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The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago

Headquarters: NIBTT Queen's Park East 14-19 Queen's Park East, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-2171 Website: www.nibtt.net

NIBTT Initiatives Customers can access and rely on the following services to gain knowledge, save time and money and earn peace of mind:

NIBTT'S EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM

Greta Stephen-Henry

FeyaadKhan

Niala Persad-Poliah EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, BUSINESS SERVICES

EXECUTIVE MANAGER INSURANCE OPERATIONS

Michael Gopaul

Brendon Nelson

The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT) is a contribution-funded system committed to providing financial protection to workers, retirees and their dependants.

EXECUTIVE MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES (AG.)

EXECUTIVE MANAGER FINANCE&ACCOUNTING

Sarah Baboolal

Jacqui Castillo

EXECUTIVE MANAGER RISK (AG.)

EXECUTIVE MANAGER LEGAL SERVICES

In our 46th year of operations with over 500,000 customers contributing to the National Insurance System (NIS), our strategic plan finds us transforming our brand to meet the changing technological needs of our stakeholders.

www.nibtt.net

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Funeral Grant

Ramlakhan Seecharan EXECUTIVE MANAGER TECHNOLOGY

Bernard Smith

EXECUTIVE MANAGER POLICY, PLANNING& ACTUARIAL SERVICES (AG.)

Contact us today - (868) 625-4NIS - onlinepayments@nibtt.net - www.nibtt.net -�

NIBTT continues to implement innovative and creative solutions while adopting more online options to enhance outbound efficiency and service delivery through the efforts of a competent management team.

Employment Injury

- Online Contribution Statements - Online Contribution Payments - Online Education Seminar Request Forms - Pension Ready Programme

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Invalidity

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Maternity

I Retirement I

Sickness

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Survivor's

I Customer Care Centre: (868) 625-4NIS (4647) or customercare@nibtt.net Ii Find us on Facebook


CONTENTS AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES

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PRESTIGE BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS TEAM Richard Lewis Chairman

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION

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38

Patricia Lewis Director Marie Gurley Director Soraya Gonsalves Operations Manager

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

44

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

52

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS

64

HUMAN RESOURCE AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

78

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

84

Patrice Letren, Jessica Medina-Sammy Production Supervisors Nichele West-Broome Vanessa Ramtahal Administrative Assistants Produced and Created by Prestige Business Publications Ltd. Advertising Patricia Lewis, Marie Gurley, Betti Gillezeau, Kathleen Maynard, Christine François Edited by Lonsdale Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising Limited Cheryl-Ann Phillips-Gonzales Layout Laird Raymond, Verónica Sierra, Patrice Letren, Jessica Medina-Sammy Writers Joel Henry, Keith Lewis, Paula Lindo, Atiba Phillips, Dawn Richards, Keith Spencer, Sheldon Waithe, Anna Walcott-Hardy Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)

INSURANCE

98

Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA) Risk Management Services Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago - E. Joanne Edwards

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION

108

The Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT) Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI) - Syan Laurel Bhagwatsingh Trinidad & Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) - Ismahieel Ali, Christian George

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

118

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

132

Annual Distribution 12,000 copies

TRAVEL, PORTS, SHIPPING AND COURIER SERVICES

140

Copyright © 2018 Prestige Business Publications Ltd. All rights reserved. Prestige Business Publications Ltd. The Film Centre, 9 Humphrey Street St. James, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 622-0738/9 Fax: (868) 622-0426 Email: info@whoswhotnt.com www.whoswhotnt.com

Special Thanks Jonathan Barcant, Christopher Laird and the Laird family, Stephen Mendes, Patricia Ruddell


CONTENTS Trafalgar Motors - Range Rover Velar....................................Inside Front Cover Citibank Trinidad and Tobago Limited................................... Inside Back Cover El Dorado Demerara Rum................................................................. Back Cover The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT)....................... 1 TRICON Company Limited................................................................................. 3 AMS Group of Companies.................................................................................. 5 AMS Biotech Security Concepts Limited........................................................... 5 AMS Technologies.............................................................................................. 5 AST Security International Distribution LLC........................................................ 5 AWWL Affordable Window Wash Ltd ................................................................ 5 Sacha’s Gourmet................................................................................................ 5 AMS Café............................................................................................................. 5 Publisher’s Note.................................................................................................. 7 Prestige Business Publications Limited / Caribbean Tourism Publications Limited........................................................................................ 147 Messages.....................................................................................................8 Senator the Honourable Paula Gopee-Scoon, Minister- The Ministry of Trade and Industry...................................................... 8 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)................................ 8 The Honourable Kelvin Charles, Chief Secretary - The Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and Secretary of Education, Innovation and Energy............. 9 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce ............................ 9 Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce..................................................................................... 9 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)...................... 10 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago............................................... 10 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI).......... 10 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)................... 10 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)................................................................................................. 11 Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA)............. 11 Informational Lists and Indices...............................................................148 Honorary Consuls Accredited to the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago....... 149 Diplomatic Missions and International Organisations................................... 150 The Government of Trinidad and Tobago...................................................... 151 Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago................................................................ 152 Index by Surname........................................................................................... 156 Index by Company.......................................................................................... 159 Chambers American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)..................................................... 11, 128 British Caribbean Chamber of Commerce...................................................... 11 Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce..................................................... 11 Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce............................... 11 Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce................................................................ 11 Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce................. 11 Sangre Grande Business Association.............................................................. 11 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)................ 10, 11 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago.......................................... 10, 11 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce...............9, 11, 129 Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce.......................................................................9, 11, 129

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Associations Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA)............................................... 17, 134 Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC)............. 17 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)............................... 17, 36 Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA)................................................................. 11, 17, 129 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF)............... 17, 36 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago................................................. 17 The Human Resource Management Association of Trinidad & Tobago (HRMATT).......................................................................................................... 17 The Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA).......................................................................................................... 17 Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA).............................................. 17 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI).................................................................................................10, 17, 130 Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA)................................... 17

Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA)........................................... 17 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)..........8, 17, 112, 116 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)............. 10, 17 Special Features Judy Chang ...................................................................................................... 37 Moving Trinidad & Tobago to World-Class Customer Care........................... 51 Transfer of Technology..................................................................................... 61 Jonathan Barcant.............................................................................................. 77 Food Labelling – Can you read this?.............................................................. 117 Colin Laird........................................................................................................ 131 Automotive and Aviation Services............................................................. 12 Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago................................................. 14, 15 Piarco Aeropark................................................................................................. 15 Sookhai’s Diesel Service Limited...................................................................... 16 Toyota Trinidad and Tobago Limited............................................................... 16 Banking, Investment and Financial Services............................................ 18 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)............................... 17, 36 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF)............... 17, 36 Eastern Credit Union Co-operative Society Ltd (ECU)......................20, 21, 130 EPL Properties Limited.............................................................................. 21, 130 First Citizens Bank....................................................................................... 22, 23 Republic Financial Holdings Limited.......................................................... 24, 25 CIBC FirstCaribbean Financial Centre Bank.................................................... 26 CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank.......................................................... 26 Island Finance .................................................................................................. 27 The JMMB Group Trinidad and Tobago.......................................................... 28 JMMB Bank....................................................................................................... 28 JMMB Investments............................................................................................ 28 NCB Global Finance Limited............................................................................ 29 Scotiabank Trinidad and Tobago Limited........................................................ 30 Trinidad and Tobago Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (TTAIFA).............................................................................. 31 Trinidad and Tobago Police Credit Union........................................................ 32 Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation (UTC)........................................ 33 Caribbean Information & Credit Rating Services Limited (CariCRIS)............. 34 Funds International Limited............................................................................... 34 KCL Capital Market Brokers Limited................................................................ 35 Trinidad and Tobago Free Zones Company Limited...................................... 35 Construction, Engineering and Transportation........................................38 The Paramount Transport & Trading Company Limited................................. 40 Caribbean Lifts Limited..................................................................................... 41 Safe-Tec Limited................................................................................................ 41 G. Murray Engineering Works Limited (GME).................................................. 42 OJ’s Electrical & Instrumentation Services (OJ’S) / Kentz-OJ’s E&I Services JV.............................................................................. 42 TOSL Engineering Limited................................................................................ 43 Design Landscape Architects........................................................................... 43 Kennicon Engineering Limited.......................................................................... 43 Education and Training..............................................................................44 MIC Institute of Technology.............................................................................. 46 University of the Southern Caribbean (USC).................................................... 47 YTEPP Limited................................................................................................... 48 Caribbean Centre for Leadership Development Ltd. (CCLD)......................... 49 The Professional Institute of Marketing & Business Studies Ltd. (PIMBS)..... 50 Caribbean Kids and Families Therapy Organization (CKFTO)....................... 50 Energy and Energy-Related Industries.....................................................52 Atlantic............................................................................................................... 54 Falck Safety Services........................................................................................ 55 HHSL Safety Systems Limited.......................................................................... 56 Lake Asphalt of Trinidad and Tobago (1978) Limited..................................... 57 Nutrien................................................................................................................ 58 The NGC Group............................................................................................... .59 The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited........................ 59 Phoenix Park Gas Processors Limited (PPGPL).............................................. 59 Trinidad and Tobago NGL Limited (TTNGL).................................................... 59 NGC CNG Company Limited (NGC CNG)...................................................... 59


Apart from being Managing Director Ms. Sacha Singh is now in the category of International Author as she launched her book in July of this year in the United States of America. She has written about some of the challenges that most women go through and how she as a young budding entrepreneur rose above them. Ms. Singh is the first young female in the Caribbean to have written a book/ mini memoir and autobiography of her life thus far. The book is available at leading book­ stores nationwide, online (www.xlibris.com) and across the Caribbean.

Published by Xlibris LLC, USA

OVERCOMING a�,o�� lk�IHJ}��l

S. SACHA SINGH CEO- AMS Group of Companies

The AMS Group of Companies is the umbrella company for AMS Biotech Security

Concepts Limited, AWWL, AMS Technologies, AST Security International Distrib­ utors, Sachas Gourmet and AMS Cafe. The AMS Group of Companies was formed

by Ms. S. Sacha Singh nine years ago. They cover a wide range of areas which include distribution in security equipment, alarms and monitoring, restaurants and maintain­ ace companies. Ms. S. Sacha Singh has now also taken the International spotlight with her recent publication of her book "Overcoming a Woman's Struggles Through a

A\ l\\ ll(CC' Biotech

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SECURITY CONCEPTS LIMITED

Distribution of Security Equipment, Access Control and Intrusion, CCTV & Fire Equipment.

Young Girl's Heart!".

AMS Biotech, founded in May 2009 by Managing Director Ms. S. Sacha Singh was

already the leader in the Fingerprint Time and Attendance Biometric technology when the company launched AMS Security Equipment distribution company in 2012, offering CCTV, Access Control, Fire Panels, Alarms, Biometrics Access Control, Cables and Wiring, Time and Attendance Biometric Fingerprint Systems, Walk-through Scan­ ners and Hand-held Scanners. We carry renowned brands such as Seco Enforcer, Honeywell, Hikvision, DCS, RBH, Kantec, Genesis, Purple Series Harddrives, SEA Gates, Commax, Fingerprint Time and Attendance and Fingerprint Access Control.

SECURITY INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION LLC

AMS Technologies (2016) is a distribution company mainly for the 'Can't See Can't Thief' concept (a fogging system that deters unwanted intrusion in business places), Biometrics Access Fingerprint System and Fingerprint Time and Attendance.

International Distributors (2015) operates out of Doral, Miami Florida and opened its doors to the Caribbean when we acquired the distribution of one of the world's number one CCTV line, HIKVISION.

AST Security

AWWL Maintenance Company specializing in High rise glass cleaning and external building mainatainance.

Sachas Gourmet is a beautiful restaurant in El Socorro in the heart of the industrial estate. It offers great gourmet style food in a relaxed ambiance that allows our customers to be in a relaxed setting before of after work. AMS Cafe: Local Indian restaurant located at Piarco Plaza convenient for travellers going and coming from sweet T&T.

AFFORDABLE \NINDO\N VVASH LTD.


CONTENTS National Energy Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (National Energy)............................................................................................... 59 Subsea Specialist Ltd........................................................................................ 60 Trinidad & Tobago Offshore Innovators Ltd / Offshore Innovators (Guyana) Inc.................................................................... 60 ASCO Logistics Limited.................................................................................... 62 The Power Generation Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (PowerGen).......................................................................................... 62 Safety Pass Alliance Trinidad and Tobago (SPATT) Limited........................... 63 Fircroft................................................................................................................ 63 Health, Safety, Security, Environment and Standards.............................64 Allied Security Limited....................................................................................... 67 Health City Cayman Islands / Caribbean Health Access .............................. 68 Central Athletic Club.......................................................................................... 69 Renew Star Serpentine Ltd............................................................................... 70 St. Clair Medical Centre / Medcorp Limited .................................................... 71 The Security Zone Limited (TSZ)...................................................................... 72 Ace Recycling Limited....................................................................................... 73 Biomedical Enterprises of Trinidad and Tobago Limited................................ 73 Ecosol Services Limited.................................................................................... 74 Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI)............................................ 74 Joint Medical Products Caribbean Limited...................................................... 74 Ms. Brafit Limited............................................................................................... 75 Equilibrium Environmental Services Ltd........................................................... 75 Piranha International Ltd................................................................................... 76 Monte Vista Medical.......................................................................................... 76 Sygma Environmental....................................................................................... 76 Human Resource and Management Consultancies..................................78 Aegis.................................................................................................................. 80 Eve Anderson Recruitment Limited.................................................................. 80 Caribbean Resourcing Solutions...................................................................... 80 Lok Jack GSB Consulting Services.................................................................. 81 HR Technologies Ltd......................................................................................... 81 ODYSSEY CONSULTinc Limited...................................................................... 82 Business Lifeline Limited................................................................................... 82 DRA Consulting ................................................................................................ 82 Dispute Resolution Centre................................................................................ 83 Regency Recruitment & Resources Limited.................................................... 83 TSG Consulting................................................................................................. 83 Information and Communications Technology.........................................84 bmobile........................................................................................................ 86, 87 Telecommunications Services of Trinidad & Tobago Limited (TSTT)....... 86, 87 C&W Business............................................................................................. 88, 89 Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad & Tobago (TATT)................... 90, 91 Air Link Communications Limited / Air Link Networks..................................... 92 Massy Technologies Applied Imaging (Trinidad) Ltd...................................... 93 Massy Technologies InfoCom.......................................................................... 94 SiMedia.............................................................................................................. 95 Alliance Software and Technology Systems Limited....................................... 96 National Information and Communication Technology Company Limited (iGovTT)............................................................................... 96 SoftwareONE..................................................................................................... 97 Chakra Enterprises Ltd...................................................................................... 97 Spark Technologies Limited............................................................................. 97 Insurance...................................................................................................98 Agostini Insurance Brokers Ltd (AIB).............................................................. 100 Beacon............................................................................................................. 101 Cardea Health Solutions Ltd........................................................................... 102 CUNA Caribbean Insurance Society Limited / CUNA Mutual Group........... 103 ForenSys Trinidad & Tobago.......................................................................... 104 Massy United Insurance................................................................................. 105 NAGICO Insurance (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited...................................... 106 Risk Management Services Ltd...................................................................... 107 Farah Insurance Brokers Ltd.......................................................................... 107

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Manufacturing and Retail Distribution...................................................108 Angostura Limited........................................................................................... 110 Engineering Associates Ltd............................................................................ 111

Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)..........8, 17, 112, 116 ecliff elie........................................................................................................... 113 Ettes Office Furniture Ltd................................................................................ 113 GE Single Source Company (GESSCO)........................................................ 114 Happi Products Ltd......................................................................................... 114 ROSSCON....................................................................................................... 115 SCRIP-J............................................................................................................ 115 S.I.L. Imports & Exports Ltd............................................................................ 116 Professional Services, Public and Private Sector Organisations.......... 118 LH Group ................................................................................................120, 121 GCG Group - GCG Trinidad / Allied Caterers / Katerserv............................. 122 Debt Recovery and Administrative Services Limited (DR&ASL)................... 123 Grant Thornton ORBIT Solutions.................................................................... 124 KPMG............................................................................................................... 125 Access Trinidad............................................................................................... 126 PMSL................................................................................................................ 126 Sandra Welch-Farrell & Company (SWF&CO).............................................. 127 The Trade Promotion Agency of Costa Rica (PROCOMER)......................... 127 The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)............................................................................................................. 128 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)......................................................................................... 11, 128 Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited............................................................... 128 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (T&T Chamber)......................................................................................9, 11, 129 Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce.......................................................................9, 11, 129 Concepts & Services....................................................................................... 129 Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA)....................................................................................................11, 17, 129 EPL Properties Limited.............................................................................. 21, 130 Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd.................................................................. 130 Sacoda Serv Limited....................................................................................... 130 The Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI)...10, 17, 130 Real Estate, Property Development and Facilities Management...........132 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA)............................................... 17, 134 1 On 1 Realty...........................................................................................134, 139 Cevara Realty.................................................................................................. 134 CPRC Realty.................................................................................................... 134 Errol Jaglal Real Estate................................................................................... 134 Golden Key Real Estate.................................................................................. 134 Key West Real Estate...................................................................................... 134 N.R. Jones Realty Ltd...................................................................................... 134 S2 Real Estate Services.................................................................................. 134 Sea Jade Investments..................................................................................... 134 The Eco-Industrial Development Company of Tobago (E-IDCOT) Ltd.......... 135 Cove Eco-Industrial and Business Park......................................................... 135 Europa............................................................................................................. 136 Regus............................................................................................................... 136 RGM Limited.................................................................................................... 137 Servus Limited................................................................................................. 137 Sparks Consultancy Services......................................................................... 138 Terra Caribbean............................................................................................... 138 Dynamic Real Estate Consultancy Ltd........................................................... 139 J & G Supplies Just Clean Janitorial Services............................................... 139 Re/Max Nexus Realty...................................................................................... 139 Travel, Ports, Shipping and Courier Services..........................................140 Caribbean Dockyard & Engineering Services Ltd (CDESL).......................... 142 CL Marine Ltd. (CLM)...................................................................................... 142 Trinidad and Tobago Postal Corporation (TTPOST)..................................... 143 Cargo Consolidators Agency Limited............................................................ 144 DHL.................................................................................................................. 144 Go 4 Less Ltd.................................................................................................. 145 Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Limited (PLIPDECO)..................................................................................................... 145 Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited................................................ 146 Go4 Delivery Service....................................................................................... 146 Shipping Solutions & Services Limited........................................................... 146


PUBLISHER’S NOTE Richard Lewis Publisher

Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business 2018 - 2019 is here again and has been undergoing a few design changes to modernise the look and keep with the trend of transforming the publication into one which will have a wider appeal to both readers and advertisers, as well as being able to deepen the digital presence over the next two years to allow advertisers to reach a bigger and more focused international audience. I would not want to announce any of the new services that we hope will become available in the next 12 months to our loyal customers through use of these new digital offerings. We will certainly keep our users and our customers advised of the new developments as they are launched. This publication has continued to lead the field of regional publications when it comes to promoting the concept of “It’s not who you know, it’s who knows you.” In a nutshell, the personal contacts developed in the world of business are of little value, if you do not have powerful networking strategies to make these contacts work for you and your business. How do we grow the Human Social Capital value of our Frontline Directors and Managers in a positive way, that will influence success at the Management Team level, Director level and the level of the Brand? I thought that it would be worthwhile sharing a recent insight that I experienced in some existing edge publications that relates to branding of the leadership team and how we communicate this to the customers. Leadership development comes in a number off guises but normally only focuses on individual leadership, only allowing them to demonstrate this persuasive leadership INSIDE the organisation. Leadership Team Branding, however, is a new approach that focuses on building group leadership skills within an organisation, and the impact those skills have OUTSIDE the organisation, specifically on the CUSTOMER. Leadership Branding therefore, encourages Leaders to see themselves as an integral and vital component of the overall customer offering. A Leadership Brand promise is therefore, a clear statement of what the collective leadership wants to be known for and experienced by the customers. All of our customers in this prestigious publication are leaders in themselves and within the companies they represent, so there is real reinforcement that there must be more channels to communicate the leadership team branding promise. Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business portrays only leadership Brands and the collective leadership needed to fulfil the brand promise of these companies. I suggest that all users of this publication grow from their own leadership team branding strategies and benefit from the experience that will move people to know you more than you know them. Enjoy the publication. It took a lot of hard work from employees and customers alike, so I cannot close without my sincere thanks. Remember to live the statement, “Promise reality but deliver a dream.”

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MESSAGES Senator the Honourable

Paula Gopee-Scoon MINISTER MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY REPUBLIC OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO The Ministry of Trade and Industry continues to play its significant role in the revitalisation and expansion of the local economy, strengthening the non-energy sector. The already strong manufacturing sector which has more than 50,000 employees is challenged to widen its product base and expand its exports extra-regionally. The Ministry continues to work toward expanding market access, attracting quality domestic and foreign investments and creating a more conducive environment for businesses to grow and develop. A critical component in our strategy is the improvement of quality and innovation in our products and services with the aim of becoming more competitive through such product differentiation, beyond price. To this end, the Ministry of Trade and Industry, through the Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards, is operationalising the National Quality Policy and the National Quality Infrastructure to improve domestic systems, where necessary, to international standards and thereby enable exporters to meet the demands of the multilateral trading system. This will provide credible proof that domestic products conform to international standards. In order to stimulate and grow trade especially in the non-energy sector a new Trade Policy and Strategy for the period 2018-2022 is currently being developed in collaboration with the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). A significant objective is to double this country’s non-energy exports by 2025. Considerable work has been advanced towards the implementation of Partial Scope Trade Agreements (PSTAs) between this Trinidad and Tobago and Panama by example. Relatedly, a new Trade Mission Strategy has been approved with the long term goal being an increase in non-energy exports and export diversification in targeted foreign markets. For the fiscal year 2018, trade missions were executed to Costa Rica, Cuba, Guyana, Jamaica and Panama. Two further trade missions to Haiti and Colombia will take place before the end of 2018.

Christopher Alcazar President

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION (TTMA)

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The global environment has created ever increasing competition within the international manufacturing sector. Governments from across the world have recognised the significant contribution made by this essential industry and continue to invest and encourage growth in this domain. Similarly, the Government of Trinidad and Tobago for several years has advocated that it is the manufacturing sector that is expected to lead the mandatory process of diversification of the national economy. The Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) takes seriously this initiative and views this partnership beneficial in varied ways to all citizens of our nation. Our network of over 400 members are therefore represented by our intensified efforts in ensuring that there are optimal policies, processes and initiatives to encourage meaningful and accelerated growth and sustainability of our sector. On a larger scale, our community of manufacturers is of the strong belief that we represent the best interests of every citizen of our nation through the unique and high-quality goods which we produce, the vast economic benefits which we stimulate through local and international commerce, the meaningful employment which we provide to over 55,000 Trinbagonians and the deep sense of pride and ownership which we instil in our people. We view manufacturing as a homegrown solution to our cyclical economic woes and we continue to advocate for the best ways to harness and quickly grow our economy through our industry.

The Government has also recognised that in order to develop globally competitive and innovative products, manufacturers must invest extensively in Research and Development. To this end, an enhanced Research and Development Facility was introduced offering tiered funding for capacity-building and innovation of products and services in the non-energy sector, up to a maximum of TT$1 Mn per beneficiary. The Ministry has also developed a Grant Fund Facility for Small and MediumSized Enterprises (SMEs). This facility seeks to assist export-oriented SMEs in acquiring machinery and equipment to become more competitive in the global trading arena. The Grant Fund Facility provides financing up to a maximum of TT$250,000 and is available to targeted agro processors and light manufacturers. Additionally, a new Business Development Fund is to be introduced for small locally owned businesses valued up to a maximum of TT $100,000 per applicant. Similarly, new and existing farmers will also benefit from an Agriculture Financial Support Programme of equal value. A key aspect of industrial investment is the development of strategic spaces where investors can build factories and offices to create goods and services for local and international consumption. The development of the Phoenix Park Industrial Estate, the Moruga Agro-Processing and Light Industrial Park and the Piarco AeroPark, the latter in collaboration with the Ministry of Works and Transport, is ongoing. Continued development and tenanting of the Tamana InTech Park remains vital with added synergies expected with the operationalization of the Tamana Campus of the University of Trinidad and Tobago. The Ministry of Trade and Industry is also implementing a Special Economic Zones (SEZs) Policy which will revamp the current regime and guide the growth of SEZs across Trinidad and Tobago. The Ministry of Trade and Industry, guided by the World Bank’s Doing Business Report, is collaborating with several ministries and Government agencies to implement a robust package of administrative and legislative reforms aimed at improving the ease of doing business in Trinidad and Tobago. Over the next two years, the services offered by the Single Electronic Window (SEW) for trade and business facilitation – TTBizLink will be enhanced and expanded. This includes the automation of several Government services including obtaining construction permits and making electronic payments, both of which have already commenced. Additionally, the implementation of several administrative and legislative reforms are ongoing to improve key aspects related to business, trade and investment including starting a business, trading across borders, resolving insolvency, and getting credit. The implementation of a secured transactions and collateral registry policy will also yield considerable gains as businesses utilise movable collateral to access financing.

This avenue to economic sustainability should provide a beacon of hope to our country’s citizens that we can produce great entrepreneurs, executives, thinkers, innovators and contributors who have the capacity to build our nation to become more progressive and less dependent on our traditional sources of income. Indeed, it is our hope that our nation’s people and in particular our young people, turn to innovation like many of the citizens of other developing nations so as to create products that are unique and marketable on the world’s stage. These dynamic individuals would be the future leaders and transformers of our society and economy. The TTMA has coined the phrase ‘Proudly T&T’ because as an industry, we feel pride every day in producing for our country and its citizens. Each leader in our industry has at some time made the concerted effort to invest and build something in our country which would ultimately contribute and generate value for our people and our economy. ‘Proudly T&T’ represents hope and pride for all citizens — young and old — which proves that positivity and excellence are produced right here within our shores and this is something which we must all celebrate. The TTMA recognises our challenging economic circumstances but we equally recognise the opportunities which accompany difficult times. We know that despite our hurdles, we are invested in the survival and growth of our economy for the long haul. It is therefore my hope as President of the TTMA, that ‘Proudly T&T’ speaks to each one of us as citizens and that the pride it inspires, motivates and revitalises our next generation of great manufacturers. TTMA Building, 42 Tenth Avenue, Barataria, Trinidad and Tobago P.O. Box 971, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 675-TTMA (8862) • Fax: (868) 675-9000 Email: service@ttma.com or info@ttma.com • Website: www.ttma.com


MESSAGES The Honourable

Ronald Hinds

CHIEF SECRETARY OF THE TOBAGO HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY (THA) AND SECRETARY OF EDUCATION, INNOVATION AND ENERGY

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (T&T CHAMBER)

Kelvin Charles

This is a crucial and significant time in Tobago’s existence. Now more than ever, the island is poised to undergo a transformation that will impact generations to come, once the right opportunities are seized. Notwithstanding the challenges of the last 12 months with a collapsed sea bridge, Tobago continues to showcase resiliency and promise. The current administration of the Tobago House of Assembly (THA) believes that, ‘it’s together we will build Tobago’; the signal has been sent throughout the island that the THA cannot do it alone, neither the politicians. A clarion call has been sent out for us to adopt an, ‘all hands on deck’ approach to develop and take Tobago further. As an Assembly we have been making significant strides even in the face of Trinidad and Tobago’s economic challenges. The THA has managed to transform the previously burdened and inefficient Studley Park Quarry into a Special Purpose Company that generates a profit by supplying raw material to local and national projects. Additionally, the South Western Waste Water Treatment Plant is in progress after successful negotiations were reached regarding land use, among the Mt. Pleasant Credit Union, the Tobago House of Assembly and the Water and Sewage Authority. We continue to strive to develop Tobago using a community based and community focused approach, as we believe empowering communities will fashion an island that is holistically equipped and developed for the 21st century and beyond. The Division of Community Development, Enterprise Development and Labour has also been utilised as the gateway for transforming and reshaping the Unemployment Relief Programme (URP), as well as the Community Based Environmental, Protection and Enhancement Programme (CEPEP). Business training is currently being provided for URP workers through a partnership between Community Development and Division of Infrastructure, Quarries and the Environment. This training is geared towards ensuring URP workers are given the tools to become self-sufficient and more marketable. Additionally, URP is also playing a critical role in the Cocoa Rehabilitation Project aimed at harvesting thousands of square miles of cocoa for local use and export. The THA continues to explore avenues to sharpen and improve our tourism product. The newly established Tobago Tourism Agency has been entrusted with the responsibility to market destination Tobago and plans are in train. The Division of Tourism, Culture and Transportation recently hosted a Tobago roadshow in Gulf City, La Romaine and C3 Granno Area, San Fernando, sending a signal that Tobago is open for business. As Tobago entrepreneurs prepare for the Trade and Investment Convention in Macoya, Trinidad, seeking new local and international markets for their products, the THA continues to work towards ensuring a vibrant and growing private sector on the island. Discussions on autonomy for Tobago will continue as the Bill has been laid in Parliament and is now before a Joint Select Committee. Autonomy for Tobago will give Tobago greater control over its own affairs while ensuring a more equitable relationship with Trinidad. Tobago is not only poised for success, it is ready for take off. Office of the Chief Secretary Tobago House of Assembly, Administrative Complex 62-64 Calder Hall Road, Scarborough 900408 Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2696 • Fax: (868) 639-5374 Email: chiefsecretary@tha.gov.tt

President

The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce is pleased to be part of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business. We would like to express our admiration and respect for the publishers on the consistent standard of excellence of this magazine, which has positioned Who’s Who as a valued publication for investors and businesspeople overall. As the recognised “Voice of Business”, the T&T Chamber offers an extensive portfolio of services to assist members through advocacy, lobbying, networking opportunities, trade facilitation and missions, conference/meeting facilities, and dispute resolution services. We have enhanced these with a cache of new services to better serve our members and facilitate the development of businesses. This includes the Business Insights series, providing ‘training for business by business’ through live events, live streamed feed and recorded online platforms. We introduced a Membership Value-Added programme which provides cost-saving benefits to members on selected services including local and international savings. The T&T Chamber has also created a special category of membership open to local participants of business incubator programmes. This is one way we offer support to entrepreneurs and start-ups as they develop into viable commercial enterprises. Our flagship Contact magazine has been rebranded and continues to be delivered to a wide number of readers and all are complimentary. The publication is also available as an e-magazine on our website. Our organisation continues to be national in scope, with over 580 corporate members spanning the services, import, export, distribution and manufacturing sectors as well as startup operators, while Tobago’s business community is served through our Tobago Division. The T&T Chamber serves on over 30 national and non-governmental committees where we represent the views of business to national stakeholders. Our internal committees are comprised of members who volunteer their time and expertise to input on a range of issues – from trade and investment, leadership, finance, small business development, to technology and responsible business. Visit our website for more information on the T&T Chamber, or find us on: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Columbus Circle, Westmoorings, P.O. Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad. Tel: (868) 637-6966 • Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt • Website: www.chamber.org.tt

Claude Benoit Chairman

TOBAGO DIVISION OF THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE The Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce extends warmest greetings to the publishers of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business, upon the publication of another informative issue. The T&T Chamber remains the only business representative organisation with an office specifically dedicated to serving the needs of the Tobago business community. Originally established as the Tobago Chamber of Commerce, it merged with the Trinidad Chamber 37 years later, becoming a national organisation. As the newly elected Chairman leading a new Management Team, I thank the past Chairman and his team for their committed work. Over the years, many teams have contributed to the respect in which the Division is now held. As we go forward, the Division will continue to be the voice of business for operators on the island in critical areas of business and tourism development. We will do this through the work of our seven committees and through our presence on committees of the Tobago House of Assembly. We also enjoy close engagements with other representative groups in Tobago and seek out synergistic relationships central government and national stakeholders. In doing so, we provide a critical link between the private and public sectors and civil society to further the interests of Tobagonians. 2nd Floor, Ansa McAl Building, Milford Road, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2669 • Fax: (868) 639-3014 Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt. • Website: www.chamber.org.tt

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MESSAGES Vishnu Charran

Eugene Tiah

THE CHAGUANAS CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (CCIC)

THE ENERGY CHAMBER OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (THE ENERGY CHAMBER)

President

The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC) is elated to be a part of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business, once more; and would like to commend the publishers on their exceptional efforts in creating an outstanding business to business directory. The CCIC’s mission has always been to preside as advocate for the membership and community on numerous governmental and non-governmental platforms; and most importantly to assist our members in developing their businesses and entrepreneurial initiatives. Economic challenges and a growing membership, has propelled the Chamber to broaden the scope of knowledge, recognising the need to diversify the economy. For this reason, the Chamber has partnered with a number of organisations to put forth exhibitions and seminars showcasing opportunities which members of the business community can utilise to improve operations in such turbulent times. There is potential for the growth of the manufacturing and agriculture industry, which can open doors for business owners to access both the import and export markets. Hence, we encourage innovative and new approaches to business which discerns niche markets. The Chamber acknowledges these achievements and chooses to incentivise such business developments annually, by presenting small, medium and large enterprises with well deserving awards for their excellence. We genuinely believe that these initiatives will have a ripple effect throughout the country and enable national development. Rome wasn’t built in a day, but with the unwavering dedication of our membership and other participants, we strive for a better tomorrow. 17-18 Biljah Road, IDC Industrial Estate, Charlieville c/o Metal-X Engineering Limited, Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 671-2242 (CCIC)/779-8804 • Fax: (868) 671-2242 Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org • Website: www.chaguanaschamber.org

Lara Quentrall-Thomas President

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO COALITION OF SERVICES INDUSTRIES LIMITED (TTCSI) The Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI) is pleased to be a part of the latest edition of the Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business. Established in 2006, the TTCSI continues to champion the services sector and remains the vanguard of the services industry in Trinidad and Tobago, comprising 35 umbrella member associations spanning over 5000,000 individuals, it represents the robustness and dynamism of the services sector. In an effort to strengthen the interactions with the national economy, the TTCSI has placed its associations into seven clusters of related industries. The clusters reflect the existing services industries in Trinidad and Tobago, and are: • Business Services • Financial Services • Construction and Related • Health and Related Social Services Engineering Services • Tourism and Travel-Related Social Services • Environmental Services • Recreational, Cultural and Sporting Services Over the last year, the TTCSI has collaborated with the Ministry of Trade and Industry to further develop the services sector into becoming globally competitive. Among our initiatives is the development of a financial/lending mechanism that will enable service providers to access lines of credit and financial support. We have also completed the first phase of the nation’s first Services Exporters’ Registry, which highlighted the top services sectors with the greatest export potential for Trinidad and Tobago. The second phase of the Registry Project should be completed at the end of 2018. We continue to further assist the sector through lobbying and providing an enabling environment for services. The TTCSI played a crucial role in lobbying for the removal of Value Added Tax (VAT) on foreign yacht services and regulatory reform in the areas of digital trade for the facilitation of e-payments for businesses. As a coalition, the TTCSI continues to be the voice for the services sector, and as we continue to support Trinidad and Tobago’s diversification thrust, we believe that the services sector should lead the way into making this a reality.

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Chairman

The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago is a vital player in the continued development of this country and the wider Caribbean region, and is committed to positioning Trinidad and Tobago as the energy services hub of the region. We continue to work towards achieving this by focusing our efforts in six key advocacy areas: fiscal reform, gas value chain realignment, promoting local content, increasing energy efficiency, reforming industrial relations and exporting energy services. The Energy Chamber is focused on meeting our members’ needs while ensuring the sector’s sustainable development. In this regard, our strategic mandates are both inward and outward looking. Our two key strategic imperatives are to ensure that Trinidad and Tobago is an attractive investment destination and that we also diversify our economy by exporting energy services. Supporting local content is a vital element of our mandate, as we build companies which compete at home and abroad and we maximise the retention of value within the domestic economy. Reforming our industrial relations environment is vital to drive the competitiveness of our companies and our economy actively and we are vigorously pursuing this objective with our other private sector association partners. Trinidad and Tobago’s place in the new energy order will depend on both how well we promote our country as a preferred energy investment destination and export our energy sector expertise globally. As the representative body of our century-old energy sector, the Energy Chamber works to ensure that the sector remains sustainable and redounds to the benefit of all its stakeholders.

Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Avenue, Point Lisas, Trinidad P.O. Box 80, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 • Fax: (868) 679-4242 Email: execoffice@energy.tt • Website: www.energy.tt

Hassel Thom President

TRINIDAD HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION (THRTA) The Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA) is honoured to be part of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business. As the largest private sector tourism body in Trinidad, the THRTA has played a leadership role in the tourism industry in Trinidad and Tobago for the past 50 years. The Association’s membership comprises hotels/guesthouses, restaurants, transport and tour operators and several companies that provide goods and services to the industry. THRTA provides benefits and services to its members through the creation of a business environment conducive to tourism sector development by influencing government policies, programmes and legislation, which in turn stimulates investment, profitability and competitive rates of return to our member companies. In the upcoming period, the THRTA will be focusing on executing its mandate, supported by strategic pillars, including Advocacy and Industry Representation; Strategic Networking and Alliances; Revenue Generation and Financial Sustainability; Human Capital Development; and Research and Data Acquisition. The THRTA will also be working closely with its training arm, the Trinidad and Tobago Hospitality and Tourism Institute (TTHTI) to ensure that the human capital needs of the industry are adequately served. We continue to work towards creating an enabling environment for tourism in Trinidad, encouraging investment in the sector, creating additional demand, strengthening the visitor experience and fostering the coordination of the efforts amongst all stakeholders. We seek to bring about more awareness and recognition that tourism has the potential to be a major driver of the diversification plans for the economy of Trinidad and Tobago.

Corner Airways Road and Hilltop Lane, Chaguaramas P.O. Box 243, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 634-1174/5 Email: info@tnthotels.com • Website: www.tnthotels.com


MESSAGES Patricia Ghany

Keston Nancoo

AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (AMCHAM T&T)

EMPLOYERS’ CONSULTATIVE ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (ECA)

President

Chairman

Since becoming independent in 1962, Trinidad and Tobago has experienced a number of economic, social and cultural shifts. With the fourth industrial revolution upon us, the tide is again shifting as the rate of technological innovation and adoption is increasing exponentially. Countries that choose to stand still will inevitably run the risk of falling behind, as no country will be able to survive in a digital age with an analogue mind-set. At the American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T), we recognise the impact of the digital revolution and believe it brings enormous possibilities for growth and diversification of our local economy. To this end, AMCHAM T&T formed the Digital Transformation Committee in January 2018, with a mandate to “drive digital transformation in Trinidad and Tobago”. We believe that with a transformed system of public administration, and enhanced delivery of services, we can create innovative processes, integrated systems and inprove data collection. We can then leverage said data to ensure optimum use of our resources and efficient delivery of government services to create a more agile economy. This transformation also enables businesses, investors and citizens to be more productive. As the pathway to the Americas, AMCHAM T&T leads the way in proactive advocacy aimed at creating a business environment that fosters fairness, growth, and accountability. We continue to create opportunities for engagement between our members and all stakeholders in the US and Latin America. We remain a vibrant member of the Association of American Chambers of Commerce of Latin America and the Caribbean (AACCLA), and continue to form linkages with business and government leaders involved with our 23 sister AMCHAMs across the Western Hemisphere as well as the US Chamber of Commerce. AMCHAM T&T remains committed to collaborating with the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago to establish trade and investment opportunities that will lead to a more robust economy and consequently the creation of wealth that can be shared and enjoyed by all citizens.

It is an honour to extend warm greetings to you and to again be part of this essential reference for useful business information. Having now been in existence for 60 years, the Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA) is acutely aware that the ability to continuously create value, even in recessionary times, is a fundamental aim and aspiration of any business. Managing human capital risk is a vital aspect of realising this goal and this is the strategic value contribution of the ECA to employers and by extension, the national community. As an organisation itself, the ECA not only possesses a clear understanding of potential employee issues that are likely to arise from a poorly managed workforce, but is also actively assisting employers in identifying, developing and implementing strategies to mitigate these human capital risks. This is our raison d’etre as we continue to leverage our regional and international affiliations with the Caribbean Employers’ Confederation (CEC), International Organisation and Employers (IOE) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) to offer informed, innovative and transformational leadership and quality services to employers for the realisation of sound policies and systems, talent optimisation, reduced costs and ultimately, operational excellence. At the national level, it is generally accepted that private sector businesses are the indispensable engine of job creation and economic growth. In this regard, the ECA is persuaded that a vibrant private sector is a crucial element for achieving national progress characterised by sound industrial relations practices, enhanced productivity, social development and sustained economic growth. The ECA’s membership covers a diverse range of enterprises and remains open for all employers, notwithstanding size or industry, to join. As a responsible social partner, the ECA remains committed to promoting, protecting and practising the process of tripartite social dialogue toward progressive advancements in the world of work and for the sustained development of Trinidad and Tobago now and for the benefit of generations to come.

62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. P.O. Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466/0340, 628-2508 • Fax: (868) 628-9428 Email: inbox@amchamtt.com • Website: www.amchamtt.com

17 Samaroo Road, Aranguez Roundabout North, Aranguez, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-5873 • Fax: (868) 675-6026 Email: communications@ecatt.org • Website: www.ecatt.org

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T) Patricia Ghany - President Nirad Tewarie – Chief Executive Officer 62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad W.I. PO Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466 Fax: (868) 628-9428 Email: inbox@amchamtt.com Website: www.amchamtt.com

British Caribbean Chamber of Commerce Nadira N. Persad – Country Manager ESG Business Suites, Fitt Court, 9-11 Fitt Street, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 352-0923 Email: n.persad@britishcaribbean.com Website: www.britishcaribbean.com

Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce Ramchand Rajbal Maraj – President #12 Camden Road, Couva, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 636-5017/223-6670 Email: couva.chamber@gmail.com

Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce Surindra Maharaj – President 110 Eastern Main Road Tunapuna, Trinidad c/o Pat & Max Limited Tel: (868) 645-5639 Email: info@tunapunachamber.org Website: www.gtcic.org

Penal Debe Chamber of Commerce Rampersad Sieuraj – President 18 Penal Rock Road, Penal, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 647-0452/ 683-9573 Email: penaldebechamber@gmail.com

Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce George Alexis – President Davita Simon – First Vice President Carlton Semper – Second Vice President M6 Furlong Street, Mahaica, Point Fortin, Trinidad Email: pfswcic@gmail.com Website: www.pfswcic.org

Sangre Grande Business Association Kenneth Boodhu – President c/o OJOE’S Building, 193B Eastern Main Road, Sangre Grande, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 668-5932 Email: kenboodhu@hotmail.com

The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)

Vishnu Charran – President 17-18 Biljah Road, IDC Industrial Estate, Charlieville c/o Metal-X Engineering Limited, Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 671-2242 (CCIC)/779-8804 Fax: (868) 671-2242 Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org Website: www.chaguanaschamber.org

The Energy Chamber of Trinidad & Tobago

Eugene Tiah – Chairman Dr. Thackwray Driver – President and CEO Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Avenue, Point Lisas, COUVA P.O Box 80, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 Fax: (868) 679-4242 Email: execoffice@energy.tt Website: www.energy.tt

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce

Ronald Hinds – President Gabriel Faria – Chief Executive Officer Columbus Circle, Westmoorings P.O Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 637-6966 Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce

Claude Benoit – Chairman 2nd Floor Ansa McAl Building, Milford Road, P.O Box 47, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2669 Fax: (868) 639-3014 Email : tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

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AUTOMOTIVE BIG PICTURE

AUTOMOTIVE & AVIATION By Joel Henry

The automotive sector in Trinidad and Tobago is made up of new and foreign used vehicle dealerships. The new car market is controlled by a small group of franchise holders for US, European, and Asian brands. The foreign used vehicle market consists of many small and medium-sized dealers. Because of the nature of the industry and constraints on the market at present, the number of dealers can range anywhere between 377 (the total number of authorised used car dealers) and half that amount.

SECTOR IN TRANSITION Though Trinidad and Tobago remains a regional leader in the automotive sector, in the 2017/2018 period, several factors have had an impact on its performance. Firstly, the economic downturn has played a part in the car buying habits of the population. The sector has also been affected by Government’s 2017/2018 Budget, which contained several policies that directly affect both new and used car dealers.

BUDGET 2017/2018 ON CARS IMPORTATION OF CARS A MAJOR SPENDER OF FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Cars amount to

23% of

US$ 3 billion in spent forex

• US$ 500 million spent in 2017 for 35,000 vehicles INCENTIVISING FUEL EFFICIENCY & SUSTAINABILITY

• Maintains removal of taxes on hybrid vehicles under 1599 CC • Removes tax breaks on petrol and electric hybrid engines over 1599 CC

• Maintains tax breaks on CNG vehicles • Removes fuel subsidy

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AVIATION Globally, aviation is a massive industry. In its 2017 Aviation Benefits Report, the Industry High Level Group (IHLG) of the international aviation sector states: • Airlines carried 3.8 billion passengers with 7.1 trillion revenue passenger kilometres (RPKs) • Latin America and the Caribbean air transport provides 5.2 million jobs and US$167 billion in GDP

KEY PLAYERS IN THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO’S AVIATION SECTOR

CNG transportation requires considerable infrastructural investment, which is being undertaken by the National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago’s CNG subsidiary, NGC CNG. In general, the country has been slow to adopt CNG vehicles. It is hoped that the budgetary incentives, along with new vehicle models and proper infrastructure will jumpstart growth.

CNG LANDSCAPE NGC to construct 30 supply points by 2019 at TT$321 million

The Trinidad and Tobago Civil Aviation Authority (TTCAA), is the chief regulatory body of the sector. Caribbean Airlines Limited (CAL) is the national carrier. The Airport’s Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (AATT) is the agency with responsibility for the management of the country’s two airports. The sector employs an estimated 4,500 people.

Local air service providers are required to have an air operator’s certificate (AOC). Currently there are five AOC holders. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO AIR OPERATORS: • CAL • Briko Air Services, a fixed wing air service provider • National Helicopter Services Ltd (NHSL), a national carrier • Bristow Caribbean, a helicopter service provider • PHI Inc, a helicopter service provider

Currently 12 supply points in Trinidad and Tobago

International airlines licences are granted through air service agreements (ASAs) between countries. Several regional countries are part of the CARICOM Multilateral Air Service Agreement (CMASA) with Trinidad and Tobago.

Approximately 2,000 CNG vehicles sold between 2015-2017

INTERNATIONAL AIR SERVICE AGREEMENTS: • Number of countries with ASAs with Trinidad and Tobago – 15 • Number of CMASA countries including Trinidad and Tobago – 10 • Number of foreign airlines operating in Trinidad and Tobago – 16

During this period, electric hybrid vehicles have been growing in popularity and in one very specific and outstanding success story, have become a profitable niche. While there are several dealers selling electric hybrid vehicles on a small scale, P&V Marketing, a Chaguanas-based dealership, has built a business offering several new and used models along with servicing and repair facilities.

PREDICTIONS • Despite challenges, sector will remain strong due to limited national transportation system • Market growth in fuel efficient petrol, electric hybrid and CNG vehicles • Foreign used dealers will continue to be challenged by quota, age rules and forex • Nevertheless, there will continue to be strong demand for affordable, foreign used vehicles.

SECTOR PERFORMANCE The aviation sector is seen as high potential by analysts but faces several challenges. Aviation, like most sectors, has been affected by the economic downturn. Helicopter firms serve the energy sector, which in recent years has been hit with falling commodity prices and natural gas shortages. CAL has had difficulty with profitability for many years. In 2017, the Joint Select Committee on State Enterprises released a report on the administration and operations of the national carrier. Joint Select Committee on CAL: • Serious personnel issues • Outstanding debts from Venezuela • Burdensome cost of serving the air bridge between Trinidad and Tobago Since the report, CAL has made progress: • New Chief Executive Officer, Garvin Medera, appointed in October 2017 • 21% revenue increase in Q1 2018 • 64% earnings increase in Q1 2018 • CAL’s stated goal is profitability by end of 2019

AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES

CNG AND ELECTRIC HYBRIDS

POTENTIAL FOR NEW AIR BRIDGE CARRIER In January 2018, it was reported that a new business interest, Tobago Airways Ltd, was seeking investors and planned on competing with CAL for the air bridge. Air travel between islands has been a persistent problem because of the enormous subsidy on the route.

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AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES


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ASSOCIATIONS

Mark Edghill

ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS (AREA)

THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INCOMING TOUR OPERATORS ASSOCIATION (T&TITOA)

Suite A4 Kencita Court, 76 Picton Street, Newtown, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago Mailing Address: c/o P.O. Box 6494, Maraval Post Office, Maraval Tel: (868) 628-9048 • Fax: (868) 628-9049 Email: area.tt.assoc@gmail.com Website: www.areatt.com

Secretariat Email: ttitoatnt@gmail.com, info@touroperatorsassociationtt.com Website: www.touroperatorsassociationtt.com Tel: (868) 633-4733/753-2775/710-3970

President

Paul Traboulay

Lorraine Pouchet President

ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INSURANCE COMPANIES

TOBAGO HOTEL AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION (THTA)

8 Stanmore Avenue, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-2817 or 625-2940 • Fax: (868) 625-5132 Email: mail@attic.org.tt Website: www.attic.org.tt

Apt 1, Lambeau Credit Union Bldg., Auchenskeoch Road, Carnbee, Tobago. P.O. Box 295, Scarborough, Tobago Tel/Fax: (868) 639-9543 Email: tobagohoteltourismassoc@gmail.com Website: www.tobagohoteltourism.com

President

Christopher James President

BANKERS ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (BATT)

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO COALITION OF SERVICES INDUSTRIES LIMITED (TTCSI)

Level 2, Invader’s Bay Tower, Invader’s Bay, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 235-6049/235-6050 Website: www.batt.org.tt

#18 O’Connor Street, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9229 • Fax: (868) 622-8985 Email: info@ttcsi.org Website: www.ttcsi.org

Nigel Baptiste

Lara Quentrall-Thomas

President

President

EMPLOYERS CONSULTATIVE ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (ECA)

Keston Nancoo

17 Samaroo Road, Aranguez Roundabout North, Aranguez, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-9388/638-6463 • Fax: (868) 675-6026 Email: communications@ecatt.org Website: www.ecatt.org

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION (TTCA)

The Professional Centre Bldg., Ground Floor, Unit A 303, 11–13 Fitzblackman Drive, Wrightson Road Ext., Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-1266 / 627-8020 • Fax: (868) 623-2949 Email: service@ttca.com Ramlogan Roopnarinesingh Website: www.ttca.com President

Chairman

INSTITUTE OF BANKING AND FINANCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS (TTIA)

Level 2 Invader’s Bay Tower, Invader’s Bay, Off Audrey Jeffers Highway, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 235-6049 /235-6051 Email: marketing@ibf.org.tt Misty Dorman-Hosein Website: www.ibf.org.tt

Ronald Ammon

President

President

SHIPPING ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION (TTMA)

15 Scott Bushe Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. Tel: (868) 623-3355 • Fax: (868) 623-8570 Email: om@shipping.co.tt Website: www.shipping.co.tt

TTMA Building, 42 Tenth Avenue, Barataria, Trinidad and Tobago. P.O. Box 971, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 675-TTMA (8862) • Fax: (868) 675-9000 Email: service@ttma.com or info@ttma.com Website: www.ttma.com

Sonja Voisin

Christopher Alcazar

President

President

Maxine Attong President

Rm 305B, The Professional Centre, North Block, 11–13 Fitzblackman Drive, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-8842 Email: administration@ttia-architects.org Website: www.ttia-architects.org

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD & TOBAGO (HRMATT)

TRINIDAD HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION (THRTA)

Suite 4, Lot #5 Chootoo Road, El Socorro South, San Juan, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-9960/ 687-5523 Email: manager@hrmatt.com; eventinfo@hrmatt.com Website: www.hrmatt.com

Corner Airways Road and Hilltop Lane, Chaguaramas P.O. Box 243, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 634-1174/5 Email: info@tnthotels.com Website: www.tnthotels.com

Hassel Thom President

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THE BANKING SECTOR IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

BANKING, INVESTMENT & FINANCIAL SERVICES By the Bankers Association of Trinidad & Tobago

As an indispensable facilitator of commerce, the local banking sector ranks at a sound 34 out of 137 countries surveyed in the World Economic Forum’s 2017-2018 Global Competitiveness Report. Recently, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), attested to the strength of the sector, indicating that it is well-capitalised with healthy balance sheets which enabled it to be profitable notwithstanding the fall in energy prices since 2014 and the associated economic shocks.

The sector’s capital adequacy ratio, in 2017, stood at a solid 21.0%, while Return on Assets was a sound 2.4% with Return on Equity at 18.5%. Commercial banks continue to be the leading source of credit for firms and households as confirmed by the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago which reported a 4.6% rise in private sector credit

granted by the consolidated financial system in 2017 of which 91.5% came from commercial banks.

STAYING

AHEAD OF THE GAME

ABM/CARD FRAUD With fraudsters becoming more sophisticated, the commercial banks have had to enhance their fraud-fighting capabilities as they related to ATM and credit card scams as well as to a constant barrage of cybersecurity attacks. In addressing this issue collectively, The Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT) has adopted a multi-pronged approach which includes training events on fraud prevention strategies for organisations, and information to customers on cyber crime, credit card and ATM fraud. At an individual level, the banks have taken concrete steps to improve its cyber vigilance and IT security infrastructure. MONEY LAUNDERING

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A significant concern for the sector is the effectiveness of Trinidad and Tobago’s anti-money laundering framework. Any deficiencies in the country’s legislative framework for anti-money laundering and counter- terrorism financing expose the financial sector to international censure, including significant penalties and the loss of international banking services for our customers. To mitigate vulnerability to money laundering, commercial banks continue to invest heavily in their compliance departments and IT infrastructure while working closely with the local anti-fraud agencies.


SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTS

The signing into law of the Tax Exchange and Information Bill in March (2017) was crucial for the banking sector. Over the year leading up to the enactment of the bill, BATT was ardent advocate for regulatory and legislative reforms which included in this instance, a call for much-needed compliance with the United States Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). With the passage of this critical piece of legislation, Trinidad and Tobago avoided the adverse consequences of losing correspondent banking and the imposition of withholding taxes, the impact of which, would have had severe implications for firms engaged in cross-border trade and investment.

In 2017, BATT celebrated 20 years as an association and marked this milestone with the relaunch of a revised Code of Banking Practice. The Code sets out the sector’s commitments to customers on standards of practice, disclosure, customer grievances and redress. The Code is supported by the Office of the Financial Services Ombudsman who can mediate on operational problems with a view to ensuring that they are resolved speedily and amicably in the interests of building and protecting mutually beneficial relationships between banks and their customers.

Convenient Banking Options

The deepening integration of technology into the delivery of commercial banking services supported our efforts in the past year to use a variety of digital channels to better serve our customers’ needs. To this end, all of our commercial banks offer a complete and enhanced range of banking services. The facility of internet and mobile banking is being driven not just by cost-saving benefits offered to our customers and to our banks, but also by the demand of our customers for the convenience of managing finances quickly and easily.

EMPOWERING OUR STAKEHOLDERS FINANCIAL LITERACY BATT has for many years implemented, and or supported, a number of programmes that contribute to raising the level of financial literacy among our citizens. For 2018/2019, BATT has embarked on a heightened financial education drive for its stakeholders in both Trinidad and Tobago. As a key partner on the National Financial Education Committee, BATT will coordinate with other members of the financial sector to develop and deliver a national strategy on financial education. The National Strategy on Financial Education will serve to empower Trinidad and Tobago consumers and businesses to understand the significance of financial planning, credit and cash flow management, retirement savings and budgeting. As a sector, we have planned initiatives aimed at reaching out to members of the public, through engagement in print and electronic media, workshops with SMEs, presentations

to public and private sector groups, sensitisation awareness activities in communities, as well as continued stakeholder engagement at various levels. LEVERAGING BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY Blockchain technology is on the banking sector’s radar. While it recognises that blockchain has thus far been primarily associated with cryptocurrency transactions, the sector has recognised the potential that blockchain technology can offer to banking and other sectors. For instance, the blockchain protocol can be incorporated into our banks’ Know Your Customer (KYC) infrastructure to digitise records or as a base for our financial services. While BATT promotes the stability of the banking sector, it also supports innovation consistent with elevating the sector and the country’s competitiveness thrust.

DRIVING CULTURAL CHANGE In its role as change leader, commercial banks are laying the groundwork for the Cheque Imaging and Truncation System which will activate real-time processing of cheques. At the same time, banks will accelerate their outreach to consumers on the ease and efficacy of banking. The end-game is to have greater migration of most routine transactions to electronic platforms while banking halls are used for value-added services. THE SECTOR’S OUTLOOK The banking sector is sound, flexible, resilient, proactive and its expected that all of the sector’s key performance indicators to remain in solid terrain. In short, Trinidad and Tobago will continue to have a banking sector that is built on delivering superior value for its customers and the wider economy.

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

Improved Regulatory Standards

Raising Standards and Engendering Customer Interests

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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


Republic House 9-17 Park Street Port of Spain Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies Telephone: (868) 625-4411 Email: email@republicfinancialholdings.com Website: www.republicfinancialholdings.com

For decades, Republic Financial Holdings Limited (formerly Republic Bank Limited) has held a resolute focus on its Vision to be the Financial

The Republic Group area of operations includes:

Institution of Choice for its Staff, Customers and Shareholders by setting the Standard of Excellence in Customer Satisfaction; Employee

Trinidad and Tobago

Engagement; Social Responsibility and Shareholder Value – while

Republic Bank Limited (Formerly Fincor) Republic Investments Limited Republic Securities Limited Republic Wealth Management Limited London Street Project Company Limited

building successful societies. The Organisation, over 181 years old, is a visionary one, with a history of continual financial growth, professional and personal development,

Grenada

and successful collaboration with communities to bring about positive

Republic Bank (Grenada) Limited

change. It is one of the largest and most successful indigenous financial

Guyana

groups in the Caribbean, offering a diverse portfolio of products and services designed to satisfy the growing needs of its retail banking customers,

corporate

clients

and

governments,

regionally

and

internationally. The Group has also expanded its reach into Sub-Saharan Africa, with its Ghanaian subsidiary, Republic Bank (Ghana) Limited, further solidifying its vision. The Group subscribes to a philosophy of expansion through organic

Republic Bank (Guyana) Limited

Cayman Islands Republic Bank (Cayman) Bank Republic Insurance Company (Cayman) Limited

Barbados Republic Bank Trinidad and Tobago (Barbados) Limited Republic Bank (Barbados) Limited

growth and acquisition, and the provision of locally focused service.

Suriname

Today, Republic Financial Holdings Limited employs over 5,584 persons

Republic Bank (Suriname) N.V.

in the Caribbean. As at September 30, 2017, the assets of the Republic

St. Lucia

Group stood at US$10,312 million, with equity at US$1.5 billion and profits attributable to shareholders for the year ended September 30, 2017, of US$187 million.

Republic Caribbean Investments Limited Atlantic Financial Limited Republic Suriname Holdings Limited

Ghana In Trinidad and Tobago, the Bank has a branch network of 41 branches – the largest in the Nation – and the most extensive ABM network in the island, with 133 ABM’s in 85 locations. The Bank is also the Nation’s largest credit card operator and has the most experienced Trust Services Division in the country, with assets under administration of over US$5,100 million. In addition to being a strong financial institution, the Republic Group is a socially responsible one. Grounded by a strong belief that every human life has an invaluable contribution to make to his or her environment, the Group introduced its flagship social investment programme, the Power to Make A Difference, in 2003. Through the Programme, the Group champions the cause of the young, elderly and socially marginalised, all the while promoting and safeguarding the rights of the differently able. For the period 2013-2018, the Group has committed another US$15.4 million, to continuing the legacy established by the Power to Make A Difference Programme thus far.

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REPUBLIC FINANCIAL HOLDINGS LIMITED Who's Who 2018 7.5" x 10.875".indd 2-3

Republic Bank (Ghana) Ltd.


om s.com

Nigel M. Baptiste President and Chief Executive Officer, Republic Financial Holdings Limited Managing Director, Republic Bank Limited

Roopnarine Oumade Singh

Farid Antar

Executive Director, Republic Bank Limited

Executive Director, Republic Bank Limited

General Manager, Group Enterprise Risk/ Chief Risk Officer, Republic Financial Holdings Limited

Kimberly Erriah-Ali

Anna-MarĂ­a GarcĂ­a-Brooks

Hilton Hyland

General Manager, Group Human Resources

General Manager, Commercial and Retail Banking

Michelle Palmer-Keizer

Marlon Persad

Vijai Ragoonanan

General Manager, Group Marketing and Communications

General Manager, IT Consolidation

General Manager, Risk Management

Denyse Ramnarine

David Robinson

General Manager, Electronic Channels and Payments

General Manager, Wealth Management

Parasram Salickram

Derwin M. Howell

Riah Dass-Mungal General Manager, Internal Audit/ Chief Internal Auditor, Republic Financial Holdings Limited

ted

General Manager, Planning and Financial Control/ Chief Financial Officer, Republic Financial Holdings Limited

Charles A. Mouttet General Manager, Treasury

Aldrin Ramgoolam General Manager, Information Technology Management

Karen Yip Chuck General Manager, Corporate and Investment Banking

6/6/18 12:07 PM

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

Group General Counsel/ Corporate Secretary, Republic Bank Limited Republic Financial Holdings Limited

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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


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info@ttfreezone.gov.tt

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BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


BANKERS ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (BATT)

INSTITUTE OF BANKING AND FINANCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Level 2 Invader’s Bay Tower Invader’s Bay, Off Audrey Jeffers Highway Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 235-6049 /235-6051 Email: marketing@ibf.org.tt Website: www.ibf.org.tt

Level 2, Invader’s Bay Tower, Invader’s Bay, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 235-6049/235-6050 Website: www.batt.org.tt

Nigel Baptiste President

Kelly Bute-Seaton Executive Director

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The Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago is a non-profit organisation formed among the commercial banks to promote collaboration on matters of importance to the banking sector. Our Mission is to play a core role in the growth and stability of the financial sector, through advocacy and representation, and to facilitate the provision of the most competitive banking products and services to our customers, with integrity and transparency. Our objectives are: • To foster a collaborative approach for positioning the banking sector in Trinidad and Tobago consistent with international trends, standards, compliance and changing markets and regulatory requirements.

Misty Dorman-Hosein President

About Us: The Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF) is a non-profit organization established in 1984 to assist the advancement of banking and finance professionals through its offerings of professional educational programmes and corporate training services. We are the educational arm of the Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago. Our Council Members are representatives of participating commercial banks, the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago, the Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation and the University of the West Indies. Our Mission: To facilitate the continuous development of banking and finance professionals and to promote high standards of knowledge, skills and conduct to meet the high demands of a changing financial industry. Our Vision: To be the preferred learning institution for financial services professionals.

• To play an active role in the education of the public on various risk mitigation methods as well as to enlighten them on their financial options.

Who We Serve: IBF serves banking and finance professionals seeking career advancement through self-development. We offer two educational programmes:

• To work as a cohesive body in partnering with the Central Bank and other local regulatory and business agencies for the development of the banking sector, as well as to enhance their support for the productive sectors of the economy.

1) The Professional Certificate for Financial Advisors (Cert. FA), accredited by the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago. Marsha R. John

Chief Executive Officer

2) The Diploma in Banking (DIB) which allows matriculation into UWI upon completion. IBF also serves the public with awareness-building workshops and initiatives.


JUDY CHANG 1943-2018 By Anna Walcott-Hardy

The daughter of Chinese immigrants, Judy Yukzun Chang, CA, CPA, CMT was a true pilgrim, a woman of substance, integrity, intellect and altruism. Although she had a demanding, distinguished career in the financial services sector of Trinidad and Tobago, she devoted decades of service to her family, the community and the nation. Awarded the National Chaconia Gold Medal for Business, a member of the Board of the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago and the Deposit Insurance Corporation, she was also a Trustee of the Anglican Church in the Diocese of Trinidad and Tobago. Throughout her lifetime, she remained committed to the development of public and private institutions throughout the country. As an unassuming young student walking through the gates of Bishop Anstey High School in Port of Spain, she excelled academically, yet, remained committed to the development of her alma mater and the church. A devoted Hilarian, she was a long-standing member of the school’s Board and subsequently, appointed Chairman. She was deeply involved in the development of Anstey House, and was often praised by committee members for her astute financial planning which “worked magic with minimal funding”. “She never sought the limelight, never wanted praise,” explained Chang’s close friend, the former Principal of Bishop Anstey High School, Port of Spain, Pat Ruddell. “Judy was a wonderful lady who is sadly missed by her family and friends. Her contribution to the school, the church, the business and banking community and many others was immeasurable. Trinidad and Tobago has suffered a major loss.” A chartered accountant, she was a partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers, having worked for over 29 years in Canada and Trinidad with the company, she retired early in 1997. She was then appointed Chairman of the Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation just prior to becoming the first Banking Services Ombudsman, a position she held until 2008. Her distinguished career in both the private and public sector includes being appointed to chair a committee on Company Law Reform for Trinidad and Tobago, which led to the historic enactment of a new Companies Act in April 1997, replacing a Companies Ordinance which was on the statute books for 60 years. “Judy left a lasting impression as a Director of the ANSA McAL Foundation, and as a member of the ANSA Caribbean Awards’ Regional Eminent Persons Panel from its inception in 2005,” A. Norman Sabga, Executive Chairman, ANSA McAL Group of Companies stated.

Her tireless efforts in private and public sectors earned her the respect of her peers ...

At ANSA McAL she was heralded as a “woman of substance who will be greatly missed” by colleagues throughout the Group. There she held several high-level positions having been appointed as a Director on the Parent Board from 28 June 2008 to 31 May 2012, she was also a Director on the ANSA Merchant Bank from 31 July 2012 to 30 April 2016. “Her tireless efforts in private and public sectors earned her the respect of her peers who were inspired by her commitment to effect change and improve the financial well-being of citizens of Trinidad and Tobago,” Norman Sabga concluded. Devoted to her husband Leslie Peter, children Russell and Patricia, and grandchildren, she was remembered fondly as a talented seamstress and cook who loved to host family gatherings. Judy Chang was surrounded by family when she died peacefully on 8 March 2018, in Richmond Hill, Canada.

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As three significant pillars that point to the progress, status and capacity of any nation, Construction, Engineering and Transportation stretch way beyond their respective sectors, intertwined as they are into almost every facet of society.

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING & TRANSPORTATION by Sheldon Waithe

Trinidad and Tobago, with its deep roots in industrialisation can boast of experience and progress within these sectors, in many cases far ahead of its neighbours in the Western Hemisphere. But this does not mean that the country has overcome the challenges or perfected the practices of these pillars, even if - with one eye on diversification and expanding the plans to become one of the major business hubs in the region - the trickle down effects of energy industrialisation offers Trinidad and Tobago a distinct advantage.

CONSTRUCTION Fuelled by the universal staple requirement to provide affordable accommodation via the Housing Development Corporation (HDC), the renovation of existing city centres together with projects under the tenure of State Boards, there are multiple developments across both islands, including: • The continued transformation of the Chaguaramas peninsula into a major tourist park • The Point Fortin Highway Extension • The Curepe Interchange • A major redevelopment of the ANR Robinson airport in Tobago

The current government has recognised the need to incorporate all relevant sectors into these projects, citing a willingness to jump-start the industry by partnering with the private sector construction companies, but the latter is awaiting further action on the matter. The current challenges facing the industry include: • Within the past 15 years, construction expertise has been imported, especially from China for mega projects • The majority of all construction is being carried out by the public sector • An increased flow of money out of the country to foreign firms • Minimal construction expertise being handed down to locals for future development

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• The construction industry has accounted for only 5% of Trinidad and Tobago’s GDP (2010-2015)


• Two new ferries will prove a boon to a Tobago tourism sector that is still recovering from the sea bridge struggles

The inevitable contraction that occurred in subsequent years is expected to be reversed in 2018 through to 2020. In January 2018, Prime Minister Dr. the Honourable Keith Rowley was in a position to state to the Joint Consultative Council for the Construction Industry (JCC) that “Our collective circumstances have improved significantly” while announcing the said projects. If these also incorporate the private sector, then the predicted marginal growth will continue in line with the Ministry of Finance’s predictions.

• The government-operated service will need to ensure the highest standards of maintenance are implemented and adhered to, or perhaps look to privatise the process • The pursuit of the Rapid Rail project is on hiatus

TRANSPORTATION

The four divisions under the engineering umbrella - civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical - have been directly affected by the economic slowdown of Trinidad and Tobago’s economy; equally, they stand to gain directly from their required input into the prospective projects announced by Government as well as global upsurge trends. The sizeable number of chemical engineers in the country is a direct result of 50 plus years of energy production and with the slight increase in oil prices, there is some sustainability and now, opportunity:

There is little coincidence that the proposed investment into transport related projects for the immediate and mid-term future of Trinidad and Tobago, represents the crucial hub that brings together local and foreign investment, expertise, employment and the prospect for real growth in the construction industry. Together with the aforementioned highway projects, the Government has also mandated:

Export of expertise that offers new opportunities for the chemical side, in particular the emerging energy sector of Guyana Mechanical and civil engineers required for the urban development proposals together with the major expansion of transportation facilities Civil engineers will hold oversight on indirect items of any project such as environment and health effects Engineering expertise can contribute to long-neglected areas such as flood alleviation, in turn diversifying the local economy The recognition for the sector’s 21st century role by the Prime Minister was reflected in the same JCC address: “There is a regularisation process underway to address amendments to existing Acts and the introduction of Bills. The aim here is to strengthen some of the key professions to the construction industry, specifically engineers.” They have been earmarked for their capacity to contribute, the size of which will be determined by the growth and investment in the construction sector.

• While more readily implementable, questions will arise as to its effect upon the existing Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC) or indeed whether it will fall under their purview.

01 The creation of a Fast Ferry Port in Toco

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The construction of a first-class road from Valencia to Toco

This in turn opens up the underdeveloped eastern side of Trinidad but also seeks to address the long-standing issue of inadequate ferry transportation between the two islands. • Short term, the Government has purchased a new ferry to complement the existing two, whose age and maintenance requirements have led to travel woes for the public and a negative impact upon Tobago’s economy between 2017 and early 2018. • The air bridge can handle some of the shortfall in service but the importance of a permanent and superior solution prompted the purchase of the new ferry and the exploration of buying another from Australia.

There is the definite need to address the traffic issue, away from the simple expansion of highways (that will lead to overheating the already overpopulated roads), with the integration of an effective strategy that links urban development with transport development for an all-encompassing holistic result, for the long term.

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION

ENGINEERING

• The environmental and financial investment of such a mega project are considerable. Alternatives have been explored, including a bus rapid transit system similar to Colombia’s oft-hailed TransMilenio.

The shoots of recovery in these sectors are evident for 2018 to 2020, the management of which will be crucial to long-term sustainability.

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CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION


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the average person spends 90% of their day indoors. make the 10% outdoors worth it.

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION

fact:

www.dla.design

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EDUCATION AND TRAINING By The Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT)

Successive governments have demonstrated the importance of education through their investment in the development of the sector. Education is viewed as a key tenet of national development, with higher education and skills training playing an integral role in the transformation of the economy. Additionally, higher education is a major contributor to the development of a country’s human capital, which positively impacts a society’s ability to diversify and build its economy. This remains a poignant factor in the current economic climate.

REGULATORS & LEGISLATION The Trinidad and Tobago higher education sector is governed by legislation, (Chapter 39:06 - the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago Act) and regulated jointly by the Ministry of Education, National Training Agency (NTA) and the Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago (ACTT). Accreditation Council of Trinidad & Tobago (ACTT) The ACTT’s responsibility is the regulation of post-secondary and tertiary level education and training. National Training Agency (NTA) The NTA’s role differs from that of the ACTT’s in that the primary responsibility of the NTA is the regulation of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET), the ACTT’s responsibility is the regulation of post-secondary and tertiary.

ACTT SERVICES

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With the mandate currently held by ACTT, several initiatives are employed by the Council in the execution of its duties which include the mandatory registration and voluntary accreditation of institutions. The recognition of transnational programmes and foreign awarding bodies as well as the approval of locally developed programmes also fall within the remit of ACTT. The Council has established and continues to review and revise the standards by which the tertiary education sector, as well as the segment of the post-secondary education sector not regulated by the NTA, will be assessed.


ACADEMIC SYSTEM TERTIARY EDUCATION

GRADUATE SCHOOLS

Public Regional 3-Year University Public & Private 3 & 4-Year Universities

CAPE EXAMS

2-Year A-Level Secondary School (15 – 17+) 7-Year Secondary School (11 – 17+) Community Colleges & Colleges Private Higher Education Institutions

SECONDARY EDUCATION

CSEC EXAMS

5-Year Secondary School (11 – 15+)

T&T’S HIGHER EDUCATION SECTOR Trinidad and Tobago’s higher education system is diverse, comprising not only many small providers and institutions that offer basic proficiency programmes, but also providers that offer short and professional courses. These post-secondary programmes may be taught through private institutions, post-primary schools, Ministry training programmes or TVET centres, and trade schools. The tertiary component of the sector consists of two public regional universities, public and private universities, community colleges and private higher education institutions. ACTT currently has registered two (2) local awarding bodies, registered 47 institutions and accredited 13 institutions. The programmes at these institutions range from locally developed degree options such as those offered by The University of the West Indies (The UWI), College of Science, Technology and Applied Arts of Trinidad and Tobago (COSTAATT) and the University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT), to programmes which are franchised from transnational institutions such as those offered by the Association of Business Executives (ABE), the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA), University of London and Pearson Education Ltd. These institutions’ offerings cover the full suite of qualifications from undergraduate certificates to doctoral degrees.

TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL SYSTEM TERTIARY EDUCATION

SECONDARY EDUCATION

CAPE EXAMS

Private Technical Institutes TVET Centres & Trade Schools

CSEC EXAMS

TVET Centres & Trade Schools Ministry of Community Development Training Programmes Community Colleges & Colleges Post-Primary Schools

Recent developments in the sector are changing the way business may have to be conducted. One change is the restriction in government funding for students to pursue qualifications at approximately 80% of the tertiary level institutions. This, however, only affects an approximate 30% to 35% of the student population eligible for funding. While this may initially result in a contraction in the student enrolment in the sector, some argue that it may also result in the reduction of programme duplication, leading to a more streamlined and purposeful investment in the sector. There are also external factors which impact the sector. One such external factor that is going to influence the sector soon is the recently agreed to CARICOM Qualifications Framework (CQF). This framework will be the foundation for the National Qualifications Framework (NQF), which will explain in detail the characteristics of vocational, academic and professional qualifications and will guide their development, classification and recognition. When launched, it will establish the minimum requirements to attain qualifications at the various levels of the education and training system in Trinidad and Tobago. ACTT is at an advanced stage in the development of the NQF in conjunction with the NTA and when completed, it will be an important instrument utilised in regulating the post-secondary and tertiary education sector.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

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Visit us @ www.mic.co.tt

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Moving Trinidad & Tobago to World-Class Customer Care By Dawn Richards

The Current State of Service in Trinidad and Tobago The words of one of our national songs ‘God Bless Our Nation’ by Marjorie Padmore paint an endearing portrait of Trinidad and Tobago as a land of ‘many varied races’ and ‘tropic beauty rare’. Our people are often described as happy, warm, welcoming, friendly, fun loving, and easy going. These traits of our national character suggest that we have some natural characteristics that can facilitate great service. Despite the natural advantages provided by our national personality, the level of service in Trinidad and Tobago is less than ideal. While some of us have experienced great service, too often we experience service that does not demonstrate the happiness, warmth, and friendliness of our national personality. Where service in Trinidad and Tobago is concerned, it seems as though the disappointments far outweigh the things that make you say, ‘Wow!’. It is time for us to rebalance the scale of service in favour of the latter. It is time for us to say, in words and actions, to our customers, ‘It is a pleasure to serve you’.

World-Class Customer Care Is No Longer Optional Trinidad and Tobago needs this change now because we are competing in a globalised market where international furniture stores, coffeehouse chains, and casual dining restaurants are seeking to make their mark. We are also facing competition in the virtual marketplace via the internet with the advent and enticing appeal of online shopping. Underscoring all of this is the reality that the new driver of revenue is service and customer experience.

Small Steps Your Company Can Take to Improve Service The good news is that companies can follow a step-by-step process for winning with customers. As a start, companies can reorient their employees to view service as a privilege, not as a pain (it’s not as hard as it sounds). Having accomplished that, they can then deploy strategies that position service delivery as the new revenue-boosting champion. Here are five actions that companies can take to build the bridge to customer delight and increased revenue: - ENFORCE SMILES as a must-do action on the front end, even when employees answer the telephone. Stop with the manicou stares (our Caribbean equivalent to the deer in the headlights stare). This warms up the customer contact process and gives the customer the attention that he or she deserves. - ACKNOWLEDGE ALL CUSTOMERS who enter the company or come to the counter to ask for information or pay for merchandise. No customer should be ignored. - GREET CUSTOMERS FIRST. Counter employees should greet the customer first and not stand there waiting on the customer to say good morning or good evening. - IMPLEMENT A SWIFT SERVICE RECOVERY system that makes it a swift, hassle-free experience for customers to have their complaints, queries and enquiries resolved. - TRAIN STAFF in Customer Engagement Techniques. Companies should view the training of staff as an investment that will reduce the risk of losing customers and losing revenue through poor service. Great service in Trinidad and Tobago is possible, however, it is important to view the effort as a journey and not a destination. This effort is best supported by a corporate attitude that prioritises continuous improvement. As you gradually move the needle from less-than-ideal service to great service, you will see customers who are not only delighted, but are willing to recommend your business(es) to others. In other words, they will be your client advocates. Remember, your best form of advertising is a customer who has experienced service that has exceeded his or her expectations.

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ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES By Atiba Phillips

In the Caribbean, Trinidad and Tobago is most reliant on energy for national revenue – currently accounting for around 32% of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) – as opposed to tourism, which is the mainstay of most other Caribbean island economies.

T&T’S ENERGY CHALLENGES The country has seen its fair share of challenges in recent times based on its significant reliance on energy sector revenues. Not only from the precipitous fall in commodity global prices –

prices fell from almost US$120/barrel in January 2013 to below US$30/barrel by the end of 2015 – but also due to falling domestic production levels.

CRUDE OIL PRICE 77.57 USD/BBL 31 MAY 2018 140

CRUDE OIL PRICE (USD/BBL)

130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

JAN 4 2013

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FEB 28 2014

APR 24 2015

JUN 17 2016

AUG 11 2017


According to the Finance Minister, for the first five months of 2017, production had levelled off at 73,500 barrels per day (bpd), as compared with the 100,851 bpd in the corresponding period for 2010. Energy sector revenue, which peaked at $28 billion in 2008, fell to $1 billion in 2017. But energy fortunes for this little twin island state may be changing… From a low of approximately US$30/barrel in early 2016, Brent Crude stood at just over US$78/barrel on 31 May, 2018 The Finance Minister indicated a new tax regime to be introduced to provide incentives for increased exploration and production The Energy Minister indicated that upstream companies had committed to invest over US$10 billion in exploration and development activities over the next five years The investments include the BP Angelin project, which is due to come on stream in 2019 and is expected to provide in excess of 550 mmscf/d The other projects include De Novo energy exploration of Block 1 (a) off Trinidad’s west coast; the East Coast and North East Coast development projects of Shell, such as Starfish, Dolphin, Dolphin Deep, Endeavour and Bounty fields, and the Cassra and Orchid on the North East Coast BHP announced a deepwater natural gas discovery indicating between five to 10 tcf of gas with a high probability of oil

INCREASED INTEREST THROUGHOUT THE CARIBBEAN Indeed, there has been renewed interest and investment in energy exploration across the Caribbean.

GRENADA Prime Minister Dr. Mitchell, indicated that hydrocarbons were found in “huge commercial quantities” by Global Petroleum Group (GPG), a little-known Russian company near to Grenada’s maritime boundary with Venezuela.

BARBADOS Minister with responsibility for Energy, Senator Darcy Boyce stated that Barbados had successfully negotiated exploration licences for two blocks within BHP Billiton and had awarded another block to Repsol. He revealed: “BHP Billiton is now in the final stages of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) process, and once complete, we expect exploration to begin within the next year.”

JAMAICA British firm, Tullow Oil Limited, has signed an agreement to pursue 3D seismic surveys of Jamaica's south coastal seafloor as part of the island's efforts to discover oil and gas in conjunction with the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (PCJ).

GUYANA-SURINAME BASIN Oil exploration has stepped up significantly following ExxonMobil's major discovery of more than 3.2 billion oil-equivalent barrels of recoverable resource on the Stabroek block, not including other more recent significant discoveries. As stated by Exxon, first oil is to be expected by March 2020, with production forecasts in excess of 340,000 bbls/day by 2022.

NEW KINDS OF OPPORTUNITY FOR T&T All this notwithstanding, Trinidad and Tobago continues to be an important oil and gas producing hub in the Caribbean and Latin American Region with major multinational energy giants, such as bpTT, Shell, BHP, EOG Resources and Perenco which continue to maintain a presence in the country. Speaking of the massive finds in the Guyana-Suriname basin, Julie Wilson, research director of global exploration for Wood Mackenzie, said, “In Guyana and Suriname, gas is problematic because there is no market for it. Initially, gas can be reinjected into the reservoir, but if there are large quantities, eventually a use will need to be found…the lack of a local demand for power or industrial uses is the biggest impediment to gas development.” She goes further to say, “A pipeline to the nearest market, Trinidad and Tobago, would be prohibitively expensive. Developing local power-consuming industries, such as chemicals or fertilizer, can take a long time – but it can be done.”

T&T – STALWART OF ENERGY EXPERIENCE In Trinidad and Tobago, 99.8% of power generation is fuelled by natural gas and 0.2% by diesel. Further, T&T has the largest Liquid Natural Gas Train in the Western Hemisphere, and a number of industries, including ammonia and methanol, which are founded upon natural gas. Indeed, Trinidad and Tobago has been involved in the petroleum sector for over 100 years and is still the largest oil and natural gas producer in the Caribbean. Trinidad and Tobago’s evolving challenge, is not only to optimise its domestic production and commercial outcomes based on its own domestic production, but now also be cognisantof the booming interest in the regional energy space. Trinidad and Tobago must become more engaged and market its expertise and energy competence in proactive and synergistic ways which will assure the country’s long-term economic prowess long after its own domestic energy reserves are depleted.

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

CHANGING FORTUNES

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When global standard safety training and solutions are required‌

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Transfer of Technology After a recently completed job for an oil and gas major in Trinidad, the Drilling Superintendent responsible for the rig said on the morning conference call “This is the best Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) team that I have worked with anywhere in the world throughout my 25-year career offshore.” This resounding accolade was directed at a team of ROV operators made up primarily of Trinidadians. The positive recognition could be attributed to a Transfer of Technology process over 12 years by several local industry companies and professionals who intentionally sought to develop the competency of the local work force. There are several forces that drive a Technology Transfer to a country or emerging market, perhaps the most significant are government, economics and ethics/social responsibility. The forces of ethics or social responsibility, which in the case of the oil and gas industry would come from the operators, are generally not considered a priority initially and are often reactive to the forces of government. Although Corporate Social Responsibility has become a very popular theme recently, the business case for the operator initiating a Transfer of Technology to a new market is traditionally not a popular one. Transfer of Technology driven by Government is a far more popular occurrence, particularly in emerging oil and gas markets. The initiative to develop a competent local work force, often referred to as local content, is executed initially through government encouragement of the operator, and eventually, through the implementation of policy and legislation. Government policy and legislation can have varying results, depending on how they are implemented, leading to the term ‘local content’ often having negative connotations. A well-implemented policy can lead to the development of a robust local energy service industry. A poorly implemented policy can lead to an incompetent workforce, personnel and environmental risk, and an inefficient, expensive working environment.

By Keith Lewis

Technology Transfer driven by economics is a long-term strategy as the investment is high upfront and the financial benefit is only recognised later. This strategy requires training of personnel in technical vocations, followed by on-the-job training, often by trainees shadowing existing technical personnel. The initial training and hosting of additional personnel for a single task translates to extra cost to the operator or contractor. However, as the training programme evolves, and the local personnel demonstrate their competency, the trainees proceed to fill the ranks as legitimate technical staff throughout the hierarchy of the operation. The operator or contractor then reaps the financial rewards of reduced personnel mobilisation and accommodation costs, non-expat salaries, and the ability to respond to service requests more quickly. The process of Technology Transfer manifests a globalised environment in the work place, often producing a good mix of nationalities influencing the development of the candidates and exposing them to many cultures and industry best practices. The candidates who start out as trainees from emerging markets eventually have their opportunity to influence the workplace and add positively to industry best practice through innovation and a shift in paradigm. A great example of this paradigm shift was demonstrated with the Trinidadian ROV team who utilised a non-traditional method of aligning a well conductor through a platform conductor guide for the drill rig, by using rigging equipment designed for humans with the manipulator arms of their robot. The international supervisors overseeing the operation had never seen this done before and anticipated a high probability of failure. The team’s effort was successful and everyone gained from exposure to a new method of executing the job. As the energy market advances in neighbouring Guyana, the Government and Operators are pushing for development at record pace. A competent workforce must be developed and prepared to meet the imminent demand for their skills. The Transfer of Technology that was consciously undertaken to bring international best practices to Trinidad over several years must now be accelerated significantly and delivered to Guyana in just a few.

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HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS By Joel Henry

The Health, Safety, Security and Environment sectors provide goods and services that contribute to the well-being of individuals, organisations and the society in general. The condition of these sectors is closely related to Government policy, whether through direct investment, in the case of the health sector, or through regulation.

HEALTH Trinidad and Tobago has a large public health system and a smaller but growing private system.

T&T Public Health Sector TT$6.02 billion allocated in the 2017/2018 Budget Construction underway for new hospitals in Arima and Point Fortin Overseen by the Ministry of Health and 5 Regional Health Authorities (RHAs) 2 medical complexes 8 hospitals 6 health facilities

95 health centres

Couva Hospital In April 2018, the Government announced that it would repurpose the recently constructed Couva Children’s Hospital to become a teaching hospital, working in collaboration with The University of the West Indies (The UWI). In addition, Government is considering making the hospital a fee-based facility and using it to develop a medical tourism industry.

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Public and private care The procedures and technologies in the health sector have advanced in recent years. Procedures such as minimally invasive surgery, neurosurgery and interventional surgeries are widely available and accessible. However, there is a considerable difference in access between private treatment (which is expensive) and public treatment (which is free but limited in terms of resources).

Safety and Health in Trinidad and Tobago • Governed by the amended Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act 2006 • Overseen by the Trinidad and Tobago Occupational Safety and Health Authority and Agency (OSHA). The OSH Act and OSHA have played an important role in the development of the safety sector in recent years because regulation and enforcement are powerful motivators for compliance.

SECTOR PLAYERS

On the other side, the public health system provides for the needs of most citizens of Trinidad and Tobago at no cost to them, even for extremely advanced, expensive and pioneering procedures. However, budgetary constraints hamper its service delivery. Public facilities are limited in terms of equipment, medication and personnel.

Health and safety (HS) professionals within organisations

Consultants

Personnel challenges Resource constraints in the public system have led to: • Hundreds of unemployed doctors at the house officer level • A shortage of sub-specialists in areas such paediatric oncology, vascular surgery and many others.

SECTOR PLAYERS

• Emigration of well-trained and experienced nurses to the US and UK for employment opportunities and better remuneration packages.

Sellers of safety equipment and clothing for various industries

Rise of rural facilities On the consumer side, the demand for affordable and accessible healthcare has in the last five to 10 years led to the emergence of small practices in rural and outlying areas that provide a range of medical services. However, the quality of care in these practices is sometimes questionable.

Future of the sector Analysts see a need for more public investment, as the system will be increasingly strained by the needs of citizens for quality health care, and the needs of medical professionals for employment and advancement opportunities.

HS firms who provide safety officers to organisations on contract

Training firms

Performance Several industries have seen major improvements in their safety practices, although some continue to perform better than others. The energy sector in particular, has been a leader in compliance with health and safety regulations for some time. This can be attributed to the nature of the industry and its hazards, as well as the influence of multinational corporations. Multinationals must comply with the safety laws of their parent country and in turn require compliance with those laws from local partners, subcontractors and suppliers.

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS

Over the last decade, the services available in private hospitals and medical centres have expanded dramatically. Patients can receive complex surgeries and other advanced procedures. They have access to excellent facilities and experience low wait times. Private care, however, is costly. A 10-day stay in an intensive care unit of a private facility can cost as much as $300,000, putting it well beyond the reach of the average citizen or those without health insurance.

SAFETY

There has been great improvement in compliance with the OSH Act as the OSH Authority’s enforcement activities have increased. However, there is still major room for improvement. Safety analysts say the future of health and safety should entail the progression from compliance to proactive strategic planning and management of risk in the workplace.

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SECURITY The security sector in Trinidad and Tobago has exploded. This rapid expansion is due to the rise of crime. In the most recent Global Competitiveness Report of the World Economic Forum, crime and theft are listed as the fifth most problematic factor for doing business in the country. Since the early 2000s, the nation has experienced a massive increase in firearm-related crime and violence, and the sector has evolved to meet the demand for security.

Sector snapshot

Environmental Sector in Trinidad and Tobago • Organised under the Environmental Management Act of 2000 • Managed by the Environmental Management Authority (EMA) • Signatory to several international environmental agreements, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

• Comprises residential, commercial, industrial and marine security. • Products and services are provided by a host of consultants, security firms and equipment sellers. • An estimated 500 companies employing 50,000 people.

The EMA has a powerful role in planning, monitoring, managing and responding to incidents relating to the environment.

Performance

Air conditioning and refrigeration guidelines

This is a lucrative time for the sector, particularly in the area of residential security, as homeowners concerned about themselves and their property invest in solutions that were once seen as suitable only for commercial and industrial organisations. Residential customers are also encouraged to invest in technology, such as closed-circuit television (CCTV) and access control, as it has become more affordable and easier to use. However, the growth of the sector has led to increased competition for customers and personnel. Labour is a concern for security firms as many are required to use resources to train employees in-house. These workers can then leave the firm and form small (sometimes one-man) operations and offer services at a lower price. Security sector analysts point to the need for a regulatory body to ensure that all operators adhere to specific standards of quality, training and service provision, such as the UK’s Security Industry Authority. Draft legislation, the Private Security Industry Bill 2014, has been developed to address this need.

Cyber Security Globally, the cyber security market is expected to grow to a massive US$181.77 billion by 2021. Unlike many other sectors, it is truly a global business. Organisations and individuals in Trinidad and Tobago have to deal with cyber security threats from around the world. As societies become more reliant on technologies that create these kinds of international linkages, the need for a robust cyber security industry to face these dangers increases as well.

In need of security professionals Cyber security in Trinidad and Tobago is provided primarily through anti-virus and firewall software. The industry includes several firms that offer software and support services. It has also become common for companies to have in-house information technology personnel, up to chief information officers on their executive teams. However, there are still very few information security specialists. Multinational companies have robust information security systems, but these functions are provided at the group level and are not part of the market for local information security professionals. There is, however, an opportunity for homegrown and regional organisations.

Cybercrime Bill 2017 Presently, the Government is holding discussions with stakeholders on the Cybercrime Bill 2017, which when passed, will create the regulatory environment for the growth of the industry. As organisations face potential penalties for cyber-related activities, they will be encouraged to invest in systems and personnel to ensure compliance with the law. The passing of cybercrime legislation will play a pivotal role in the future of information security in Trinidad and Tobago.

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ENVIRONMENT

In May 2018, Government, through the Ministry of Planning and Development, approved national guidelines for air conditioning and refrigeration industries called, “The National Guidelines for Good Refrigeration Practices.” This level of regulation has contributed to a large and growing environmental sector.

Sector players • Consultants • Service companies • Professionals in company HSE departments • Product and equipment providers • Non-governmental organisations • Researchers

Performance Bolstered by regulation and heightened global awareness on environmental issues, the sector is performing well. Growth opportunities: • Waste management • Repurposing • Recycling Renewable energy, one of the key growth areas internationally, is experiencing limited development in Trinidad and Tobago because of the low cost of natural gas and electrical power.


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Medical Oncology Urology Interventional Cardiology Cardiovascular Surgery Cardiac Electrophysiology Orthopedic Surgery Sports Medicine Neurosurgery Neurology Spinal Surgery

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• Free second opinion on medical diagnosis • All-inclusive medical packages available including return flight and accommodation • Medicard and TTARP members welcome

A part of Narayana Health, one of India’s largest private healthcare systems, Health City also provides access to medical services available at the group’s Bangalore facility, including: • Bone marrow transplants (autologous, allogeneic and haplo) • Kidney transplants (ABO incompatible available)

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Learn more from Health City Cayman Islands’ exclusive representative in Trinidad & Tobago – Caribbean Health Access. Telephone: 1-868-497-2669/ 1-868-720-4019/ 1-868-689-0182/ 1-868-462-3504

info@healthcity.ky | healthcitycaymanislands.com

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www.acerecyclingcaribbean.com

17A, Yorke Avenue, O’Meara Industrial Estate, Arima, Trinidad, W.I Tel: 1 (868) 290-2970 / 2975 /642-7231 Fax: 1 (868) 642-7231 Email: acerecycling@gmail.com Website: www.acerecyclingcaribbean.com

• Free Collection of waste paper and baled cardboard • Off site bulk shredding of confidential documents complete with certificate of destruction.

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS



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Ms. Brafit Limited The Loft at The Hotel Normandie 10 Nook Avenue, St. Anns, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-UFIT or (868) 755-1496 Email: nicole@msbrafit.com • Website: www.msbrafit.com

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

This model also consists of mentorship of future medical practitioners; by pioneering non-clinical breast health education within global academic spheres.

One of the global VV100 Women and an alumna of the VV Lead 2015, Government of India Leadership Scholarship 2017, Cherie Blair Women’s Foundation 2013 and US State Department IVLP 2011, Nicole has developed Ms. Brafit (www.msbrafit.com) into a Caribbean household name for adolescent health, mastectomy care, breasthealth and bra fitting, focusing on the influences of a healthy pair of breasts on the economy, the workforce, the comfort and the self-esteem of women and girls. Nicole was the recipient of the AFETT 2018 award for Social Entrepreneurship in Trinidad and Tobago.

In 2015 and 2017 respectively, Spelman College of Atlanta, engaged in a mentorship exchange program with their visiting class of Medical Students and Professors.

This innovative Health-Leadership model consists of creatively designed spaces, consultancy services and an educational program all proven to have positive impact on every community – from grassroots, to the corporate and from adolescents to women in treatment - their families and wider support systems. Through thought-leadership and many years of experience in her field of women’s health, Nicole has effectively contributed to enhancing health-education ecosystems that contribute to global standards for women’s health, in keeping with the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.

This merging of traditional clinical academic studies with the Ms. Brafit’s innovatively designed breast health model, creates a value-added component in the delivery of a globally enhanced healthcare curriculum for emerging medical practitioners and health professionals. Nicole has spoken on numerous global platforms spanning 5 continents, authored and designed many innovative breast-care, prevention, awareness and survivorship tools, including the Treatment Companion, a journal that encourages women to store their personal medical records in a transportable and attractive package as well as the Pink Slip Project, Beauty Beyond the Bruises and the multi-lingual 2016 campaign – The Gesture That Saves. Nicole can be reached for Keynote Speaking Engagements, Seminars, Workshops, Corporate Wellness Programs, Women’s and Adolescent Health Program Development, Health Conferences and Motivational Speaking.

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS

Nicole Joseph-Chin

Nicole Joseph-Chin is the Founder and CEO of Ms. Brafit Limited, a globally respected, innovative Social Enterprise focused on healthy breasts as a catalyst for social impact.

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JONATHAN BARCANT By Paula Lindo

“The truth is, we’ve only got one world to live in, there is no Planet B. The environmental issues we now face have come onto mankind’s radar much more strongly in the last few decades than before and is therefore something which younger generations must consider now more greatly than past generations have. When we hear studies say that soon we may have ‘more plastic in the oceans than fish’, and that hurricanes like we saw in 2017 in the Caribbean may only get stronger and more frequent, and that the ocean may rise several feet in the next 50-100 years covering some ports and cities - it’s quite frankly negligent to think that it’s alright for us to ignore our environmental impacts, and leave such an unhealthy and unstable world for our children.” Jonathan Barcant has a background in civil engineering, specialising in soils, water and the environment. He worked mainly on mining projects following graduation from McGill University, and was moved by greatly destructive projects causing massive environmental impact and rainforest and biodiversity loss. This inspired him to change his career direction to commit to environmental conservation and climate action. Barcant developed the Vetiver System which uses vetiver grass to build resilience to extreme weather in rural communities. He also is the Managing Director of IAMovement, an NGO which has been driving the civil society conversation on climate change in Trinidad. In recognition of Barcant’s work, he received the Caribbean and the Americas Regional Award for Excellence in Development at the Commonwealth Youth Awards in 2018. He is also now a member of the Next Generation Board of the Inter-American Development Bank. Barcant said he would like to see the government contribute to sustainable development in Trinidad and Tobago. “I think that developments in our digital space through some types of new publicparticipatory digital governance systems could allow the wider citizenry to voice positions on key issues our country faces, including the environment, which could help step up the pressure on both governmental and private sectors to take top-concern items more seriously. I have truly been amazed at some of the creativity, innovation, genius and desire to help that I’ve seen among the youth and wider public in Trinidad and Tobago over the last few years, and I would love to see a platform (or several) become available for these people, organisations and the greater public in general to speak out and work from.” He also called on the private sector to become more involved in social entrepreneurship, as it is often more innovative and agile than the public sector. “Social entrepreneurship means creating successful, profitable business, which simultaneously has key positive social and environmental impacts. As the movement towards ‘green and sustainability’ grows, the private sector could become true innovators in this area, by greening their work places, work streams, energy savings through efficiency, reducing and recycling waste. These transitions could even take place by inviting greater participation and involvement of staff to assist in this process, which could also lead towards a shift which sustains itself into the future given a more inclusive approach from which it was created.”

The truth is, we’ve only got one world to live in, there is no Planet B.

Barcant said young people are becoming more aware, excited and engaged in trying new things, including “NGO/non-profit approaches, to excellent development ideas which the government should consider more strongly, to great-for-profit business initiatives as well. Given that the youth are our future and environmental care is the next greatest challenges of our time, citizens of Trinidad and Tobago could play a major role in helping this movement by supporting it – purchasing local, purchasing green, supporting new ideas and efforts and helping to lift them up – and perhaps most importantly by being vocal, to our business and public leaders in saying that the world is moving in this direction, and this is the way Trinidad and Tobago must go as well.”

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HUMAN RESOURCE AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES By the Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA)

The “Future of Work” is a topic that has gained significant traction globally by policymakers, workers’ representatives and the business community. Vibrant debates take place around imminent and inevitable changes and the related issues of how to identify and interpret trends; prepare and adapt to meet challenges; and how to harness emerging opportunities for sustainable organisational success. Trinidad and Tobago is not immune to the impact of these changes. This will have an impact on job creation as well as the management of our human capital via the Human Resource (HR) function. The Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA) believes it is time that we ask the difficult questions: • Is the traditional Human Resource (HR) function still relevant? • Are HR practitioners adequately equipped to deal with the changing environment? • Are our HR policies and practices in alignment with our changing realities? • Is our HR function reactionary or proactive and how does this impact employee relations?

HR IS NOT JUST AN “ADMINISTRATIVE” FUNCTION The key lesson here for senior management and business owners is to reposition and rename the HR function from one of “support” to “business partner” and to include HR from the beginning in developing business goals and strategy.

Strengthening the employer-employee relationship

Developing training

Formulating workforce strategy

Capacity-Building programmes

Assessing the relevance of functional processes for organisations to effectively achieve productivity and financial goals

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THE WAY FORWARD The size of the labour force in Trinidad and Tobago has been shrinking year-on-year since 2014. This can be attributed to either a rationalisation of operations by employers based on prevailing economic challenges or individuals opting to engage in other activities as opposed to competing for a limited number of vacancies. The latter means that it is becoming critical for employers to find ways to keep existing employees.

GDP OIL/GAS

In Trinidad and Tobago, several new people-relevant topics are now at the forefront of national debate, such as: • social media and the world of work • workplace harassment and discrimination, including sexual harassment • mental health considerations in the workplace • leave and absence management These issues require that companies implement strategies and policies clearly articulating their position and the roles and responsibilities of parties to the employment relationship. Company policies are the strategic link between an overall vision and mission, and day-to-day operations. Clear policies and procedures define a company’s expectations and standards to employees and outline how these standards are maintained, communicated and measured.

HOW DOES T&T STACK UP? Now, with the millennial generation transforming the workplace, companies are looking towards greater work/life integration. Trinidad and Tobago, like many other Caribbean countries, is characteristically reactionary and resistant to change. Many other countries outside of the region have already institutionalised employee sensitive policies like telecommuting, flexitime, mandated time off, and employee health and wellness programmes. As a signatory to various conventions of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), there is already a strong foundation on which we can build if we are to adapt and survive. HR is at a crossroads. Technology can now accomplish many traditional administrative and technical responsibilities faster, cheaper, and better than before. With countless recruiting platforms, on-boarding programmes, human resource information systems and talent management systems available, HR as a whole will have to quickly adapt or face severe diminution of relevance in the market place.

GDP BY SECTOR SERVICES

MANUFACTURING

5.6% US$ 22 BILLION

% OF LABOUR FORCE

34.9% 50.8%

12% 3% 62.9%

LABOUR FORCE

638,300

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE 5% Labour Force Part. Rate: 59.7% MALE: 68.78% FEMALE: 50.9% RETRENCHMENT 2017: 1106 2016: 1315 Global Competitiveness Index

83rd / 137

Organisations should not underestimate the value of periodic HR/IR audits and reviews of systems, policies and procedures. Although local labour laws have been relatively constant for a number of years, there are many other variables that impact the world of work and such audits will help to manage those risks associated with the human capital component of a business, ensure compliance and an optimal contribution of processes. Managing human capital risk is a vital aspect of continuous value creation and is especially necessary in recessionary times. It is therefore necessary to have a clear understanding of potential employee issues that are likely to arise from a poorly managed workforce and find ways to identify, develop and implement strategies to mitigate against such issues. The private sector is a key contributor to growth, poverty reduction and wealth creation of any country - it is the indispensable engine of job creation and economic growth. It requires not only an enabling environment but also an ability to respond to environmental and organisational changes.

THE ECA AS A FACILITATING BUSINESS PARTNER HIGHLIGHTS THE FOLLOWING KEY PRACTICES WHICH WILL RESULT IN POSITIVE HUMAN CAPITAL OUTCOMES FOR ANY ORGANISATION: HIRE DIFFERENTLY. DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE VALUE OF PSYCHOMETRIC ASSESSMENTS, ASSESSMENT CENTRES AND COMPETENCY-BASED RECRUITMENT

CONSIDER THE BENEFITS OF GREATER WORKPLACE FLEXIBILITY

ENGAGE IN PROACTIVE WORKFORCE PLANNING

MAXIMISE EMPLOYEE TALENT. INVEST IN EMPLOYEE EDUCATION AND CONTINUOUS UPSKILLING OF TECHNICAL AND COGNITIVE SKILLS

UNDERSTAND AND EMBRACE THE IMPLICATIONS OF DIGITAL DISRUPTIONS AND THE APPLICATION OF BIG DATA IN THE WORKPLACE

THE FUTURE IS ALREADY HERE. Current trends in business, society, technology, communications and information are changing the where, when, how, why, and with whom employees will work over the next few decades. For investors, this reality demands an appreciation for the human capital component of enterprise and its tangible and intangible importance to organisational success, share price and return on investment.

HUMAN RESOURCE AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

As new technology and trends emerge, the strategic role of HR will be increasingly important in achieving sustained organisational success. Development will invariably include some form of “people” disruption. HR is therefore required to not only anticipate emerging trends but to develop strategies for managing its effects on the organisation, particularly its human capital.

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Dennis Gurley, S.C. Chairman

Elizabeth Solomon Executive Director

The Dispute Resolution Centre is the longest serving private mediation agency in Trinidad and Tobago. The DRC has 23 years of experience in providing Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution services. Driven by a mandate to foster an environment where disputes are seen as opportunities for communication rather than adversarial action which ultimately will help get your business back on track. The DRC manages a roster of highly skilled, experienced and certified Mediation and ADR professionals. Many of our dispute resolution professionals are specialists in disciplines such as Construction, Energy Sector related disputes, Contractual disputes, Insurance claims, Medical Negligence, Sports and Industrial Relations disputes, just to name a few. At the DRC mediations and arbitrations are conducted in specially appointed facilities supported by an experienced, well-trained team that understands that the environment is important for a successful mediation. The DRC also provides rigorous training and certification in the full range of alternative dispute resolution techniques.

HUMAN RESOURCE AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

Ground Floor Chamber Building, Columbus Circle, Westmoorings Phone: (868) 632 4051 • Email: drc@chamber.org.tt Facebook: facebook.com/disputeresolutioncentre; instagram Website: www.disputeresolutioncentre.org.tt

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INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY By INFOCOMM Technologies Ltd., Atiba Phillips

In 2013, Trinidad and Tobago, dropped a precipitous 12 places down the World Economic Forum’s Networked Readiness Rankings. In the three years that followed, there was a virtual flatlining of fortunes with a modest increase in ranking in 2016. NETWORKED READINESS INDEX RANK 55 60 65 70 75 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Data for 2017-2018 is not yet available, and the jury is mixed as to whether the moderate improvements will continue based on some of the missteps in the ICT space over the last 12 months as follows: • The term “ICT” did not appear in the National Budget of Trinidad and Tobago for fiscal year 2017-2018. This despite multiple calls from private sector and international actors for greater investment and emphasis on ICTs. • The substantive Minister of Public Administration, under whose purview the main ICT portfolio falls, had been absent from his post for an extended period due to health reasons. A substantive replacement Minister, the Honourable Marlene Mc Donald, has only been recently appointed. • The new National ICT Plan being called “Fastforward II” was drafted by the Government during early 2017. Since then, there have been no recent updates or announcements regarding finalisation or implementation. • The Ministry of Trade and Industry launched a new e-commerce strategy for Trinidad and Tobago in November 2017. However, it does not deal in any depth with the systematic and infrastructural issues which prevent the widespread adoption of digital payment modalities by the private sector and State institutions, which puts the Trinidad and Tobago economy at a significant disadvantage when attempting to compete in the ever-increasing and pervasive global digital economic space.

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• The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce had scheduled a major ICT conference in Trinidad and Tobago for 15 & 16 May 2017 dubbed, “ICT Pro TT Conference - Ignite your Digital Transformation”. The affair was to have had 60+ content sessions and a wide array of local and foreign speakers. Unfortunately, the Chamber decided to abort the initiative after the anticipated level of participation was not achieved.


Notwithstanding all of these, Trinidad and Tobago is endowed with an enviable telecommunication environment, including a number of data centres, international fibre cable connections and best-in-class mobile coverage. INTERNET EXCHANGE POINT (IXP)

In place since 2014

DATA CENTRES

Arguably best destination in the region for data storage with advantageous location south of the hurricane belt

COST OF BROADBAND

Lowest broadband tariffs in the region

THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO ICT CHALLENGE Yet while this is true, by and large the internal organisational infrastructures which support enterprise-level/potentially transformative technology projects in local businesses, are not in place. There is still no widespread understanding or importance placed on the need for highly skilled Chief Information Officer (CIO) role within organisations to fashion, inform and lead innovative initiatives on behalf of the company. Consequently, while more budget is being allocated for companies to try out new technology-driven ways forward, many of these projects are conservative in their reach comprising of communications infrastructure projects (more network cabling, routers, firewalls, servers, etc.) – the sort of way forward to drive greater efficiency that can be competently handled by a traditional IT Manager.

DNS ROOT SERVER

In place since 2014

Truly innovative or potentially disruptive projects however will remain in peril as these are often given to relatively junior “tech-savvy” staff to manage and they do not have the authority or enterprise understanding to drive digital transformation initiatives.

MOBILE NETWORK COVERAGE

Ranked #1 by World Economic Forum 1

THE OUTLOOK FOR ICT IN T&T

IPV6 ADOPTION AND DEPLOYMENT

T&T also ranks #16 in the world 2

As such, the outlook for Trinidad and Tobago’s increased technology adoption and innovation is mixed.

INTERNET HOUSEHOLD PENETRATION

58 % 3

MOBILE PENETRATION

150 % (2017) T&T Snapshot

This has attracted interest from international investors looking to take advantage of T&T’s good infrastructure and advantageous location south of the hurricane belt. Among these are:

The leveraging of the country’s sound telecommunication infrastructure to drive transformation of the Government and the economy has been frustratingly characterised by fits and spurts of activity which have not caught the imagination of the population as a whole and have lacked sustainability. Trinidad and Tobago is in great need of knowledgeable and resourced leadership in the ICT space in order to be seen once again as the tiger of the Caribbean regarding ICTs. NETWORKED READINESS INDEX

• iQor who entered in 2015 and now has two contact centres in the country, growing from 60 seats to 600, with room for further expansion. • International technology consulting firm, Avasant, has also recently announced the launch of its Trinidad and Tobago operations to support its Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) practice. The launch was held on 15 May 2018 as part of Avasant's Digital Innovation and Business Transformation Forum.

RANK

NO. OF COUNTRIES

2012

60

142

2013

72

144

2014

71

148

2015

70

143

2016

67

139

GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS INDEX

On the legislative side, the Cybercrime Bill 2017 and the Data Protection Act of 2011 (which was assented to on 22 June 2011 and which still has not been fully proclaimed) are currently before a Joint Select Committee process of Parliament wherein the concerns and feedback of affected stakeholder groups (including the media) are being heard. These bills criminalise the misuse of data collected or distributed online and are key cornerstones of the regulation of the digital economy. At the level of domestic institutions and businesses, due to commercial competitive concerns, a tightening economy and the phenomenon of younger persons assuming positions of leadership, it would seem that the business mindset is beginning to warm to the need to include technology in the discussion when engaging in strategy planning or seeking to address business problems.

YEAR

1 2 3

YEAR

RANK

NO. OF COUNTRIES

2011

81

142

2012

84

144

2013

92

148

2014

89

144

2015

89

140

2016

94

138

2017

83

137

http://reports.weforum.org/global-information-technology-report-2016/economies/#economy=TTO https://www.aelius.com/njh/google-ipv6/ Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

T&T STRUCTURALLY SOUND

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87

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


88


89

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


90


91

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


92


93

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


94


95

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


96


www.softwareone.com

Follow us @SoftwareONEWestIndies

#17 Cumberbatch Street, Chaguanas, Trinidad Phone: 299-5566 Phone/Fax: 665-9907 Email: sales@sparktt.com Website: www.sparktt.com

Founded in 2008, Spark Technologies Limited has evolved from an IT Solutions Company specializing in Corporate IT Services into a full Technology Provider in the areas of IT, Security, Safety and Automation. Representing some of the leading brands in the market, STL provides complete solutions from design to engineering to completion. Leading by example, STL stays on the cutting edge of technology to ensure the client’s requirements are surpassed. Customer satisfaction is our highest priority and we have a strong history showing this. Our solutions include surveillance systems, burglar alarms, fire detection, suppression and prevention, automation, access control and lifestyle options such as audio/visual for almost any budget.

FIRE • Detection • Suppression • Hypoxic

AUTOMATION • Smart Home • MultiZone Audio • BMS

SECURITY • CCTV • Alarms • Access

Control

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

Contact us info.wi@softwareone.com

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Record Hurricane Insurance Payments Made

INSURANCE

Insurers demonstrated the robustness of their reinsurance arrangements and claims responsiveness with swift payments of most of the US$100 billion in insured losses.

By Risk Management Services

The passage of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, during the worst hurricane season to date, marked the first recorded instance of two Category 5 hurricanes occurring in the same month and accentuated the need for all Caribbean territories to re-evaluate the maximum wind speeds that can now be expected and to revise and enforce building codes appropriately. It was initially believed that reinsurers would react decisively to raise property rates across the region, however, rate increases for the first quarter of 2018 were modest following an influx of capital into the reinsurance market. Likewise, insurers have been very selective in their rate increases with those territories that are in the main hurricane pathways seeing the bulk of the increase.While some local insurers pressed for rate increases in the local market, this is yet to be realised. However, the downward pressure on property insurance rates has been alleviated with most claims-free property renewals holding their expiring rates.

Passage of the New Insurance Act After some 12 years of review by the various stakeholder groups, the Insurance Act 2018 was proclaimed in June. The immediate challenge for all insurance companies and intermediaries will be understanding and meeting the new requirements for capital, solvency, registration etc. particularly given the heavy penalties for non-compliance.

Trends in Motor Insurance Heightened police checkpoints, alcohol testing and adjusted speed limits provided benefits to both the driving public and insurers with the number of major road accidents continuing its downward trend in 2017. The trend is welcome news to a very competitive motor insurance market that is now experiencing its first local online insurance quotation comparison service. However, an alarming upsurge in motor vehicle thefts in early 2018 may temper any reduction in losses from motor accidents. A trio of motor insurers joined forces to introduce ForenSys, a motor accident management company that collects and preserves information at the scene of serious accidents. This service is intended to help determine liability in disputed motor accident scenes.

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Major underinsurance and low insurance penetration Access to foreign exchange New investment opportunities Unknown impact of climate change Lack of a national building code and enforcement Increase in lifestyle diseases Fraud and enforcement in motor insurance

Economic Issues The industry continues to be affected by economic conditions with policy lapses, reductions in sums insured and a decline in insurance programmes as companies and individuals alike seek to reduce expenses. Insurers have been unable to obtain timely access to foreign exchange to pay their reinsurers and this remains a concern, particularly given the greater frequency and costs of catastrophic events worldwide. New high-yielding investment opportunities also continue to challenge the life, pension and non-life sectors.

Impact of Climate Change For the first time, the Trinidad and Tobago government effected a policy for excess rainfall in 2017 from the Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) and received a payment later that year for $47 million following the devastating October floods. While the cover was timely, Trinidad is still in the assessment stage of determining our climate change vulnerabilities, in stark contrast to many of our Caribbean neighbours.

Insurance Fraud and Enforcement The non-life sector continues to struggle with its image as the pervasive issues of fraudulent motor insurance certificates and ‘PH’ vehicles go unresolved. Motor insurers are blamed when they deny claims brought by injured third parties in these instances. The lack of progress in establishing the administration of the fund for victims of uninsured motor vehicles means that an increasing number of innocent parties will go without compensation for debilitating injuries. With one major legislative matter behind us, the industry hopes that the focus can now move to a quicker resolution of these remaining issues.

T&T Property Insurers - Premiums vs Claims Gross Premium - Property - Non-Life Insurance Companies Gross Claims - Property - Non-Life Insurance Companies

Also of concern is the continued lack of development of a national building code and an enforceable small-building code particularly given the amplified warnings from the Seismic Research Unit of The University of the West Indies of a potentially devastating seismic event in the region.

7

Source: Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago

CRITICAL COMPONENTS OF THE NEW INSURANCE ACT:

Stem excessive risk taking and promote good governance and sound risk and capital management practices by management and boards of directors of regulated entities.

Provide an effective deterrent for breaches of the legislation via a regime of increased fines and penalties.

Ensure robust balance sheets and adequate capital buffers are held to cater for unanticipated losses.

Provisions for the restructuring of business groups that engage in financial and non-financial activities and requirements for the formation of a holding company to hold exclusively the regulated financial entities in the group.

Impose standards of market conduct on insurers and their sales people in dealing with the public and give the regulator the power to revoke an insurer’s registration where practices are found to be unfair to the general public or there are unreasonable delays in settlement. Expand the range of tools for preventative and prompt corrective action and intervention by the Central Bank. The Regulator must now take action when an insurer’s capital ratio (current assets versus current liabilities) falls to 70%.

Allow the Regulator to deal with the re-emergence of systemically important conglomerates in the region by providing: • Power to approve and deal more clearly with the fitness and propriety of ultimate controllers • Power to require the establishment of financial holding companies to avoid the group risk • A limit to unrelated-party transactions • Central Bank approval of proposed mergers and acquisitions

INSURANCE

• • • • • • •

Other unknowns that come with climate change are the potentials for new diseases, such as the Zika and Chikungunya viruses, and the impact they may have on the life and health insurance sectors. These sectors are also dealing with the high prevalence and mortality rates for lifestyle diseases and increasing health care costs.

(TT$Mn)

Main Challenges Facing the Local Insurance Industry

• Overseas subsidiaries • For minimum capital at the level of the holding company in addition to minimum capital at the level of the insurance subsidiary.

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100


101

INSURANCE


102


103

INSURANCE


ForenSys provides insurance companies with data that supports their underwriting, claims and management decisions. When called, ForenSys Agents go to the scene of an accident to take pictures, scan documents, and take statements from all involved parties. As a result, the insurance company can provide their clients the best service possible, by settling claims as quickly and correctly as possible. ForenSys is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, and will register any incident, regardless of which insurance companies cover the involved parties. We can be reached at 866-8888, and both the call and service are free to the public.

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105

INSURANCE


106


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INSURANCE


MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION By the Trinidad & Tobago Manufacturers' Association (TTMA), Christian George

Reflecting on the 2018 theme for the annual Trade and Investment Convention (TIC) is an apt way to begin discourse on the current state of affairs of the manufacturing sector. This article maintains an optimistic outlook, acknowledging challenges, but also new horizons and opportunities. Such an outlook is reflective of the ability of the sector’s constituents to successfully operate in the globalised trading environment. Recent developments for the sector have occurred due to the manufacturers as well as the government. Manufacturers’ continued investments in their plant and equipment result in increased capacity and competitiveness which is needed for their survival and success. Some of these investments have been highlighted in local media, including: • Baron Foods Ltd, a manufacturer of sauces and condiments, recently commenced operations in Trinidad and Tobago. • Carib Glassworks Ltd’s new furnace that increases capacity to 70,000 tonnes of glass bottles annually. • KC Confectionery Limited’s state-of-the-art bubble gum lines, which add 5,000 tonnes of confectionery annually.

Furthermore, the Government has developed initiatives targeted towards the manufacturing sector, including a grant fund facility for machinery and equipment, and the research and development facility (RDF) which focuses on innovation. Applicants can receive as much as $250,000 via the grant fund facility, and $1 million via the RDF. The aforementioned developments, as well as the others, auger well for the future of the economy. This positive outlook is reflected in the Ministry of Finance review of the economy, which has indicated that the food and beverage, as well as the textiles, clothing, leather, wood, paper and printing sectors are experiencing an upward trend in their respective contributions to GDP (using constant 2012 prices). Furthermore, notwithstanding the negative GDP growth from 2014, the World Bank forecasts GDP growth rates of 1.9%, 2.2% and 1.6% for the periods 2018, 2019 and 2020 respectively. Thus, the outlook for the sector is promising, as this growth would be partly due to the operations of manufacturers.

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NEW INITIATIVES Manufacturers are keen on exploiting these initiatives, and others, as they can boost productivity and competitiveness, leading to increased exports and resulting in increased foreign exchange earnings.

THE GOVERNMENT HAS SIGNALLED ITS INTENT TO LAUNCH THE FOLLOWING AS EARLY AS 2018:

Such fortunes are not without their challenges. Two primary challenges that affect local manufacturers are inefficient government operations and access to foreign exchange for raw materials.

THESE PROBLEMS HAVE BEEN ARTICULATED TO THE GOVERNMENT, WHICH HAS PROPOSED THE FOLLOWING SOLUTIONS:

01

02

A facility that would provide access to hard currency to address manufacturers’ needs for access to foreign exchange needed for imported raw materials.

The expansion of services offered via TTBizLink, Trinidad and Tobago’s Single Electronic Window, as online applications increase accessibility to, and decrease delays encountered at government institutions.

• Implementation of the National Export Strategy • Development of new and enhanced suite of incentives • Establishment of centres of excellence and technology parks

THE NEW SERVICES TO BE OFFERED ONLINE ARE: Business registration, work permit applications and visa exemptions (by December 2018)

• Implementation of the National Quality Policy

Launched in 2018, the objectives of the initiative include the engenderment of national pride in locally manufactured products, and the reminder that these products are renowned for quality both locally and internationally. This campaign consists of videos, promotional items, and radio infomercials. Manufacturers have already started incorporating the logo on their respective packaging.

Expedited approvals by the Town and Country Planning Division, as well as water and sewerage, and electricity connections with initial reform work (beginning in 2018).

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO IS AN ECONOMY THAT IS OPEN TO FDI, AND POTENTIAL INVESTORS CAN BENEFIT FROM THE FOLLOWING: • High GDP per capita (USD 16,041 in 2016), which reflects a high standard of living

• High availability of scientists and engineers, whose skills are needed for research and development

• 9.61 months of import cover based on reserves (2016), which exceeds the recommended 3 months of import cover

The above figures, as well as other attractive indicators, are recorded in the World Bank’s database, the Global Competitiveness Index, and the Ease of Doing Business rankings.

• High tertiary education enrolment rate (65%), which suggests access to an educated labour pool • Duty-free access to approximately 50 countries, which can increase the price competitiveness of the exports of manufacturers

Figure 1: Proudly T&T Logo

• Strong legal rights index, which indicates that the collateral and bankruptcy laws protect the rights of borrowers (which can result in increased borrowing for investment)

Manufacturing in Trinidad and Tobago continues to be an important sector of the economy. Potential in the sector is evident, notwithstanding the existing challenges. Also, the forecast for the economy is positive, which can only redound to the benefit of all, including those who are considering investing in the twin island state. Thus, it is justifiable to conclude by reiterating that there are new horizons and new opportunities for manufacturers in 2018 and beyond.

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION’S PROUDLY T&T CAMPAIGN.

Reduction in the clearance and approval times by the Customs and Excise Division (by March 2019).

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PRESIDENT

Mr. Christopher Alcazar

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DIRECTOR Mr. Gary Awai

DIRECTOR Mr. John De Silva

DIRECTOR Mr. Ian Mitchell

DIRECTOR Mr. Ryan Lewis

DIRECTOR Mr. Anthony Farah

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

SECOND VICEPRESIDENT

Ms. Franka Costelloe Dr. Mikaeel Mohammed

DIRECTOR Mr. Philippe Agostini

DIRECTOR Mr. Patricio Torres

DIRECTOR Mr. Dale Parson


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MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


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MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


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FOOD LABELLING – Can you read this? By the Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA), Ismahieel Ali

In 2013, the global food industry was hit hard by the horse meat scandal where products labelled beef contained horse meat and consumers were not aware of this fiasco. A Dutch meat wholesaler was later convicted of having sold over 300 tons of horse meat, labelled as beef, to over 500 companies. Further to this, the milk scandal of 2008 had brought concerns over food fraud to the forefront in China. Chinese officials estimated that as many as six (6) babies died, and nearly 300,000 infants were sickened by dairy products contaminated with melamine, which had been added to watered-down milk in order to fool protein content tests. This is according to a report labelled ‘‘China’s Food Industry in Crisis: A Detailed Analysis of the FSL and China’s Enforcement Obstacles’’.

• Any panel including the bottom of the package: • Expiry date, best before date, date mark • Any applicable storage instructions e.g. keep frozen, refrigerate after opening • Preparation instructions, where applicable and Instructions for safe handling, where applicable. Labels for drug products (excluding most antibiotics and narcotics) must include the following information on the main panel of both the outer and inner labels: • Drug’s proper name; standard under which the drug was manufactured, including the abbreviation if mentioned in the regulations

These scandals brought public awareness to the fact that there were severe shortcomings in food supply chain control mechanisms especially in the area of labelling. In Trinidad and Tobago, we continue to see an enormous amount of poorly labelled food and drugs entering our market space and onto our supermarket shelves. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to address the importance of proper food labels. The primary role of food labels is to inform consumers of the food’s nutritional values and ingredients, its manufacturer, health claims and possible allergens or some other potentially threatening food information. All this data helps people decide whether they will eat certain foods, which is why food producers need to adhere to the standards that are in place to do just that.

• Common name if not proper name

The legislation that monitors labelling standards in Trinidad and Tobago is the Food & Drugs Act of [1] 1960. This legislation requires that the food package carry specific information including:

Looking at the other extreme, consumers can misinterpret these labels and thus misalign their personal preferences and their actual food purchases.

• Main panel – This will include brand name or trade name, common name of food and correct declaration of the net contents of the package in terms of weight, volume or number.

What is being done?

• Any panel except the bottom of the package – This will include: - complete list of ingredients in descending order of proportion - the name and address of the manufacturer or person preparing the food and its country of preparation or origin - Declaration by name of any added Class II, Class III or Class IV preservative e.g. sodium benzoate and • A declaration of any added food colour or flavouring preparation

• Name of manufacturer or distributor • Address of manufacturer or distributor, required on outer label only when contents are less than five millilitres • Lot number or batch number so indicated for drugs intended for internal or parenteral use (except for patent or proprietary medicinal ingredients) except on official drugs, shipping cases, and wrapping material.

What are the consequences of poor labelling? From a company’s perspective, chronic label issues resulting in delayed shipments, customer fines, or the delivery of the wrong product can turn customers away to seek alternate sources of supply. This negatively affects market share and margins, leads to loss of brand credibility, and increases customer dissatisfaction. We are also faced with the possibility of product recalls as well. From a national perspective, there is an outcry from the public for the Government to be more vigilant of these products and for additional resources to provide to regulatory agencies that need to monitor labeling of products.

In Trinidad and Tobago, there is a need to monitor labels as there has been an infiltration of products with poor labels. The state-run agency Chemistry Food and Drug Division (CFDD) is responsible for overseeing and taking proactive measures in addressing labelling standards. In an attempt to tackle this problem, the Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) has established a Trade Desk Officer to focus on the investigation of illicit trade and unfair trading practices, which also includes noncompliance with labelling regulations, in Trinidad and Tobago. This Trade Desk is being implemented to build capacity, strengthen partnerships and implement strategies to combat the illicit trade of products in and about the manufacturing sector.

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ASSOCIATIONS By the Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI), Syan Laurel Bhagwatsingh

In Trinidad and Tobago, Services contribution to GDP in 2017 was estimated at approximately 50.8% while agriculture and industry stood at 48.8 % and 0.4% respectively. Moreover, the services sector’s relative contribution to GDP for the period 2011-2016 has been estimated at 52.3%, this indicates that slightly more than 50% of the income derived from the services sector is generated within the borders of Trinidad and Tobago (Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industry (TTCSI) 2016). Apart from this, the services sector, unlike the hydrocarbon sector, has experienced significant growth despite external shocks that could be attributed to the recent fall in global oil prices. Despite the services sector showing a strong performance locally, it is yet to be a viable foreign exchange earner as its performance with respect to services exports has been relatively poor when compared to other sectors such as manufacturing and hydrocarbons. While the sector has been marked to fast track the diversification thrust, it falls short in its ability to increase its trade and earning power as seen by Trinidad and Tobago’s negative trade balance (exports minus imports) in international trade in services. For the period 2011- 2016, there has been a reported negative trade balance with regard to international trade in services, with services accounting for only 28% of exports in 2011 (TTCSI, 2016). In addressing these issues • It is obvious to see that more attention needs to be paid to the services sector, if it is to be positioned as a revenue earner internationally. • The need for a more evidence-based approach to the development of the services sector needs to be employed. This is necessary as the only way to harness existing opportunities is to properly assess strategies and policies that are geared towards developing the sector. • There must be sufficient and current data on available services to substantiate the methodologies used in the creation of policy to determine effectiveness, prior to implementation.

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Educates and informs small and medium enterprises of trade flows, market trends, and international opportunities.

2

Serves as a resource for commercial decisions and secures business-to-business and matchmaking opportunities for service exporters and importers.

3

Contains readily available information on the services industry.

4

SERVICES EXPORTERS’ REGISTRY 5

The majority of small and medium enterprises in Trinidad and Tobago are indigenous to the services sector. As such, it is imperative that they become more globally competitive. To do this, information on the services sector must be made available to educate and inform these entities of trade flows, market trends, and international opportunities. A resource such as the services exporters’ registry is undoubtedly welcomed at this time. Being the first of its kind, it hopes to fill the dearth of services data within the local industry. The practicality of such a mechanism is to have information on the services industry readily available. The registry can certainly make a difference in a person’s perception on trade in services.

Acts as a repository where foreign investors can access information on statistical data, industry trends, number of local operators, value of exports etc.

Stores information in a virtual database housed within the remit of the TTCSI and will be easily accessible by all persons with the touch of a button.

While some services are easily tradable, their inherent characteristics make them predisposed to cross-border digital trade, for example, ICT-enabled services. It is indeed a breakthrough for the data regime in Trinidad and Tobago, and Phase I has already been completed by the

TTCSI which has identified the services sectors with the highest export potential to be used in the registry. These sectors were identified and ranked using the Export Potential Index (EPI) as the main index.

TTCSI hopes to complete Phase II, which will focus on determining a suite of service data products that will be offered by the registry.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

1

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS


GCG Trinidad Allied Caterers Katerserv

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS


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KPMG is a global network of professional services firms providing Audit, Tax and Advisory Services. We have more than 200,000 outstanding professionals working together to deliver value in 154 countries worldwide. The firm has been in existence internationally for over 100 years and we have been operating locally in Trinidad and Tobago for over 45 years. The international network of KPMG member firms openly share resources. Thus providing exposure to leading-edge technology and techniques through the provision of training, documentation and other support to equip our professionals to be experts in their chosen field.

Dushyant Sookram Managing Partner

Stacy-Ann Golding Partner

Robert Alleyne Partner

Gillian Wolffe Director

Nigel Panchoo Partner

Abigial De Freitas Partner

Marissa Quashie Partner

Nicole Joseph Director

Our services include: Audit

Tax

Advisory

Contact us:

Savannah East 11 Queen’s Park East Port of Spain, Trinidad W.I. T: 1 868 612-KPMG F: 1 868 623 1084 E: kpmg@kpmg.co.tt W: www.kpmg.com/tt

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Financial Statement Audit Project & Donor-Funded Audit Regulatory and Contractual Assurance Other Assurance Services Accounting Services

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Corporate & Business Tax Compliance International and Domestic Tax Advisory Tax Structuring Advice Indirect Tax Advisory Individual and Employment Tax

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Cyber Maturity Assessments Business Continuity Planning Strategic Planning Business Process Improvement Change Management Forensic Investigations Internal Audit & Compliance Data & Analytics Liquidations & Insolvency Mergers & Acquistions Valuations

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

Contact us to enquire how we can drive your business forward, together.

© 2018 KPMG, a Trinidad and Tobago partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

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Outsourcing Learning and Development Industrial Relations Services Psychometric Testing & Assessment Centre Coaching and Performance Management HR Management and Interventions Business Process Management Competency Assurance and Management Payroll Services

Since 1980 your partners for success

+1.868.625.9212 www.pmsl.org

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

Recruitment and Selection

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AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (AMCHAM T&T) 62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. • PO Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466/0340, 628-2508 • Fax: (868) 628-9428 Email: inbox@amchamtt.com • Website: www.amchamtt.com

Patricia Ghany President

The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago represents some 286 companies, 75% of which are local and 25% multinationals. As The Pathway To The Americas, AMCHAM T&T adds value to its member companies by focusing on the following key areas: 1. Strategic Linkages • AMCHAM T&T facilitates the generation of new business and market access for goods and services by promoting interaction among member companies, key T&T and U.S. Government agents and its 23 sister AmChams throughout the Western Hemisphere. AMCHAM T&T connects firms with potential investors, suppliers, partners and buyers. 2. Influence policies and legislation to enhance competitiveness • AMCHAM T&T actively participates in and contributes to the national discussion on key economic issues. It works with Government Ministries and State Agencies to create a favourable environment for business and Foreign Direct Investment destination. • Lobbying U.S. administration for favourable trade policy towards the Caribbean.

Nirad Tewarie

Chief Executive Officer

3. Transfer of Knowledge • AMCHAM T&T facilitates access to information and leverages experiences to raise industry standards and positively impact national systemic issues.

Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited 9B Fondes Amandes Rd., St. Anns, P.O.S. Trinidad Mobile: (868) 620-1989 Email: caribbeandiscoverytours@yahoo.com Website: www.caribbeandiscoverytours.com

Caribbean Discovery Tours, a pioneer of eco-tourism in Trinidad and Tobago, offers expertly guided kayaking, hiking, camping and scuba adventures, and services for academics and film-makers.

Stephen Broadbridge Managing Director

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On his travels, Stephen Broadbridge, Managing Director, has photographed wildlife, birds, wetlands, forests and urban landscapes, and his images have been widely published. Caribbean Discovery Tours co-produced the film Wild T&T, documenting the country’s flora and fauna, which won a Green Leaf Award in 2005. Stephen has held positions on several private and state boards including the EMBD as deputy chairman, Creative TT, Papa Bois Conservation, and was a director on state owned company TT Free Zone Company and is currently the vice president of the T&T Incoming Tour Operators Association.


Columbus Circle, Westmoorings, P.O. Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad. Tel: (868) 637-6966 • Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt • Website: www.chamber.org.tt The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce’s mission is “To be The Champion of Business towards the development of a strong and sustainable national economy”. Our 139-year old organisation has continued to create opportunities for members to leverage shared resources, knowledge and key contacts to develop a competitive edge in the global marketplace. The T&T Chamber remains one of the largest and most influential business organisations in Trinidad and Tobago.

President

We offer a broad range of services, and direct and indirect benefits that cater to companies in the widest span of sectors, and businesses at various stages of development. We facilitate trade initiatives in a number of ways including trade missions to create opportunities for outward exploration and new market penetration. Effective networking opportunities are available at all events, including our Business Insights training sessions. The T&T Chamber hosts three Signature Events annually - the Annual Business Luncheon, the Post-Budget Forum (a review, analysis and discussion forum on National Budget items) and the Champions of Business Gala. The latter provides recognition and reward to start-ups, businesses which export T&T goods or services and technology innovators. The event includes a lifetime award for outstanding business people by induction to the Business Hall of Fame.

Gabriel Faria

The T&T Chamber also offers business referrals and dispute resolution training and services through the Dispute Resolution Centre. Our strong media presence via our weekly newspaper columns, radio programmes, electronic newsletters and through Contact magazine are used to educate, and advocate for members by ventilating important issues affecting business today. Members can also influence their business sectors in a more meaningful way by joining a committee. Our standing committees include, Crime & Justice, Facilities Maintenance & Management (FMM), Responsible Business, ICT Professionals of T&T (ICT ProTT), Employment and Labour Relations (ELR), Trade and Business Development (TBD), Environment Safety and Health (ESH), and NOVA for start-ups and entrepreneurs. Other committees are formed on an ad hoc basis to manage a number issues. The T&T Chamber’s views are also represented on several national committees. Members enjoy business savings through our Membership Value Added Programme on select cost items. And there is more!

Ronald Hinds

Chief Executive Officer

We invite you to browse through the benefits of the T&T Chamber membership. Find us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

TOBAGO DIVISION OF THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE 2nd Floor, Ansa McAl Building, Milford Road, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2669 Fax: (868) 639-3014 Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt The Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce represents close to 50 businesses on the island, including service providers, retailers, distributors and sole Claude Benoit traders. The Division Chairman lobbies on issues that specifically affect the island’s businesspeople. The Chairman of the Division champions these at the national level with a view to bringing resolution where possible. The Division operates under the leadership of an annually-elected Chairperson and management team. The Chair also serves ex-officio on the Board of the T&T Chamber. The Division’s seven committees review and report on key areas such as Security, Tourism & Airlift, Inter-island Transport, Business Development, Airlift & Manufacturing, Editorial, and Planning & the Environment.

EMPLOYERS CONSULTATIVE ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 17 Samaroo Road, Aranguez Roundabout North, Aranguez, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-9388/638-6463 Fax: (868) 675-6026 Email: communications@ecatt.org Website: www.ecatt.org Follow us: Facebook (@ecatnt), Twitter (@ECATrinidad), LinkedIn Since 1960, the ECA has represented, with excellence and professionalism, the interests of Employers as they relate to labour and social policy at the national and international levels.

Keston Nancoo Chairman

Stephanie Fingal

Chief Executive Officer (Interim)

Originally founded as an Association to assist exclusively with industrial relations matters, the ECA continuously grew its service portfolio in response to the changing needs and growing demands of its membership. This led to the establishment of its subsidiary in 2008, the Employers’ Solution Centre (ESC), whose primary focus is professional training and consultancy on all matters relating to the world of work, a strategic move which allowed the ECA to refocus its resources on representing the interests of employers while still fulfilling a variety of service requests. The ECA is committed to providing support and advice, all geared towards managing and mitigating risks associated with the human capital component of your business. While membership will inherently attract preferred rates, our services are available to all businesses in Trinidad and Tobago. These include: • Free telephone advisory and exclusive e-content (members only) • Advocacy at national level (members only) • Representation at the Ministry of Labour and the Industrial Court • Complete Industrial Relations services • Professional Training and Employee Development • Human Resource Solutions • Publications, Market Research and Compensation surveys • Payroll Processing Give us a call today and experience the difference that membership with the ECA can make!

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ORGANISATIONS

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE (T&T CHAMBER)

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Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd. Lot 7A O’Meara Industrial Estate, Arima, Trinidad. (868) 678-3164; 376-4104; 643-7136 Email: lensealy@yahoo.com

Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd. is the region’s leading provider of management consultancy, training and personal development services based on complex systems theory. Dr Sealy is our Managing Director and Lead Consultant. He offers his extensive knowledge of the natural sciences, systems theory and management combined with his vast consultancy experience in many sectors.

Dr. Lennox Sealy Managing Director and Lead Consultant

Our services include: Management Consultancy Interventions: • System Redesign • Strategic Modelling • Process Re-engineering • Team Building • Strategic Planning • Implementing the Balanced Scorecard Training Programmes: • Quality Customer Service • Successful Conflict Management • 5-S Performance Management Personal Development: • Success Training • Stress Management • Presentation Skills And much more …. We give you the edge by implementing systems that yield enhanced benefits to you and your customers.

THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO COALITION OF SERVICES INDUSTRIES (TTCSI) 18 O’Connor Street, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9229 • Fax: (868) 622-8985 Email: info@ttcsi.org • Website: www.ttcsi.org The Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI), which was established in 2006, is the voice of the services sector. TTCSI is a business support membership organisation comprised of services sector organisations and associations. It represents the local private sector’s interests to decision makers as well as international, regional and local stakeholders. The main goal of the TTCSI is the building and development of a sustainable industry Lara Quentrall-Thomas President sector in Trinidad and Tobago. Toward that end, we lobby and engage in direct dialogue with key decision makers, undertake organizational strengthening and institutional building activities and facilitate the marketing and export of services of Trinidad and Tobago. TTCSI membership is organized around seven clusters of related service industries. This structure allows the TTCSI to function as a one-stop shop for interaction with the services sector. Via the clusters arrangement, TTCSI can provide aggregated feedback, organized interventions and collated ‘local knowledge’ to national, regional and international decision makers wanting to plan and implement interactions with the Trinidad & Tobago services sector. The present mix of service industry clusters of TTCSI is: • Business Services • Health & Related Social Services • Construction & Related • Tourism & Travel Related Social Services Engineering Services • Recreational, Cultural & • Environmental Services Sporting Services • Financial Services

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COLIN LAIRD 1924-2018 By Anna Walcott-Hardy

“Colin Laird was not a man that can be readily explained away in a few words,” Stephen Mendes, renowned architect, urban planner and close friend of Laird stated at the beginning of his remarks at the book launch of Forged from the Love: Colin Laird, Caribbean Architect at the Normandie Hotel in May. Mendes emphasised that Laird was an architect’s architect, who had “a greater impact on the urban face of our capital city than any other architect in recent times, with his designs for Queen’s Hall, the Hasely Crawford Stadium and the Jean Pierre Complex, the National Library and the Brian Lara Promenade”. Even a cursory view of the architectural drawings underscore that Laird was committed to creating a dialogue with those using the space, through innovative, inclusive, meticulous designs. But there was also a broader perspective. “I’m searching and searching for what one can do to the whole mess of Trinidad, the world, the man,” he wrote to his son, Christopher during the social unrest in 1970. “Architecture per se is wonderful, but to what end” For many, Laird created an architectural identity for his adopted country. He brought

a language, a decipherable linguistic to the civic buildings and urban spaces in the capital. Mendes explained that these designs typically reinforce what one of his professors, David Crane, called the “Capitol Web” of a city, in this case the Res Publica of Port of Spain, against a backdrop of generally uncontrolled and disorganised physical development, the Res Privata, in the city of a thousand designers.

Trinidad and Tobago citizenship in 1964, his wife Jeanette said in 2017, she died later that year, “he was very much more a Trinidadian than I ever have been or will be.”

Born in 1924 in North Shields, England, Laird was as unassuming as he was complex. An aircraft navigator during World War II, a yachtsman sailing the Atlantic single-handedly, an advocate of the West Indian Federation with an incongruous laugh and a wry sense of humour, Laird’s integral architectural contributions were recognised locally and internationally. His accolades include the Soane Medallion from the UK, Chaconia Gold National Award from Trinidad and Tobago, he was an Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and rated among the top 300 architects in the world by World Architecture Magazine in 2001. He was indeed an innovator whose interest in green and sustainable architecture came well before LEED certification became fashionable.

He often loved the sea and often sailed up the islands to Grenada and Dominica to make site visits to the company’s projects under construction. Mendes recalled that he enjoyed meeting him at the Yachting Association “scrubbing away at the barnacles at the bottom of his boat with his snorkel on and periodically surfacing for air with a smile on his face; and this continued until he was well over 80 years old. On other occasions I would arrive at his home studio and there he was drawing away on his drawing board with his headphones on, listening to classical music in order to focus and inspire his creative juices – a man truly enjoying what he did, and often doing it alone”.

A devoted husband to wife, Jeanette (Butler) whom he met at a dance at the Soldiers and Sailors Club in Port of Spain while he was enlisted as a Navy Navigator on the HMS Goshawk in 1942; they married two years later to the chagrin of the parents who thought they were too young, she was 17, he was just 20. A family man, he was a loving and dedicated father to son, Christopher and daughters, Nicolette, Naomi and Martina, as well as to his grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Recently, his grandson, Sebastien, spoke with obvious admiration of the time Laird placed him and his cousins in a small boat before speeding off to protest a ship with nuclear cargo stationed in Trinidad, fearlessly circling the massive tanker in the small craft. A supporter of the arts, especially of his dear friend the indefatigable dancer and choreographer, Beryl McBurnie, he designed the Little Carib Theatre in 1964, pro bono, and continued to support productions there for decades. He was also a great proponent of Carnival, a lover of sailor mas’, he even placed second in the Carnival King Competition at Dimanche Gras in a Ken Morris costume in 1970. He had enlisted in the navy when he was just 18 and was sent to the then British colony, Trinidad to train as a navigator. When asked how he felt returning to Britain after 50 years of being abroad, Laird said, “I feel I am a Trinidadian going to England”. He was granted

He was often praised for sharing his views on architecture openly with young architects, while at the same time being prepared to listen to their views.

Amicable and generous, he also had a steely resolve on unpopular, social issues, often going against the grain protesting capital punishment; as well as alcohol and cigarette advertising at the stadium; and in 1973, he resigned from the Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects over ties to the South Africa Institute of Architects, during the days of Apartheid. Known for major urban projects, he also designed several residential buildings including the elegant Coblentz House Apartments with its cool atrium and lush garden with samaan and cedar trees, housed on the former sugar estate in St Ann’s. Yet there are so many unbuilt ones that would have benefitted the country’s built heritage including an inter-religious centre at The University of the West Indies (The UWI) in 1987, where the Amerindian Benab was a central structure, surrounded by a Hindu Temple, Muslim Mosque and Christian Church; as well as a National Festival Centre; and National Cultural and Carnival Entertainment Centre. It’s worth a visit to the Colin Laird Collection at the Alma Jordan Library, The UWI, St Augustine Campus, to view the scope of the work and the architect’s dedication to ensuring functionality as well as inclusivity of the people and tropical landscape. “Colin’s wealth was never one of physical possessions - his wealth was one of the spirit, and a free spirit it was... [he] was a visionary and a master architect and together with other local architects who followed, have been responsible for our architectural legacy,” concluded Mendes. Colin Laird died at his home in Westmoorings, Trinidad in 2018, at the age of 93, surrounded by the family he loved.

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REAL ESTATE SECTOR

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT, AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Real estate activities contribute approximately 2% to GDP, which in absolute terms, approximates to TT$3.0 billion annually. Central Bank data indicates marginal increases year-on-year in real estate output over the last six years. The outlook for this sector is that activity is expected to increase with improvement in the economic performance of the country.

(TT$ M) YEAR

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Real Estate Activities

3,037.1

3,039.1

3,047.9

3,084.4

3,129.5

3,175.6

Contribution to GDP

1.84%

1.77%

1.75%

1.98%

2.10%

2.12%

Total GDP

164,745.1 171,234.8

148,745.0

149,684.7

174,326.6 155,624.5

By Keith Spencer

Residential Property Market The residential property market continues to mimic the cycles in the overall economy. According to the Central Bank (March 2018), the price of a standard three-bedroom unit rebounded from a low of just over TT$1.0Mn to a high of just over TT$1.4Mn. The median house price during the past year was TT$1.3Mn.

1,500

TT$ 000s

1,450 1,400 1,350 1,300 1,250 1,200 1,150 1,100 1,050

House Price (Quarterly Economic Survey, Central Bank, March 2018)

As the economy continues to rebound in 2018, the expectation is that the median house price will increase slowly as the market adjusts incrementally.

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Commercial Property Market The commercial rental market continues to enjoy buyer’s market status with tenants either reducing their footprint or holding their landlords to zero rental increases. Vacancy rates increased during 2017, as companies rationalised their space utilisation and opted not to exercise their option for lease renewals. The outlook for this segment is that the existing market conditions will hold in the short term until confidence is restored to the economy.

This sector is dominated primarily by in-house provision, particularly in the commercial (retail and office) and industrial segments. Key challenges faced by this sector are:

Keeping occupancy costs in check

Property Tax

Softening of rental rates

TYPE OF PROPERTY Industrial Developed

Agricultural

Commercial

1% 3% 6% 3% 5% Industrial Undeveloped

Residential

PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT SECTOR

Skilful lease and rental negotiations will be critical success factors for operators in this sector. The impact of the expected economic turnaround will not be realised in the short term given the longer duration of lease contractual arrangements.

Implementation of IFRS 16V A significant development that will impact the property management sector is the change in the lease reporting requirements for public entities with the coming into effect of the International Financial Reporting Standards 16 (IFRS 16) from 1 January 2019. The IFRS 16 standard requires lessees to recognise assets and liabilities for all leases unless the duration is 12 months or less or the subject asset has a low value.

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SECTOR

output annually.

As a rule of thumb in mature markets, total facilities management (FM) services (i.e. outsourced and in-house provision) contributes approximately 4.9% of GDP. A conservative estimate of the size of the FM industry in Trinidad and Tobago, given the current stage of the emerging market here, would be in the order of 2.5% of GDP. At current GDP levels, this would translate to approximately TT$3.7 billion annually. At this level of output, the prospects remain good for the industry as the economy improves, particularly for integrated FM providers.

(TT$ M)

The key issues which the FM industry needs to address are:

According to the Central Bank data, property development

contributed 5.33% - 6.37% of GDP at cost during the past

six years and represents on average TT$9.4 billion in

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Property 8,778.5 Development

9,343.9

9,778.1

9,918.8

9,354.3

8,942.3

Contribution to GDP Total GDP

5.46%

5.61%

6.37%

6.29%

5.97%

148,745.0

149,684.7

Year

5.33%

164,745.1 171,234.8

174,326.6 155,624.5

Fragmentation of the FM supply chain Skilled labour Cost containment

Although property development activity declined by 0.32% in 2017 compared with 2016, the outlook for this sector remains optimistic as the economy continues on the path to recovery.

Evolving customer demands in terms of flexibility, performance, and risk management

Among the key projects currently under development are: • Two new multistorey car park facilities in downtown Port of Spain which are expected to significantly alleviate the current shortage of parking in the city. The developers stand to benefit from the tax credit being offered by the Government up to 2022 for building car parks • A new shopping centre in the Trincity area.

Sustainability and energy management

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

The moratorium on the collection of property tax expired on 31 December 2015, and is expected to be extended to 31 December 2017. The Government proposes to implement the new property tax regime in 2018, with collections scheduled for 30 September 2018. A 10% penalty will be incurred by property owners for taxes not paid by 15 April of the following year. The tax will be charged on the Annual Rental Value of the property as assessed by the Valuations Division of the Ministry of Finance. The rate of tax payable will depend upon the classification of the property.

Tax Rate as a % of the Annual Rental Value

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SECTOR

Taken as a whole, the Real Estate, Property Development, Property Management, and Facilities Management sectors remain an attractive space for investors, particularly with the expected turnaround in the economy.

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135

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT


136


137

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT


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1 ON 1 REALTY

1 On 1 Realty is one of Trinidad and Tobago‘s leading and respected real estate companies under the strategic management of Wendy Abraham. Formed nine years ago, 1 On 1 Realty consists of a team of dedicated professionals who concentrate on excellence in customer service while adding value at all times. Our core skills include commercial and residential sales and rentals throughout the West and Port of Spain, but on a wider scale we capture the entire market of Trinidad and Tobago through our networking associates. Our client-focused approach and desire is to serve people who come to us to the very best of our ability. We offer our services seven days a week at any time convenient to the client.

Our on-site Rug/Carpet Laundry is the only one which exists in T&T.

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

67 Nina Drive, Columbus Circle, Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2721 Mobile: (868) 497-4863 Email: wendy@1on1realtors.com Website: www.trinidadrealtors.com

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WHAT WERE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT RECENT DEVELOPMENTS FOR THE MARITIME SECTOR?

TRAVEL, PORTS, SHIPPING AND COURIER SERVICES By the Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago, E. Joanne Edwards

Over the course of 2017 into 2018, there have been both negative and positive developments in the maritime sector, the most significant of which were:

• Sea bridge between Trinidad and Tobago. The sea bridge has been an abysmal failure in its current form, and the model for it desperately needs to change. It continues to be a resource draining and highly inefficient transport model that need not remain so. The Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT) calls for an urgent convening of a commission to explore and implement, in whole or in part, the recommendations put forward by experts within the fraternity. • The resumption of Ship to Ship Transfers, aka, Transshipment. Trinidad and Tobago has a major competitive/location advantage for these activities - the sheltered and calm waters of the Gulf of Paria, and a cadre of shipping agents well experienced in the coordination of these operations. The sudden cessation of the authorisation to conduct these activities in 2017 occurred at a time when demand was quite high and caused serious disruption in the supply chain for this service. Trinidad and Tobago lost out on a golden opportunity to earn millions of dollars in foreign exchange during the affected period. STS transfer is a lucrative niche in the maritime industry, with significant opportunity for growth and it is highly dependent on appropriate facilitating regulation.

• The recovery of LNG production in Trinidad is also quite significant. Specific to the maritime industry, this means a corresponding increase in demand for ship agency services, as well as ancillary services such as Pilotage.

• Implementation of two container scanners at the Port of Point Lisas. In April of 2018, the Customs & Excise Division, whose line Ministry is the Ministry of Finance, formally launched these scanners at Point Lisas. two of four donated to Trinidad and Tobago by the Government of the United States. This technology will aid in combating the importation of contraband including narcotics, firearms and ammunition. They are designed to detect weapons, hazardous materials and other illegal activities such as human trafficking.

Outlook for the maritime sector in T&T for 2018-2019 Provided the economy picks up, moreso in the context of increased foreign exchange earnings from a significant increase in activity in the energy sector, only then can we expect a corresponding increase in imports and exports which directly affects the industry and drives the demand for shipping services.

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Key challenges and how they can be addressed

We also expect the Revenue Authority, the umbrella entity under which Customs is to be absorbed, to be implemented. This is expected to have a significant impact on needed customs reform.

The main challenges facing the local maritime industry continue to be the absence of strong maritime policy and strategy; poor facilitating regulation and legislation - including debilitating Customs Administration. Lack of investment in port infrastructure is also a major weakness which is likely to become more pressing as larger vessels continue to be deployed.

For investors, the economic climate of the maritime industry, and doing business in T&T Again, the absence of policy and strategy to complement the growth potential is proving a major inhibiting factor. Investors want something they can rely on that demonstrates the Government’s commitment to the identified segments of the market, and what incentives (including facilitating regulation and legislation) will be in place to support said growth potential. This is particularly necessary in the case for Bunkering, Ship Repair, and the Inbound-Outbound Port and Logistics Hub.

Major developments are expected in 2018-2019 We expect a major decision to be made regarding the location of an inbound/outbound port and logistics hub. This project, if proceeded with, is expected to facilitate the capture of increased transshipment traffic; improve port performance for transshipment and domestic goods; improve land utilisation and increase competitiveness.

PORT OF ARRIVAL

NUMBER OF ARRIVALS

POINT LISAS PORT OF SPAIN CHAGUARAMAS POINTEAPIERRE CLAXTON BAY POINT FORTIN SCARBOROUGH/TOBAGO LA BREA BRIGHTON GUAYAGUAYARE POINT GALEOTA CHARLOTTEVILLE/TOBAGO TOTAL

100 86 65 33 19 11 3 2 1 1 1 322

%

GROSS TONNAGE HANDLED

%

NUMBER OF ARRIVING CREW

31.06% 26.71% 20.19% 10.25% 5.90% 3.42% 0.93% 0.62% 0.31% 0.31% 0.31% 100%

2,001,543 1,163,096 417,727 498,911 35,873 1,066,716 248,211 29,540 3,198 38,833 32,477 5,536,125

36.15% 21.01% 7.55% 9.01% 0.65% 19.27% 4.48% 0.53% 0.06% 0.70% 0.59% 100%

1,880 1,305 707 563 178 323 2,501 20 10 25 364 7,876

NUMBER OF ARRIVING PASSENGERS

% 23.87% 16.57% 8.98% 7.15% 2.26% 4.10% 31.75% 0.25% 0.13% 0.32% 4.62% 100%

 122 71    6,611    435 7,239

%

SOURCE: TTBIZLINK

0% 1.69% 0.98% 0% 0% 0% 91.32% 0% 0% 0% 6.01% 100%

Table 1 shows that Point Lisas accounted for 31% of arrivals and 36% of total tonnage handled. Port of Spain was slightly lower at 26.71% of arrivals. Almost 91% of arriving passengers was recorded in Scarborough, Tobago.

TABLE 2: DECLARED ARRIVALS BY CATEGORY OF VESSEL (AS OF APRIL 2018) PORT OF ARRIVAL

NUMBER OF ARRIVALS

%

GROSS TONNAGE HANDLED

%

CARGO  BULK CARRIER CONTAINERISED TANKER CHEMICAL FISHING TANKER LPG TANKER LNG CARGO  CAR CARRIER PASSENGER/CARGO VESSEL PASSENGER TUGS BARGE SUPPLY VESSEL COASTER OIL RIG RESEARCH TOTAL

86 72 49 48 16 15 13 5 5 4 3 2 2 1 1 322

26.71% 22.36% 15.22% 14.91% 4.97% 4.66% 4.04% 1.55% 1.55% 1.24% 0.93% 0.62% 0.62% 0.31% 0.31% 100%

1,443,027 995,360 794,909 6,433 164,487 1,388,632 370,485 4,489 287,440 1,099 7,704 1,971 346 65,790 3,953 5,536,125

26.07% 17.98% 14.36% 0.12% 2.97% 25.08% 6.69% 0.08% 5.19% 0.02% 0.14% 0.04% 0.01% 1.19% 0.07% 100%

NUMBER OF ARRIVING CREW 1,221 1,294 918 400 289 421 202 46 2,966 32 3 18 17 21 28 7876

%

NUMBER OF ARRIVING PASSENGERS

15.50% 16.43% 11.66% 5.08% 3.67% 5.35% 2.56% 0.58% 37.66% 0.41% 0.04% 0.23% 0.22% 0.27% 0.36% 100%

        7,168     71  7,239

% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 99.02% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0.98% 0% 100%

SOURCE: TTBIZLINK As shown in Table 2, 27% of arrivals was from Cargo Bulk Carriers which accounted for the largest gross tonnage of 1.44 million GT.

TABLE 3: DECLARED VESSEL ARRIVALS BY PURPOSE (AS OF APRIL 2018) PORT OF ARRIVAL

NUMBER OF ARRIVALS

%

GROSS TONNAGE HANDLED

%

LOADING/DISCHARGE FISHING BUNKERING EMBARKING OR DISEMBARKING PASSENGERS PROVISION, STORES AND/OR SPARES CREW CHANGE REPAIRS AND/OR SURVEY ANCHORAGE DROGHERS DIVING OPERATION MEDICAL ASSISTANCE TOTAL

247 46 6 5 4 4 4 2 2 1 1 322

76.71% 14.29% 1.86% 1.55% 1.24% 1.24% 1.24% 0.62% 0.62% 0.31% 0.31% 100%

4,638,223 6,182 115,093 287,440 186,063 100,480 48,967 105,266 5,502 42,747 162 5,536,125

83.78% 0.11% 2.08% 5.19% 3.36% 1.81% 0.88% 1.90% 0.10% 0.77% 0.00% 100%

TRAVEL, PORTS, SHIPPING AND COURIER SERVICES

TABLE 1: DECLARED VESSEL ARRIVALS BY PORT (AS OF APRIL 2018)

SOURCE: TTBIZLINK The primary purpose of arrivals was to load and discharge cargo. This accounted for 77% of arrivals as shown in Table 3.

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145

TRAVEL, PORTS, SHIPPING AND COURIER SERVICES


Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited 107 Ninth Street, Barataria, Trinidad & Tobago, W.I. Tel: (868) 222-7595 Fax: (868) 222-7596 Email: info@acclaimfreight.com Website: www.acclaimfreight.com

Derek Telfer

Managing Director

Kyle Telfer

Director Operations

Acclaim Freight and Logistics is a full service shipping operation which caters to all modes of international and domestic transportation. With a streamlined, efficient team of over 80 years combined experience in the industry, Acclaim prides itself with being unencumbered by big business bureaucracy and its ability to exercise flexibility to meet the needs of a wide range of modern consumer demands. For both Import and Export with N.V.O.C.C. operations and Customs Clearance, we provide in-house worldwide transportation of cargo by Sea and Air Freight. We also specialize in value added logistics and door-to-door services to ensure that we maintain control of your product at all times. Acclaim Freight and Logistics Services Limited caters to the needs of both corporate and private clients and is the most suitable option for the smart customer who just wants the job done. Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Ltd. “Our Service, Your Acclaim.�

SHIPPING SOLUTIONS & SERVICES LIMITED Unit #22, One Woodbrook Place Damian Street, Woodbrook, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 627-3627 / 623-6386 Fax: (868) 623-4475 Email: ashton@sssltt.com Website: www.sssltt.com

Ashton Le Blanc Managing Director

Judy Le Blanc

Director of Business Development

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Shipping Solutions and Services Ltd (SSSL), has over 30 years experience in the Marine and Logistics Industry. Our knowledge and expertise is evident in our high success rate and positive customer feedback. We are your reliable import and export logistics partner in FCL, LCL, Air and Ocean Globally. Additionally, as Vessel and Port Agents, in the Energy Oil and Gas Industry SSSL manages all aspects of a Port Call, from Government Authorities and Port Management to Vendor Services and invoicing. SSSL engages with quality and reliable Vendors who meets the Industry Service and Safety Standards. SSSL is continuously building long term client business relationships by solving near impossible challenges and delivering on promises made! Knowledge, Expertise, Experience, Innovation, Customer Satisfaction and Ingenuity are key to our success.


Informational Lists & Indices

148

Honorary Consuls Accredited to The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

149

Diplomatic Missions and International Organisations

150

The Government of Trinidad and Tobago

151

Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago

152

Index by Surname

156

Index by Company

159


Honorary Consuls Accredited to The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA Mr. Karl Pilstl  Honorary Consul Blue Haven, Bacolet Bay P.O. Box 8, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 660-7500 Fax: (868) 660-7900 Email: kpilstl@yahoo.com THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Dr. E. Monica Davis  Honorary Consul c/o The University of the West Indies Faculty of Medical Sciences Complex Building 35, Room 101 Uriah Butler Highway Champs Fleurs, Trinidad Tel: (868) 663-8986 Fax: (868) 645-1642/637-9422 Email: thebahamasconsulatett@gmail.com PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF BANGLADESH Mr. Razai Azard Rahaman Honorary Consul-General 1 Shafik Drive, Cross Crossing San Fernando, Trinidad Tel: (868) 652-2637/657-8425 Fax: (868) 652-7108 Email: azard_rahaman@rahamutgroup.com imtiaz_rahaman@rahamutgroup.com KINGDOM OF BELGIUM Mr. Paul Jay Williams  Honorary Consul #2, Sixth Avenue Barataria, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-1677 Fax: (868) 675-9831 Email: honoraryconsulbelgium@gmail.com BELIZE Mr. Thomas Chanona  Honorary Consul Corner Warren and Smart Streets St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-4062/645-4063 Fax: (868) 645-4064 Email: admin@kee-chanona.com BOTSWANA Mr. Robin Debideen  Honorary Consul 74 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-7770/627-2888 Fax : 627-3338 Mobile: (868) 625-4875 Email: boss@ultracoolgroup.com KINGDOM OF DENMARK Mr. Ravi R. Dolsingh, LLB, PG, Dip, LPC Honorary Consul, General Mansfield House 1st Floor, No. 24 Abercromby Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 780-3772 Email: ravi.dolsingh@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF FINLAND Mr. Troy Garcia  Honorary Consul #153 Eastern Main Road Barataria Tel: (868) 680-7278 Fax: (868) 674-2644 Email: tgarcia6@hotmail.com

GRENADA Dr. Patrick Antoine Honorary Consul Tel: (868) 625-9235 Fax: (868) 624-1257 Email: grenadaconsulate@gmail.com

NEW ZEALAND Mr. Donald Kelshall 31 Alberto Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-3829 Fax: (868) 624-6521 Email: dkelshall@savannahcomputing.com

CO-OPERATIVE OF REPUBLIC OF GUYANA Mr. Bishwaishwar Ramsaroop-Maraj   Honorary Consul 12 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 622-2913 Email: ernieross1@msn.com g_consulate@yahoo.com

KINGDOM OF NORWAY Mr. Staurt Jardine K.F.O  Honorary Consul 101 St. Anthony’s Drive, Westmoorings P.O. Box 13, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-7687 Fax: (868) 637-6203 Email: norkonpos@gmail.com

REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA Mr. Ian Anthony  Honorary Consul Building 5, Christina Courts 33-35 Boissiere No. 1 Maraval, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 628-4818 Email: iananthony@renavatio.net

ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF PAKISTAN Mr. Amjad Ali  Honorary Consul General 10 Morne Coco Road Westmoorings North, Trinidad Tel: (868) 640-7971 Fax: (868) 640-6594 Email: amjad@adfoam.com

STATE OF ISRAEL Mrs. Barbara Malins-Smith 18 La Seiva Terrace Maraval, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-7093 Email: malinssmith@yahoo.com

REPUBLIC OF PERU Mr. Patrick A. Ferreira  Honorary Consul Furness Court, 1 Richmond Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-4959 Fax: (868) 623-9576 Email: patrickaidenferreira@gmail.com

THE SWISS CONFEDERATION Mrs. Michele Khan  Honorary Consul General 70 Dundonald Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-7816 Fax: (868) 624-8544 Email: portspain@honrep.ch

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Dr. Marie Magno Advani  Honorary Consul, a.h. B41 Ridgewood Towers, Four Roads, Diego Martin, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2988 Fax: (868) 633-6946 Email: philhoncongentt@gmail.com

SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC Mr. Marwan Yousef  Honorary Consul 15 Queen Street, Arima, Trinidad Tel: (868) 667-3927 Fax: (868) 667-7019 Email: syrianconsolatect@gmail.com

ITALIAN REPUBLIC Ms. Shira Serena Mohammed  Honorary Consul 8 Hillcote, Scott Street St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 662-0861 Fax: (868) 645-0960 Email: italconstt@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF LATVIA Mr. Kirby Anthony Hosang Honorary Consul 112 Saddle Road, Maraval, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-3234 Fax: (868) 638-2083 Email: hosanganthony@gmail.com LEBANESE REPUBLIC Mr. Amer G. Haidar  Honorary Consul (Dean) 22 Sweet Briar Road St. Clair, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-0209 Email: aghaidar3@gmail.com MALTA Mr. John Hadad  Honorary Consul JRJ Warehousing Compound LP #56 Bhagoutie Trace San Juan, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-7628 Ext. 1221 Email: johnh@hadcoltd.com MAURITIUS Dr. V. R Mooneeram  Honorary Consul 12 Wahid Circular Drive Sumadh Gardens San Fernando, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 657-6440 Email: vinomooneeram@hotmail.com MOROCCO Mr. Mario Sabga-Aboud Honorary Consul 80 Lower Boundary Road San Juan, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-2697 Fax: (868) 638-4711 Cell: (868) 680-3597 Email: Mario@pizzaboys.com

REPUBLIC OF POLAND Mr. David Lewis  Honorary Consul Lot 25 Frederick Settlement Industrial Estate Caroni, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-5522 Fax: (868) 663-0897 Email: davidl@labelhouse.com REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL Mr. Ignatius S. Ferreira  Vice Consul 11-13 Milling Avenue, Sea Lots P.O. Box 283, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-1745/625-1131 Fax: (868) 625-1243 Email: furness@furnessgroup.com SLOVAK REPUBLIC (SLOVAKIA) Mr. Lawrence S. Naipaul  Honorary Consul Port Authority of Trinidad and Tobago Administration Building, 1st Floor Dock Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-6273 Mobile: (868) 680-4863 Email: isnaipaul@msn.com SLOVENIA Mr. Om Prakash Lalla  Honorary Consul c/o K R Lalla & Co. 41 Edward Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-5074 Fax: (868) 625-6110 Email: omlalla@krlalla.com

DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF SRI LANKA Mr. Krishna Seegobin  Honorary Consul Corner Hugh & Algernon Street Montrose, Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 665-1237 Fax: (868) 665-1237 Email: kseegobinco@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF SURINAME Mr. Jerome Khan Honorary Consul 24 Fitzgerald Lane P.O. Box 437, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-4747/627-0102 Fax: (868) 627-1936 Email: jeromekhan.slm@gmail.com KINGDOM OF SWEDEN Mr. David O’ Brien Honorary Consul c/o Massy Motors, Lady Young Road, Morvant, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-4200 Ext. 1100 Fax: (868) 674-7761 / 675-6523 Email: david.obrien@massygroup.com

KINGDOM OF THAILAND Mrs. Joan Wilson  Honorary Consul 148 Belmont Circular Road, Belmont, Trinidad Tel: (868) 621-1574 Email: thaiconsulatett@gmail.com REPUBLIC OF TURKEY Mr. Michael Llanos  Honorary Consul 19 Western Main Road St. James, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-3222/324-4989 Fax: (868) 622-6661 Email: mike@llanosgroup.com REPUBLIC OF UGANDA Dr. Dinesh Mor Honorary Consul 133 Columbus Circle Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2215 Fax: (868) 680-6995 Email: ganeshjl@mail.tt ORIENTAL REPUBLIC OF URUGUAY Mr. Anthony Edwards  Honorary Consul D14 Ridgewood Towers Four Roads, Diego Martin Tel: (868) 623-7713 Fax: (868) 625-9538 Email: anthony@flowtrinidad.net

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Diplomatic Missions and International Organisations EMBASSIES Apostolic Nunciature His Excellency Archbishop Apostolic Fortunatus Nwachukwu Titular Archbishop of Acquaviva Apostolic Nuncio 11 Mary Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-5009/622-6359 Fax: (868) 222-9814 Email: apnuntt@googlemail.com Embassy of the Argentine Republic Her Excellency Ambassador Ana Celia Pisano 4th Floor, Tatil Building 11 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-7557/628-7587 Fax: (868) 628-7544 Email: etrin@mrecic.gov.ar High Commission for the Commonwealth of Australia His Excellency – High Commissioner John Pilbeam 18 Herbert Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 822-5450 Fax: (868) 622-5490 Email: australianhighcommission.pos@ gmail.com Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil His Excellency Ambassador Jose`Antonio Gomes Paris 18 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-5779/622-5771 Fax: (868) 622-4323 Email: amboffice.portspain@ itamaraty.gov.br High Commission of Canada Her Excellency - High Commissioner Carla Hogan-Rufelds 3–3A Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-6232 Fax: (868) 628-2581 Email: pspan@international.gc.ca Website: www.canadainternational.gc.ca/ Embassy of the Republic of Chile Chargé d’Affaires Pablo Solar 4 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 628-0540/628-4763 Fax: (868) 622-9894 Email: echilett@minrel.gob.cl Embassy of the People’s Republic of China His Excellency Ambassador Song Yumin 76 Long Circular Road, Maraval Tel: (868) 622-1832/628-6417 Fax: (868) 622-7613 Email: chinaemb_tt@mfa.gov.cn Embassy of the Republic of Colombia His Excellency Ambassador Alfonso David Múnera Cavadia 4th Floor, Newtown Centre 30-36 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-5656/222-2275 Email: eptoespana@cancilleria.gov.co Embassy of the Republic of Costa Rica Her Excellency Ambassador Liliana Edgerton Picado 2nd Floor, 63 Tragarete Road, Woodbrook Tel: (868) 628-9601/628-8775 Fax: (868) 628-9203 Email: embcr-tt@rree.go.cr

150

Embassy of the Republic of Cuba His Excellency Ambassador Guillermo Vázquez Moreno 74 Elm Street, Bayshore, Westmoorings Tel: (868) 633-3268/632-8691 Fax: (868) 621-3573 Email: embajada@tt.embacuba.cu secretaria@tt.embacuba.cu

High Commission for the Republic of India His Excellency High Commissioner Bishwadip Dey 6 Victoria Avenue, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 225-4340 Fax: (868) 225-4248 Email: cons.pospain@mea.gov.in

High Commission for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland His Excellency High Commissioner Tim Stew 19 St Clair Avenue, St. Clair Tel: (868) 350-0444 Fax: (868) 622-4555 Email: generalenquiries.ptofs@fco.gov.uk

Embassy of the Dominican Republic His Excellency Ambassador José A. Serulle Ramia 10B Queen’s Park West, Suite 101 Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-7930/627-2605 Fax: (868) 623-7779 Email: embadom@hotmail.com

High Commission for Jamaica His Excellency High Commissioner David Prendergast 2 Newbold Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-4995 Fax: (868) 622-9043 Email: jamaica@jhcpos.org

Embassy of the United Mexican States Her Excellency Rosario Molinero 12 Hayes Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-1422 Fax: (868) 628-8488 Email: info@mexico.tt

Embassy of the Republic of El Salvador His Excellency Ambassador Raymundo Ernesto Rodríguez Díaz 29 Long Circular Road, St. James Email: embajadaelsalvador.tt@gmail.com Delegation of the European Union to Trinidad and Tobago His Excellency Ambassador Arend Biesebroek Level 2, Sagicor Financial Centre, 16 Queen’s Park West, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-6628/622-0591 Fax: (868) 622-6355 Email: delegation-trinidad-and-tobago-hod@eeas.europa.eu Website: www.deltto.ec.europa.eu Embassy of the French Republic His Excellency Ambassador Serge Lavroff 7 Mary Street, St. Clair Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-1931 Fax: (868) 628-2632 Email: info@ambafrance-tt.org Website: http://www.ambafrance-tt.org/ Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany His Excellency Ambassador Holger Wilfried Michael 19 St. Clair Avenue, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-1630/628-1633 Fax: (868) 628-5278 Email: info@ports.diplo.de Website: www.port-of-spain.diplo.de/ Grenada Trade and Economic Commissioner Grenada Consular and Trade Office Dr. Patrick Antoine Grenada House, #127 Henry Street, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-9235 Fax: (868) 624-1257 Email: grenadaconsular@gmail.com Embassy of the Republic of Guatemala His Excellency Ambassador Mario Estuardo Torres Townson Apt. 701, Regents Tower, Westmoorings By The Sea, Westmoorings Tel: (868) 632-7629 Fax: (868) 632-7629 Email: embtrintobago@minex.gob.gt High Commission for the Cooperative Republic of Guyana His Excellency High Commissioner Bishwaishwar Ramsaroop 12 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-2616/622-2913 Fax: (868) 622-5158 Email: ghctt@mission.gov.gy

Embassy of Japan His Excellency Ambassador Mitsuhiko Okada 5 Hayes Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 628-5991/628-5993 Fax: (868) 622-0858 Email: embassyofjapan@po.mofa.go.jp Website: http://www.tt.emb-japan.go.jp/ Embassy of the Republic of Korea His Excellency Ambassador Sung Moon-up 36 Elizabeth Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-9081/622-1069 Fax: (868) 627-6317 Email: trinidad@mosa.go.kr Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands His Excellency Ambassador Gilles Jerrit Bijl Trinre Building, 69–71 Edward Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-1210/625-1722/ 625-2532 Fax: (868) 625-1704 Email: por@minbuza.nl High Commission for the Federal Republic of Nigeria His Excellency High Commissioner Jika Ardo Hassan 3 Maxwell-Phillip Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-4002/622-6834 Fax: (868) 622-7162 Email: mfa.nigtt@gmail.com Embassy of the Republic of Panama Chargé d’Affaires Mrs. Joyra Castillo Quintero 7 Ground Floor, Gray Street, St. Clair, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-9956/628-9957 Fax: (868) 622-8992 Email: embpanamatyt@mire.gob.pa Embassy of the Republic of Peru His Excellency Ambassador Luis Rodomiro Hernandez #4 Trinidad Crescent Federation Park, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 221-8642/221-2939 Email: missiontt@embassyofperutt.net

Embassy of the United States of America Chargé d’ Affaires a.i. John Mc Intyre 15 Queen’s Park West, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-6371/622-6376 Fax: (868) 822-5905 Email: POSExecutiveOffice@state.gov Website: http://trinidad.usembassy.gov/ The Embassy of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela Her Excellency Ambassador Coromoto Godoy Calderón 16 Victoria Avenue, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-9821/627-9823/627-9824 Fax: (868) 624-2508 Email: embve.ttpsp@mppre.gob.ve REGIONAL ORGANISATIONS Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) President The Right Honourable Sir, Charles Michael Dennis Byron 134 Henry Street, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-2225 Fax: (868) 624-4710 Email: info@ccj.org INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS Association of Caribbean States (ACS) Secretary-General Dr. June Soomer 5–7 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-9575/628-0936/ 628-6756/628-7222 Fax: (868) 622-1653 Email: mail@acs-aec.org International Labour Organisation (ILO) Director Claudia Coenjaerts Stanmore House, 6 Stanmore Avenue Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-7704/623-7178/623-3359/ 625-0524/627-6304/624-8751 Fax: (868) 627-8978 Email: ilocarib@ilo.org

High Commission for the Republic of South Africa Her Excellency High Commissioner Xoliswa Nomathamsanqa Ngwevela 4 Scott Street, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-9869/628-6997 Fax: (868) 622-7089 Email: sahctt.general@dirco.gov.za

Pan American Health Organisation Representative Dr. Bernadette Thedore Gandi 1st Floor, Sweet Briar Place 10-12 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Tel: (868) 622-4202/622-5445/ 622-5132/622-0731/622-4433 Fax: (868) 628-4719 Email: gandiber@trt.paho.org Website: www.paho.org/trt/

Embassy of the Kingdom of Spain His Excellency Ambassador Javier María Carbajosa Sànchez 7th Floor, Tatil Building 11 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-7938/628-2560/ 622-1151 Ext. 237 Fax: (868) 622-3032 Email: emb.puertoespana@maec.es

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Representative Richard Bleinitt UN House 3 Chancery Lane, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-7056 Fax: (868) 623-1658 Email: registry.tt@undp.org


The Government of Trinidad and Tobago The Office of the President Circular Road, St Ann’s, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-1261/2 Website: http://www.otp.tt/ Office of the Prime Minister 13-15 St. Clair Avenue St. Clair, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-1625 Website: http://www.opm.gov.tt/ Ministry of the Attorney General and Legal Affairs The Government Plaza, Cornor London & Richmond Streets Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-5505 PBX: (868) 223-2452/Ext. 3796 Fax: (868) 226-5145 Website: http://www.ag.gov.tt/ Ministry of Agriculture, Land and Fisheries Cornor Narsloo Ramaya Marg Road & Soogrim Trace Endeavour, Chaguanas Tel: (868) 220-MALF (6253) Email: fpps@gov.tt Website: http://agriculture.gov.tt Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts ALGICO Building Cornor Jerningham Avenue & Queen’s Park East Belmont, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-0119/ 625-3012 or 3112/Ext.3003 Fax: (868) 627-5954/623-2626 Email: ngdolly@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.community.gov.tt/ Ministry of Education Education Towers Level 15 No. 5 St. Vincent Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-8033/ 622-2181-5/Exts. 414-417 Fax: (868) 623-9155 Website: http://www.moe.edu.tt/ Ministry of Energy and Energy Industries Levels 26, Tower C, International Waterfront Centre, 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 225-4334 Ext. 2653 Email: nolivierre@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.energy.gov.tt/ Ministry of Finance Level 8, Eric Williams Finance Building Independence Square Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-5633 Fax: (868) 625-8354 Email: cpimbert@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.finance.gov.tt/

Ministry of Foreign and CARICOM Affairs Levels 10-14, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1A Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-6894 Fax: (868) 627-5853 Email: hostmaster@gov.tt Website: http://www.foreign.gov.tt/

Ministry of Rural Development and Local Government Kent House Long Circular Road Maraval, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-1669/1979/628-1323-5 Fax: (868) 622-7283 Website: http://www.localgov.gov.tt/

Ministry of Health “CHIC” Building 63 Park Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 627-213 Fax: (868) 623-2741 Website: http://www.health.gov.tt/

Ministry of Social Development and Family Services Tel: (868) 623-2608/Sec Ext.5607 Fax: (868) 625-6095 Email: cccockburn@ttparliament.org Website: http://www2.mpsd.gov.tt/

Ministry of Housing and Urban Development HDC Building, 44-46 South Quay, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-0595/623-4663/Ext.2171 (PBX) Fax: (868) 625-2793 Website: http://www.housing.gov.tt/ Ministry of Labour and Small Enterprise Development Level 5 & 6, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-8478 Fax: (868) 624-4091 Email: communicationsmolsmed@gov.tt Website: http://www.molsmed.gov.tt/

Ministry of Sport and Youth Affairs 2 Elizabeth Street St. Clair Tel: (868) 628-6792 Ext.4008, 4010 PBX: (868) 628-6067 Fax: (868) 623-5006 Email: scudjoe@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.sport.gov.tt/ Ministry of Tourism Levels 8 & 9, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: 624-1403/ Ext.223 Fax: 624-6737 Email: rmitchell@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.tourism.gov.tt/

Ministry of National Security Temple Court 31-33 Abercromby Street Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-1262 Fax: (868) 625-2820 Email: gjsmith@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt/

Ministry of Trade and Industry Levels 9, 11-17 Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-2931-4 Fax: (868) 623-7588 Email: mti-info@gov.tt Website: http://www.tradeind.gov.tt/

Ministry of Planning and Development Level 14, Eric Williams Financial Complex Independence Square, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 612-3000 Ext.2009,2010,1389 Fax: (868) 625-0363 Email: camillerregis@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.planning.gov.tt/

Ministry of Works and Transport Level 6, Main Administrative Building Corner Richmond and London Streets Port of Spain Tel: (868) 625-1225 Fax: (868) 625-8070 Website: http://www.mowt.gov.tt/general/ homepage.aspx

Ministry of Public Administration and Communications Level 7, National Library Building Corner Hart and Abercromby Streets Port of Spain Tel: (868) 623-9081/623-4724 Fax: (868) 624-4216 Email: maxiecuffie@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.mpa.gov.tt/

Office of the Parliament Levels G-8, Tower D International Waterfront Centre 1A Wrightson Road, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 624-7275 Fax: (868) 625-4672 Email: webmaster@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.ttparliament.org/

Ministry of Public Utilities One Alexandra Place #1 Alexander Street St. Clair, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 628-9500 Fax: (868) 628-6067 Website: http://www.mpu.gov.tt/home/

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Fast Facts OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

GEOGRAPHY AND LOCATION TRINIDAD Once attached to the South American mainland, Trinidad is situated at 12 km (7 miles) northeast of the coast of Venezuela and is separated from it by the Gulf of Paria. Trinidad has three mountain ranges — the Northern Range, the Central Range and the Southern Range. The highest point, El Cerro del Aripo, is 940 metres (3,084 ft) above sea level. About 40% of all land is undeveloped forest and woodlands, although the island is experiencing rapid development. Trinidad’s Pitch Lake is the largest natural reservoir of asphalt in the world. Total Area: 4,828 sq km (1,864 sq miles) 81.25 km long by 57-73 km wide (50 miles by 35-45 miles) Location: Latitude 10.5° N; Longitude 61.5° W TOBAGO Tobago lies 34km (21 miles) northeast of Trinidad. Of volcanic origin, the island is a single mountain mass, although the south-west is flat or undulating and coralline. The highest peak, the Main Ridge, reaches an elevation of about 576m (1,890 ft). The coastline is broken up by inlets and sheltered beaches, and there are several uninhabited islets. Total Area: 300 sq km (116 sq miles) Location: Latitude 11.5° N, Longitude 60.5° W

TIME ZONE Greenwich Mean Time: Minus four hours (GMT -4) In US Winter: Eastern Standard Time plus one hour (EST +1) In US Summer: Eastern Standard Time (EST) There is no Daylight Saving Time (DST).

CLIMATE Trinidad and Tobago has a tropical climate and two distinct seasons: dry, from January to May and wet, from June to December. There is a short dry period around mid-September called Petit Carême. Trinidad and Tobago are just outside the usual path of hurricanes and other tropical storms, but Tobago can experience inclement weather as a result of such weather systems.

TRINIDAD

Capital: Port of Spain Main Towns: City of San Fernando, Arima, Point Fortin, Chaguanas (Trinidad)

TOBAGO

Capital: Scarborough (Tobago)

NATIONALITY

Trinidad: Trinidadian Tobago: Tobagonian

Daytime Average

Nighttime Average

Seasons

30.2°C (Trinidad June 2018)

22.3°C (Trinidad June 2018)

33.8°C (Tobago June 2018)

25°C (Tobago June 2018)

Dry (Jan-May) Wet (June-Dec)

CULTURE The festivals, music, customs, cuisine, religions and races of Trinidad and Tobago reflect a rich and unique cultural diversity. The nation has a passionate and colourful history spanning five centuries. Festivals and religious and cultural observances include Divali (the Hindu Festival of Light), Eid-ul-Fitr (Muslim religious day), Emancipation Day, Indian Arrival Day and Corpus Christi (Catholic). Trinidad and Tobago Carnival is a world-famous event that brings together artists, musicians, masqueraders and revellers for a month-long celebration that culminates in a two-day parade. http://www.culture.gov.tt/

PEOPLE AND SOCIETY Ethnic Groups (2011 census)

OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: English

POPULATION:

1,353,895 (2016 figures)

ELECTRICITY:

110 volts/220 volts (+/-6%); 60 Hz

TELEPHONE:

1 (868) + seven-digit local

152

35.4%

34.2%

15.1%

EAST INDIAN

AFRICAN

MIXED

Life Expectancy Male: 71.41 (2011 census) Life Expectancy Female: 77.81 (2011 census) Population Growth Rate: 0.3 (2016) Birth Rate: 12.8 / 1000 (2016) Total Median Age: 32.6 (2011 census)

7.7%

1.4%

DOUGLA

OTHER

(mixed African and Indian)


BANKING

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

The financial system consists of Commercial Banks, Trust and Mortgage Finance Companies, Finance Houses and Merchant Banks

Provisional data from the Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago indicates that the Telecommunications and Broadcasting sector generated an estimated TT$5.14 billion (US$758.1 million) in 2017, which as a percentage of GDP equates to 3.4%. This represented a 7.8% decrease in total revenues generated by this industry compared to the previous year. Total Telecom revenues decreased by 8.2% while total broadcasting revenues decreased by 6.1%.

Number of Commercial Banks: 8 Number of Branches: 122 Number of Automatic Banking Machines: 458 BANK HOURS OF OPERATION City Centres: Monday to Thursday – 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. RBC and Scotiabank (not mall branches) 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 RBC Branches open on Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Shopping Centres (Daily): 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exchange Rate: TTD 6.76: USD 1 ( August 2018) GDP 2016 TTD Million Constant (2000) = 91,939.2 GDP Per Capita 2016 = USD 13,681.4 Labour Force 2016 = 640,600 Unemployment Rate 2016 = 4.0% Inflation Rate 2016 = 3.1% Major Exports: Natural gas and oil, ammonia, alcohol, fertilizers, iron and steel Major Trading Partners: US, CARICOM, Spain, Mexico, France, UK, China, Venezuela, Japan, Nigeria, The Netherlands, Dominican Republic

Source: Summary Economic Indicators, Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago, Central Statistical Office, Trinidad and Tobago, Global Finance, www.tradingeconomics.com.

ECONOMIC DATA Contractions in crude oil, natural gas, LNG and petrochemical production in 2017 were on account of the declining economic activity that dominated the energy sector in the second half of 2016. According to the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago, growth in the first five months of 2018 has been concentrated in the energy sector. However, this is expected to spill over into non-energy activities, and there are already encouraging signs in distribution and a recovery of business credit, although construction remains sluggish. Provisional data from the Central Statistical Office indicated that total exports as at December 2017 were TT$62,054 million and total imports for the period stood at TT$46,843 million. GDP current prices were TT$149,684.7 million while GDP per capita was US$16,340.1. The inflation rate as at March 2018 stood at 0.8%. Meanwhile, headline inflation continues to be low, measuring 1.1% (year-on-year) in April 2018, up from 0.8%in the previous month.

TSTT has, for many years, been the major provider of landline and mobile telephone services. Digicel offers mobile and cable television to both islands and has also introduced fixed line and domestic wireless services. Flow offers cable television, internet and landline telephone services. With broad coverage throughout the islands, mobile phones are an easy and available option. Wireless Internet services are readily available at hotels and cybercafés. International Access Code: 1 Country Code: 868 1. Fixed Internet Subscriptions 318,800 2. Mobile Internet Subscriptions 704,600 http://tatt.org.tt/

MEDIA

Daily Newspapers: Trinidad Express, Trinidad Guardian and Newsday. Monday – Friday: Newsday Tobago Bi-weekly Newspapers: TNT Mirror Weekly Newspapers: Tobago News, Catholic News, Bomb, Punch, Trinidad and Tobago Sunshine, Tobago Today.

Television Stations: CNC (Channel 3), CCN TV6 (Channels 5 and 18), Gayelle Television (Channel 7), IBN (Channel 8), CTV (Channel 6), NCC (Channel 4), IETV (Channel 1 and 16), Parliament (Channel 11), Tobago Channel 5 (Tobago only), Synergy (Channel 15).

GOVERNMENT Trinidad and Tobago’s government is a parliamentary democracy. The head of state is the President, who is elected by an Electoral College of members of the Senate and House of Representatives for a five-year term. Executive power, however, is vested in the Prime Minister and Government, following elections every five years. The local government body in Tobago is the Tobago House of Assembly and its seat is in the capital city, Scarborough. General elections take place every five years Parliament: Westminster system Tobago: Tobago House of Assembly Local Government Body Head of State: Non-Executive President http://www.ttconnect.gov.tt/gortt/portal/ ttconnect https://www.otp.tt http://www.opm.gov.tt/ http://www.tha.gov.tt/

LEGAL SYSTEM The legal system is based on common law and statutes. The judicial system comprises magistrates’ courts and the Supreme Court, which is made up of the High Court and the Court of Appeal. There is a separate Industrial Court that deals with most labour matters. The Judicial and Legal Service Commission appoints judges of the Supreme Court. The Attorney General is responsible for the administration of the legal and judicial system. Final appeal from Trinidad and Tobago courts is to the Privy Council in England, but consideration is being given to replacing the Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice, which was inaugurated in April 2005 and headquartered in Port of Spain. http://www.ag.gov.tt/ http://www.legalaffairs.gov.tt/ http://www.moj.gov.tt/

FM Radio Stations: TBC Network (95.1, Vibe CT 105, Sangeet 106.1, Aakash Vani 106.5, Slam 100.5, Sky 99.5) CL Network (90.5, 104.1, 97.1) Caribbean New Media Group (Talk City 91.1, Next 99.1, Sweet 100.1) T&T Radio Network (Star 94.7, 96.1, 107.7) Gem Radio 5 Limited (Red 96.7, i95.5, the Word 107.1, Hott 93.5, Taj 92.3) Power 102, Boom Champions 94.1, Isaac 98.1, Street 91.9, Radio Jaagriti 102.7, Wack 90.1, Love 91.5 (Tobago), Radio Toco 106.7, 103.1, Radio Tambrin 92.7 (Tobago), 104.7, and Heritage 101.7.

Top News and Media Websites TrinidadExpress.com Guardian.co.tt Newsday.co.tt TrinidadandTobagoNews.com Power102fm.com TriniView.com Cnc3.co.tt

153


Fast Facts OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

HEALTH Trinidad and Tobago’s health system consists of government-funded and private hospitals, well-qualified specialists, private medical practitioners and clinics scattered throughout the islands. Specialists trained in gynaecology, paediatrics, radiology, physiotherapy, cardiology, gastrology, urology and orthopaedics work both in private practice and healthcare facilities. Medical services are free at the governmentfunded institutions and clinics, but a fee is charged at all others. Twenty-four-hour emergency services are available at several government and private medical facilities. There is also a 24-hour Emergency Air Ambulance Service. http://www.health.gov.tt/

EDUCATION The educational system is based on the British model and produces one of the highest standards of education in the Caribbean. Primary and secondary level education at most institutions are free, but private school options are available for a fee. Post-secondary and tertiary education providers include The University of the West Indies (The UWI), the College of Science, Technology & Applied Arts of Trinidad & Tobago (COSTAATT), distance learning tertiary-level institutions, vocational/ technical training schools and colleges, the technology-based University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT), and the National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST).

ECO-TOURISM Trinidad and Tobago, although relatively distinct ecologically, are both blessed with rich natural environments well suited for ecotourism. Once part of the South American mainland, Trinidad’s flora and fauna have comingled, leading to a great density of plant and animal types in a relatively small location. Trinidad and Tobago has more than 97 mammal species, 400 bird species, 90 reptile species, 30 amphibian species, 600 butterfly species and over 2,100 species of flowering plants. The island’s nature reserves attract major international traffic from naturalists and nature watchers. The terrain is just as diverse, with tropical rainforests, mangrove swamps, mountainous terrain and savannahs.

154

MEETING PLACES AND CONFERENCE CENTRES Trinidad and Tobago is one of the top five Caribbean meeting and conference destinations. Many hotels have facilities for conferences, including international brands such as the Hyatt Regency Trinidad and the Hilton Trinidad and Conference Centre. In addition, the state-of-the-art National Academy for the Performing Arts (NAPA), South Academy for the Performing Arts, award-winning spots like Coco Reef and the Magdalena Grand Beach Resort in Tobago are ideal for corporate meetings and teambuilding retreats. Trinidad and Tobago hosted 29,449 business travellers during the first half of 2017.

PUBLIC UTILITIES ELECTRICITY Trinidad and Tobago has a reliable supply of electricity with rates still among the lowest in the Caribbean. The domestic and commercial supply voltage is 110/220 volts, 60 cycles. The Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) is the agency responsible for the country’s electrical supply. http://www.ttec.co.tt/ WATER The Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (WASA), a state enterprise, is the sole provider of water and wastewater services in Trinidad and Tobago. http://www.wasa.gov.tt/

POST/COURIER SERVICES Regular mail, express mail and courier delivery are reliable and available from local provider TTPost at excellent rates. International courier services are efficient and readily available. http://www.ttpost.net/

EMERGENCY CONTACTS Police/Rapid Response............................................ 999 Fire..................................................................................990 Ambulance..................................................................... 811 Global Medical Response............................ 653-4343 Coast Guard.................................................... 634-4440 Port of Spain General Hospital ....................623-2951 San Fernando General Hospital...................652-3581

Birdwatching is a major attraction in Tobago as well, with Little Tobago island recognised as one of the Caribbean’s top seabird sanctuaries. Tobago is also a hub of aquatic tourism. The waters off the island are a haven for wildlife, an attraction for both divers and boat tourists. Buccoo Reef (a large coral reef and protected marine park) is a popular destination. Tobago’s Main Ridge Forest is known to be the oldest protected rainforest.

Scarborough General Hospital .... 660-4SGH (4744)

http://www.tourism.gov.tt/ www.insandoutstt.com

Directory Services (Tobago)......................................211

Roxborough Health Centre and Hyperbaric Facility, Tobago ........................660-4392 The Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management (ODPM).............. 800-ODPM (6376) - Trinidad............640-1285/8905/8653/6493 - Tobago.................................................... 660-7489 Crime Stoppers................................. 800-TIPS (8477) Directory Services (Trinidad).................................6411


TRANSPORTATION

MAJOR AIRLINES

Airports

Piarco Airport

Piarco International Airport is located about 45 minutes from the capital city, Port of Spain. It plays an important role as a vital hub for international air traffic in the Caribbean. There are non-stop daily scheduled flights to and from major international cities.

American Airlines.........1 (868) 821-6000

Trinidad and Tobago’s national airline, Caribbean Airlines, serves Toronto, New York, Miami, Jamaica, Saint Maarten, Antigua, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana and Suriname. International and regional airlines that fly to Trinidad and Tobago include American Airlines, British Airways, Caribbean Airlines, United Airlines, West Jet, JetBlue, LIAT and several charter flight companies. International flights are also available direct from Tobago’s ANR Robinson International Airport. http://www.tntairports.com/

LIAT....................................1 (800) 669-2982

Roads Trinidad and Tobago has an extensive transportation network of paved roads. Highways link the north and south of the island (Uriah Butler Highway, Solomon Hochoy Highway), and the east and west (Churchill-Roosevelt Highway). Traffic is extremely heavy at peak hours when a high number of vehicles head into and out of the capital city and environs. Driving is on the left-hand side. http://www.mowt.gov.tt/ http://www.ptsc.co.tt/ Seaports The main seaports are located in Port of Spain and Point Lisas. The Port of Port of Spain handles dry and general cargo, break bulk, containers and passenger traffic. The Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Ltd. (PLIPDECO), mainly a bulk port for industrial commerce, also handles container and general cargo traffic. There are ferries travelling the inter-island route daily. Port of Spain Ferry: (868) 625-3055 Tobago Ferry: (868) 639-2417 The CARICOM Jetty, which is located at the Port of Port of Spain and operates the passenger inter-island ferry, receives, stores and delivers CARICOM cargo and multipurpose containers for trade within the Caribbean region. A water taxi ferry connects Port of Spain and San Fernando. Scheduled sailing times are Monday to Friday. Tickets cost TT$15 one-way and can be purchased at the Water Taxi Terminal located at Flat Rock, Lady Hailes Avenue, San Fernando or the Cruise Ship Complex, Port of Spain. Free parking is available at both ports. There is a Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC) shuttle service, which costs TT$3 through the city of Port of Spain. For further information, visit: www.nidco.co.tt or call 624-3281 (POS) or 800-4WTS (San Fernando)

PUBLIC HOLIDAYS

2019

JAN

MAR

tue

SAT

Caribbean Airlines........1 (868) 625-7200 British Airways...............1 (800) 247-9297 Copa Airlines..................1 (868) 669-5189 Surinam Airways...........1 (868) 627-0102 United Airlines...............1 (800) 864-8331

01

30

New Year’s Day

Spiritual Baptist Liberation Day

APR

APR

West Jet Airlines...........1 (403) 444-2586 JetBlue...............................1 (800) 538-2583 Rutaca................................1 (868) 625-4324

ANR Robinson Airport Virgin Atlantic.................1 (800) 744-7477 Condor and Thomas Cook Group Airlines.....1 (868) 639-5201 British Airways...............1 (800) 247-9297 The following airlines/flights are sometimes scheduled to operate during peak periods. Air Canada Rouge.........1 (868) 623-2721 LASER Airlines................laser.com.ve INSEL Air..........................fly-inselair.com

19

22

Good Friday

Easter Monday

MAY

JUN

FRI

MON

30

05

Indian Arrival Day

Eid-Ul-Fitr

JUN

JUN

THU

WED

Conviasa Airlines...........1 (868) 627-8172 ............................................./6078

IMMIGRATION, WORK PERMITS AND VISAS Visitors to Trinidad and Tobago must possess valid passports and return or ongoing tickets for successful entry. Most Commonwealth countries do not require visas for entry, except Australia, New Zealand, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Cameroon, Fiji Islands, Mozambique, Uganda and South Africa. For business travel and vacations lasting 90 days or less (within a 180-day period) European Union citizens do not need visas for entry. The same applies for nationals from non-European Union Schengen countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland). Holders of CARICOM passports, with the exception of Haiti, do not require visas. Visitors from several other countries are allowed to enter Trinidad and Tobago for periods of up to three months without a visa. http://www.immigration.gov.tt/ Work permits are required for business stays beyond 30 days. Visa extensions can be obtained from the Immigration Office at 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain, while work permits can be obtained from the Ministry of National Security, Temple Court II, 52-60 Abercromby Street, Port of Spain. www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt

19

20

Labour Day

Corpus Christi

AUG

AUG

THU

SAT

WED

01

THU

31

Emancipation Day

Independence Day

SEP

OCT

24

27

Republic Day

Divali

DEC

DEC

TUE

SUN

25

26

Chrsitmas Day

Boxing Day

WED

THU

March 4th - 5th: Carnival Monday and Tuesday. These are not public Holidays, however most businesses are closed. With Divali being a Sunday, the Public Holiday will be on Monday October 28th.

155


Index by Surname A

Abdulla Ali Taib, Alya.....................................................102 Abraham, Nigel..................................................................57 Abraham, Wendy............................................................139 Ackbar, Adil....................................................................... 89 Adams, Eric A.................................................................... 34 Adams, Omaalade............................................................35 Adams, Pleashette........................................................... 58 Agostini, Philippe..............................................................112 Akili, Kamau......................................................................135 Albino, Steve...................................................................... 20 Alcazar, Alan.................................................................... 100 Alcazar, Christopher............................................. 8, 17, 112 Alexander, Anne Marie................................................... 20 Alexander, Liesel................................................................35 Alexander, Lisa-Maria..................................................... 28 Alexander, Lyle Col............................................................ 14 Alexis, Colin....................................................................... 58 Alexis, George..................................................................... 11 Ali, Amir.............................................................................. 70 Ali, Shazan.......................................................................... 43 Allaham-Hosein, Anisa................................................... 46 Allahar-Cape, Nicole....................................................... 29 Alleyne, Robert................................................................125 Ammon, Elizabeth............................................................ 89 Ammon, Ronald................................................................. 17 Andre, Tracey.................................................................... 58 Andrews, Dwight...............................................................72 Andrews, Khadija .............................................................72 Antar, Farid......................................................................... 25 Anton, Sasha....................................................................134 Apang, Megan...................................................................80 Archibald, Edmund.......................................................... 42 Attong, Maxine.................................................................. 17 Auguste, Joan Lee............................................................. 71 Augustine, Janelle.......................................................... 106 Austin, Talia......................................................................136 Awai, Anthony................................................................... 26 Awai, Gary..........................................................................112 Ayoung, Ronald................................................................137

B

156

Baah, Emmanuel................................................................ 14 Baboolal, Sarah.....................................................................1 Bagnarol, Stephen............................................................ 30 Bahadoor-Hosein, Christina..........................................80 Bailey, Marsha....................................................................57 Balbirsingh, Valmiki....................................................... 120 Baldeo, Annie....................................................................90 Baldeo, Kaydine................................................................ 94 Ballah-Tull, Lindi Joy..........................................................22 Balwah-Frontin, Dianne.................................................. 43 Bamber, Lawrence............................................................ 63 Baptiste, Arlene.................................................................67 Baptiste, Nigel .............................................................17, 36 Baptiste, Nigel M.............................................................. 25 Barcant, Jonathan..............................................................77 Battoo, Anthony................................................................ 48 Beckles, Cecile................................................................... 48 Beharry, Wayne................................................................142 Belgrave, David................................................................. 94 Benisar, Dennis................................................................ 105 Benoit, Claude........................................................9, 11, 129 Bertrand, Rollin Dr............................................................. 81 Bernard, Wanda...............................................................103 Best, Thora......................................................................... 48 Bhola, Dinesh....................................................................128 Birch, Alicia......................................................................... 31 Blache, Roger....................................................................136 Bobb-Semple, Charles..................................................... 96 Bodkin, Wendell...............................................................122 Boodasingh, Dinelle....................................................... 105 Boodhai, Krishna..............................................................128 Boodhu, Kenneth................................................................ 11 Boodoo, Russell................................................................. 43

Boodoo, Winston.............................................................. 46 Boodoosingh, Jo-Anne..................................................... 81 Boodram, Winston........................................................... 26 Borde, Dylunn...................................................................122 Borde, Johann.....................................................................32 Borel, Thayne..................................................................... 20 Bowman, Hilary Dr........................................................... 47 Bravo-Chaitram, Stacey.................................................. 20 Brereton, Kerdell............................................................... 94 Brijbassie, Arvind.............................................................. 26 Bristo, Kathy-Ann.............................................................. 21 Broadbridge, Stephen.....................................................128 Brooks, Gerry C................................................................. 59 Brown, Hugo...................................................................... 62 Bryan, Patricia................................................................... 101 Budhooram, Kathryn....................................................... 34 Bujun, Neil.......................................................................... 62 Bute-Seaton, Kelly............................................................ 36 Byer, Sean..........................................................................107

C

Callender, Dawn................................................................. 14 Cambridge, Sherwyn....................................................... 96 Campbell, Samantha....................................................... 46 Cardinez, Joy......................................................................27 Carter, Ronald.................................................................... 28 Castillo, Jacqui......................................................................1 Chan, Jonathan................................................................. 29 Chan Chow, Wayne......................................................... 58 Chang, Andrew................................................................. 28 Chang, Judy.........................................................................37 Chang, Robert.................................................................... 93 Charles, Anthony............................................................ 100 Charles, Kelvin Hon............................................................9 Charles, Leslie.................................................................... 14 Charles-Sampson, Tamara.............................................. 21 Charran, Vishnu............................................................10, 11 Cheng, Eva.........................................................................102 Cheng Wing, Marc...........................................................80 Chesney, Wanda Dr......................................................... 47 Chin Fatt, Barry................................................................ 114 Cipriani-Ortiz, Marisa....................................................135 Chinpire-O’Reilly, Denise..............................................128 Chong Ton, Maria.............................................................80 Clarke, Aldwyn...................................................................73 Clarke, Kevin.......................................................................73 Clarke, Peter..................................................................... 100 Clarke-De Freitas, Tricia...................................................73 Cobham, Melissa..............................................................80 Coker, Curlande...............................................................124 Contant, Kimberly........................................................... 101 Coosal, Tricia.....................................................................112 Corbie, Natasha.................................................................72 Costelloe, Franka..............................................................112 Cowan, Rodney.................................................................112 Cox, Jason.........................................................................122 Creese, Marli..................................................................... 29 Creese, Lisa........................................................................80 Cruickshank, Gerald.......................................................... 31 Cuffie, Gladston.................................................................27

D

D’Arcy, Gerard..................................................................137 Daniell, K. Michael........................................................... 34 Darbasie, Karen.................................................................22 Darsan, Samuel................................................................. 26 Das, Abhrajit...................................................................... 58 Dass, Carlene.................................................................. 106 Dass, Nisa.......................................................................... 101 Dass, Wayne...................................................................... 34 Dass-Mungal, Riah........................................................... 25 Davis, Andrea.................................................................. 144 Davis, Natasha M..............................................................33 De Freitas, Abigail...........................................................125 De Freitas, Nicole..............................................................22

De La Rosa-Camacho, Tricia.......................................... 30 de Meillac, Jean...............................................................138 de Meillac, Jean-Paul......................................................138 De Silva, John....................................................................112 De Verteuil, Acacia........................................................... 21 Dempster, Stephen........................................................ 105 Des-Vignes, Michelle.......................................................35 Dhoray, Sasha..................................................................... 81 Dolsingh, Ravi...................................................................134 Dookeran, Narvin............................................................ 100 Dorman-Hosein, Misty .............................................17, 36 Douglas, Adeloa............................................................... 89 Driver, Thackwray Dr......................................................... 11 Drysdale, Natalie.............................................................134 Durham, Matthew B......................................................... 21

E

Eastmond, Edson.............................................................. 96 Edghill, Mark...............................................................17, 134 Edoo, Richard....................................................................135 Edwards, Delvert.............................................................. 46 Edwards, Nigel ..................................................................33 Edwards, Melissa.............................................................143 Elder, Irwin.........................................................................134 Eleuthere-JnMarie, Carole..............................................22 Elie, Ecliff.............................................................................113 Enill, Conrad....................................................................... 20 Erriah-Ali, Kimberly......................................................... 25

F

Fagien, Zakiya, Dr............................................................ 114 Farah, Anthony..................................................................112 Farfan, Marsha................................................................ 105 Faria, Darnley...................................................................... 21 Faria, Gabriel............................................................... 11, 129 Farrell, Mark......................................................................134 Ferreira, Christine............................................................. 96 Fingal, Stephanie..............................................................129 Forbes, Ian......................................................................... 110 Forbes, Lana......................................................................103 Fortune, Stefan.................................................................. 34 Francis, Kiselle.................................................................... 81 Francis-Allen, Charmaine................................................ 21 Frankland, Steven............................................................. 70 Fraser-Lee Wen, Mekeisha............................................ 26 Frederick, Donna................................................................32 Frederick, Neshon............................................................. 46 Fridy, Joanna....................................................................... 14 Frost, Sterling K. ................................................................22 Fuller, Michelle................................................................. 101

G

Galindo, Mariana............................................................... 31 Garcia, Nicholas............................................................... 101 Garcia-Brooks, Anna-Maria........................................... 25 George, Mark..................................................................... 42 Ghany, Patricia........................................................... 11, 128 Gilbert, Abraham.............................................................136 Gittens, Cecil..................................................................... 20 Gittens, Kevon....................................................................27 Gittens-Oxley, Marilyn.................................................... 31 Glaisher, Dawn.................................................................134 Goindoo, Andre................................................................103 Golding, Stacy-Ann................................................ 125, 128 Gomes, Kizzy......................................................................72 Gomez, Blayne.................................................................. 70 Gomez, Camie................................................................... 83 Gomez-Miller, Claire........................................................57 Gonsalves, Lindsay.......................................................... 101 Gooden, Samantha.......................................................... 29 Gooden, Steven................................................................. 29 Gopaul, Carolyn................................................................ 48 Gopaul, Michael....................................................................1 Gopee-Scoon, Paula Hon...................................................8 Gopeesingh, Anyl Dr........................................................ 70 Gosine, Reya.....................................................................134


Index by Surname Graham, Randy............................................................... 105 Grannum, Lisa................................................................... 29 Granville, Joseph................................................................ 14 Gregory, Christopher....................................................... 29 Griffith, Albert, Col............................................................ 14 Griffith, Adlyne................................................................. 101 Guischard, Vernetta.........................................................80 Gunness-Rahman, Anya................................................124 Gurley, Dennis................................................................... 83 Guy-Obiakor, Levis Dr....................................................135

H

Hackett, David.................................................................. 101 Hackett, Alan................................................................... 106 Hadeed, Christian............................................................ 101 Hadeed, Gerald................................................................ 101 Hagley, Christopher..........................................................57 Hale, Susan........................................................................80 Halls, Marsha Kathy.......................................................138 Hamilton, Dinesha........................................................... 89 Harford, Anthony............................................................. 93 Harper, Neil.........................................................................75 Harrilal, Donny..................................................................116 Hassanali, Karlene............................................................ 83 Hazel, Selvon Dr...............................................................135 Henderson, Anna............................................................. 93 Henry, Joanell.................................................................... 42 Henry, Kirk.......................................................................... 96 Henry, Ralph.....................................................................135 Henry, Rosemarie A........................................................103 Hepburn, Karrian...............................................................33 Hilton, Hyland................................................................... 25 Hilton-Clarke, Jacqueline................................................35 Hinds, Ronald.........................................................9, 11, 129 Hodges, Tarin...................................................................... 81 Hollingsworth, Linda.......................................................107 Hosein, Kazim.................................................................. 114 Hosein, Neil....................................................................... 114 Hosein, Rachael................................................................ 62 Hosein, Safiyya................................................................. 114 Hosein, Silounge............................................................... 63 Hosein-Allaham, Anisa................................................... 46 Hosein-Bahadoor, Christina...........................................80 Howell, Derwin M............................................................ 25 Huggins, Chaz................................................................. 106 Hutcheon, Roger................................................................27 Hyland, Hilton................................................................... 25

I

Imbert, ClĂŠment, Professor Emeritus.......................... 46 Inniss, Kathryn.................................................................122 Ito, Shigeru.......................................................................... 16

J

Jackman, Kyle.....................................................................57 Jaglal, Errol........................................................................134 James, Brian....................................................................... 46 James, Christopher........................................................... 17 James-Reyes Tineo, Nadia ............................................. 14 Jardine, Mary....................................................................134 Jardine, Jason.................................................................. 146 Jardine, Rosemary............................................................80 Jodhan, Genevieve.......................................................... 110 John, Dexter........................................................................72 John, Ian.............................................................................. 94 John, Marsha R................................................................. 36 John, Terry.......................................................................... 47 John-Williams, Christopher............................................57 Johnson, Keith.................................................................... 81 Johnson, Nicholette......................................................... 58 Jones, Damian................................................................... 30 Jones, Natalie...................................................................134 Joseph, Andre.................................................................... 34 Joseph, Nicole......................................................... 125, 128 Joseph, Sheri.....................................................................127 Joseph, Zola........................................................................ 14

continued

Joseph-Chin, Nicole..........................................................75 Joseph-Cupid, Nichole.................................................... 82 Joseph-Mitchell, Joe Ella.............................................. 144 Joshua, Ryan...................................................................... 43 Joyeau-Flores, Arlene...................................................... 29 Julien, Jason........................................................................22

K

Kallian, Sharda....................................................................27 Kelshall, Richard Admiral..............................................142 Khan, Bari............................................................................ 16 Khan, Dale.......................................................................... 30 Khan, Feyaad.........................................................................1 Khan, Kameel...................................................................138 Khan, Rehana......................................................................27 Khan, Rizaa.........................................................................116 Khan, Shabir..................................................................... 100 King, Ernest........................................................................ 83 Kirby, Rayon......................................................................103

L

LaFoucade, Jean................................................................. 16 LaValle, Dominick..............................................................75 LaFleur, Onesi.................................................................... 47 Laird, Colin.........................................................................131 Lake, Nigel...........................................................................111 Lal, Daren............................................................................ 94 Lalonde, Stephen.............................................................. 30 Lambie, Ginelle................................................................ 110 Lange, Clayre....................................................................142 Laquis, Rachel.................................................................... 30 Lashley, Ingrid..................................................................135 Latchu, Ryan....................................................................... 16 Lawrence, Kenosha...........................................................111 Lawrence, Nicole.............................................................124 Lazzari, Robert................................................................. 100 Le Blanc, Ashton............................................................. 146 Le Blanc, Judy.................................................................. 146 Le Gendre, Esther............................................................128 Le Maitre, Sonya................................................................ 81 Lee Loy, Angela..........................................................29, 80 Lee Wo-Mollenthiel, Anouk......................................... 101 Leslie, Lois.........................................................................135 Leung, Giles.......................................................................124 Lewis, David..................................................................... 120 Lewis, Keith......................................................................... 61 Lewis, Marcus................................................................... 89 Lewis, Mark...................................................................... 120 Lewis, Richard...................................................... 7, 101, 120 Lewis, Robin........................................................................22 Lewis, Ryan...............................................................112, 120 Lewis, Shane.................................................................... 120 Lewis-Eversley, Barbara.................................................. 46 Lezama, Renato................................................................ 101 Llanos, Stephanie............................................................. 70 Look Kin, Richard...............................................................22 Loquan, Mark..................................................................... 59 Low, Christian...................................................................107 Luces-Whiteman, Rene................................................... 62 Lucky, Antonia................................................................... 58

M

Mahadeo, Ricardo............................................................ 43 Maharaj, Surindra............................................................... 11 Maharaj, Reshma............................................................... 14 Maharaj, Dhana................................................................ 58 Maingot, Anthony.......................................................... 100 Maingot, Kristi................................................................... 70 Mallalieu, Kim Dr..............................................................90 Mallian, Mukesh..............................................................103 Mangal, Vera...................................................................... 71 Mano, Dianne A...............................................................128 Manraj, Shiva......................................................................22 Manson, Jamie................................................................ 106 Maraj, Ramchand Rajbal................................................... 11 Mark, Sekou........................................................................33

Marquez, Neil.....................................................................32 Marshall-Procope, Kathy...............................................138 Martinussen-Greene, June............................................. 21 Matthews, Swedaka.........................................................57 Maynard, Shivani.............................................................. 70 Mc Clashie, Stephen.........................................................57 Mc Clatchie-Olivieri, Pauline........................................107 Mc Clean, Kevin................................................................ 83 Mc Donald-Joseph, Sherry Ann.................................... 20 Mc Guire, Gregory...........................................................135 Mc Intosh, Ian................................................................... 46 Mc Mayo, Louis................................................................. 31 Mc Millian, Sherry............................................................90 Mc Nish, Courtney............................................................ 81 Mc Pherson, Vanessa...................................................... 30 McSood Amjad, Imran.................................................. 106 Melville, Phelia................................................................... 21 Melville, Sharon.............................................................. 106 Mills, Andre..................................................................... 106 Minors, Nigel......................................................................57 Mitchell, Brent................................................................. 100 Mitchell, Ian.......................................................................112 Mitchell, Ryan.....................................................................57 Mitchell, Selvonne.............................................................67 Modeste, Errol....................................................................57 Modeste, Laurence.......................................................... 89 Modeste-Clarke, Deborah Ann.................................... 101 Mohammed, Curtis.......................................................... 59 Mohammed, Derek.........................................................128 Mohammed, Kamaral....................................................124 Mohammed, Kerry..........................................................128 Mohammed, Lisa.............................................................. 43 Mohammed, Mikaeel Dr.................................................112 Mohammed, Rahim........................................................ 110 Mohammed, Reshard...................................................... 30 Mohammed, Terrence..................................................... 43 Mohammed, Waheeda..................................................107 Monilal, Randy.................................................................. 46 Moonilal-Kissoon, Neela.................................................22 Moniquette, Knolly..........................................................113 Moniquette, Natalie.........................................................113 Moniquette, Nicole..........................................................113 Mooleedhar, Devati......................................................... 28 Moraldo-Cumberbatch, Jessell.................................... 20 Morton, Gerard................................................................. 26 Moss, Jesse........................................................................ 48 Mouttet, Charles A.......................................................... 25 Murray, Candice............................................................... 42 Murray, Gerald.................................................................. 42 Murray, Joanne................................................................. 42 Murray, Joel....................................................................... 42 Murray-Solomon, Susan............................................... 100 Mustapha-Scott, Natasha............................................. 110

N

Naime, George..................................................................112 Nancoo, Keston.....................................................11, 17, 129 Narinesingh, Jason........................................................... 30 Narinesingh, Pria.............................................................128 Nasib, Mala......................................................................... 14 Nedd, Nisha....................................................................... 48 Nelson, Brendon...................................................................1 Newallo, Kathy Ann.........................................................80 Newton, Hayden................................................................ 14 Nicol, Debbie....................................................................139 Nicholas, Michael T..........................................................67 Nicholas, Sean....................................................................67 Noel, Wendell..................................................................... 31 Norville, Yvonne................................................................ 48

O

Ogeer-Ali, Aleema...........................................................80 Oliver, Marlon.................................................................. 106 Oumade Singh, Roopnarine........................................... 25 Outridge, John................................................................... 96

157


Index by Surname P

Padmore, Shinelle.............................................................80 Palmer-Keizer, Michelle.................................................. 25 Paltoo, Vernon Dr............................................................. 59 Panchoo, Nigel.................................................................125 Pantin, Averne..................................................................145 Parabdeen, Vijay..............................................................128 Parson, Dale.......................................................................112 Pascall, Alvin.....................................................................135 Pascall, Tara....................................................................... 62 Patrick, Dexter....................................................................27 Patrick, Stuart.................................................................... 83 Pazos, Gayle M.................................................................. 30 Pereira, Camille................................................................ 101 Persad, Marlon.................................................................. 25 Persad, Nadira N................................................................. 11 Persad, Savon.................................................................... 30 Persad, Victor.....................................................................67 Persad-Poliah, Niala.............................................................1 Persaud, Avinash Prof..................................................... 101 Peters, Janet....................................................................... 96 Peterson, Gilbert...............................................................90 Pettier, Natasha............................................................... 105 Phillip, Michael A.............................................................145 Pierre, Anthony P.............................................................128 Pierre, Ian............................................................................ 62 Pierre, Samantha...............................................................72 Pouchet, Lorraine............................................................... 17 Prescott, Bernadette.........................................................32 Prince, John Dr..................................................................90 Pulchan, Melissa............................................................... 48

Q

Quashie, Marissa.............................................................125 Quentrall-Thomas, Lara................................... 10, 83, 130 Quesnel, Stephanie.........................................................136 Questel-James Pamela..................................................143

R

158

Ragbir, Harold...................................................................145 Ragbir, Ricardo.................................................................. 94 Ragbir, Sana........................................................................22 Ragoonanan, Sherwin...................................................... 96 Ragoonanan, Vijai............................................................. 25 Ragoonath, Dave.............................................................. 43 Rajkumar, Ainsley............................................................122 Rajkumar, Ava.....................................................................57 Rajkumar, Gerard...............................................................76 Rajkumar, Navin....................................................................1 Rajnauth, Heidi.................................................................139 Rajnauth, Mareen.............................................................. 81 Ramaya, Stephanie............................................................73 Ramcharan, Ancil............................................................. 29 Ramcharan, Bradley......................................................... 89 Ramdass, Naindranath..................................................... 21 Ramdath, Trudy................................................................137 Ramdhanie, Eidiana......................................................... 46 Ramdial, Sherene............................................................ 106 Ramdin, Rosemarie...........................................................27 Ramgoolam, Aldrin.......................................................... 25 Ramkissoon, Adrian..........................................................27 Ramkissoon, Artma......................................................... 58 Ramlal, Arjay................................................................... 106 Ramlal, Roshni...................................................................80 Ramlochan, Rajesh............................................................ 16 Ramnarine, Anil................................................................ 46 Ramnarine, Denyse.......................................................... 25 Ramnarine-Hill, Uthra................................................... 105 Ramos, Ria.........................................................................138 Ramoutar, Prakash........................................................... 47 Rampersad, Dominic....................................................... 59 Rampersad, Seiuraj............................................................ 11 Ramroop, Selvon............................................................... 96 Ramroop, Shevvon........................................................... 96 Ramsaran, David............................................................... 94

continued

Ramsaran, Roysce............................................................ 28 Ramsingh, Surindranath................................................. 62 Ramsook, Cindy................................................................ 94 Ramsumair, Brent.............................................................80 Ramsundar, Nievia...........................................................90 Raphael, Edison...................................................... 100, 102 Reddock-Downes, Cynthia.............................................90 Regis, Kester...................................................................... 20 Reid, Fenwick.............................................................. 93, 94 Reneaud-Lewis, Angela.................................................. 46 Richards, Dawn................................................................. 82 Roberts, Debbie................................................................ 70 Roberts, Learie.................................................................. 94 Robinson, David................................................................ 25 Robinson, Glenroy ............................................................111 Robinson, Joan M..............................................................111 Rocke, Natalie...................................................................143 Rocke-Pantin, Josanne..................................................... 71 Rodriguez-Greaves, Crystal............................................33 Rodriguez-Seijas, Dwayne.............................................128 Rodulfo, Tyrone................................................................. 96 Romano, Nigel................................................................... 28 Romany-Fournillier, Paulesca.......................................102 Roop Persad, Shastri........................................................ 97 Roopnarinesingh, Ramlogan........................................... 17 Rose, Damien....................................................................136 Rowe-Murray, Nadine...................................................... 21 Rudd, Shannon................................................................... 14

S

Sabga, Colin S....................................................................112 Salick, Brenton.................................................................. 114 Salickram, Parasram........................................................ 25 Samm, Roderick................................................................ 48 Sampson, Andrew...........................................................138 Sandy, Christopher............................................................22 Sandy, Mark Francis......................................................... 46 Sanhai, Anitra..................................................................... 81 Santiago, Alejandro......................................................... 110 Santos, Devin..................................................................... 70 Saunders, Richard............................................................137 Sawh, Vasudev Amrit Free............................................. 26 Scott, Jevorn...................................................................... 93 Sealy, Lennox H. Dr.........................................................130 Seecharan, Ramlakhan........................................................1 Seecharan, Wendell..........................................................57 Seecharan, Betty Ann......................................................116 Seepersad, Dawn...............................................................33 Seeraj, Anthony................................................................ 26 Seereeram, Mariska.........................................................80 Semper, Carlton.................................................................. 11 Serrao, Ian.......................................................................... 89 Seudat, Carlene................................................................. 30 Seuraj, Sandra...................................................................107 Shim, Melissa.................................................................... 83 Sieuraj, Rampersad............................................................ 11 Simon, Davita...................................................................... 11 Simon, Joseph................................................................... 58 Singh, Kimberly..................................................................67 Singh, Rishi....................................................................... 106 Singh, Roopnarine Oumade........................................... 25 Singh, S. Sacha.....................................................................5 Singh, Sally........................................................................134 Singh, Stephen A.............................................................. 34 Sirju, Peter.......................................................................... 43 Siu, Kimlyn........................................................................143 Small, David...................................................................... 101 Smith, Bernard.......................................................................1 Sobion, Judith.....................................................................33 Solomon, Candace........................................................... 89 Solomon, Elizabeth........................................................... 83 Sookdar, Warren................................................................33 Sooklal-Beharry, Natasha............................................... 43 Sooknarine-Ragoo, Gail.................................................. 46 Sookoo, Olivia.....................................................................27

Sookram, Dushyant.........................................................125 Sookram, Julie................................................................... 29 Sookram, Kirk....................................................................90 Soverall, Robert................................................................. 30 Spence, Joanne Dr............................................................ 48 St. Clair, Anthony...............................................................22 St. Louis, Ayana.................................................................. 21 Stephen-Henry, Greta.........................................................1 Stephens, Gerard.............................................................. 28 Steuart, Anya....................................................................137 Stuart, Natasha................................................................. 94 Subiah, Niegel...................................................................145

T

Tang Yuk, Robert............................................................... 29 Taylor, Ashley...................................................................145 Taylor, Eric.......................................................................... 48 Telesford-Pierre, Trudie....................................................35 Telfer, Derek..................................................................... 146 Telfer, Kyle........................................................................ 146 Tewarie, Nirad............................................................ 11, 128 Thom, Hassel................................................................10, 17 Thomas, Keith.................................................................... 14 Thompson, Ayana.............................................................57 Thompson, Kieran.............................................................73 Thompson, Selina............................................................107 Tiah, Eugene..................................................................10, 11 Ticklal, Dinesh................................................................... 93 Timal-Toonday, Tammy..................................................124 Titus, Heather.................................................................... 26 Toby, Keith D...................................................................... 46 Torres, Patricio..................................................................112 Toussaint, Garvin............................................................... 21 Traboulay, Paul................................................................... 17 Trimm-Bailey, Koreene.................................................... 96 Trotman, Tessa.................................................................107

V Valley, Kerwyn....................................................................35 Valley, Kieran......................................................................35 Valley, Kurt..........................................................................22 Van Lowe, Amoy................................................................33 Vincent, Amanda............................................................... 21 Voisin, Sonja....................................................................... 17

W Walcott, Ian....................................................................... 58 Walcott, Ronald Dr........................................................... 86 Webb, Aldwin.....................................................................32 Webb, Joanne....................................................................80 Webb-Brereton, Charlene.............................................. 20 Webster-Smith, Celisha.................................................122 Welch, Ian.......................................................................... 58 Welch-Farrell, Sandra.....................................................127 West-Toolsee, Elizabeth................................................. 58 Wiggins, Roger...................................................................57 Wilcox, Terry.................................................................... 100 Williams, Karanjabari.................................................... 144 Williams, Terrance............................................................ 31 Williams, Ulis.................................................................... 93 Wilson, Earl......................................................................... 14 Wilson, Kris........................................................................ 26 Wilson, Neil......................................................................135 Wolffe, Gillian...................................................................125 Wong Won, Wendy.........................................................80 Woo, Brian...........................................................................22 Woodhams, Christopher............................................... 101 Wooding, Camille............................................................. 83

Y

Yip Chuck, Karen ............................................................. 25 Young, Angus P................................................................. 29 Young, Melanie................................................................. 93


Index by Company 1 On 1 Realty..............................................................................................134, 139 Access Trinidad................................................................................................ 126 Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited.......................................... 146 Ace Recycling Limited...................................................................................... 73 Advance Readymix Ltd................................................................................... 40 Aegis.....................................................................................................................80 Agostini Insurance Brokers Ltd (AIB).........................................................100 Air Link Communications Limited................................................................ 92 Air Link Networks.............................................................................................. 92 Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago............................................14, 15 Alliance Software and Technology Systems Limited................................96 Allied Caterers..................................................................................................122 Allied Security Limited..................................................................................... 67 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)....................................................................................... 11, 128 AMS Biotech Security Concepts Limited.......................................................5 AMS Café...............................................................................................................5 AMS GROUP OF COMPANIES.........................................................................5 AMS Technologies...............................................................................................5 Angostura Limited............................................................................................110 Ansa McAL............................................................................Inside Front Cover ASCO Logistics Limited...................................................................................62 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA).........................................17, 134 Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC).................................................................................................................17 AST Security International Distribution LLC.................................................5 Atlantic.................................................................................................................54 AWWL Affordable Window Wash Ltd...........................................................5 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)........................ 17, 36 Beacon.................................................................................................................101 Biomedical Enterprises of Trinidad and Tobago Limited......................... 73 bmobile.........................................................................................................86, 87 British Caribbean Chamber of Commerce....................................................11 Business Lifeline Limited.................................................................................82 C&W Business............................................................................................88, 89 Cardea Health Solutions Ltd......................................................................... 102 Cargo Consolidators Agency Limited........................................................144 Caribbean Centre for Leadership Development Ltd. (CCLD)................49 Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited............................................................ 128 Caribbean Dockyard & Engineering Services Ltd (CDESL).................. 142 Caribbean Health Access ..............................................................................68 Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI).................................... 74 Caribbean Information & Credit Rating Services Limited (CariCRIS)...........................................................................................................34 Caribbean Kids and Families Therapy Organization (CKFTO)..............50 Caribbean Lifts Limited.....................................................................................41 Caribbean Resourcing Solutions....................................................................80 Caribbean Tourism Publications Limited.................................................. 148 Central Athletic Club........................................................................................69 Cevara Realty.................................................................................................... 134 Chakra Enterprises Ltd..................................................................................... 97 CIBC FirstCaribbean Financial Centre Bank...............................................26 CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank......................................................26 Citibank Trinidad and Tobago Limited............................ Inside Back Cover CL Marine Ltd. (CLM).................................................................................... 142 Concepts & Services....................................................................................... 129 Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce..................................................11 Cove Eco-Industrial and Business Park.......................................................135 CPRC Realty...................................................................................................... 134 CrestCom............................................................................................................49 CUNA Caribbean Insurance Society Limited / CUNA Mutual Group..................................................................................... 103

Debt Recovery and Administrative Services Limited (DR&ASL).........123 Design Landscape Architects........................................................................43 DHL.....................................................................................................................144 Dispute Resolution Centre..............................................................................83 DRA Consulting ................................................................................................82 Dynamic Real Estate Consultancy Ltd....................................................... 139 Eastern Credit Union Co-operative Society Ltd (ECU)......................20, 21 ecliff elie.............................................................................................................. 113 Ecosol Services Limited................................................................................... 74 Eco-Industrial Development Company of Trinidad and Tobago Ltd (E-IDCOT)............................................................135 El Dorado Demerara Rum...............................................................Back Cover Employers Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobgao (ECA)............................................................... 11, 17, 129 Engineering Associates Ltd............................................................................. 111 EPL Properties Limited............................................................................. 21, 130 Equilibrium Environmental Services Ltd...................................................... 75 Errol Jaglal Real Estate................................................................................... 134 Ettes Office Furniture Ltd............................................................................... 113 Europa................................................................................................................ 136 Eve Anderson Recruitment Limited..............................................................80 Falck Safety Services........................................................................................ 55 Farah Insurance Brokers Ltd.......................................................................... 107 Fircroft..................................................................................................................63 First Citizens Bank...................................................................................... 22, 23 ForenSys Trinidad & Tobago.........................................................................104 Funds International Limited............................................................................34 G. Murray Engineering Works Limited (GME)..........................................42 GCG Group........................................................................................................122 GCG Trinidad.....................................................................................................122 GE Single Source Company(GESSCO)........................................................ 114 Go 4 Less Ltd.................................................................................................... 145 Go4 Delivery Service...................................................................................... 146 Golden Key Real Estate.................................................................................. 134 Grant Thornton ORBIT Solutions................................................................ 124 Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce.........................11 Happi Products Ltd.......................................................................................... 114 Health City Cayman Islands...........................................................................68 HHSL Safety Systems Limited........................................................................56 HR Technologies Ltd..........................................................................................81 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF)......................................................................... 17, 36 Island Finance .................................................................................................... 27 J & G Supplies Just Clean Janitorial Services........................................... 139 JMMB Bank.........................................................................................................28 JMMB Investments...........................................................................................28 Joint Medical Products Caribbean Limited................................................. 74 Katerserv............................................................................................................122 KCL Capital Market Brokers Limited............................................................ 35 Kennicon Engineering Limited.......................................................................43 Kentz-OJ’s E&I Services JV.............................................................................42 Key West Real Estate..................................................................................... 134 KPMG................................................................................................................. 125 Label House Group................................................................................. 120, 121 Lake Asphalt of Trinidad and Tobago (1978) Limited.............................. 57 Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd............................................................... 130 LH Group .................................................................................................. 120, 121 Lok Jack GSB Consulting Services..................................................................81 Massy Technologies Applied Imaging (Trinidad) Ltd.............................. 93 Massy Technologies InfoCom........................................................................94 Massy United Insurance................................................................................ 105 Medcorp Limited ...............................................................................................71

159


Index by Company

160

MIC Institute of Technology...........................................................................46 Monte Vista Medical........................................................................................ 76 Ms. Brafit Limited.............................................................................................. 75 N.R. Jones Realty Ltd...................................................................................... 134 NAGICO Insurance (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited...............................106 National Energy Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (National Energy)..............................................................................................59 National Information and Communication Technology Company Limited (iGovTT)...........................................................................96 NCB Global Finance Limited...........................................................................29 NGC CNG Company Limited (NGC CNG).................................................59 Nutrien.................................................................................................................58 ODYSSEY CONSULTinc Limited....................................................................82 Offshore Innovators (Guyana) Inc................................................................60 OJ’s Electrical & Instrumentation Services (OJ’S)....................................42 Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce..............................................................11 Personnel Management Services Limited (PMSL)..................................127 Phoenix Park Gas Processors Limited (PPGPL).........................................59 Piarco Aeropark..................................................................................................15 Piranha International Ltd................................................................................. 76 Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce....................................................................................11 Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Limited (PLIPDECO)...................................................................................................... 145 Prestige Business Publications Limited..................................................... 148 PROCOMER...................................................................................................... 126 Re/Max Nexus Realty.................................................................................... 139 Regency Recruitment & Resources Limited................................................83 Regus.................................................................................................................. 136 Renew Star Serpentine Ltd..............................................................................70 Republic Bank Limited............................................................................... 24, 25 Republic Financial Holdings Limited...................................................... 24, 25 RGM Limited.....................................................................................................137 Risk Management Services Ltd.................................................................... 107 ROSSCON........................................................................................................... 115 S.I.L. Imports & Exports Ltd........................................................................... 116 S2 Real Estate Services.................................................................................. 134 Sacha’s Gourmet..................................................................................................5 Sacoda Serv Limited....................................................................................... 130 Safe-Tec Limited.................................................................................................41 Safety Pass Alliance Trinidad and Tobago (SPATT) Limited..................63 Sandra Welch-Farrell & Company (SWF&CO).........................................127 Sangre Grande Business Association.............................................................11 Scotiabank Trinidad and Tobago Limited....................................................30 SCRIP-J................................................................................................................ 115 Sea Jade Investments..................................................................................... 134 Servus Limited...................................................................................................137 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago.............................................17 Shipping Solutions & Services Limited...................................................... 146 SiMedia................................................................................................................95 SoftwareONE...................................................................................................... 97 Sookhai’s Diesel Service Limited....................................................................16 Spark Technologies Limited............................................................................ 97 Sparks Consultancy Services........................................................................ 138 St. Clair Medical Centre....................................................................................71 Subsea Specialist Ltd........................................................................................60 Sygma Environmental...................................................................................... 76 Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad & Tobago (TATT)........................................................................................................... 90, 91 Telecommunications Services of Trinidad & Tobago Limited (TSTT)...........................................................................................................86, 87 Terra Caribbean............................................................................................... 138

continued

The Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business.........................................81 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)............................................................................................................. 10, 11 The Eco-Industrial Development Company of Tobago (E-IDCOT) Ltd...................................................................................................135 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago....................................... 10, 11 The Human Resource Management Association of Trinidad & Tobago (HRMATT)........................................................................17 The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)....................................................................... 128 The JMMB Group Trinidad and Tobago.......................................................28 The Ministry of Education Tertiary Education Division...........................46 The Ministry of Trade and Industry................................................................ 8 The Ministry of Works and Transport...........................................................14 The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited................59 The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT)................................................................................................................... 1 The NGC Group.................................................................................................59 The Paramount Transport & Trading Company Limited......................... 40 The Power Generation Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (PowerGen)........................................................................................................62 The Professional Institute of Marketing & Business Studies Ltd. (PIMBS)...............................................................................................................50 The Security Zone Limited (TSZ).................................................................. 72 The Tobago House of Assembly (THA)........................................................ 9 The Trade Promotion Agency of Costa Rica (PROCOMER).................127 The Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA)...........................................................................................................17 The University of the West Indies..................................................................81 Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce..................................................................9, 11, 129 Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association........................................................17 TOSL Engineering Limited...............................................................................43 Toyota Trinidad and Tobago Limited.............................................................16 Trafalgar Motors...................................................................Inside Front Cover TRICON Company Limited................................................................................3 Trinidad & Tobago Offshore Innovators Ltd................................................60 Trinidad and Tobago Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (TTAIFA)...........................................................................31 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce........9, 11, 129 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI)................................................................................... 10, 17, 130 Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association............................................17 Trinidad and Tobago Free Zones Company Limited................................. 35 Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects................................................17 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)............................................................................................ 8, 17, 112, 116 Trinidad and Tobago NGL Limited (TTNGL)..............................................59 Trinidad and Tobago Police Credit Union.................................................... 32 Trinidad and Tobago Postal Corporation (TTPOST).............................. 143 Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation (UTC)................................. 33 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA).........................................................................................................10, 17 TSG Consulting..................................................................................................83 TSZ Retail Store................................................................................................. 72 University of the Southern Caribbean (USC).............................................47 Vega Minerals................................................................................................... 40 YTEPP Limited....................................................................................................48


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