Page 68

CC COCKTAIL CONFIDENTIAL

For everyone who believes there are only two kinds of people in the world — those who are Irish and those who wish they were — the 918 has plenty of opportunities for you to get your meangreen-fun-machine in gear this St. Patrick’s Day. By Rachel Wright One of Tulsa’s most celebrated holidays is upon us. Grab a Guinness and your favorite green attire, because this St. Patrick’s Day, Tulsa has a lineup of fun that’ll have you feeling like you’ve found the end of the rainbow. The Oklahoma-Ireland relationship isn’t widely known, despite Ireland’s traditions being well embraced in the Sooner State. Here’s a quick rundown that’ll help you impress your friends. Oklahoma’s history with Ireland is richer than most think, with the earliest Irish settlers arriving in the early 1800s in search of work in the trapping and trading industry. Over time, they were stationed with the U.S. Army throughout Indian Territory, and the two cultures combined in many documented instances. According to The Oklahoma Historical Society, many of the American Indians who were forcibly moved to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears had an Irish parent.

68 MARCH 2017

Irish immigrants were enthusiastic in Oklahoma land runs, establishing permanent residences too. By the 2000 census, more than 10 percent of Oklahomans reported Irish ancestry. Tom Hinchey, president of the Irish American Club of Tulsa and second generation Irish, remembers coming to Tulsa in 1974. One of his first St. Paddy nights out in T-Town inspired the club that’s about to celebrate its 40th year. “It was March 17, 1977, and we were out partying at a bar,” Hinchey remembers. “We had a few too many but just enough to be right. We started singing Irish songs and getting everyone to join in. Someone said we needed an Irish Club, so I took it as a challenge and we’ve been going since October of that year.” The club of roughly 60 members meets regularly, hosts weekly Irish dancing classes and Irish cooking contests, and works events year-round to raise

money for its annual St. Patrick’s Dinner Show, this year on Saturday, March 11, from 6-9 p.m. at the American Legion Post 308 Hall. The Goode Academy of Irish Dance, McTeggart Irish Dancers of Oklahoma and Ryan-Johnson Irish Fiddlers will perform this year. Tickets are available for $18 per adult and $10 per child under 12. Included is a dinner choice of corned beef and cabbage or Irish stew, which Hinchey says is “some of the best you’ll ever have, prepared fresh that day.” “The dancing is incredible and so are the fiddlers. People really seem to enjoy it when those kids get kicking high,” says Hinchey. “Two of our members, Dalton and Justin, lead Irish sing-alongs. We have song books on each table with traditional Irish-American song lyrics so everyone can join in.” Hinchey and his team consider their event a kickoff to St. Patrick’s Day

March 2017 (Vol. 31, No. 3)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 For over 30 years, Preview has been the best resource for dis...

March 2017 (Vol. 31, No. 3)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 For over 30 years, Preview has been the best resource for dis...