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CC COCKTAIL CONFIDENTIAL

Whether you’re dining, out for a drink or two, or spending the entire night at the bar, don’t forget the gratuity. But figuring out how much and when to tip can make your head spin more than the booze. Follow these rules to become your server’s best friend. BY R A C H E L W R I G H T

The New Year is in full swing, and with 12 months ahead, expect your calendar to fill while your bank account does the opposite. In addition to gifts, eating, medical, travel expenses and clothes, it’s important to budget for nights out — and that includes budgeting for service gratuity. But with so many variations of settings and tipping methods, how much and who to tip can get confusing.

And who knows, with the right tip, you could end up with drinks on the house.

the bartender may tip out the kitchen, but not the servers.

TIPS ARE ALWAYS SPLIT BETWEEN WORKERS.

In most bar settings with multiple bartenders, the team splits tips evenly, giving a slightly lower percentage of the earnings to the bar back (who is usually working his or her way up to bartending and focuses on washing glasses, keeping the bar clean and stocking the bar throughout the night).

This one’s difficult to address because there are so many tip-sharing arrangements. Generally, you can let your venue be your guide.

In most restaurant settings, you are taking care of the team by taking care of your primary server during a drinking or dining experience. The busser, bartender and sometimes kitchen Do you tip the bartender and the server? Is it crew receive a percentage of each server’s total acceptable to tip solely based on the percentage shift sales. At the end of the shift, the server of your tab? Do you need to tip more if there are “tips out” these departments based on their multiple bartenders working? To help you out, amount of sales, not tips (again, usually) they we’ve addressed some myths around today’s received. This means if you stiff your server, tipping norms, tip-sharing scenarios and you’re actually costing them money because more, so you’re well-informed when making they’re still required to tip those who “serve” those decisions. them. If you’re sitting at the bar of a restaurant,

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Door guys and bouncers are usually paid hourly and do not receive tips. If yours was especially helpful or friendly and you’re feeling generous, handing them $5-$10 and telling them it’s for them will make their night. In most concert and event venue settings in town, bartenders share tips. If you tip one bartender at Cain’s or the Brady Theater, each

Profile for Preview 918

January 2017 (Vol. 31, No. 1)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 For over 30 years, Preview has been the best resource for dis...

January 2017 (Vol. 31, No. 1)  

Where to Dine. What to Do. Where to Find It. When It's Happening. Preview 918 For over 30 years, Preview has been the best resource for dis...