Tucci RATING: NR

NOV. 9

THE GIRL IN THE SPIDER’S WEB

Young computer hacker Lisbeth Salander and journalist Mikael Blomkvist find themselves caught in a web of spies, cybercriminals and corrupt government officials. Cast: Claire Foy, Sylvia Hoeks, Sverrir Gudnason RATING: NR

THE FRONT RUNNER

American Senator Gary Hart’s presidential campaign in 1988 is derailed when he’s caught in a scandalous love affair. Cast: Hugh Jackman, Molly Ephraim, Vera Farmiga

NOV. 16 FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD

SUSPIRIA

A darkness swirls at the center of a world-renowned dance company, one that will engulf the artistic director, an ambitious young dancer, and a grieving psychotherapist. Some will succumb to the nightmare. Others will finally wake up. Cast: Chloe Grace Moretz, Tilda Swinton, Dakota Johnson RATING: R

THE GRINCH

The Grinch hatches a scheme with his trusted canine Max to ruin Christmas when the residents of Whoville plan to make their annual holiday three times bigger that year. Meanwhile, Cindy Lou Who plans to seek out Santa Claus to thank him for helping her widowed mother every Christmas, but little does she know she is trying to blow the Grinch’s cover. Cast: Benedict Cumberbatch, Cameron Seely, Rashida Jones RATING: PG

96 NOVEMBER 2018

NOV. 23

RATING: R

NOBODY’S FOOL

RATING: R

RATING: R

On the eve of D-Day during World War II, American paratroopers are caught behind enemy lines after their plane crashes on a mission to destroy a German radio tower in a small town outside of Normandy. After reaching their target, the paratroopers come to realize that besides fighting off Nazi soldiers, they also must face off against horrifying, bloody, and violent creatures that are a result of a secret Nazi experiment. Cast: Jovan Adepo, Wyatt Russell, Mathilde Ollivier

RATING: PG-13

what he seems. Cast: Tiffany Haddish, Courtney Henggeler, Missi Pyle

Set in contemporary Chicago, amid a time of turmoil, four women with nothing in common except a debt left behind by their dead husbands’ criminal activities, take fate into their own hands, and conspire to forge a future on their own terms. Cast: Viola Davis, Liam Neeson, Jon Bernthal

OVERLORD

RATING: R

A woman is released from prison and reunites with her sister. She soon discovers that her sister is in an online relationship with a man who may not be

WIDOWS

At the end of the first film, the powerful dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald was captured by MACUSA (Magical Congress of the United States of America), with the help of Newt Scamander. But, making good on his threat, Grindelwald escapes custody and has set about gathering followers, most unsuspecting of his true agenda: to raise wizards and witches up to rule all non-magical beings. In an effort to thwart Grindelwald’s plans, Albus Dumbledore enlists his former student Newt Scamander, who agrees to help, unaware of the dangers that lie ahead. Lines are drawn as love and loyalty are tested, even among the truest friends and family, in an increasingly divided wizarding world. Cast: Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterston, Jude Law RATING: PG-13

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET

Six years after the events of the first film, the steering wheel controller on the Sugar Rush game console breaks, forcing Mr. Litwak to unplug the machine. Wreck-It Ralph and Vanellope von Schweetz evacuate all of the Sugar Rush residents to other games before it is shut down, placing the racers in the care of Fix-It Felix Jr. and Sergeant Tamora Jean Calhoun. Ralph and Vanellope then use the arcade’s new connection to the internet to go looking for a replacement steering wheel. While they find a source for a replacement wheel, they need money, leading them to join a free-to-play violent racing game, Slaughter Race, where they meet Shank, one of the game’s drivers. Vanellope is taken in by what Slaughter Race has to offer over Sugar Rush, and Shank becomes a big sister figure for Vanellope, making Ralph concerned that Vanellope no longer looks up to him nor will return to her game. Along the way, the two encounter new customs, worlds, and characters, such as trendy algorithms and the Disney Princess lineup with The Muppets, Star Wars, Disney animation, Marvel Comics and Pixar characters. Cast: John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, Jack McBrayer RATING: PG


CREED 2

Under the tutelage of Rocky Balboa, newly crowned light heavyweight champion Adonis Creed faces off against Viktor Drago, the son of Ivan Drago. Cast: Michael B. Jordan, Sylvester Stallone, Tessa Thompson RATING: PG-13

ROBIN HOOD

A war-hardened Crusader and his Moorish commander mount an audacious revolt against the corrupt English crown in a thrilling action-adventure packed with gritty battlefield exploits, mind-blowing fight choreography, and a timeless romance. Cast: Taron Egerton, Jamie Foxx, Ben Mendelsohn RATING: PG-13

SECOND ACT

A big box store worker reinvents her life and her life-story, and shows Madison Avenue what street smarts can do. Cast: Jennifer Lopez, Vanessa Hudgens, Milo Ventimiglia RATING: PG-13

GREEN BOOK

A working-class ItalianAmerican bouncer becomes the driver of an African-American classical pianist on a tour of venues through the 1960s American South. Cast: Viggo Mortensen, Mahershala Ali, Linda Cardellini RATING: PG-13

NOV. 9-10

NOV. 1 SOMM 3 FILM AND WINE SERIES Van the Wine Man and master sommelier Randa Warren introduce the third installment of the SOMM documentary series. Three of the greatest legends in wine meet to drink the rarest bottles of their careers, while some of the best blind tasters gather to settle an age-old argument. Check website for details on each ticket option. ALLELUJA PRESENTED BY NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE Alan Bennett’s witty new play is a hospital drama set in a geriatric ward of a hospital threatened with closure. The residents however, are not going down without a fight in this microcosm of modern society. NOV. 2 FINDING BIG COUNTRY Seventeen years after NBA Vancouver Grizzlies star Bryant “Big Country” Reeves leaves town, super fan Kat Jayme goes on a mission to find her childhood hero and tell his story. THE HAPPY PRINCE The untold story of the last days in the tragic times of Oscar Wilde, a person who observes his own failure with ironic distance and regards the difficulties that beset his life with detachment and humor. Written, directed and starring Rupert Everett, and featuring Colin Firth and Emily Watson. NOV. 4

NOV. 30 ANNA AND THE APOCALYPSE

At Christmas, a zombie apocalypse threatens the sleepy town of Little Haven forcing, Anna and her friends to fight, slash and sing their way to survival, facing the undead in a desperate race to reach their loved ones. But they soon discover that no one is safe in this new world, and with civilization falling apart around them, the only people they can truly rely on are each other. Cast: Ella Hunt, Malcolm Cumming, Sarah Swire RATING: R

NR = A rating was not available as of Oct. 20, 2018

Release dates and ratings are subject to change.

COWBOY BEBOP The 20th anniversary of this anime favorite about a deadly virus that threatens the masses. Will our bounty-hunting Bebop crew be able to stop it in time?

WARREN MILLER’S FACE OF WINTER The 69th installment from Warren Miller Entertainment brings new and veteran athletes together to pay tribute to the man who started it all. Watch as the world’s best skiers and riders cover ground in some of the most legendary destinations to honor a face that launched a thousand quips and got us all started on this long, crazy ride. NOV. 9 WILDLIFE A boy witnesses his parents’ marriage falling apart after his mother finds another man. Written and directed by Paul Dano. Starring Carey Mulligan and Jake Gyllenhaal.

NOV. 10 THE DAUGHTER OF DAWN (1920) This restored silent film features a love triangle involving a Kiowa chief’s daughter and ensuing conflict between Kiowa and Comanche villages. A POEM IS A NAKED PERSON Following a Leon Russell monument unveiling and dedication, check out a special screening introduced by Russell historian Steve Todoroff. Les Blank considered this free-form feature documentary about singer-songwriter Russell (filmed between 1972-74) to be one of his greatest accomplishments. Made up of mesmerizing scenes of Russell and his band performing, both in concert and in the studio, as well as off-the-cuff moments behind the scenes, the film — which also features performances by Willie Nelson and George Jones — has attained legendary status over the years. OPEN NOV. 16 BORDER After a customs officer develops a strange attraction to the suspect she’s investigating, the case’s revelations soon call into question her entire existence. NOV. 16-17 ROCKY IV Rocky Balboa proudly holds the world heavyweight boxing championship, but a new challenger has stepped forward: Drago, a 6-foot-4, 260-pound fighter who has the backing of the Soviet Union. NOV. 20 MADNESS OF GEORGE III PRESENTED BY NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE Written by one of Britain’s best-loved playwrights Alan Bennett (The History Boys, The Lady in the Van). It’s 1786 and King George III is the most powerful man in the world but his behavior is becoming increasingly erratic as he succumbs to fits of lunacy. With the King’s mind unravelling at a dramatic pace, ambitious politicians and the scheming Prince of Wales threaten to undermine the power of the crown, and expose the fine line between a king and a man.

SHOWTIME S

LOCATOR

ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN 7355 E. Easton St. Tulsa | 918.878.8099 AMC SOUTHROADS 20 4923 E. 41st St. Tulsa | 888.AMC.4FUN B&B CLAREMORE 8 1407 W. Country Club Claremore | 918.342.2422 B&B CINEMA 8 1245 New Sapulpa Road Sapulpa | 918.227.7469 CINEMARK BROKEN ARROW 1801 E. Hillside Drive Broken Arrow | 918.355.0427 CINEMARK SAND SPRINGS 1112 E. Charles Page Blvd. Sand Springs 800.FAN.DANG (#1407) CINEMARK TULSA 10802 E. 71st S. Tulsa | 800.FAN.DANG (#1128) CIRCLE CINEMA 10 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.3456 ETON SQUARE 6 CINEMA 8421 E. 61st St. Tulsa | 918.286.2618 REGAL PROMENADE PALACE 4107 S. Yale Ave. Tulsa | 800.326.3264 AMC CLASSIC OWASSO 12601 E. 86th St. N. Owasso | 918.376.9191 STARWORLD 20 10301 S Memorial Drive Tulsa | 918.369.7475 WARREN BROKEN ARROW 18 1700 W. Aspen Creek Drive Broken Arrow | 918.893.9798

Check Circle Cinema website for times, costs, additional events and more details. Release dates, showings and ratings are subject to change.

PREVIEW918.COM 97


B BROOKSIDE

sushi with a pulse! fresh sushi + incredible kitchen entrees + great happy hour + live music (on Brookside) + sunset views (on the hill) on the hill 918.524.0063 brookside 918.744.1300 broken arrow 918.893.6111 call 918.671.0606 for catering

98 NOVEMBER 2018


Tulsa’s favorite

reserve your stay in paradise today Endless gaming excitement

Two casinos under one roof– River Spirit® & Margaritaville®

Fine-dining excellence

The only Ruth’s Chris® Steak House in Oklahoma

Luxurious Spa & Salon

Pamper yourself in our relaxing retreat

Beautiful river views Luxurious resort hotel

Caribbean-style pool Soak up some sun

Awesome live music

5 o’Clock Somewhere® Bar, Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville®, Paradise Cove Theater

8330 RIVERSIDE PARK WAY TULSA , OK 74137 888-748-3731 • RIVERSPIRIT TULSA .COM

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November 2018 (Vol. 32, No. 11)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...

November 2018 (Vol. 32, No. 11)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 A regional magazine of national stature, Preview 918 has rema...