Who's Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business 2021-2022

Page 1




AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES

18

PRESTIGE BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS TEAM Chairman Richard Lewis Director Patricia Lewis Director Marie Gurley Operations Manager Soraya Gonsalves Production Supervisor Patrice Letren Administrative Assistant Vanessa Ramtahal Produced and Created by

Prestige Business Publications Ltd.

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION

24

40

Sales Executives

Patricia Lewis, Marie Gurley, Kathleen Maynard, Michelle Nunes Edited by

Lonsdale Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising Limited Layout

Laird Raymond, Patrice Letren, Shayam Karim Writers

Kay Baldeosingh-Arjune, Kieran Andrew Khan, Diana Mahabir-Wyatt, Sheldon Waithe, Bevil M. Wooding

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS

46

56

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

INSURANCE

66

80

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

92

102

Special Thanks

ActionEDGE TT Allied Security Limited Airports Authority of Trinidad and Tobago Association of Professional Engineers of Trinidad and Tobago (APETT) Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA) Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC) Automotive Dealers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ADATT) Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT) Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) Energy Dynamics Limited FinTech Association of Trinidad and Tobago (FinTechTT) IAMovement National Agricultural Marketing and Development Corporation (NAMDEVCO) Personnel Management Services Limited Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT) Terra Caribbean The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad & Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) Trinidad and Tobago Medical Association (T&TMA) Cover Photos Christian Anderson Printed by Scrip-J, Trinidad Annual Distribution 6,000 copies

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND SECURITY SERVICES

114

SHIPPING, PORTS, COURIER SERVICES AND TRAVEL

120

Copyright© 2021 Prestige Business Publications Ltd. All rights reserved. Prestige Business Publications Ltd. 15 Mucurapo Road, St. James Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. Tel: (868) 622-0738/9 Mobile: (868) 706-4650 Email: info@whoswhotnt.com www.whoswhotnt.com

®

2


From the House of Angostura comes Angostura® Solera, the Home of premium wines and spirits. Shop in-store, collect on the curb or shop online for the widest selection of your favourite brands.

ANGOSTURA 1919® Award-winning premium aged gold rum

BOLLINGER SPECIAL CUVÉE Hints of roasted apples and peaches

MOUTON CADET ROUGE 2017 Intense red wine boasting red fruit aromas with a hint of caramel

BOLLINGER ROSÉ Hints of red currant, cherry and wild strawberry

ANGOSTURA® 7 YEAR OLD A full-bodied rum with maple, chocolate, honey and toffee flavours

soleratt.com |

FREE DELIVERY on orders over $250

CALVET CHÂTEAUNEUFDU-PAPE A rich palate with notes of orange, strawberry, marmalade and candied fruit

POS: Cor. Tragarete Road and Gray Street, St. Clair ⦁ 628-7258 SAN FERNANDO: #39 Union Park West, Marabella ⦁ 612-WINE

|

@soleraTT @soleratrinidad solera@angostura.com


MESSAGES

PUBLISHER’S NOTE RICHARD LEWIS

Chairman, Prestige Business Publications Limited

The 2021-2022 edition of Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business is the second published during the COVID-19 pandemic as, despite vaccinations happening in Trinidad and Tobago and globally, the spread continues. We do need to change gears now as it looks like this new normal will prevail for many years to come. We hear about lives and livelihood, response and recovery, sustainability and resilience and we know that all of these activities have a distinct role in the journey of the pandemic, but we know very little about what strategies and best practices we should adopt to cover all the phases above. This publication focuses on people in their businesses and how they create and nurture relationships and networking, so my message this year is about resilience and recovery on the wings of change. It is said that there are five pillars of resilience which are self-awareness, mindfulness, self-care, relationships and purpose. Self-awareness is having a clear perception of your personality, including strengths, weaknesses, thoughts, beliefs, motivations, and emotions. Mindfulness is a state of active open attention to the present. Self-care refers to our ability as human beings to function effectively in the world while meeting the mindful changes of daily life. Positive relationships are the reciprocal connections we share with people who support and care for us. Purpose is a recognition that we belong to and service something bigger than ourselves. As businesses recover from COVID-19-related disruption and begin to reimagine their position in the new normal, they need to become more selfaware as this impacts their ability to achieve long-term resilience. Businesses must consider all the potential strains on all functions of operational capacity, as well as take their employees’ psychological resilience into account. They need to look at the shifts in demand and how to prepare for them. They need to seek out innovative new ways to improve health and increase the productivity of their people. There will be a need to think about new capital allocation models and focus on creating value, which will allow businesses to avoid disruptions that happen a lot quicker than before. Lastly, the major question we in the private sector seem to be asking is – what is the role of our businesses in rebuilding our economy and improving our communities? We must answer the call to be involved in a higher sense of purpose if we wish to succeed. Organisations must now navigate and support employees’ expectations associated with the new normal. This means managing change associated with a shift in workplace arrangements. Organisations will need to address the work from anywhere and hybrid schedule expectations in order to recruit and keep top talent. There will be a need for effective change management for resilience and recovery to soar on the wings of change. As always, I wish all the stakeholders of this publication a speedy transition from the state of surviving to thriving.

4



CONTENTS Prestige Business Publications Limited/ Caribbean Tourism Publications Limited..................... Inside Front Cover Publisher’s Note...................................................................................................4

MESSAGES........................................................................................................ 8 Senator the Honourable Paula Gopee-Scoon, Minister - Ministry of Trade and Industry....................................................8 The Honourable Ancil K. Dennis, Chief Secretary of Tobago House of Assembly (THA) and Secretary of Tourism, Culture and Transportation....................................9 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce....................9 Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce.............................................................................10 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA).................10 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago........................................... 11 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)............................................................................................... 11 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)............. 12 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)...... 12 Employers’ Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA).................................................................................................................... 13 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI)................................................................................................................. 13 The Supermarket Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT)..........14

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE.............................................................................14 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)..............................................................................................14 Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce.........................................14, 15 European Business Chamber in Trinidad and Tobago............................14 Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce...........................................................14 Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce...........................................................................................................14 Sangre Grande Chamber of Commerce......................................................14 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC).......14, 15 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago..........................................14 The Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce..............14 Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce..................................................................................14 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce..................14

ASSOCIATIONS.................................................................................................16 Arima Business Association........................................................................... 16 Association of Professional Engineers of Trinidad and Tobago (APETT)............................................................................................................... 16 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA)................................................ 16 Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC)................................................................................................................ 16 Automotive Dealers Association of Trinidad and Tobago..................... 16 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)............................ 16 Employers’ Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA).................................................................................................................... 16 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF)........... 16 Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)................................................................................................................ 16 Sangre Grande Business Association........................................................... 16 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago........................................... 16 The Human Resource Management Association of Trinidad & Tobago (HRMATT)..................................................................... 17 The Supermarket Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT).... 15, 17 The Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA).................................................................................. 17

6

Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA)..................................... 17 Trinidad and Tobago Association of Insurance and Financial Advisers (TTAIFA).......................................................................... 17 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI)................................................................................................................. 17 Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA)......................... 17 Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA)............................... 17 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)................. 17 Trinidad and Tobago Medical Association (T&TMA)............................ 17 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)...... 17

LEADERSHIP PROFILES

Richard Ramrekha............................................................................................. 62 Samson Acevero...............................................................................................64 Gabrielle Agostini...........................................................................................100 Rachel Renie & David Thomas..................................................................... 101 Lara Quentrall-Thomas...................................................................................113

SPECIAL FEATURES

Leading the Caribbean’s COVID-19 Response......................................... 58 Attaining Digital Nation Status for Trinidad and Tobago...................... 68 Property Trends We Did Not Expect for 2021......................................... 119

AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES.........................................................18 Airports Authority of Trinidad & Tobago (AATT)..................................20 Lifestyle Motors.......................................................................................... 21, 22 Toyota Trinidad and Tobago Limited.......................................................... 23 Crism Automotive Sales & Service Centre................................................ 23 Kalloo’s Holdings Ltd....................................................................................... 23

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES.................................... 24 First Citizens................................................................................................ 26, 27 Republic Bank Limited.............................................................................. 28, 29 CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank..................................................... 30 Firstline Securities Limited.............................................................................. 31 Island Finance Trinidad and Tobago........................................................... 32 NCB Merchant Bank (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited............................. 33 The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT)........ 34 Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation (UTC).............................. 35 Caribbean Information & Credit Rating Services Limited (CariCRIS)........................................................................................................... 36 EXIMBANK Export - Import Bank of Trinidad & Tobago Ltd............... 36 RBC Financial (Caribbean) Limited.............................................................. 37 Funds International Limited........................................................................... 38 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF).......... 38 KCL Capital Market Brokers Limited........................................................... 39 ASPIRE Fund Management........................................................................... 39 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)........................... 39

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION..............................40 TOSL Engineering Limited.............................................................................. 42 Carvalho’s Construction Ltd.......................................................................... 43 Concepts and Services Company Ltd......................................................... 43 High Tide Custom Steel Fabricating Ltd.....................................................44 O.J.’s Electrical and Instrumentation Services (O.J.’s)...........................44 ORIGITEK Solutions Limited ......................................................................... 45

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES..............................................46 HHSL Safety Systems Limited.......................................................................48 Marine Consultants (Trinidad) Ltd..............................................................49 Offshore Innovators.........................................................................................50 RelyOn Nutec...................................................................................................... 51


CONTENTS The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (NGC).................................................................................................................. 52 ASCO................................................................................................................... 53 Ben Lomond Industrial & Safety Solutions (B.L.I.S.S.) Limited............. 53 Hot-Hed Trinidad Limited.............................................................................. 54 Process Systems Limited................................................................................ 54 Trinidad Project Management Services Limited...................................... 55 Capital Signal Company Limited.................................................................. 55 Salitavo Trinidad Ltd........................................................................................ 55

HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS.............................56 Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI).................................. 59 Renew Star Serpentine Ltd.............................................................................60 St. Clair Medical Centre................................................................................... 61 Medcorp Limited................................................................................................ 61 ISD Health Solutions........................................................................................ 63 St. Augustine Medical Laboratory Limited................................................ 63 Biomedical Enterprises of Trinidad and Tobago Limited ...................... 65 Goodhealth Medical Centre - Medcorp Limited...................................... 65 Sygma Environmental...................................................................................... 65

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY..................................66 Flow Business...............................................................................................69, 71 C&W Business.............................................................................................70, 71 bMobile......................................................................................................... 72, 73 Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT).......... 73 Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT).......................................................................................................... 74, 75 Amaranth Business Solutions Limited........................................................ 76 Simply Intense (Si) Media.............................................................................. 77 Alliance Software and Technology Systems Limited.............................. 78 AMPLIA Communications Ltd ..................................................................... 78 Unified Networking Development Systems Limited (UNDSL)............ 79 Digital Broadcast............................................................................................... 79 Huckleberry Media Co. Ltd............................................................................ 79

INSURANCE.....................................................................................................80 Agostini Insurance Brokers Limited............................................................. 82 Beacon................................................................................................................. 83 Cardea Benefits Limited..................................................................................84 Genesis Insurance Brokers & Benefits Consultants Ltd......................... 85 NAGICO Insurances........................................................................................ 86 Pan-American Life Insurance Group........................................................... 87 Raphael Teeluck Financal Legacy Services Limited................................ 88 Universal Insurance Brokers Ltd................................................................... 89 CUNA Caribbean Insurance Society Limited............................................90 Farah Insurance Brokers Limited..................................................................90 Furness Group of Companies......................................................................... 91 The Insurance Company of the West Indies (ICWI)............................... 91

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION............................................. 92 LH Group......................................................................................................94, 95 The Pouch Company........................................................................................ 95 Angostura Limited............................................................................................ 96 Business Supply Group Limited (BSG)....................................................... 97 Boss...................................................................................................................... 97 Scrip-J................................................................................................................... 97 Engineering Associates Limited.................................................................... 98 Happi Products Limited................................................................................... 99 MM Design......................................................................................................... 99 National Agricultural Marketing and Development Corporation (NAMDEVCO).......................................................................... 99

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES........102 bmobile.............................................................................................................. 104 Caribbean Centre for Leadership Development Ltd. /CrestCom..... 105 National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST)......................................................... 106 Youth Training & Employment Partnership Programme (YTEPP) Ltd...................................................................................................... 107 Access Records Management of Trinidad Limited............................... 108 HR Technologies Ltd...................................................................................... 108 Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)............................................................................................................. 109 Regional Compliance Consultants............................................................. 109 Regency Recruitment Limited...................................................................... 110 Marsids Consulting......................................................................................... 110 NEM Leadership Consultants....................................................................... 110 SWF & Co (Sandra Welch-Farrell and Company).................................. 111 Sital College of Tertiary Education............................................................... 111 LFR Consulting Services..................................................................................112 Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd (LSA)...................................................112 ODYSSEY CONSULTinc Limited..................................................................112 Trinidad Project Management Services Limited......................................112

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND SECURITY SERVICES........ 114 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA).............................................. 116 1 On 1 Realty...................................................................................................... 116 CPRC Realty...................................................................................................... 116 Errol Jaglal Real Estate.................................................................................... 116 Fair Deal Real Estate....................................................................................... 116 G.A. Farrell & Associates Limited............................................................... 116 Key West Real Estate..................................................................................... 116 NORSTROM...................................................................................................... 116 Sea Jade Investments..................................................................................... 116 South Homes Real Estate.............................................................................. 116 Broadview Surveillance Systems/ProTec Group.....................................117 EPL Properties Limited....................................................................................117 Terra Caribbean: Trinidad............................................................................. 118 Cornerstone Properties.................................................................................. 118 Plimmer Real Estate........................................................................................ 118

SHIPPING, PORTS, COURIER SERVICES AND TRAVEL...............................120 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago.........................................122 Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited..........................................123 Cargo Consolidators Agency Limited........................................................123 Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Limited (PLIPDECO)..................................................................................................... 124 Port of Port of Spain....................................................................................... 124 Tropical Express Couriers.............................................................................125 Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited...........................................................125 Shipping Solutions & Services Ltd...............................................................125

INFORMATIONAL LISTS AND INDICES...........................................................126

Fast Facts of Trinidad and Tobago..............................................................126 Regional and International Organisations................................................129 Honorary Consuls Accredited to the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago...................................................................................... 130 Embasssies and Diplomatic Missions.........................................................131 The Government of Trinidad and Tobago................................................132 Index by Surname............................................................................................133 Index by Company...........................................................................................135

7


MESSAGES

Moving towards recovery and growth through transformative initiatives and programmes that will engender confidence in our people.

SENATOR THE HONOURABLE

PAULA GOPEE-SCOON

MINISTER MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY REPUBLIC OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Ministry of Trade and Industry

T

rinidad and Tobago’s recovery is imminent. The past year and a half have been particularly challenging for us all, however, it has also been an opportunity globally for governments and businesses alike to reflect and reformulate their efforts for creating more resilient and adaptive institutions, businesses and workforces. In the face of the pandemic, the Government of Trinidad and Tobago has been focused on balancing lives and livelihoods as it seeks to keep the economy on an even keel as we move towards recovery and growth through transformative initiatives and programmes that will engender confidence in our people, entrepreneurs and investors. Through the stewardship of the Prime Minister, Dr. the Honourable Keith Rowley, a Roadmap to Recovery Committee was established comprising public and private sector, labour, civil society and academia. A Plan of Action known as the Roadmap to Recovery was developed and it outlines a clear strategy for the immediate and long term. The Plan focuses on three (3) main pillars: Economic Transformation; Food Security; and Leave No One Behind (through Equity and Empathy). It encompasses all sectors of the economy, including social services, energy and energy industries, agriculture, manufacturing, financial services, digital, construction and development, creative and cultural and the green and blue economies. Advancing these recommendations of the Action Plan requires a national paradigm shift which must be bold, focused and resultsoriented and include participation from all stakeholders. We have heard the concerns of the business community regarding the ease of doing business in Trinidad and Tobago.

Ministry of Trade and Industry Level 17, Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-2931-4 Fax: (868) 623-7588 Email: mti-info@gov.tt Website: http://www.tradeind.gov.tt/

8

Rest assured that as a Government we are working towards making doing business in Trinidad and Tobago more effective and efficient through the advancement of digital transformation. To date, several Government e-services have been introduced through various platforms such as TTBizlink, DevelopTT and Government e-appointments. Additionally, work has also commenced on improving business processes across a number of Agencies. This year, Cabinet agreed to the implementation of nine (9) priority Business Process Re-engineering recommendations geared towards simplifying, modernising, and harmonising the major regulatory processes for import, export, transit and business facilitation services in Trinidad and Tobago and we are well on our way to achieving these goals. The Government is also investing in economic spaces such as the Phoenix Park Industrial Estate and the Factory Road Industrial Park through which local and international firms can securely invest and expand into the wider region. This will be reinforced by the roll-out of a new Special Economic Zones regime later this year that will target specific sectors through a robust regulatory and incentive framework, and which will ensure that Trinidad and Tobago’s investment climate is open, transparent and attractive. Despite the current challenges, Trinidad and Tobago’s non-energy trade has seen some positives, growing by 26% during the period October 2020 to June 2021, when compared to the same period a year before. This is very encouraging and a step in the right direction. With the willingness of firms to pivot and adapt, and the assured commitment by the Government, our path is clearer and our destination more achievable.


MESSAGES

The Honourable

Ancil K. Dennis

CHIEF SECRETARY, SECRETARY OF TOURISM, TRANSPORTATION AND CULTURE AND SECRETARY OF FOOD PRODUCTION, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

Tobago House of Assembly (THA)

R

esilience is how Tobago has always responded to adversity. Today, in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic, the country’s economic challenges and even the Assembly’s 6-6 deadlock, the island continues to achieve significant development milestones. Indeed, as a people, we are not defined by those challenges, but by our determination to rise above them. On the tourism front, Destination Tobago acknowledges the fluidity of our current circumstances. Through the Tobago Tourism Agency Limited (TTAL), a Tourism Industry Health and Safety Manual was developed providing operational guidelines for local businesses in the sector. This Manual played a crucial role in attaining the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC) ‘Safe Travels’ stamp, a globally respected safety standard. This is an encouraging development that can help to maintain the trust of repeat visitors and instil confidence in potential visitors to the island. TTAL has also repackaged the island with a focus on wellness tourism. Major improvements are also occurring on a deeper scale within the industry. The Inter-Island Ferry Service has been bolstered with the addition of two fast ferries, thus increasing accessibility to our island. North-East Tobago was designated a UNESCO ‘Man and the Biosphere’ reserve – the largest of its kind in the English-speaking Caribbean and our sustainable tourism thrust was further strengthened by the approval of two Green Key properties. With the issuance of the first tranche of our historic $300M bond for developmental projects, Tobago has embarked on a new, bold path – one that might be paved with obstacles, but one that will be extremely rewarding.

Office of the Chief Secretary Tobago House of Assembly Administrative Complex 62-64 Calder Hall Road Scarborough 900408 Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868 639-3421/2696 Fax: (868) 639-5374 Email: chiefsecretary@tha.gov.tt Website: tha.gov.tt

Charles Pashley President

Ian R. De Souza

Chief Executive Officer

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (T&T Chamber)

T

he Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce takes this opportunity to warmly congratulate the publishers of Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business on its newest edition, especially given the challenges resulting from the global pandemic. We are pleased to continue to be part of this magazine which is firmly established as a go-to reference for investors and business people overall. Our country is now at a defining point as we confront a new society that is fuelled not by fossils but by creativity, use of technology, collaboration and sustainability. As a people, our historical resilience must come to bear, for the path ahead is one in which we must embrace change to our very social fabric in the recovery process. The T&T Chamber continues to represent the “voice of business” as we work with other national stakeholders to engender business growth. We provide robust lobbying and advocacy on key public policies and regulations to foster a facilitative environment that allows all businesses to thrive and be globally competitive. We remain the only business representative organisation in Trinidad and Tobago with a Tobago desk. Additionally, we offer an extensive portfolio of services to assist members through industry insights, developmental training, medical insurance coverage, a business awards programme, linkages with regional and international business associations and preferential rates for rental of our facilities. Visit our website for more information on the T&T Chamber, or find us on: Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Columbus Circle, Westmoorings PO Box 499, Port of Spain Trinidad Tel: (868) 637-6966 Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

9


MESSAGES

Diane Hadad Chairman

Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (T&T Chamber)

Tricia Coosal President

Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA)

T

As we move forward into a post-pandemic recovery phase, businesses on our island will be called upon to adapt and reimagine their operations. The Division will continue its work to be the connecting thread in advocacy for operators on the island in critical areas of business and tourism development. Through the work of our seven committees and our presence on committees of the Tobago House of Assembly, we engage collaboratively. We also seek out synergistic relationships with central Government and national stakeholders. In doing so, we provide a vital link between the private and public sectors and civil society to further the interests of Tobagonians.

rinidad and Tobago Manufacturers Association (TTMA)’s mission and primary focus is the stabilisation and exponential growth for our members of the manufacturing sector in Trinidad and Tobago. We are quickly approaching the second half of Year Two of the COVID-19 pandemic where many were hopeful our situation would be behind us, but it remains. The uncertainty has not only challenged the manufacturing sector, but most industries. The resilience of the manufacturing sector determined to survive and take the requisite steps to adapt, pivot and reinvent are quite evident and notable. In 2020, TTMA set an audacious goal to double exports by 2025. Based on current projections, all efforts and resources apportioned should realise this goal. TTMA’s mission and call to service in a strategic approach during this pandemic was to evolve. One of the key takeaways commissioned was a virtual platform for trade missions. This methodology was widely successful and remains a key avenue for growth and expansion opportunities for our members to increase the value. CARICOM remains the second largest export market for Trinidad and Tobago outside of the United States. During this period of border closures, virtual trade missions within CARICOM have been very successful and fuelled export growth. TTMA also embraced the opportunity to partner with exporTT and the Ministry of Trade and Industry to prepare our Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) for export via the Export Booster Initiative. This initiative is geared towards the establishment of Trade Facilitation Offices and Trade Attachés, gathering of market intelligence, hosting of virtual trade missions and a virtual expo platform with the availability of translating services. It also affords the opportunity for in-market promotion and the promotion of sector profiles. Another very effective venture is the TTMA’s alignment with the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Trade and Industry in a public-private partnership to undertake the management of vaccination sites for the business community under the Government’s programme ‘Vaccinate to Operate’. TTMA supports a strategic approach for the safe reopening of the economy and collaboration among stakeholders plays a major part of ‘Safety for Success’ for the business community. TTMA in its public-private partnership with the Government has administered 40,000 vaccines to the business community and public. With the Manufacturing Sector completely re-opened, continued vaccination and adherence to stringent COVID-19 Health and Safety Protocols are key. TTMA encourages everyone to be vaccinated to protect yourselves and your loved ones. TTMA is in service to our membership and committed to continued growth and expansion for the manufacturing sector. TTMA pledges our full support to a safe and successful reopening of all sectors.

2nd Floor ANSA McAL Building Milford Road PO Box 47, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2669 Fax: (868) 639-3014 Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt Website: www.chamber.org.tt

TTMA Building, 42 Tenth Avenue Barataria, Trinidad PO Box 971, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 675-TTMA (8862) Fax: (868) 675-9000 Email: bdu@ttma.com; info@ttma.com Website: www.ttma.com

T

he Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce extends congratulations to the publishers of Who’s Who in Trinidad and Tobago Business, upon successful publication of another informative issue. The Division was established specifically to serve the needs of the Tobago business community and remains a vibrant and proactive arm of the T&T Chamber. Originally established as the Tobago Chamber of Commerce, it merged with the Trinidad Chamber 37 years later.

10


MESSAGES

Dr. Thackwray Driver President / Chief Executive Officer

Dwight Mahabir Chairman

The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago (The Energy Chamber)

T

he global energy sector has always been dynamic and responsive to major shocks. In 2020, however, many key issues emerged which has caused the energy sector to rethink its future. One of the most pressing issues is energy transition. Over the past year, we have seen strong commitment by the global energy sector to address the dual challenge: the need to produce increasing amounts of energy but at a dramatically lower carbon footprint. The impact of this has far-reaching effects throughout the energy value chain and the supply chain and it is clear that it is not going to be “business as usual”. The energy sector has taken clear leadership in this area and many of the major oil and gas companies have committed to Net Zero by 2050 or sooner. Within this new context, the Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago remains focused on positioning Trinidad and Tobago as the supply chain hub of the region and playing a major role in the sustainability of the sector. We continue to work towards achieving this by focusing our efforts in six key advocacy areas: increasing energy efficiency and renewables, gas value chain realignment, fiscal reform, promoting local content, industrial relations reform and integration regional energy services markets. While the COVID-19 pandemic of course still looms large, there seems to be some light at the end of the tunnel, now that the country is in a better place to start easing restrictions. The “new reality” will require policy measures to improve the ease of doing business and cutting unnecessary regulatory red tape, which must be a central element for economic recovery. We must take advantage of this ‘new reality’ to automate systems, especially Government regulatory processes. Additionally, labour market reforms must be central to the recovery plans, as well as removing subsidies that promote inefficient use of resources. Greater integration of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) labour markets, especially for skilled but currently uncertified workers, will help the overall efficiency of the region’s energy sector. Governments are going to have to work closely with the local private sector and international investors to ensure that the overall investment climate promotes new energy sector investment. This includes getting the right fiscal measures in place to ensure that we continue to attract capital into the upstream oil and gas industry. Without this investment, the petrochemical and LNG sectors have a very uncertain future. It is necessary to consider the additional changes that are impacting the global, regional and local energy sector, that is the energy transition and the urgent need for the industry to decarbonise energy production rapidly and fundamentally, whilst simultaneously providing sustainable and reliable sources of energy. There are many opportunities that we have here in the region to take a leadership role in the energy transition. Focusing on Trinidad and Tobago, one of the world’s oldest hydrocarbon producers, we already have many of the ingredients in place to play a leading role. As the representative body of our energy sector, the Energy Chamber will continue to advocate for, and take the lead in ensuring that the sector remains competitive and sustainable and continues to serve all stakeholders. Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Avenue Point Lisas, Couva, Trinidad PO Box 80, San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 Fax: (868) 679-4242 Email: execoffice@energy.tt Website: www.energynow.tt

Caroline Toni SirjuRamnarine President

Nirad Tewarie

Chief Executive Officer

American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T) Trinidad and Tobago is an ideal destination for trade and investment opportunities. Our geography, culture, creativity, adaptability, and natural resources offer many great opportunities for investments in the areas of tourism, manufacturing, and the energy industry where Trinidad and Tobago has one of the largest petrochemical industries in the world. Also, investments in tech, communications, and the creative arts present many benefits. Ultimately, what makes us a rich and vibrant nation is our people. The world-class energy, creativity, and adaptability we have shown time and time again define our small twin-island State into a beacon of hope and dynamism. This is a great place to work, live and play! The disruptions of COVID-19 may have created some hardships, but it has also provided many opportunities that ushered in the acceleration of digital transformation especially in the way we do business and interact with the State. Investments in tech provide untapped potential here for local businesses to grow and ultimately become one of the leading tech hubs in the world. At AMCHAM T&T, we are well poised to lead the business community through our expertise and access through our network of 25 AMCHAMs within this region. We are committed to developing a conducive business environment and building a resilient and cohesive society. So, make AMCHAM T&T your preferred growth partner into Trinidad and Tobago or from Trinidad and Tobago to the hemisphere!

62 Maraval Road, Port of Spain Trinidad, W.I. PO Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466 Fax: (868) 628-9428 Email: inbox@amchamtt.com Website: www.amchamtt.com

11


MESSAGES

Richie Sookhai President

The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)

S

ince 2020, the business community has endured many challenges locally, regionally, and internationally, brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. Sectors such as retailers, food service and manufacturing to name a few have been substantially hurt given the downturn in sales due to restrictions and border closures, while still having to cover various operating and fixed costs. However, the pandemic has also provided opportunities for new and innovative business models, which if properly implemented, will ensure future sustainability and growth. The advances in globalisation have been challenged due to the pandemic, and this was clearly apparent given the many supply chain issues throughout the world. We must therefore aggressively implement strategies to become more self-sufficient through the diversification of various sectors, looking beyond the dependency on oil and gas. We must embrace and protect our most precious resource - our people. Education and innovation should be a top priority as they are indeed the key drivers for any diversification opportunities. COVID-19 has exposed significant vulnerabilities in brick and mortar operations within the retail sector. This has accelerated the desire and urgency for businesses and consumers to utilise digital platforms for operating their business and making purchases. Furthermore, with regard to digital platforms, social media has created many new career opportunities for individuals to become influencers, bloggers, etc. While the concept is not new, the pandemic has accelerated their importance for the future. We must, as a country motivate the younger generation to appreciate the value of social media and its critical role in business today. The Chamber realises that the way of the future is the online economy. It is therefore important for SMEs to adapt to this model to ensure their sustainability. The Government needs to provide the necessary infrastructure to foster an environment for the private sector to successfully embrace digital transformation. Business chambers ought to provide educational programs to assist businesses in moving towards digital marketing of their products and services, through social media platforms.

Hassel Thom President

Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)

T

he Trinidad Hotels, Restaurant and Tourism Association (THRTA), Trinidad’s largest private sector tourism body is honoured to once again be part of this year’s Who’s Who in Trinidad & Tobago Business publication.

As the THRTA continues to advocate for industry stakeholders on matters that can both negatively and positively impact the tourism centric trading landscape, as it has done for more than half a century, on behalf of its membership and nonmembers alike that comprised of the recognized locally-owned independent hotels and guest houses, as well as the those belonging to international chains. Other integral component of its membership includes restaurants, transport and tour operators and a multitude of companies that provide goods and services to the tourism industry. The COVID-19 pandemic has been both the most disruptive phenomenon to our tourism value proposition in the past three generations, in the light of such, the THRTA understands the need to work with all public and private sector partners, towards returning some level of normalcy to the trading environment, be it so with less resources through Advocacy and Industry Representation, Strategic Collaborations, Networking and Alliances, Research and Data Acquisition and sourcing new Revenue Generation opportunities that will engender short term survival. The THRTA remains cognisant that the post-pandemic modus operandi demands that it must capitalise on opportunities that may not necessarily be generated from traditional sources as a strategy to ensure that each element of Trinidad’s tourism value chain continues to place the destination’s collective interest above self-interest, through rigorous adherence to and monitoring of Health and Safety Best Practices to influence the level of confidence for all travellers to Destination Trinidad.

In due course, payment methods will continue to evolve and we may have to embrace cryptocurrency as a means of digital payment. The State should already be formulating laws and procedures to regulate the use of digital currencies.

17 Cumberbatch Street Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 671-2242 (CCIC), 477-3444 Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org Website: www.chaguanaschamber.org

12

Corner Airway Road and Hilltop Lane Chaguaramas, Trinidad PO Box 243 Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 634-1174/5 Email: info@tnthotels.com Website: www.tnthotels.com


MESSAGES

Keston Nancoo Chairman

Stephanie Fingal

Chief Executive Officer

Mark Edghill President

Vashti G. Guyadeen

Chief Executive Officer

Employers’ Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA)

Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI)

he ability of organisations to create value, even in difficult and uncertain times, now, more than ever, requires a deliberate shift in mindset and quality of thinking that moves us from just being practitioners to profit makers. In fact, this has become even more apparent given the continued devastating impacts of an ongoing pandemic, and which has introduced many new workplace issues and challenges for employers, as they adapt to changing business models, organisational structures and systems of work to survive and operate in what is being called the “new normal”.

ince March 2020 Trinidad and Tobago, like the rest of the international community has had to deal with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Managing the spread of this aggressive and deadly virus has been challenging, our citizens have been asked to curtail their movements, isolate themselves from friends and loved ones and give up their source of income simply to survive; lives vs livelihoods. Fifteen months later, we continue to be asked to ‘stay the course’.

Among other things, this ability to continuously create value and successfully manage human capital risk in any environment, requires strong, competent and futuristic-thinking leadership. We must be leaders who are driven by responsibility – not by reward or self-interest – who can motivate and inspire others not only to see the future and lead them there, but to reward them when they get there, and celebrate their collective success. This is a recipe for achieving desired results and realising personal and organisational success, and especially when leaders can understand and apply the skills of emotional intelligence

1. Prolonged lockdowns and restrictions to operate

T

Managing human capital risk is also a strategic value proposition of the ECA. With over sixty (60) years of experience in Industrial Relations, the ECA not only possesses a clear understanding of the issues that are likely to arise from a poorly managed workforce, but also the capacity to actively assist employers in identifying, developing and implementing strategies to mitigate these human capital risks. In this regard, the ECA remains committed to supporting the employer community through responsible advocacy, informed representation and the provision of innovative and transformational services.

17 Samaroo Street East Aranguez, El Socorro 280536 Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-5873, 638-6463 Fax: (868) 675-6026 Email: communications@ecatt.org Website: www.ecatt.org

S

Trinidad and Tobago faces several challenges: 2. Extended border closure 3. Sectors prepared to open, still closed 4. Business closures 5. Reduced revenue in circulation - job losses and wage cuts 6. Family dynamics – financial hardship – home schooling – childcare – globally women are most affected 7. Supply chain interruptions – Forex scarcity - import delays – shortages. During this period, the TTCSI has been hard at work collaborating with our members to ensure that they are able to address the challenges presented by the pandemic. We have been working with member associations to ensure the safe reopening of their sectors once approval is received. This, without a doubt, has been our greatest challenge, balancing lives with livelihoods. We are, however, committed to meeting these challenges and look forward to working closely with our members and stakeholders over the short and medium term to pursue a path of growth and sustainability.

18 O’Connor Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9229 Email: marketing@ttcsi.org Website: www.ttcsi.org

13


MESSAGES

RESILIENCE AND RECOVERY… THE PATH AHEAD

The Supermarket Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT) As the curtain fell on 2020, many looked toward the coming new year with renewed hope. The sheer trauma that COVID-19 has caused to both society and the individual shook the nation to its proverbial knees. The die that caste essentials from non-essentials with the restrictions that followed could surely be the worse of the pandemic that we ever hoped to experience right? Plus, vaccines were turning the corner with big pharma receiving the stamp of approval from the World Health Organization. A glimmer of hope on the horizon.

Rajiv Diptee President

Corner Connector Road and Chaguanas Main Road Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 689-2037, 762-9702 Email: info@satthq.com; sattexecdirector@gmail.com Website: www.satthq.com Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

Fast forward to June 2021. If anything last year, the average household held onto some modicum of savings as a safety net, the frustration was still nascent not yet plumbing the depths of our sanity while we were still able to ensure collective buy-in to the restrictions. The deeper a crisis goes, the deeper we are able to measure the elasticity of the attitudes, behaviours and platitudes of the people whom it affects the most. And today we see that as an alarming indication of where we are as a society. It measures the elasticity of our resilience to maintain that which is being asked of us while acknowledging the most ignominious of circumstances in which we find ourselves. As a people and a culture, the path to recovery is shaped by that desire we inherited from our indigenous forefathers; the desire to craft a better future. While COVID-19 has robbed us of these opportunities, it has not dampened those ambitions. Today’s protagonists have pivoted even before the term was ever coined. COVID-19 has given us a timely reminder that the most basic human values shape us as a people as we trudge the road to recovery. May we extol such virtues as we seek to exit this pandemic.

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T) Caroline Toni Sirju-Ramnarine – President Nirad Tewarie – Chief Executive Officer

62 Maraval Road Port of Spain, Trinidad, W.I. PO Bag 150, Newtown, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 622-4466 Fax: (868) 628-9428 Email: inbox@amchamtt.com Website: https://amchamtt.com/

Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce George Alexis – President Davita Simon – First Vice President Carlton Semper – Second Vice President

Southern Main Road, Point Fortin, Trinidad c/o Coastal & Offshore Maritime Training Institute (COMTI) Tel: (868) 648-4961 Email: pfswcic@gmail.com Website: https://www.pfswcic.com/

Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce

Sangre Grande Chamber of Commerce

12 Camden Road, Couva, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 636-5017, 609-5017 Email: couva.chamber@gmail.com Website: https://www.facebook.com/cplcoc/

The Secretariat PO Box 4500 Sangre Grande, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 275-7274 Email: sgchambertt@gmail.com; sgrandechamber@gmail.com Website: http://sgchambertt.com/

Mukesh Ramsingh – President

European Business Chamber in Trinidad and Tobago Maarten Spiljard – President

18 O’Connor Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 684-8365 Email: info@eurochamtt.org Website: http://www.eurochamtt.org/

Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce Rampersad Sieuraj – President

18 Penal Rock Road, Penal, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 647-0452, 683-9573 Email: penaldebechamber@gmail.com

Preston Sam – President

The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC) Richie Sookhai – President

17 Cumberbatch Street Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 671-2241, 477-3444 Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org Website: https://chaguanaschamber.org/

The Energy Chamber of Trinidad & Tobago Dr. Thackwray Driver – President and CEO Dwight Mahabir – Chairman

Suite B2.03, Atlantic Plaza, Atlantic Avenue Point Lisas, Couva PO Box 80, San Fernando Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 6-ENERGY, 679-6623/1398 Fax: (868) 679-4242 Email: execoffice@energy.tt Website: https://energynow.tt/

14

The Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce Melissa Senhouse – President

110 Eastern Main Road Tunapuna, Trinidad c/o Pat & Max Limited Tel: (868) 322-4GTC (4482) Email: gtchamberinfo@gmail.com Website: http://www.tunapunachamber.com/

Tobago Division of the Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce Diane Hadad – Chairman

2nd Floor ANSA McAL Building, Milford Road PO Box 47, Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 639-2669 Fax: (868) 639-3014 Email: tobagochamber@chamber.org.tt Website: https://chamber.org.tt/

Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (T&T Chamber) Charles Pashley – President Ian R. De Souza – Chief Executive Officer

Columbus Circle, Westmoorings PO Box 499, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 637-6966 Fax: (868) 637-7425 Email: chamber@chamber.org.tt Website: https://chamber.org.tt/


CHAMBERS AND ASSOCIATIONS THE CHAGUANAS CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY & COMMERCE

17 Cumberbatch Street, Chaguanas, Trinidad, W.I. Tel: 671-2242 or 477-3444 Email: gccic@chaguanaschamber.org Website: https://chaguanaschamber.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Chaguanaschamber/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ chaguanas-chamber-of-industry-and-commerce KARENA SUKHU - Treasurer; SUNIL MOONASAR - Director; KYRON REGIS - Public Relations Officer; VAALMIKKI ARJOON Secretary; RICHIE SOOKHAI - President; KEVIN RAMGOOLIE Director; VISHNU CHARRAN - Immediate Past President; BALDATH MAHARAJ - Vice President; NESHA MAHASE - Manager; SAJJAD HAMID - Director; DANIEL AUSTIN - Assistant Secretary;

L to R:

https://d.facebook.com/couvachamber/

15


ASSOCIATIONS EMPLOYERS’ CONSULTATIVE ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (ECA)

ARIMA BUSINESS ASSOCIATION Christian Rampersad – President Marcia Samaroosingh – 1st Vice President Sudesh Ramkissoon – 2nd Vice President

Christian Rampersad President

c/o Broadway Express Services Ltd. 24 Broadway, Town of Arima Arima, Trinidad Tel: (868) 331-6404, 685-0441, 365-2361 Email: arimabusinessassociation@yahoo.com Website: https://www.whoswhotnt.com/associations/

Keston Nancoo – Chairman Stephanie Fingal – Chief Executive Officer

Keston Nancoo

President/Chairman

17 Samaroo Street East, Aranguez, El Socorro 280536, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-5873, 638-6463 Fax: (868) 675-6026 Email: communications@ecatt.org Website: www.ecatt.org

ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (APETT) Eng. Jainarine Bansee – President Eng. Dr. Chris Maharaj – President Elect

Eng. Jainarine Bansee President

INSTITUTE OF BANKING AND FINANCE OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (IBF)

The Professional Centre Building 1st Floor, Unit A203 11-13 Fitz Blackman Drive South PO Box 935, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-6697 Email: office@apett.org Website: www.apett.org

ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS (AREA)

Darren Ali – President Marsha R. John – Chief Executive Officer

Darren Ali President

Level 1 Invader’s Bay Tower, Invader’s Bay Off Audrey Jeffers Highway Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 235-6291, 321-9330 (m) Email: marketing@ibf.org.tt Website: www.ibf.org.tt

Mark Edghill – President

Mark Edghill President

Suite A4 Kencita Court 76 Picton Street, Newtown 190205 Port of Spain, Trinidad PO Box 6494, Maraval Post Office Maraval, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-9048 Fax: (868) 628-9049 Email: area.tt.assoc@gmail.com Website: www.areatt.com

ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INSURANCE COMPANIES (ATTIC) Jason Clarke – President

Jason Clarke President

ATTIC Head Office and Training Centre 46-50 Picton Street, Newtown Port of Spain, Trinidad PO Box 208, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-1663/5457/2969 Fax: (868) 622-4205 Email: mail@attic.org.tt Website: www.attic.org.tt

INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (ICATT) Denise Chinpire-O’Reilly – President

Denise Chinpire-O’Reilly President

SANGRE GRANDE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION Kenneth Boodhu – President

AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

c/o Ojoe’s Building 193B Eastern Main Road Sangre Grande, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 668-5932 Email: kenboodhu@hotmail.com

Ryan Latchu – President Reyaz Ahamad – Vice President 130 Seventh Street, Barataria Trinidad and Tobago Tel: (868) 674-8885 Email: ryan.latchu@toyota-trinidad.com

2nd Floor, Professional Centre Building 11-13 Fitzblackman Drive Wrightson Road Extension Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-8000 Email: service@icatt.org Website: www.icatt.org

Kenneth Boodhu President

Ryan Latchu President

SHIPPING ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

BANKERS ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (BATT)

Richard Downie President

16

Richard Downie – President Kelly Bute-Seaton – Executive Director

Hayden Alleyne – President Yuri Jardine – Vice President

Level 1, Invader’s Bay Tower, Invader’s Bay Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 235-6291 Email: secretariat@batt.org.tt Website: www.batt.org.tt

15 Scott Bushe Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-3352/55 Fax: (868) 623-8570 Email: admin1@shipping.co.tt; president@shipping.co.tt Website: www.shipping.co.tt

Hayden Alleyne President


ASSOCIATIONS TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO COALITION OF SERVICES INDUSTRIES (TTCSI)

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD & TOBAGO (HRMATT)

Mark Edghill – President Vashti G. Guyadeen – Chief Executive Officer

Cavelle Joseph – President Keisha Deokiesingh – Vice President

Cavelle Joseph President

PO Box 22, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 687-5523 Email: secretariat@hrmatt.com; manager@hrmatt.com Website: www.hrmatt.com

Mark Edghill President

18 O’Connor Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9229 Fax: (868) 622-8985 Email: info@ttcsi.org Website: www.ttcsi.org

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION (TTCA) Glenn Mahabirsingh – President Rodney Cowan – Vice President

THE SUPERMARKET ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (SATT) Rajiv Diptee – President Maria Mohammed-Maharaj - Executive Director

Rajiv Diptee President

Corner Connector Road and Chaguanas Main Road Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 689-2037, 762-9702 Email: info@satthq.com; satt.president@gmail.com Website: www.satthq.com

THE TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INCOMING TOUR OPERATORS ASSOCIATION (T&TITOA) Lorraine Pouchet – President

Glenn Mahabirsingh President

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS (TTIA)

Martyn Joab President

Tel: (868) 689-2037, 762-9702 Email: info@satthq.com; sattexecdirector@gmail.com Website: www.satthq.com President

Tricia Coosal – President

TOBAGO HOTEL AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION (THTA)

President

Tricia Coosal President

Christopher James – President Apt 1, Lambeau Credit Union Bldg. Auchenskeoch Road Carnbee, Tobago PO Box 295, Scarborough, Tobago Tel/Fax: (868) 639-9543 Email: tobagohoteltourismassoc@gmail.com Website: www.tobagohoteltourism.com

Dr. Vishi Y. Beharry – President Dr. Damion Basdeo – Vice President

President

President

TTMA Building, 42 Tenth Avenue Barataria, Trinidad PO Box 971, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-TTMA (8862) Fax: (868) 675-9000 Email: bdu@ttma.com; info@ttma.com Website: www.ttma.com

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (T&TMA)

Dr. Vishi Y. Beharry

Gerald Crockshaw

Martyn Joab – President Rm 305B, The Professional Centre North Block 11–13 Fitzblackman Drive, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-8842 Email: administration@ttia-architects.org Website: www.ttia-architects.org

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION (TTMA)

Lorraine Pouchet

Christopher James

The Professional Centre Bldg. Ground Floor, Unit A 303 11–13 Fitzblackman Drive, Wrightson Road Ext. Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-1266/8020 Fax: (868) 623-2949 Email: service@ttca.com Website: www.ttca.com

1 Sixth Avenue, Xavier Street Extension Orchard Gardens Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 671-7378/5160 Email: medassoc@tntmedical.com Website: tntmedical.com

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE AND FINANCIAL ADVISERS (TTAIFA)

TRINIDAD HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND TOURISM ASSOCIATION (THRTA)

Gerald Crockshaw – President Larry Tai Chew – Vice President

Corner Airway Road and Hilltop Lane Chaguaramas, Trinidad PO Box 243, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 634-1174/5 Email: info@tnthotels.com Website: www.tnthotels.com

129-131 Edward Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-2940/2608 Email: info@ttaifa.com Website: www.ttaifa.com

Hassel Thom – President

Hassel Thom President

17


AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES

INTERVIEW

RYAN LATCHU

PRESIDENT AUTOMOTIVE DEALERS ASSOCIATION

I

n his 2020/2021 budget presentation, the Finance Minister Colm Imbert made some major announcements regarding the Automotive industry. He stated, “At close to one million vehicles, there are simply too many cars on the road in Trinidad and Tobago today. As a country, we spend $2.5 billion per year or US$400 million per year importing an average of 25,000 vehicles per year, at least two thirds of which leads to private motor cars. This has created a serious leakage of foreign exchange. We propose to remove all tax concessions on the importation of private motor cars. All private motor cars will now attract customs duty, motor vehicle tax and Value Added Tax (VAT), with the lowest rates of duty and tax being imposed on hybrid cars, electric cars, CNG cars and small engine cars below 1500cc to encourage low use.” The Minister added that tax concessions are to stay in place for commercial and industrial vehicles and on public transport vehicles. Earlier this year, as instructed by the Minister in his budget presentation, a reduction in the age of imported foreign used vehicles was implemented – from four years to three years. Additionally, the quota for the importation of used cars was reduced by 30%. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, full-year sales for 2020 were 10.122 units, a 31% decrease when compared to 2019.

18

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, full-year sales for 2020 were 10.122 units, a 31% decrease when compared to 2019.

HOPE FOR A FUTURE IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO DESPITE CHALLENGES The year 2021 started negatively for the Trinidad and Tobago market. In the first quarter, 3.120 units were sold - an 11.7% decrease in sales when compared to the first quarter in 2020. Trinidad and Tobago’s automotive industry experienced several lockdowns due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With lockdown measures during the second quarter of 2021, being relaxed in July 2021, the industry was allowed to operate on a temporary basis.

Where do all these new measures coupled with a pandemic leave the Automotive industry?

It has been adversely affected. This is according to the President of the Automotive Dealers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ADATT) Ryan Latchu. When asked how he would describe the last year for the sector, he said, “The Automotive sector has been adversely impacted over the past 18 months due to several factors. Internationally, the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected the automotive supply chain as it relates to the manufacture of component parts, vehicle


AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES production and global logistics. Domestically, we began experiencing challenges over the past few years with foreign exchange shortages and this has resulted in a steady decline in the vehicle market. Recently, the removal of tax and duty concession on hybrid and CNG-powered vehicles under 1,600cc the local COVID-19 situation and the domino effect this has had on the economy all contribute to a market that is now 50% of what it was a mere five years ago.”

What are the major challenges post-COVID and moving into 2022? “The major challenges facing the automotive industry post-COVID-19 will be our ability to sustain stimulated demand for vehicles” Latchu stated. But what, if anything, can be done to address such challenges? The president of ADATT stated, “The global landscape and approach for consumer purchases have drastically evolved due to the pandemic and as such, we have also prepared to mitigate against any potential threat impacting our industry. The reality is that although work life will change, there will always be a need for mobility. As such, we have planned for the sustainment and survival of our industry by developing and enhancing our digital tools, contactless solutions and safety protocols.”

What are the future trends and growth opportunities for the industry?

“Transportation and mobility will continue to be essential for the public and as such, we see our industry with a future. However, 2020 was a challenging year and we believe that based on the factors mentioned, 2021 will be similar. The level of economic activity moves in tandem with the Automotive sector, so in essence when there is an increase in economic activity this translates into increased demand for vehicles and vice versa. We believe that growth in our sector is limited in the short term considering the current situation. However, with the recovery of the economy in the mid to long term, we anticipate an increase in market activity for all players.”

What is the outlook for the automotive industry in 2021-2022? Latchu stated, “The automotive sector in 2021 is forecast to be similar to that of 2020. On the other hand, 2022 is primarily dependent on the Government’s micro and macroeconomic policies to drive economic stimulation and growth. Although we hope the market improves, based on the pandemic, we see only marginal increases if any.”

Aviation industry

There is no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic has heavily impacted upon the Aviation industry in Trinidad and Tobago. Emmanuel Baah, Deputy General Manager explains, it has been a major disruptor to the aviation industry. Some countries attempted to prevent the entry of new variants by putting restrictions on travel. This resulted in an unprecedented fall in aircraft and passenger movements. This country’s borders were closed to commercial flights from March 23rd, 2020 to July 17th, 2021. Trinidad and Tobago experienced a 95% drop in international passenger movements. This led to severe cash flow challenges for many airlines, airports and businesses related to travel and tourism. Some airlines and duty free operators retrenched staff or attempted furloughing in order to reduce personnel expenditure. Politically: As vaccines were developed and distributed, the issue of vaccine passports has arisen. Many countries have stipulated that passengers be vaccinated in order to enter their countries. Some countries have refused to accept some of the COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by the WHO. So, 2021 finds us at an intersection between geopolitics, economics, a pandemic and commercial competition.

INTERVIEW

EMMANUEL BAAH

DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER ESTATE PLANNING AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AIRPORTS AUTHORITY OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

Socially and economically: COVID-19 led to unprecedented financial challenges for airports and airlines. Suppliers to these entities faced financial turmoil. Employees and business owners in affected sectors faced reduced disposable income, this may reduce their availability of funds for leisure travel in 2021. Technology: The pandemic has driven increased use of technology. It remains to be seen if this will adversely impact upon the demand for business travel, meetings and conferences. Legal: Regulations have impacted on the cost of travel. Environment, safety and health: Increased focus on health has stimulated interest in contactless processes for check-in, passport control and shopping. This trend is likely to continue into the future.

What are the challenges facing the industry post-COVID, and what can be done to address them?

One major challenge is the projected slow recovery for air travel. Some industry analysis suggests that passenger movements may not recover to 2019 levels until 2023. What can be done: - Encourage domestic travel - Promote mass vaccination to reduce the number of new cases and the number of deaths from COVID-19 in Trinidad and Tobago so countries that use a tier system to categorise countries based on risk of infection, will categorise Trinidad and Tobago as one of the countries where the spread has been contained. This will encourage other countries to reduce restrictions placed on travel to and from Trinidad and Tobago - Advocate for the acceptance of all WHO-approved vaccines in major source markets such as Canada and the EU so the brand of vaccine will not be a nontariff barrier (NTB). The Authority is working to reduce its dependence on revenue streams linked to movement of aircraft and passengers. This will be done by pursuing the development of non-aviation revenue streams. The Authority will be working to attract investors and land developers to projects on the Piarco Airport estate. In Tobago, the next big initiative will be the construction of a new terminal. Skytrax World Airport Awards declared the Piarco International Airport the cleanest Caribbean airport as well as the Best Airport in the Caribbean for 2020 to 2021.

19


20


21

AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES


21PORTT-4912 Taycan Magazine Ad_7.5x5.375in-v2.indd 1

22

8/2/21 11:50 AM


23

AUTOMOTIVE AND AVIATION SERVICES


BANKING, INVESTMENT AND

FINANCIAL SERVICES INTERVIEW

BANKERS ASSOCIATION

RICHARD DOWNIE KELLY BUTE-SEATON President

Executive Director

T

he Bankers Association of Trinidad & Tobago (BATT) sees a resilient banking sector continuing to meet and overcome the challenges posed by the COVID-19 health crisis while advancing digital transformation and managing issues of asset quality deterioration, loan delinquency and slowdown in credit. “Overall, the sector remained well-capitalised, highly liquid and is well supported in no small measure by the Central Bank’s monetary policy measures,” BATT said.

Outlook and challenges for banking sector in 2021/2022

While noting that the rollout of vaccinations provides a crucial anchor for positive medium-term expectations, in light of the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, BATT said the near-term outlook may reflect: Asset Quality Deterioration. Payment deferral and forbearance programmes helped borrowers in the near term, but the lockdowns of 2020 and 2021 impaired companies’ finances, while rising unemployment ate into household incomes and weighed on borrowers’ ability to service their loans. This, combined with the phasing out of support measures, means that banks remain vulnerable to adverse credit risk movements, particularly in sectors hit hardest by the pandemic, such as tourism, hospitality and entertainment. Arising from this, asset quality risk could increase due to pandemic-induced repayment challenges. . Non-Performing Loans. In December 2020, nonperforming loans (NPLs) at 3.4% of total loans, up from 3.1% one year earlier, remained within reasonable proportions but were likely to be one of the most serious consequences of the pandemic for banks.

24

OF TRINIDAD & TOBAGO (BATT)

Improving the ease of conducting banking business remotely and safely via various digital platforms.

by Kay Baldeosingh-Arjune

CHALLENGING TIMES AHEAD IN THIS UNCERTAIN ENVIRONMENT

The third wave of COVID-19 infections and the reimposition of restrictions in 2021 triggered a considerable slowdown in economic activity, weakening the ability of debtors to pay their obligations and placing strain on banks that serviced the sectors most affected. NPLs can be expected to creep upward, demonstrative of the financial impact of the pandemic, particularly as relief measures such as loan moratoria are eventually withdrawn. Muted credit growth. An environment of weak economic activity will weigh on bank loan demand as businesses struggle to survive, investment projects are put on hold and unemployment inevitably rises. Despite low interest rates, lending to businesses has been weak, falling by 4.6% year-over-year in September 2020. Loan growth is very likely to be muted in 2021 and 2022 as businesses may be less inclined, in this uncertain environment, to seek new financing.

Support of SMEs during and post-COVID

During this crisis, BATT noted that banks responded collectively and expeditiously to support those struggling to meet financial obligations by instituting various forms of relief, including reducing interest rates on all loan types, loan instalment deferrals of up to six months, and waivers of penalty charges and late payment fees on credit facilities.


BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES “We continue to invite individuals and SMEs experiencing ongoing financial difficulties to have urgent discussions with their banks to develop tailored financial packages to meet their financial commitments, including loan restructuring, selective waiver of fees and charges on merchant services and specific credit facilities,” BATT said. The banks also provide guidance to SMEs wishing to apply to the Government’s SME Loan Facility.

INTERVIEW

FINTECH ASSOCIATION

Other areas of support to small and medium enterprises, BATT said, include: • The introduction of an e-commerce platform to allow SMEs to operate online via social and other digital accounts thereby enabling them to create digital stores to facilitate business in the midst of the COVID-19 restrictions. • Financing of commercial vehicles. Given the increased demand for customer deliveries, some banks created a specific financial package to enable SMEs to acquire these vehicles to evolve their business models. • Free consultations for existing and new clients to identify untapped opportunities for their businesses, as well as workshops for our SME clients in order to build their internal capacity and address a range of areas, from digital marketing to strategic planning, that are critical and important to their businesses at this time.

Digital transformation developments Investment in new technologies has enabled banks to offer improved digital services. Key developments include:

- The upgrade of debit cards to LINX _VISA EMV (Europay, MasterCard and Visa) chip cards using VISA chip technology. - Growth of the e-commerce ecosystem by facilitating the use of LINX_VISA debit cards online. - The introduction of contactless payments at the point of sale. In the pipeline is the “contactless” experience at the ATMS and the use of QR codes (matrix barcodes) as a purchasing tool within the retail space. - Helping the underbanked to access services they need within mainstream digital banking. - Continued improvement of digital legislation to advance the ability to conduct transactions both in the payments space as well as the credit/lending space. - Improving the ease of conducting banking business remotely and safely via various digital platforms. - Modernising the electronic payment infrastructure to support Real Time Gross Settlement (RTGS) and Automated Clearing House (ACH) transactions as well as an electronic cheque exchange between financial institutions, which is currently in the pipeline. “Our banks are moving to phase out paper cheques in favour of digital payment mechanisms such as an electronic cheque clearing system which will allow financial institutions faster and more convenient access to cheque images, thus offering customers the benefit of having their cheques settled within a shorter time frame,” BATT said.

MARIA DANIEL President

RUDOLPH HANAMJI

OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (FINTECHTT)

Co-Founder and Public Education Group Lead

In 2020/2021, what is new in the local banking sector with regard to the rollout of e-money solutions? As part of the National Financial Technology (FinTech) Road Map, e-money solutions are integral to taking Trinidad and Tobago one step closer to a cashless society. Over the last year, the COVID-19 crisis has hastened the adoption and expansion of e-money solutions. National adoption of these solutions is key to further development in the local banking sector. Many of our members have invested in developing new-to-market e-money solutions and are interested in collaborating with the local banking sector to encourage adoption of same. Commercial banks have focused on upgrades to their online banking services and offer their large and small corporate clients alike wider access to online payments and technology to support same. We have seen Republic Bank, our largest indigenous regional bank, partnering with local FinTech companies to bring e-money solutions faster to the market. First Citizens bank has also invested in and partnered with Term Finance, an online SME lending and payday financier. This collaboration enables the big banks to partner with local developers who would not have access to the customer base, funding, nor the established reputation to build trust. For the larger banks that have traditional legacy systems and IT infrastructure that can sometimes be molasses for innovation, FinTech allows them to bring innovative solutions to their customers at a much faster rate. This collaborative model works effectively in small economies like ours and will definitely assist in the acceleration of the adoption of e-money solutions by the wider population.

What is FinTechTT’s vision for the local banking sector with regard to e-money solutions?

Our vision is to widen the net of solutions that can be brought to the market by facilitating the growth and development of the FinTech ecosystem. Raising awareness and public education is going to be a key initiative of FinTechTT. We have a working group of members dedicated to educating the population about e-money solutions and the benefits for small businesses. With more solutions available to customers, transaction costs will reduce, which in turn improves the services to customers and evens out the playing field for smaller entrepreneurial companies. We believe that the key ingredients exist for Trinidad and Tobago to be a regional leader in financial technology. We will be a driving force in the sustained development of FinTech solutions that put financial services within the reach of the unbanked and underbanked.

What specifically is needed to achieve this vision?

To achieve this vision, all the levers in the ecosystem have to be operating and working together almost like a gear system with each rotation moving the next. These gears include a facilitating regulatory system that can balance risk and innovation, talent upskilling and education, financing, Government support and infrastructure. Lastly, and certainly most importantly for this vision to be achieved, is high digital adoption by the population.

25


26


27

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


Republic House 9-17 Park Street Port of Spain Trinidad and Tobago T: +1 (868) 625-4411 email@rfhl.com www.republictt.com

Republic Bank Limited is one of the longest serving commercial banks in Trinidad and Tobago. Since first opening its doors 184 years ago, the Bank has strived to be the financial institution of choice for staff, customers and shareholders.

1

NIGEL M. BAPTISTE

2

DERWIN M. HOWELL

3

ROOPNARINE OUMADE SINGH

4

WENDY BOSSE

5

RIAH DASS-MUNGAL

6

KIMBERLY ERRIAH-ALI

7

MARSHA MC LEOD-MARSHALL

8

MARLON PERSAD

9

ALDRIN RAMGOOLAM

The Bank has grown alongside the diverse communities it faithfully serves with a network that consists of 40 Branches as well as 124 ATM’s in 75 locations throughout Trinidad and Tobago. During its evolution Republic Bank has expanded its reach by investing in staff training and customer care initiatives, continuously upgrading its digital marketing strategies and social media outreach, as well as its sustainable corporate social responsibility activities.

Managing Director Executive Director

Executive Director

General Manager, Internal Audit General Manager, Group Human Resources Group General Counsel/Corporate Secretary General Manager, Planning and Financial Control General Manager, Information Technology Consolidation Division General Manager, Information Technology Management Division

10 BALDATH RAMKISSOON

Most

recently

in

the

area

of

corporate

social

responsibility, the Bank became a signatory of the United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative, Principles of Responsible Banking (PBR). The PBR are a unique framework of six principles ensuring that banks’ strategies and practices align with the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Climate Agreement. The Bank has also placed greater emphasis on Small and Medium Enterprises via its SME Toolkit portal to assist local entrepreneurs in growing their businesses. The online portal provides a complete guide on what it takes to start, manage and grow a business.

General Manager, Group Treasury/Forex

11 DENYSE RAMNARINE

General Manager, Electronic Channels and Payments Division

12 DAVID ROBINSON

General Manager, Wealth Management and Trust Services

13 PARASRAM SALICKRAM

General Manager, Group Risk

14 RICHARD SAMMY

General Manager, Corporate and Investment Banking

15 CARLENE SEUDAT

General Manager, Shared Services

16 ROBERT SOVERALL

General Manager, Creditor’s Protection

17 KAREN TOM YEW-JARDINE

General Manager, Group Marketing and Communications

18 MICHAEL WALCOTT

General Manager, Overseas Operations

In charting the way forward Republic Bank will continue to serve with heart and purpose in meeting

19 KAREN YIP CHUCK

General Manager, Commerical and Retail Banking

the needs of all its stakeholders.

28

REpublic Bank Who's Who single pages x 2.indd 1

8/4/21 8:27 AM


BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES

Republic Bank. The Power of One Serving Many.

1

7

2

8

14

3

9

15

10

16

republictt.com

REpublic Bank Who's Who single pages x 2.indd 2

4

5

11

17

12

18

6

13

19

email@rfhl.com

8/4/21 8:27 AM

29


30


31

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


32


33

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


34


35

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


36


37

BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES


38


BANKING, INVESTMENT AND FINANCIAL SERVICES BANKERS ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (BATT) Level 1, Invader’s Bay Tower, Invader’s Bay, Port of Spain Tel: (868) 235-6291 Email: secretariat@batt.org.tt Website: www.batt.org.tt

Richard Downie President

The Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago is a non-profit organisation formed among the commercial banks to promote collaboration on matters of importance to the banking sector. Our Mission is to play a core role in the growth and stability of the financial sector, through advocacy and representation, and to facilitate the provision of the most competitive banking products and services to our customers, with integrity and transparency. Our objectives are: • To foster a collaborative approach for positioning the banking sector in Trinidad and Tobago consistent with international trends, standards, compliance and changing markets and regulatory requirements. • To play an active role in the education of the public on various risk mitigation methods as well as to enlighten them on their financial options.

Kelly Bute-Seaton Executive Director

• To work as a cohesive body in partnering with the Central Bank and other local regulatory and business agencies for the development of the banking sector, as well as to enhance their support for the productive sectors of the economy.

39


CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION INTERVIEW

ENG. JAINARINE BANSEE

PRESIDENT ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS OF TRINIDAD & TOBAGO (APETT)

C

onstruction

Earmarked as a vital cog in the assembly line of the nation’s recovery, the construction sector has suffered from a ‘stop start’ scenario in the past year, due to the Coronavirus pandemic. Regardless, the importance of the sector is evident by the prioritisation allocated – 15,000 construction workers were selected for early COVID-19 vaccination – as well as the continued plans for building homes and highways across the landscape. Indeed, construction was top of the list of the sectors that were allowed to resume as part of a phased reopening of the economy in July 2021. Minister in the Ministry of Finance Brian Manning alluded to the economic thrust provided by construction “The Government wants 25,000 new homes to be built in the next 10 years with 20% of this project being awarded to small and medium contractors. This will help boost the economy, creating thousands of jobs.” Such new projects offer a welcome addition to the others that have been stymied by various pandemic-enforced lockdowns, such as the Point Fortin Highway Extension. At the time of writing, both public and private sector construction projects were fully operational. Exemptions were granted for some projects to recommence during the nationwide lockdowns, including an early restart on the Valencia to Toco Road Upgrade Project. The other mass project of note is the Diego Martin Interchange that began in March 2021. Expected to last 18 months, its development will be a major symbol of construction leading the economic recovery.

40

The challenges as a result from COVID-19 have provided opportunities for organisations to re-evaluate, upgrade and retrofit their plant assets.

by Sheldon Waithe

RESUMPTION, RESTORING, REJIGGING AND PLANS FOR BUILDING

Besides the lockdown period, what has been the biggest problem faced by the industry during the pandemic?

Perhaps the greatest challenge to the sector has been the rapid price rise of materials due to COVID-19. The price of steel almost doubled in the six months to April 2021. This represents a disruptive factor for the local building industry, creating increased costs and according to the TTCA President, Glenn Mahabirsingh, it must lead to new contractual practices “This is a variation on a long-standing debate on how contracts should cater to contingencies beyond GLENN MAHABIRSINGH the control of commercial parties. For companies, President - Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association the difference between profit and loss hinges on margins easily eroded by ungovernable variables.” (TTCA) The second critical factor for the industry remains the substantial debts owed by the State to contractors and the potential for retrenchment as part of cost-cutting exercises. Mahabarsingh confirms that the TTCA recognises these issues and is doing its part to deal with these perceived pressures “You have a mixture of direct employees as well as a lot of


CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION sub-contractors. There would be some level of inconvenience which they would have experienced a year ago during the last lockdown so, I assure you that the various members have mechanisms to deal with this period of shutdown. We have also been holding dialogue with the Government on paying off debts owed to members for work done as he noted this money will go a long way, particularly now.” The sector will have to overcome many hurdles during its reopening, but its position as a crucial pillar for the nation is clear, as espoused by Manning: “Construction will restart the economy.”

Engineering

Directly affected by the economic downturn and the reduction of actual human movement due to the pandemic, were the myriad divisions that fall under the engineering umbrella – chemical, civil, mechanical, electrical. Each encountered different outcomes over the 2020-2021 period. President of the Association of Professional Engineers of Trinidad and Tobago (APETT) Eng. Jainarine Bansee confirmed this “Engineers across all disciplines are at the forefront to mitigate the effects of the coronavirus and are functioning as essential workers and professionals in all sectors of the economy to maintain stability.” Eng. Bansee indicated the other side of the sector’s fortunes throughout this unprecedented time, “There have been loss of income and jobs due to underutilisation of machinery and plant assets as a direct fallout from COVID-19. This resulted in a reduction of the services from engineering professionals inclusive of contractors, who continue to endure financial hardship.”

How has the sector adapted its practices during the pandemic period?

However, the sector has utilised modern technology to quickly adapt to the global scenario and continue its dissemination of information and education. “The restrictions from physical gathering and networking have provided opportunities for virtual dissemination of knowledge through webinars which APETT has embraced. This facilitated uptake by engineers and associated professionals from anywhere. For example, employees at an offshore oil and gas platform.”

How will this affect the sector in 2021/2022?

Eng. Bansee sees the benefits for both the current situation and the sector’s outlook towards 2022. “The restrictions and challenges as a result of COVID-19 have provided opportunities for organisations to re-evaluate, upgrade and retrofit their plant assets to become more competitive in the global market. Similarly, it’s an ideal opportunity for individuals to acquire knowledge and competence across multidisciplines to become more marketable.”

Transport

The COVID-related travails for this sector are dominated by the news of cost-cutting at the State-owned Caribbean Airlines Limited (CAL). After a year and a half of almost no air travel and recording an operating loss of $738M in 2020, the second half of 2021 will see an enforced retrenchment of 450 staff, costing $110M, as well as a reduction in the routes offered. CAL will also reduce the number of aircraft flying its insignia, with a restructured fleet of eight 737 jets for international destinations and five ATR Turboprops for its Trinidad to Tobago airbridge. A $400M investment in early 2021, by the State into the Public Transport System Corporation (PTSC), is designed to create a larger bus fleet that can access the smaller roads across the nation, thereby offering alternative routes to those currently used by the 32,666 taxis in operation.

The two new fast ferry purchases offer the confidence of regular service ‘‘Seabridge reliability is now here.’’ Minister of Works and Transport, Rohan Sinanan explained the overhauling of the fleet – “One of the problems PTSC has is the number of routes. We only operate on 50% of the routes because of the number of buses we have. Government took a decision to purchase 300 buses, which would increase the number of buses to 500, and that would show a significant increase in the number of people choosing the PTSC.” Minimal traffic on the roads has made it difficult to attain credible figures to assess the full impact of The Ministry of Works and Transport’s landmark initiative ‘Driving Toward Transformation’ that was launched during the first lockdown in March 2020. The mechanics are now in place to support the scheme – from online registration and mobile licensing units to an all-encompassing demerit points system with a comprehensive camera network – that has been rolled out to create cohesive modern technology solutions for the driving population. Though its infancy has been extended by the pandemic, the system has already taken effect with the suspension of driver’s licences resulting from the accumulation of demerit points. The technology enacted under the scheme represents a great leap forward in the effort to improve the country’s safety record, with NGO Arrive Alive President Sharon Inglefield welcoming the implementation “I am confident that the Ministry’s initiative will benefit citizens and make the nation’s roads safer for all.” With a stated aim of reducing road fatalities by 50% under the ‘Decade of Action for Road Safety 2021-2030’, the Ministry now has the means to create a significant culture shift across the nation’s roads. The Ministry also launched two new fast ferries in the past year, APT James and Buccoo Reef, as part of its inter-island travel fleet. The two catamarans, costing US$73.5M and US$72.9M respectively, offer greater passenger and vehicle capacity on their daily journeys between the islands. Further, after the negative trickle-down effects created by reduced ferry services in the 2017-2019 period, the ferry purchases offer the confidence of regular service and with it, the consistent movement of goods as well as people. “Seabridge reliability is now here,” confirmed Tobago House of Assembly Chief Secretary Ancil K. Dennis.

41


42


43

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION


O.J.'s Electrical & Instrumentation Services Limited is a STOW-TT contractor based in Trinidad and Tobago, engaged in a range of services that are offered locally, regionally and internationally within the commercial, energy, oil and gas sectors. Services Cost Impact ssessment EPC (Electrical & Instrumentation) Fibre Optic Installation & Testing Plant Equipment Monitoring Preventative Maintenance Sand Blasting Scaffolding Installation Start-up & Commissioning Transformer Oil Dehydration Troubleshooting of E&I Systems Turnaround

No. 176 Southern Main oad, Dow illage, South Oropouche, Trinidad, West Indies 1 (868) 223-0681 1 (868) 680-5619/ 1 (868) 741-6592 oojagaree.jagoo@gmail.com/ amitjagoo.ojs@gmail.com wwwojselectricaltt.com

44

Supplier of: Cad Welding Materials CCT Electrical Panels & Starters Industrial Electrical & Instrument Material Fibre Optic Materials High oltage Terminations Shipping Containers Transformers

Equipment Rental Backhoe Bobcat Compressors Crane Truck Dry-type Transformers Excavator

Generators Man-lift Mini-excavator Scaffolding Scissor lift Telescopic Forklift Modified Shipping Containers


45

CONSTRUCTION, ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION


ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

INTERVIEW

DR. THACKWRAY DRIVER

PRESIDENT AND CEO THE ENERGY CHAMBER OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

T

he Energy Chamber is unequivocal about the biggest challenge facing the industry. According to President and CEO of the Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago: “The huge challenge for the industry that looms over everything else - that we have to just face up to and very clearly put it centre stage - is climate change and the energy transition as the world moves to decarbonise its energy and petrochemical production. That is the overarching big issue that dwarfs everything else,” Driver stressed. “In the past year, we’ve seen global capital markets really place great emphasis on trying to understand where their investment dollars are going and wanting to be sure they will not be stranded in oil and gas projects that wouldn’t be able to be produced,” he said. Nevertheless, the big transition will take decades. Within that, there are still significant opportunities for fossil fuels. We have to deal with both sets of challenges and opportunities simultaneously, Driver said.

Energy transition initiatives

Solar Power: Driver highlighted two significant solar projects now in train. Lightsource, BP and Shell are investing in two major solar energy projects, the largest in the English-speaking Caribbean, which are currently progressing through the approval process and will hopefully begin construction this year, he said. “By next year, they will supply 10% of the country’s electricity demand,” he said. Going forward, we need to replicate that kind of project, he added. Development of Green Hydrogen. The Energy Chamber is passionate about this initiative. Trinidad has a major internal market for hydrogen produced from natural gas which is currently used by the

46

The huge challenge that we must face up to – is climate change and the energy transition.

by Kay Baldeosingh-Arjune ENERGY TRANSITION -

EXCITING PROJECTS AND MAJOR CHALLENGES methanol and ammonia plants on the Pt Lisas Industrial Estate. There is a massive opportunity, via a project in the development stage between NewGen Energy Ltd and Tringen, to create green hydrogen from water through electrolysis and feed that hydrogen into the petrochemical stream, Driver said. There are also opportunities for blue hydrogen. Blue hydrogen is produced from natural gas where, instead of venting the CO2 into the atmosphere, it is captured and sequestered, lowering a company’s carbon intensity and creating a greener petrochemical that can command a premium price. Biomethanol. Driver also noted a significant waste to biomethanol project that is in the proposal stage and which would see municipal waste converted to biomethanol, generating important environmental benefits and providing a practical solution for dealing with Trinidad and Tobago’s problem of dealing with its ever-growing mountain of municipal waste. Energy Efficiency. The Chamber is also very involved in discussions surrounding improving energy efficiency and Driver noted that a lot of work was being done by companies to reduce the carbon footprint of their operations by reducing the amount of energy and greenhouse gases, for example, by switching to more efficient engines and using wind power to run offshore platforms. The Energy Chamber championed the Energy Efficiency draft policy which has been submitted to Government. “We were major players in getting that policy written,” Driver noted.


ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

Electricity subsidy

Removing the subsidy on natural gas that goes to Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) is a major challenge the country has to address, Driver said. At present, he noted, industry has to sell cheap natural gas to allow T&TEC to supply cheap electricity rates to the country. “That’s not sustainable. That has to change. But higher electricity rates doesn’t mean your bill has to be higher,” he stressed. Studies that we have done and been involved in show that “the average commercial building in the country or government office could save up to 60% on their electricity bills through simple energy management processes that need no investment dollars or investment dollars that would pay off over a six-month period,” he said. He explained this could involve actions as simple as turning off lights at night, plugging holes in building insulation, and turning off air-conditioning on weekends. He also noted that better off households were enjoying the highest benefit from the subsidy. While the Energy Chamber believes the country needs to ensure people have access to and could afford basic electricity, the State should not be subsidising the cost of operating pumps to swimming pools and flat screen tvs, he said.

Overall outlook

For all the right public health reasons, 2020/2021 was a very difficult environment, and working through that increased everyone’s costs of production, delayed projects and created a difficult operating environment, Driver said. However, over the medium-term, Driver said “there was great reason to be positive on both the oil and gas side.” He noted that with prices recovered to a large extent and a number of petrochemical plants back in production, 2022 for Trinidad and Tobago would be generally more positive than 2021. “The positives are that despite delays we did see BHP bring the Ruby field into production ahead of schedule, that’s really an incredible achievement for them.” He also noted that Shell, BP and EOG all had projects that were progressing well and Touchstone’s “exciting” new gas finds onshore “opens up an interesting new source of gas” that could be brought to market very quickly.

Barriers to doing business in T&T

Driver identified the top two barriers to doing business in Trinidad and Tobago as the digital process with respect to interacting with the Government and the country’s confrontational industrial relations system. He is looking forward to a new IR Act which he believes would “create a much more flexible labour market that balances employer/employee rights” and give individuals rights versus trade union rights. This will allow a company to be flexible and adapt quickly in how it manages its workforce to not miss opportunities, and it will change the focus from job preservation to job creation, he said. The top issue with regard to attracting new investment into the energy sector is the fiscal terms, he added. The Energy Chamber has submitted a comprehensive proposal for changes to the fiscal regime specific to the energy sector.

ANDRE ESCALANTE

MANAGING DIRECTOR AND FOUNDER ENERGY DYNAMICS LIMITED

Towards an energy efficient T&T

What is the outlook for a more energy efficient T&T in 2021/2022?

The outlook is good - not excellent - for a more energy efficient Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad and Tobago is somewhat different than most other islands in the Caribbean with respect to energy as follows: • The country boasts the lowest energy cost in Caribbean and amongst the lowest in the Western Hemisphere @ US$0.06/kWh. • Trinidad and Tobago buildings have the highest energy use index in the Caribbean at over 260 kWh/m2 yr whereas most islands are under 160 kWh/ m2 yr (40% lower) • Because of its low energy cost, the culture of the people is one of waste with respect to energy – lights, appliances and equipment are left on continuously with little or no regard for the energy consumption and cost. • There has been an increase in demand from the private and residential sectors to reduce energy costs driven by the current economic situation and also due to the Government’s indication of a pending increase in energy costs.

How can businesses and individuals practise energy conservation?

• A recent Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) study of a public building in Trinidad found a 20% reduction in energy consumption through low cost /no cost initiatives. Plans are being made to expand the pilot in all Ministries which will have a significant impact on energy conservation in public buildings. • The high energy use index of over 260 kWh/m2 yr that we have seen in the local public and private sector means that there is an opportunity to reduce energy consumption by a minimum of 20%. Residential customers can convert all their lighting to LED, consider solar water heaters, timers to switch off lights and equipment when not in use and prepare to retrofit their old AC system to high efficiency systems.

What can be done to attract businesses into the sector?

• Introduce incentives and disincentives to attract businesses into the Energy Efficient (EE) and Alternative Energy (AE) sectors. The current low cost of energy does not make the economics of using EE and AE technologies very attractive. Removing subsidies will raise the cost of energy and hence increase the demand of these technologies. • Implement the Energy Services Companies (ESCO) legislation set up in 2010, with necessary modifications along with the tax incentives to attract business into this industry. When the ESCO legislation was passed in 2010, many new businesses entered the industry hoping to obtain returns, but when then legislation was not fully implemented (not one company was certified as an ESCO) many dropped out. • Pass the law to allow people to use Solar PV systems and tie onto the grid. Disincentives can include raising import duties on incandescent bulbs, electric water heaters and inefficient AC systems to make the EE and AE technologies more competitive.

47


48


49

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES


50


51

ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES


52


ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES

ai16250401139_advert_V2_print.pdf 1 30/06/2021 09:01:54

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

MEMBER

53


JUST A BETTER WAY TO DO THINGS ABOUT US HOT-HED® TRINIDAD LTD was incorporated in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago in April 2001 and is a subsidiary of HOT-HED® INTERNATIONAL- an oilfield services provider with more than 40 years of experience in Oil and Gas Industries globally and with over 25 different offices worldwide. Our company has been providing the Upstream, Midstream, Downstream, Brownfield and Green field Energy related markets, Locally and internationally with innovative, safe and reliable Oilfield Services, Products and Safety Solutions for nearly half a century. SAFETY & TRAINING Our company offers quality workmanship and superior results at every job with our highly train and skilled crew ensuring we meet our clients needs. Our patented products are internationally recognized and have received major awards. The #1 choice by the Energy and Construction sectors for their major projects.

JSP Complex 71 Hakim Juman St Edinburgh, Chaguans, Trinidad, W.I. www.hot-hed.com

54

OUR PRODUCTS

• Hot-Hed® Preheater / Postheater System • Hot-Be’lr® Preheater / Conductor Pipe & Casing Cutter • Hot-Chek® Weld Integrity Testing System • Hot-Jnt® Pipe & Casing Pre-Heater • Lock-Well™ Wellhead Security Nuts • Mud-Saver® Drill Mud Bucket OUR SERVICES

• Portable HABITAT ™ Welding Isolation OUR FOCUS ON HSSEQ

Hot-Hed® operations is integrally focus and committed to HSSEQ at the workplace and at our client locations. As a preferred supplier of oilfield products and services in high risk environments, we adhere to ALL HSSEQ requirements and safety practices. Hot-Hed Trinidad Ltd conforms to the guidelines of Safe to Work (STOW) and has maintained being STOW certified for seven plus (7+) years. Our parent company Hot-Hed® International offices maintains ISO-9001:2015 and ISO 45001:2018 certification, ensuring our patented products and services to our customers are of a high quality and done safely.

+868-221-1889 / +868-305-8492 admintrinidad@hot-hed.com

Chambers, ATEX Type 1,2 and 3 available

• Press-Test ™ Wellhead Pressure Test

Hydraulic and Manual Bolt Torquing Services • Hydraulic Bolt Tensioning Services • Hot Bolting Services • Cold Cutting Services • Hot Tapping Services • Wellhead Installation Services • Hydrostatic Pressure Testing Services • Hydraulic Nut Splitters • Leak Sealing / Denso Taping • ATEX Temporary and Portable Lighting Solutions, Industrial Air Horns and Industrial Fans (Rental and Supply)


ENERGY AND ENERGY-RELATED INDUSTRIES Safety Helmet Brackets for Wolf Mini Torches

, W.I.

,

55


HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS INTERVIEW

DR. VISHI Y. BEHARRY

PRESIDENT TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MEDICAL ASSOCIATION (T&TMA)

H

ealth

Unprecedented. That is the only word to describe the past year for Trinidad and Tobago’s health sector, and indeed that of the wider world. A major spike in COVID-19 cases from April 2021 onwards has seen the Ministry of Health shift focus from implementing quarantine measures and lockdown procedures to instigating a parallel healthcare system to cope with an increase that has seen Trinidad and Tobago move from 123 cases in June 2020 to 43,344 - as of late August 2021. The marked increase in COVID-19 infections sorely tested the nation’s medical capacity of 10 public hospitals, 10 private hospitals and 89 public health facilities. The establishment of two field hospitals at Port of Spain and Couva provided the necessary extra bed space and formed part of the proactive planning on the part of the sector. North Central Regional Health Authority CEO Davlin Thomas confirmed the overall forecasting strategy in dealing with the pandemic, to ensure that medical supplies were in place to accompany the increased bed space “We have been stockpiling. In the past, we did a lot of projections via our public health observatory. Based on that, we knew we had a good sense of what we would be dealing with, and we were stockpiling equal to that.” Manpower support has been provided by the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force, while industrial estates local to many of the patient centres have been providing essentials such as oxygen tanks.

56

The Trinidad and Tobago Medical Association has a clear role in the movement to get as many people as possible vaccinated.

by Sheldon Waithe

ESTABLISHING NEW METHODS FOR A NEW WORLD While the medical sector has been performing above and beyond its remit – aided by volunteers such as dentists and veterinarians – the toll on the medical professionals and their support staff has been considerable. The Trinidad and Tobago Medical Association (T&TMA) has recognised the issue of the pressures facing its members, with new President Dr. Vishi Y. Beharry establishing a committee to help its members cope with the extraordinary stress levels due to the Coronavirus pandemic. Burnout has been a common factor across the globe; the medical association will address this with counselling and provide avenues for its members’ mental health. Equally, the T&TMA has a clear role in the movement to get as many people as possible vaccinated, thereby creating the herd immunity to allow the country to reopen “We can provide the support of going into the communities to the patients who cannot go to the health centres. Just as we did the outreach after the 2018 floods, providing medical care to affected persons through simultaneous clinics in multiple areas, we’re going to use that model and partner with the Ministry (of Health).” The association has also disseminated information to the public as an education campaign designed to curb vaccine hesitancy.


HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS The burden upon the medical sector will continue in the coming year but Beharry knows that it must continue to evolve, perhaps even more so because of the virus, instead of being hindered by it. “Medicine is an ever-changing world with new research, evidence, and evidence-based medicine. It is important for doctors to update themselves, so they are giving patients the best care available.”

INTERVIEW

JONATHAN BARCANT

CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR IAMOVEMENT; FOUNDER AND LEAD ENGINEER VETIVER TT ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS LTD.

Through the traditional methods of mentorship of junior doctors and new approaches such as virtual conferences, the sector continues to arm itself for the year ahead and its role in protecting the citizens of Trinidad and Tobago at this unprecedented time.

Safety

Establishing practices for new essentials, such as the enactment of field hospitals to cope with pandemic patients, put the Occupational Safety and Health Agency (OSHA) at the forefront once again to ensure that global standards are met, even throughout the pressures of a medical emergency. The agency has met the challenge while still undertaking its duties across the sectors that are deemed essential services, such as the oil industry. The new normal of working from home has also forced a change in thinking for the risks associated with the base of working virtually, a factor that will require careful and intricate consideration over the coming year. The Chamber of Industry and Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago recognised as much, stating ‘Work from home was once a privilege but now it is the standard. We need to look at the risks and opportunities of work from home. Employers still have a duty of care even with work from home arrangements. OSHA Trinidad has outlined reasonable steps as a guide when it comes to risk assessments.’

Standards

The pandemic forced the proliferation of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) across all sectors. The Trinidad and Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS) fulfilled its essential role of not only ensuring that PPE products met the minimum requirements, but also offered, where relevant, advice on the proper usage, fit, or application. Further, the Bureau’s laboratories are equipped to test both prototypes and existing PPE products as well as the disinfectants, cleaning products and sanitizers that have become part of the new normal. To minimise physical human contact while they carry out these crucial supportive tasks, many of the Bureau’s processes such as applications, testing, assessment, certification, customer complaints and payments have moved to their vastly expanded online platforms, with portals enabling the TTBS to carry out its tasks throughout the pandemic period but also easing the usage and improving the efficiency for the immediate future and long term.

Environment

The Environmental Management Authority (EMA) has been able to maintain its duties throughout the lockdowns, through a mixture of essential workers and virtual working. As such, it has been able to maintain many services including the recycling programme iCARE. Behavioural change towards more environmentally friendly practice is also at the forefront of the efforts of another Government agency Solid Waste Management Company (SWMCOL). The company is pursuing legislative action for a Beverage Containers bill, to curb the massive plastic bottle pollution problem. CEO Kevin Thompson sees both the resultant change towards greater recycling as well as the economic benefit, “At SWMCOL, we are doing work on developing position papers on different waste streams. All waste streams create opportunities to have less waste in the landfill. The legislation provides that framework for the other persons who may not be so voluntarily minded or environmentally sensitive about the damage that is being done to the environment. And (with funds gained from recycling plastics for sale) you give them another reason to participate.” SWMCOL saw a reduction in its plastic recycling process in the past year, with COVID-19 forcing two of its three sites to close, but it still processed 335 tonnes of plastic for export and resale. There is also a big push for environmentally friendly practice towards creating 21st-century revenue streams from the private sector, spearheaded by NGOs such as IAMovement. Natureloving brothers Jonathan and Daniel Barcant created the group of young, environmentally conscious Trinbagonians in 2014 to raise awareness but it has now developed into a platform for climate mitigation and reduction of costs to power the nation. IAMovement states that if Trinidad and Tobago were to wholeheartedly embrace getting its own energy from renewable sources, the benefits would resonate throughout various trickle-down factors. Jonathan Barcant says “The country is spending money on energy which could be saved and invested in other industries – especially in the midst of a move toward diversifying the economy of Trinidad and Tobago. Every dollar of natural gas or barrel of oil not consumed locally could benefit the country by selling it overseas or sending it to the refinery in Point Lisas to generate more revenue and create jobs through petrochemical products. It is win-win.” With almost 50 nationwide Climate Talk events and utilising the trend towards online learning through the establishment of their REThinking Energy portal, IAMovement is hoping to disrupt the status quo and create meaningful change in both the way the country treats its bountiful environment and utilising it towards economic benefit.

57


https://carpha.org

LEADING THE CARIBBEAN’S COVID-19 RESPONSE

D

espite the pandemic, the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) successfully hosted its 65th Annual Health Research Conference from June 16th to 19th, 2021. It was the agency’s first virtual conference which carried the theme “Pandemic, NCDs, and Climate Change: the Caribbean’s Triple Threat”. The theme was chosen to highlight the challenges with respect to COVID-19, the high levels of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) within our societies, and the devastating impacts and implications of climate change on public health. CARPHA is leading the regional health response, actively working with the 26 CARPHA Member States (CMS) and key partners on regionwide approaches to the COVID-19 response. According to CARPHA’s Situation Report published on June 21st, 2021, “Some Member States continue to experience increases in the number of positive cases, with the number of cases passing 906,000 in the Caribbean and 211,000 in CMS. Additionally, 50% of CMS is reporting community spread and there have been reports of all three variant strains of concern of SARS-CoV-2 present in the region.” Since that report on June 21st, 2021, an additional 10,383 cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in 22 countries within the Caribbean, bringing the region’s total confirmed cases to 906,840 in 35 countries/territories (including the 26 CMS). The new total represents a 1% increase in the number of confirmed cases. There were 12,291 deaths recorded in the Caribbean region as of June 24th, 2021. As of August 3rd, 2021, CARPHA reported 242,968 confirmed cases from CMS and 1,219,589 confirmed cases in the Caribbean (including the CMS).

CARPHA’s response to the pandemic In February 2020, even while the risk of COVID-19 was low for the Caribbean, CARPHA’s incident management team for emergency response (IMT-ER) was activated to coordinate the regional public health response. CARPHA is coordinating the health response using a multifaceted approach from regional coordination with Heads of Government, and agencies, laboratory testing, surveillance, response, support to vaccination, research and safer re-opening of our borders and tourism sector. CARPHA continues to strategise with regional agencies and governments and has developed regional documents on the safe re-opening of borders, public health border policy, repatriation, economic recovery, resuming travel for CARICOM and guidelines for multiple sectors and groups.

58

The agency has also been providing reliable and timely COVID-19 updates and situation reports. It has also developed testing protocols and procedures for detecting possible COVID-19 cases and conducts training in the proper use of personal protective equipment, laboratory testing and COVID-19 health prevention measures. CARPHA procures supplies such as testing kits, masks and other equipment. Due to the resumption of travel for many states, CARPHA joined forces with the Caribbean Tourism Organisation, the Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association and other regional tourism agencies to form a COVID-19 Tourism Task Force, developing proactive health measures for healthier, safer tourism. The agency has been privileged to have multiple interactions with the Heads of Government who have been frequently updated regarding the situation, the risks, threats and opportunities. As Dr. Lisa Indar, Director of Surveillance, Disease Prevention and Control at CARPHA stated, “CARPHA, as the regional public health agency, has a multisectoral approach in terms of focusing on the pandemic. We have focused on the tourism sector through our Tourism and Health Programme; at addressing COVID-19 during a hurricane or a disaster through our emergency and response department we have our Chronic Disease Department which is looking at our vulnerable populations; we have our Medical Microbiology laboratory that is not just focusing on the laboratory testing for COVID-19 via PCR, but is also involved in validation and ensuring we are turning around our laboratory results information rapidly. Our turnaround time for PCR has been less than 48 hours, sometimes less than 24 hours for countries.” Complimenting CARPHA’s response to the pandemic, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago Dr. Keith Rowley in a media briefing in May 2020 stated, “We want to single out the staff of the Caribbean Public Health Agency…who provided us with absolutely exquisite professional help and guided the Heads of Governments and other decisionmakers in the Caribbean. We have been well served.” Mia Mottley, Prime Minister of Barbados and Chair of The Conference of Heads of Government of CARICOM, in her address at the 73rd World Health Assembly on May 18th, 2020 said, “… were it not for the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO), or CARPHA and more recently the WHO, we would believe that we were living in the “wild wild west” that we see in movies where only those who are strong and well-endowed should survive.” While most countries have started major vaccination drives, CARPHA continues to urge that it remains critical that active surveillance, testing and COVID-19 prevention and control measures are maintained.


59

HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS


60


61

HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS


LEADERSHIP PROFILE

RICHARD RAMREKHA LEADER. INNOVATOR. TRAILBLAZER. ASC, BS-CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES, MBA HOSPITAL AND HEALTH CARE SERVICES MANAGEMENT (UK)

Committed to providing unsurpassed service in the industry.

M

r. Ramrekha sits as Managing Director of the Lab Medica Group of Companies and is a forerunner in the private medical services industry within Trinidad and Tobago.

As a young, clinical laboratory scientist, Mr. Ramrekha founded Lab Medica Services in 1995 as a small-scale private laboratory in San Fernando. With a strategic vision to grow the organization into a full fledge medical facility, he embarked on heavy business development initiatives, identifying key market segments such as, the Occupational Health Industry, Private Physicians Markets, and the Life and Health Insurance Sector. With 26 years under Mr. Ramrekha’s astute leadership, the group now has four (4) companies under its portfolio namely, Health Net Caribbean, South Coast Medical Center, Lab Medica Laboratory and Cubatrin Medical Supplies. The importance of affordability, accessibility and quality health care is evidenced by the several clinics located in the north, east-west corridor, central and south Trinidad, offering a range of medical, dental, diagnostic, and urgent healthcare services. Mr. Ramrekha affirming his value proposition that affordability would attract persons to be proactive toward their health, has also pioneered the creation of unique health plans, My Senior Card and MedCare Plus, which allow members to unlimited access to free doctors’ visits and free annual medical check-ups, along with having unlimited access to a wide range of highly affordable health care.

Health Net Caribbean

Having grown a small private laboratory with 3 employees to a network of clinics with 120 employees, investment in training and development is continuous and ongoing, keeping abreast with the advances in the health care industry and ensuring that quality is always at the helm of the Lab Medica Group. Richard Ramrekha is a qualified clinical laboratory scientist with post graduate studies in health care management.

www.labmedicaservices.com

Mr. Ramrekha’s motivation has always been the same. It is his main intention to become the most prominent and pioneering network of preventive medical care in Trinidad and Tobago, committed to providing unsurpassed service in the industry.

SERVICES LIMITED A MEMBER OF THE LAB MEDICA GROUP

62


63

HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS


LEADERSHIP PROFILE

SAMSON ACEVERO

FOUNDER AND FACILITIES MANAGER AT PURIVO DIALYSIS CENTRE LIMITED

Modelling dialysis through quality care and innovation.

E

very leader dreams of their success. Some may go abroad to learn and prosper. Others may acquire the training, come back, and serve the community that inspired their ambition. While most people will choose the former, Samson Acevero, Founder and Facilities Manager at Purivo Dialysis Centre Limited, did not. He answered his calling to serve by establishing Trinidad and Tobago’s premier hemodialysis centre. After 11 years of practice as a critical care nurse in the United States, Samson Acevero returned to his beloved home country to inspire quality healthcare through dignified service. He noticed the epidemic spread of kidney disease leading to high mortality among citizens. Although kidney disease is critical, Acevero knew that persons could live long and well with high-quality dialysis treatment. Hence, he was determined to establish a model dialysis clinic providing best-in-class medical care. In June 2016, he opened the doors of his first clinic in Chaguanas. The facility provides clients access to state-of-the-art treatment technology, highly trained nurses, and a nephrologist, a dietitian, and a pharmacist. Leading with innovation, this centre was the first in Trinidad to introduce nocturnal dialysis - a type of treatment known to improve patient outcomes. While many persons on dialysis in this country receive treatment at facilities stipulated by the Government-assisted programme, Acevero believes that “no person should have to compromise quality healthcare because of their inability to pay.” He partners with health insurance companies to offer cost assistance to clients who desire the safety and comfort of treatment at a private facility. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Mr Acevero opened a second centre in Piarco. When asked about the risk associated with this venture, he responded, “I knew it was important for persons receiving dialysis to avoid hospitals at this time, so I opened a facility to accommodate them.”

www.purivodialysiscenter.com

64

Under Mr Acevero’s leadership, Purivo Dialysis Centre Limited continues to be the number one choice for dialysis in Trinidad and Tobago.


65

HEALTH AND SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT AND STANDARDS


INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

BEVIL M. WOODING

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CARIBBEAN AGENCY FOR JUSTICE SOLUTIONS, APEX

I

t has been a long, trying and turbulent time since the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. However, information and communications technologies have played a vital; role in helping Trinidad and Tobago, and indeed the world, navigate the pandemic’s disruptive impact. The public health and safety responses to COVID-19 have had a devastating effect on livelihoods, education, employment, and investor confidence. The combination of border closures, curfews and social-distancing mandates, left businesses, government agencies and the selfemployed scrambling to find ways to keep their operations going. Sadly, not all have been successful. However, necessity, ever the mother of invention, has led leaders and business owners to the path of pandemic-accelerated digital transformation projects and investments. Digital innovations in service delivery, production, sales and distribution that would have otherwise taken years, if not decades, have be implemented and embraced in weeks and months. Digitalisation has resulted in many in-person activities, and manual or paper-based processes evolving to online delivery modes. Virtual workfrom-home to distance learning, online shopping and delivery, tele-health, e-government services, online court hearings, and even virtual physical activities, are now part of the new digital-services normal. In the process, individuals and institutions that may have otherwise been resistant to such disruptive change, have had no choice but to accept and embrace the process as a matter of survival.

66

Necessity has led leaders and business owners to the path of pandemicaccelerated digital transformation projects and investments.

Digital Innovations

TT INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY OUTLOOK The advantages of the pandemic–accelerated introduction of technology into our lives and businesses have not, however, been sufficient to overcome all challenges. The process has exposed long-standing gaps in critical infrastructure, public policy, investment facilitation, and strategic human resource development.

Enabling the local digital economy

Government agencies, businesses and consumers that were able to ‘go digital’ have helped mitigate the social and economic hardships caused by the pandemic. But they have also had to negotiate all too familiar roadblocks – scarcity of software programmers; slow, expensive or unreliable connectivity, un- or under-developed logistics systems; inefficient public services; indifferent or reluctant or unhelpful financial institutions. Undaunted, some enterprising businesses turned to overseas providers for services such as merchant accounts, credit card processing, software engineering and application-hosting. On the surface, these workarounds to local obstacles seem positive as they enabled businesses to shift to online service delivery, but there’s a catch. Too many businesses and consumers are being left behind.


INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY To realise the true economic benefits of the digital economy, local internet users must be able to find and support local businesses anchored in the local economy. That’s why economic benefits of internet commerce are most strongly experienced in the jurisdictions where the underlying internet infrastructure resides. Therefore, to fully enable the local digital economy, we must actively seek to ensure that local businesses are incentivised to run their digital services on local networks, conduct their electronic transactions with local financial institutions, be supported by local human resource capacity and subject to local laws.

Public policy and investment facilitation

There is nothing predetermined or guaranteed about the massive digital transformation that has taken place over the past year. And it would be reckless and irresponsible to consider the role technology plays in helping mitigate the impact of the pandemic without also considering our attendant responsibility to build the domestic digital economy beyond the pandemic. Any structured plan to support business in this way and incentivise the production of more local digital content and services, will require coordination, effective public policies and increased local investment. According to the World Bank, global foreign direct investment (FDI) flows are predicted to decline by more than 40% this year. The Bank’s Global Investment Competitiveness Report finds that more predictable trade and investment policies could help emerging market governments attract more investment flows needed to support financial stability and economic recovery. This is where public policy and regulatory frameworks can play a facilitating role in supporting increased local and regional investment in technological transformation. Public and private sector attitudes toward the value of local intellectual property and local capability may not change overnight. But the pandemic and closed borders have highlighted the importance of a having and properly supporting a robust local value chain for digital goods and services. For local businesses with promising ideas and innovations to go meaningfully beyond ideation and prototyping solutions, new funding and support models have to be made available. For example, a change in procurement policies to favour local vendors and enhance their opportunity to design, implement and maintain local solutions, can help strengthen the local technology services sector and open doors to significant global opportunities in the future.

Peering into the future

Our country, region and the world have hit an economic and social inflection point. Yet, in the challenges ahead lie the seeds of new opportunities. The promise of technology-enabled development is achievable but cannot be divorced from issues of leadership, vision, or values.

Our entrepreneurs and innovators have already shown that they are brimming with ideas about how technology can be used to tackle old challenges and create new business, services and value. Our opportunity now is to take its many lessons the pandemic has brought and use them to better prepare as a society for the inevitable crises ahead. While vaccines have presented a ray of hope, it is already clear that the impact of COVID-19 will be with us for some time to come. And, as we peer into the uncertain future, we can see that technology will continue to be an essential enabler in the post-pandemic recovery process – but only if it is thoughtfully and relevantly harnessed.

The promise of technology-enabled development is achievable but cannot be divorced from issues of leadership, vision, or values. People-driven transformation

Ultimately, digital transformation is driven and sustained not by technology, but by people. For our digital innovators, entrepreneurs and creators to take advantage of technology and the new modalities of work, business and life that have emerged in the pandemic, there will have to be deliberate, strategic investment in their success. This mission can be entrusted to any one individual, business, government or agency. It is a collective responsibility. Every sector has a role to play. Like the internet itself, our digital-revolution cannot and must not be centralised.

Government

Stakeholders can be engaged in myriad ways. • Articulate overarching national development goals • Lay the policy tracks and accelerate necessary legislative changes • Lead by example - support local digital innovators and businesses

Academic institutions

• Lay the education pipelines in collaboration with industry • Innovate in the delivery of courses and training programmes to accelerate the development of human capacity in targeted skills and competencies

Private sector

• Invest funding to foster relevant people skills; and automate and optimise local and regional value chains • Support production of local digital goods and services

Klaus Schwab, the World Economic Forum’s Founder and Executive Chairman, writes in the Global Technology Governance Report, “We have to make sure that the new technologies in the digital, biological and physical world remain human-centered and serve society as a whole, providing everyone with fair access.

67


ATTAINING DIGITAL NATION STATUS FOR

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO FROM SENATOR THE HONOURABLE HASSEL BACCHUS

I

n a rapidly evolving digital landscape, internet access and data sharing for business, administrative and social purposes are critical to removing barriers to facilitate transactions. COVID-19 has highlighted the fact that lack of access to ICT services prevents vulnerable groups from accessing online services or even performing basic activities. It was with this in mind, that Government felt that there existed a need for a Ministry to be charged solely with the responsibility for the development of a ‘Digital Nation’. As such, on July 12th, 2021, the Ministry of Digital Transformation was formed with a mandate to ensure that all citizens and residents are able to participate in a digital society and to have access to digital resources. Digital Transformation has become increasingly important for many nations around the world, as many have embarked on strategies geared towards achieving enhanced economic vitality, robust social safety nets, along with efficient and fair governance. Digital Transformation requires a radical reframing of our thoughts; inclusive of how technology is leveraged in both the public and private sectors, the processes employed and the way in which we ascertain if they are indeed successful in positively changing the way we operate. To transform digitally, we need to change culturally. Traditionally, governments have had limited reliance on the use of digital data in the decision-making process. However, what is being proposed now is an agile, iterative design, which focuses on user needs whilst tailoring government standards and processes with a substantial focus on data-driven decision-making. A digital government will focus on the use of open source solutions and the development of horizontal platform models, together with a flattened organisational structure and placing emphasis on delivery to citizens first. Critical to this achievement are three key stakeholders which include public officers, citizens and businesses. Understanding the needs of the public service and more particularly, the needs of public officers are critical in ensuring a cultural shift. Having a clear digital strategy driven by effective leadership, enables successful digital transformation. Governments that focus on technologies and disregard organisational and cultural impacts are doomed to fail. As part of the Ministry’s digital strategy, we have embarked on several initiatives geared toward successful cultural change in order to enable digital public service delivery. These initiatives include: • ICT Capacity Building – Government ICT Leadership Advisory Council (GILAC); • Digital Literacy – Education Reform in Schools. The Ministry’s digitisation strategy has identified five key steps which are needed to attain a ‘Digital Nation’. These steps include:1. Deployment of basic IT infrastructure – This step is ongoing with Ministries looking at their infrastructure requirements, ensuring that they are in compliance with GORTT standards;

68

2. Service Excellence – Ensuring resources and infrastructure are integrated with service delivery; 3. A ‘Whole of Government’ approach – Integrated, citizencentric services supported by efficient and open government. This approach promotes e-Citizen engagement and inclusion; 4. Sector Development – Looking at growth in GDP as a result of adoption and usage of ICT through E-Trade, built on a knowledge-based society; 5. Digital Nation – Technology-enabled nation. Single face of government with a minimum goal of 95% of all services available online. Additionally, the Ministry is engaged in reviewing and developing digital-ready legislation intended to build trust in the system by ensuring the security of our citizens’ data. What we are looking at is legislation that supports and benefits the citizens of a digital society, whilst fostering Digital Transformation. At present, we have engaged the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) for further technical assistance in this area. In the coming months, the Ministry will be rolling out various projects that are all intended to ensure digital inclusion. We have already removed taxes on mobile and digital equipment, mobile phones, specific software and computer accessories. Additionally, we have partnered with Government bodies to provide devices to students in need, along with donating to at-risk groups such as the visually impaired. We are currently looking into the provision of an additional spectrum of ICT services in Trinidad and Tobago, that will be free to use for citizens through an arrangement with Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT). Moreover, the Ministry will also continue with the provision of free public Wi-Fi through the TTWiFi project which is available in several public spaces and high traffic areas. Added to this, citizens can also access ICT training opportunities and enjoy internet connectivity in several rural communities nationwide as a result of the provision of community-based ICT centres known as Access TT Centres. The Ministry anticipates that it will have at least eight (8) new ICT centres available to the public before the end of 2021 and another ten (10) centres in 2022. As we continue to proliferate the avenues for digital inclusion, it is our hope that we will see an increase in the growth of our micro, small, medium and large enterprises in Trinidad and Tobago. This we believe will be supported in the near future through the use of several e-channels which will be leveraged to greater effect in a more facilitative ICT environment. Furthermore, the Ministry will also be placing focus on strengthening the digital ecosystem by updating our governance frameworks through amendments to the Cybercrime Bill and the Consumer Protection legislation.


69

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


70


71

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


72


73

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


74


75

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


76


77

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY


78


INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

HELLO

we an tweet you better

We are Huckle erry Media Company,

the digital marketing team you're looking for, built to provide international grade digital media solutions for aribbean brands

THE COMPANY

Huckleberry Media Company is the original remote-first, digital media agency founded in 2012. Over 60 major clients have trusted us to deliver compelling social media management and digital brand strategy in sectors from wellness to retail & from start-up to starting over. THE FOUNDER

Kieran Andrew Khan our founder and Digital Media Director is also a prolific writer with two decades of published work including this issue of Who's Who in T&T Business He's worked with F500 companies local and regional businesses and believes in partnering with brands that are creating a better tomorrow WIN with us in DIGITAL MEDIA + BRANDING | SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGEMENT | CONTENT MARKETING | PR MANAGEMENT | DIGITAL REPUTATION MONITORING | DIGITAL VIDEO|AUDIO + ALL OTHER WINNING CONTENT FORMATS

contact us

Global WhatsApp: +1 (754) 317-0170 Trinidad and Tobago: +1 (868) 228-4848 office@huckleberrymediacompany.com HUCKLEBERRYMEDIACOMPANY.COM

y c n e g A d A n At o N @ y c n e g A d A n At o N @ y n a p m o c ai d e m y r r e b el k c u H @

25 projects successfully completed on time over the last 24 months.

79


INSURANCE

INTERVIEW

JASON CLARKE

PRESIDENT ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO INSURANCE COMPANIES (ATTIC)

I

ncreasing motor vehicle fraud, soft insurance rates, low interest rates and adjusting to a new Insurance Act are just some of the challenges facing local insurance companies. In addition, the blows dealt by the pandemic and related economic and business disruptions have left the local insurance industry “a bit bruised and battered,” says newly appointed President of the Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC), Jason Clarke. But, he is confident that not only is the industry seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, but it will emerge stronger than before. Clarke took up the mantle of President in May 2021. In this Q&A in June, he gives ATTIC’s perspective on the industry.

How would you describe the last year for the insurance industry and was there any major challenges due to COVID-19? Similar to that experienced by most sectors within Trinidad and Tobago, the last year has been arduous for our industry, inclusive of the 24 insurance companies represented by ATTIC. At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of our members were confronted with a complex choice of ensuring continued service to customers whilst safeguarding the health, safety and wellbeing of employees. As an essential service, some of our members’ employees are on the front line.

Most members had to quickly transition processes and shift some operations to work-from-home models. We are proud of our members, as most were able to implement the necessary changes, adjust to the evolving economic climate, regulatory health

80

As a dynamic industry, we are continuously managing varying and evolving challenges and risks.

by Kay Baldeosingh-Arjune

ADAPTABLE, FLEXIBLE, STRONGER THAN EVER

protocols, and social distancing mandates. The adaptability and flexibility shown by our membership over the last year have thus far protected many jobs. It has also enabled members to ensure that they continue to satisfy their obligations to policyholders in as safe an environment as possible.

Outside of COVID-19, what are some of the biggest problems currently faced by the industry and what is being done to address them?

As a dynamic industry, we are continuously managing varying and evolving challenges and risks. For example, as the economy contracts, we are wary of increasing motor vehicle fraud and the filing of suspicious claims. Our members are also dependent on the conversion of local currency to fund their reinsurance programmes. This has become difficult to perform. Insurance rates have been soft for more than 10 years, but it is now at an inflection point that unfortunately coincides with the local economic contraction and the pandemic. Interest rates on investments continue to be at historic lows whilst the local stock market declines. These present significant hurdles for members’ investment portfolios which in turn compromises their policyholders’ ability to meet their obligations. In addition to these, the industry also has to now manage the transition


INSURANCE to a new Insurance Act, with new stringent requirements and reporting guidelines. We have numerous initiatives that were implemented or are in train to assist in managing the challenges and risks of our members. We successfully worked with a number of our members to establish an Online Claims’ Bank. This enables each member to quickly validate an insurer’s claim history, to improve the underwriting of their risk. The data is also used for fraud detection. Other members are expected to join and share their data soon. ATTIC expects that within the next 12 months, all members will participate in the Claims Bank. We are also part of a private-public initiative to facilitate members of the protective services and motor vehicle authority determining, in real time, if a motor vehicle has valid insurance coverage. Motorists will not be inconvenienced by having to provide ‘paper’ motor certificates when stopped, as validation will be facilitated via access to an online database of vehicles insured by members.

Will there be any shifting of coverage behaviours post-COVID-19?

We do expect some changes post-COVID. This will be due to the adverse economic impact the pandemic has had on local, regional and international economies. Very few countries were spared from an economic contraction in 2020. This may nudge individuals and commercial entities to examine their wallets and adjust spending patterns. For our industry, we may experience an increase in consumers shifting to lower-cost policies offering less protection. Alternatively, more consumers may opt to self-insure their property, which can lead to dire consequences.

What new ways of doing things will the industry implement permanently? The pandemic has sped up the adoption of online services. Customers have shown increasing usage and confidence in online services and have embraced the ease and convenience of doing business online. Local employees and our members have had to transition to work from home programmes. Some employees prefer this option, and it is a trend we expect both parties will continue to use long after the economy is fully open for business.

What is your outlook for the industry in 2021/2022? ATTIC is very optimistic. We are confident that our people and the industry will overcome this transitory phase. Going into the pandemic, most persons were overly optimistic that it would have been short-lived and now that we are still here, the pendulum has swung to many persons not seeing any light at the end of the tunnel. There is a light and we will come out the other side soon, a bit bruised and battered but certainly stronger.

ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

KESTON HOWELL MAXIM MARQUEZ Vice President - General

INSURANCE COMPANIES

Vice President - Life

(ATTIC)

The Insurance Act of 2018 and the Insurance (Amendment) Act, 2020

The insurance industry in Trinidad and Tobago is now being governed by new legislation. The Insurance Act of 2018 and the Insurance (Amendment) Act, 2020 both came into effect on January 1, 2021, replacing the Insurance Act of 1980, which had been in effect for over 40 years. According to ATTIC: “The Act is aligned with international best practices. It will also provide the tools needed to enable effective regulatory oversight and control. Risk-based measurements are employed, improving the capitalisation of insurance companies and offering additional protection to policyholders.” Highlighting some of the key provisions, ATTIC noted that: “For insurance intermediaries i.e. agents, brokers, etc., Continuous Professional Development (CPD) is a new requirement. This ensures continuous annual training and development of those key persons who interface with policyholders and the public. It is now a mandatory requirement that they continuously update their skills.” ATTIC also noted that: “Due to the increasing regulatory requirements, higher capitalisation and greater oversight, we may see some consolidation within the insurance industry. Insurers may be motivated to seek economies of scale to offset the increasing cost of operating under the new Act.” According to a Central Bank overview, requirements under the new legislation include: • A mandatory audit committee with at least two independent directors and segregation of duties – the appointed actuary cannot be the CEO or CFO • Prohibition of directors from voting on contracts for which they have a conflict of interest • Disallowance of bonus payments where an insurer does not meet the minimum capital requirements • Restrictions on payments of dividends when the insurer is in financial difficulty • Disallowance of bankrupts and persons involved in the management of a company that was insolvent in the last 10 years from being directors/officers unless expressly approved • Transparent and clear marketing - insurers’ sales and marketing materials must be clear, fair, accurate and not misleading.

81


82


83

INSURANCE


84


85

INSURANCE


1

6

10

4

2

8

11

7

9

5

3

12

Fast, Fair & Always There The NAGICO Group has been in existence for almost forty (40) years, providing a combination of personal and commercial property and casualty products and life and health risk solutions to its customers across the 21 territories within which it operates. The Group has over $475 million in equity, nearly $3 billion in assets and generates over $1 billion in gross written premiums per annum. The Group’s foundation lies not only on its nancial strength but in its business model, which is focused on people, trust and relationships. It is no surprise therefore that NAGICO is one of the largest privately owned P&C insurers in the region. It is a dynamic and agile group th that is able to navigate through challenging periods, identify and make use of opportunities along the way. This was demonstrated recently again during the pandemic where NAGICO accelerated its digital transformation plans and expanded its suite of online services geared toward ensuring customer convenience and safety. The NAGICO Group remains committed to delivering excellent service, both internally and externally, and continues to navigate within the current climate.

On October 4, 2021, NAGICO Insurance (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited will celebrate ten (10) years as an insurer in the Trinidad and Tobago market. During this period, the Company saw its gross written premium increase by ~140% from $55m in 2011 to $131m in 2020. This decade of exceptional performance is owed to the Company’s dedicated employees, reliable and supportive intermediaries and our thousands of valued customers, to whom we owe a debt of gratitude. The NAGICO Group is pleased and excited to announce that a deenitive agreement has been reached and Peak Reinsurance Company Limited (“Peak Re”), the A.M. Best A- and Moody’s A3 rated global reinsurer, is to become its 100% owner, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions being satissed. This transaction, when concluded, would result in the NAGICO Group being a wholly owned subsidiary of an A.M. Best A- and Moody’s A3 rated global reinsurer with approximately $1.5 billion in equity, thereby further strengthening the group’s proole and broadening its reach. Our dedicated partners and customers remain at the heart of what we do.

1. Mr. Marlon Oliver - Manager - Claims 2. Mrs. Lois Marcelle-Kennedy - Corporate Services Manager 3. Mr. Kendal Walter - Management Reporting Manager 4. Mr. Chaz Huggins - Executive Manager - Claims 5. Mrs. Carmen Sylvester - Senior Manager - Underwriting 6. Ms. Sharon Melville - General Manager 7. Ms. Kyria Ali - Group Interim CEO 8. Ms. Sherene Ramdial - Company Secretary 9. Mr. Arjay Ramlal - Manager - Sales 10. Ms. Jamie Manson - Manager Insurance Administration 11. Mr. Alan Hackett - Financial Reporting Manager 12. Mr. Rishi Singh - Sales Manager - Agencies

NAGICO InsurancesTrinidadTobago NAGICO InsurancesTT

86

www.nagico.com


87

INSURANCE


RAPHAEL TEELUCK FINANCIAL LEGACY SERVICES LIMITED Raphael Teeluck BSc.

Court of the Table

Managing Director

"My business is not just a job, it's my calling!" Rest assured that your business and its most treasured resources are in great hands. Your go-to financial advisor in the business sector, Mr. Teeluck with his highly experienced and professional team, partners with your organization every step of the way to ensure the financial solutions you desire are implemented and secured for years to come. A proven track record for providing exceptional service to businesses and professionals markets. We provide a special emphasis on the achievement of longterm sustainability and growth through the establishment of sound client relationships. Call us today to schedule your consultation. Let us personalize a plan to suit your every need.

You know your business, we know how to protect it! raphael.teeluck@myguardiangroup.com 1 (868) 749-9652 • 1 (868) 304-9983

88

@rtfinanciallegacyservices


89

INSURANCE


90


INSURANCE www.furnessgroup.com

91


MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION

INTERVIEW

TRICIA COOSAL

PRESIDENT TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION (TTMA)

A

s the third-largest contributor to Trinidad and Tobago’s Gross Domestic Product, the country’s manufacturing sector is important and dynamic but with the unfortunate occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, how has the sector taken the blow?

Impact of COVID-19

Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA) President, Tricia Coosal, has indicated that despite the significant COVID-19 challenges, the manufacturing industry was able to stabilise by the end of 2020. She said, “As of December 2020, Trinidad and Tobago’s non-energy exports took a hit, moving from TT$3.6B in 2019 to TT$3.3B in 2020, representing a 5% fall year on year. We ended 2020 well considering many experts projected high double-digit losses for the year. In addition, when compared to other regional producers, who suffered on average 25% decline in production, Trinidad and Tobago’s non-energy producers fared fairly well.” The President stated that the sector was still in recovery mode during the first quarter of 2021. This was supported by the Minister of Trade and Industry and the Minister of Finance who both indicated that there was growth in the first quarter of 2021 for the economy’s non-energy sector. However, with the surge in the number of COVID-positive cases and deaths in the second quarter of the year, this situation has once again threatened the stability which the manufacturing sector fought so hard to regain. But Coosal believes that the lessons of 2020 have made the sector somewhat more responsive and innovative as more companies invested in digitisation in 2020, retooled and re-engineered.

92

The lessons of 2020 have made the sector somewhat more responsive and innovative.

MANUFACTURING SECTOR VIEWS 2022 WITH RENEWED SENSE OF OPTIMISM

“Once companies are able to continue operations and remain open, they would be sustainable even though the local and regional markets would likely become relatively sluggish,” she said. “The mere fact that the sector was able to pivot to produce $105M in Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in 2020 to meet local demand is a testament to the resilience of the sector.”

Challenges

As the number of COVID-positive cases rises in Trinidad and Tobago, what does Coosal see as the major challenges facing the industry moving into 2022? She said, “Presently, non-essentials are not allowed to operate. As such, this affects both local and export markets, which has created challenges for those who have contractual obligations and has introduced the possibility of losing market share to competitors. I firmly believe that regaining lost market share will likely be a major challenge moving into 2022.”

Taking the lead

Still, the President remains confident that in 2022 the non-energy manufacturing sector will take the lead in charting a course to put the economy on the right path of sustainable growth and economic development. How does the TTMA intend to do that? It has developed


MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION an Export Manufacturing Strategy and is working with the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) and exporTT to put all the necessary pre-requisites in place to achieve its objective of doubling exports by 2025. They are seeking to have a trade facilitation office in Panama, similar to the one that exists in Cuba, to allow greater entry for exporters into the Central American Markets. In April 2021, TTMA hired a consultant who is working with SMEs with the primary objective of creating opportunities for these operators, allowing them to prepare themselves for export markets and opportunities.

Growth

The TTMA is cognisant of the growth in some sectors that flourished during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 – production in PPE as well as the chemical sector and the creative industries sector. It is working with members in these areas, to get these companies exportready via access to funding, certification and partnership with potential investors. Another area of growth that the TTMA is promoting is the synergy for the country’s business operators. This entails working with local producers to have their products marketed through the local and regional supermarket chains. These large-scale operators are having challenges sourcing goods from the international arena to sell into their retail stores. The TTMA is also promoting the concept of local content for purchases by Government, by encouraging local producers to attain the standards and qualifications that will allow their goods to be attractive to purchasers, be it local, regional, or international.

Outlook for 2021/2022

So, what is Coosal’s outlook for the sector in 2021/2022? Coosal said, “To answer this question, one would have to appreciate what is happening at the macro level to manage the pandemic the world is experiencing. I believe as we continue to live and operate within the pandemic paradigm, challenges that are associated with such an environment would stymie the potential for growth of the nonenergy manufacturing sector. If I am to put on my optimist’s hat and appreciate that there will be a proper vaccination framework in place, companies and people will continue to adhere to the protocols and practices to get us over this pandemic hurdle. I can see business operations re-stabilising possibly in 2022. Assuming that the measures the TTMA, MTI and exporTT are putting in place to create an enabling environment can be realised, 2022 can be viewed with a renewed sense of optimism and hope – with the view that Trinidad and Tobago, CARICOM and the world, will come to grips with the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

INTERVIEW

NIRMALLA DEBYSINGH -PERSAD CEO, NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL

MARKETING AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (NAMDEVCO)

Production and retail distribution

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted many sectors but it has given the agribusiness (production and retail distribution) sector in Trinidad and Tobago a push as many persons are now encouraged to buy local. As Nirmalla Debysingh-Persad, CEO of National Agricultural Marketing and Development Corporation (NAMDEVCO) pointed out, “The pandemic has obviously created more opportunities for the sector in terms of production.” She further explained that it has not created many opportunities for export. “Because of the importing countries’ labour issues and the outcome of the pandemic, we are not able to export as much as we could despite the increase in production, but, we have more persons eating local, we have more persons utilising local foods to substitute the ones they would normally eat of import status, so it (the pandemic) has positively impacted the sector.” Additionally, with the closure of restaurants and fast-food outlets, people now spend more time preparing meals at home. “We are seeing an increase in the number of persons visiting our Farmers’, retail and wholesale markets” stated Debysingh-Persad. “We have not had any decline in the usership of the market. So, therein is an indication of our ability to continue to increase the demand for local foods.” Debysingh-Persad further pointed out that due to the decline in imported items, there has also been an increase in the number of persons utilising value-added, local foods such as fresh-cut packs, juices and beverages. So, what does the CEO foresee as the major challenges facing the industry moving into 2022? The availability of planting material has always been a challenge and with the continued closure of borders, the delay in time to get planting material can be one of the significant deterrents. However, this is being dealt with to some extent. She related, “We have the Seed Bank Centre in Chaguaramas and we are working aggressively on making available to local farmers, seeds that are adaptable to our conditions for growth to ensure the continuity of production.” The CEO also has high hopes for the sector for 2022. “We now have an increase in the amount of local produce on the supermarket shelves. Additionally, we are being reached out to by the Supermarket Association to get more packaged products of local content on their shelves.” Now that buying local is on the rise, will the reopening of borders pose a threat? Debysingh-Persad does not anticipate this happening. “We do not know about the health and well-being of the foreign countries and their ability to produce mass amounts to be able to export. Further, there are challenges with prices, with shipping costs, et cetera.” The CEO further pointed out that there is also a lot of regional demand for local foods and that is an opportunity that has not been tapped into just yet. “If you look at the market, the imports of CARICOM produce are at an all-time low, so therein leaves opportunity for our production base to be able to supply the CARICOM islands.”

93


94


95

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


96

www.angostura.com


97

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


98


99

MANUFACTURING AND RETAIL DISTRIBUTION


LEADERSHIP PROFILE

GABRIELLE AGOSTINI

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER (COO) CGA LTD. (CGA)

By Kieran Andrew Khan

“As an individual, above all, keep pushing forward. Keep setting your goals, just have it in your mind, and keep pushing, it’s okay to fail once you learn from it.”

S

tarting as a collective under the name Coconut Growers Association, CGA Ltd. has been pressing coconut oil since 1937 but has recently embarked on a brilliant rebranding and repositioning campaign in local and international markets. At the centre of these initiatives is Gabrielle Agostini. Gabrielle alongside the CGA team started with rebranding existing soaps, margarines and oils in the CGA range before expanding into infused coconut cooking oils under the Constance Estate label. “Many of the brands in the range had not had a visual refresh or rebranding for some time. What we also realised is that we had all these great facets to the brand that were ontrend now - such as the fact that we have been producing vegan products that were sustainable and cruelty free and others that were on par with the clean beauty trends of today,” she added. This allowed the R&D team to expand with another new label - Cedros Bay, an eye-catching all-natural, vegan and cruelty-free skincare line, keenly taken up by Instagram influencers, and now available globally via Amazon and CGA’s websites. Agostini led their initiation into the cosmetics category in the same way she worked on the re-development of the other lines. “We didn’t simply repackage the products, in many cases we also updated the formulations and worked with regulatory agencies to ensure that they would meet global criteria, too. Our overall goal is really about changing our products so that they are healthy for your body but also safer for the environment too,” she included. Much of the push into social media and new product development comes from Agostini herself. “I have really sensitive skin, so I understand the needs of people like me, in addition to the online surveys we did. My background is actually in Medical Sciences and I’m also doing diploma studies in skincare right now, too.” An avid traveller, prepandemic, Agostini had been to every continent other than Antarctica on many travels to 52 countries. In 2017, she created a website under the brand www.thetrinitraveller.com before transitioning it to Instagram. “I wanted to show Trinis simple and cost-effective ways to travel and I spent a lot of time and effort in my blogs and content creation to make it a success,” she highlighted. From these digital media experiences for her brand, Agostini was able to bring new levels of vibrant aesthetics to the CGA brands. Her personal site would also win Best Caribbean Travel Blog Posting from the World Tourism Organization in 2017. “We have been using social media at CGA as a means of connectivity and transparency with our customers. We also continue to explore new ideas as innovation is key at these times, as is always asking your customers for feedback,” Agostini advises. “However, as an individual, above all, keep pushing forward. Keep setting your goals, just have it in your mind, and keep pushing, it’s okay to fail once you learn from it.” That personal and professional approach has netted CGA numerous awards such as Green Manufacturer of the Year 2018 and Innovator of the Year 2019 and many kudos for Agostini’s role in it as well. https://cgacaribbean.com/

100


LEADERSHIP PROFILE

RACHEL RENIE & DAVID THOMAS

FOUNDERS OF D’MARKET MOVERS

Where agriculture and entrepreneurship meet technology and innovation.

B

oth Rachel Renie and David Thomas have always been passionate about local food. “Our business is centred on health and convenience, and our mission - to make the freshest, healthiest ingredients readily available to our customers by delivering directly to their doorsteps.” When Rachel and David co-founded D’Market Movers in 2009, they were fulfilling orders for less than 20 people, facing numerous rejections from financial institutions. The then budding entrepreneurs were told that Trinidadians would not buy market items over the internet. Fast forward to more than a decade later, D’Market Movers has over 6,500 customers and is well on its way to becoming a household name in Trinidad and Tobago. Since their business was always online, they were well-positioned to respond to the increase in demand arising from the pandemic. In 2016, Rachel and David were recognised for their business prowess when they won the Ernst & Young ‘Emerging Entrepreneur of the Year’ Award. “We firmly believe that a rising tide lifts all boats. More businesses in the online space signals growth. It strengthens the sector and benefits customers, farmers, business owners, and their employees. Digital is the future and the growth of it is an exciting time in Trinidad and Tobago’s history,” stated Renie. They credit their relationship with farmers as integral to their success. “When you buy local, not only is it often healthier and more sustainable, but it also supports farmers and augurs well for the local economy,” highlighted Renie. 2016 also marked the launch of ‘Farm & Function’, a line of frozen fruit that now boasts five local flavours and a new mixed variety pack which will soon be exported to other territories through exporTT. The duo recently established their first ‘Click & Collect’ location and their design arm, ‘Market Movers Design’. “Our customers remain at the core of everything we do,” stated Thomas. “While our eyes are set on growth and innovation, we always want to be known as a company that cares about the future of local food.” www.dmarketmovers.com

101


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

INTERVIEW

INDIRA COUCH, Ph.D. CEO ACTIONEDGE TT

T

he United Nations Conference on Trade and Development’s (UNCTAD’s) World Investment Report for 2021, revealed that Trinidad and Tobago experienced the worst Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in 2020 with negative FDI in the range of US$439M (approximately TT$3B). This leaves Trinidad and Tobago in a lurch where non-energy sector revenues become more necessary than ever. Recognising this in an address to Caribbean entrepreneurs at a CARICHAM Conference in July 2021, The Honourable Mia Amor Mottley, QC, MP, Prime Minister of Barbados, called for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) to do what is needed to become the engines of innovation and future prosperity in the region. “There is a place where profit can meet purpose,” Mottley advised.

Pivoting means more than technology

Indira Couch, currently ranked as the number one Engagement, Leadership and Culture Master Coach by Engage and Grow, expounds that the pace of change is faster now more than ever, and organisations need to take a pause, to rethink and refocus. “Organisation agility, which is the ability of an organisation to rapidly adapt to market dynamics and respond to customer needs is going to be a key area of focus,” she explained. “This can only be achieved by building a workplace centred on nimble, high-performing teams, fuelled by talent who have the right mindsets, tools, systems and processes, supported by leaders and managers. For this transformation to take place, it starts with people, but specifically with deliberate action from leaders,” she highlighted.

102

For transformation to take place, it starts with people, but specifically with deliberate action from leaders.

by Kieran Andrew Khan

ENGAGEMENT, LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE IN

CHALLENGING TIMES Remote readiness is essential

Technology uptake in Trinidad and Tobago is relatively high but the pandemic has shown the weak spots in areas like cloud-based solutions, virtual private networks, educational device availability, payment gateways and technological readiness as a people. The reality is that most employees are still caught in an in-between of working from home and the office. While some smaller, savvier businesses were able to adapt to remote work better than larger, established institutions, the key takeaway is that we all have to continue to be ready. “We have to understand that hybrid workplaces are here to stay and that this era brings something new that we must adjust to whether as an employee or as a manager, owner or entrepreneur,” she added. And readiness implies that we have a plan - derived from strategy, assessment and process. But at the centre of all of this is company culture.


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

Culture is the cornerstone

“During this time and specifically for the future, to improve agility, some organisations continue to focus on improvements in processes, systems, governance, procedures and products, or what is known as the brain side of the business. However, the research from Deloitte and Gallup 2020 has shown us that it is ‘culture that eats processes for breakfast every day’,” Couch advised. Couch defines culture as “how you do anything is how you do everything”. She elaborated on the role of culture in today’s climate, “What we have seen, especially during the last year from the most successful businesses in the world, is that organisations that focus on the heart side: leadership, culture, behaviours, communication and relationships get better results. Culture change is also something that does not happen overnight, it takes at least two years of consistent and deliberate effort on the heart and then on the brain side and then to create a delicate balance of both.”

Agility, open communication and new thinking required

Based on the experience of countries impacted by COVID-19 before us, it is likely we can experience another curtailing of free movement or free commerce in the future. Couch advised that adaptation and agility is the key to surviving and ultimately thriving. “Interaction is critical, and we need to keep connected with our teams. Depending on the organisation’s size, you can do various things. Get into the habit of keeping in touch with people, whether these are your clients or employees. One of my mentors used a formulaic approach that I appreciated - reach out to five of your network contacts, and with four of them send them a quote or a custom message, three you can invite out to coffee, two you can send a small token or thought and one you can invite out to lunch,” she advised. “You have to lead and direct and influence your teams so that they, in turn, can lead and inspire anyone in their circle,” she added. Couch is the CEO of ActionEDGE Trinidad and Tobago and represents global brands in business education and coaching, Engagement, Leadership and Culture programmes and certified Sales training. She believes heavily in personal development alongside any development that happens ‘at work’ too. “Success is more of something you need to become rather than something you need to ‘achieve’. Success in your personal life and your organisation will become something you then attract. It’s a mix of who you need to become, paired with what you do each day, that will give you what you love and what you have in life,” she concluded.

DIANA MAHABIR -WYATT

BOARD CHAIR AND SENIOR CONSULTANT OF PMSL AND PRESIDENT OF THE CARIBBEAN CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (CCHR)

Outlook for the professional services sector moving forward in 2021/2022

The landscape for those in the consultancy and services sector for the coming year is grim. COVID-19 is not going to go away, according to the medical professionals, and as a nation, we are just going to have to live with it, sooner rather than later, when, apart from a few large conglomerates, the private sector economy is failing and Government has increased charges for petroleum products, hence the cost of living generally and transport for those lucky enough to be still earning. SMEs will continue to need help from the services sector, most keenly from financial, marketing and internet technology consultants, who can help them get out of debt and back into profitable, or even break-even status, but it will be a challenge and may depend on banks and other investment financing sources’ willingness to be flexible in their loan policies. A major challenge for human resource professionals will be dealing with severance pay issues which are contingent liabilities often ignored in recessions and therefore unions’ willingness to join with employers on severance issues, to find creative alternatives, will be important. Unions are themselves business organisations with wages, rents, electricity, water rates, insurances, and internet charges to meet on a monthly basis, while the members’ fees they depend on are dropping as employees are retrenched and cannot afford to pay fees. Industrial relations and human resource managers now face the most severe challenges in their professional careers. The optimists among us continue to believe that every recession brings opportunities as well as challenges, and they are right. While the lockdown and Government restrictions on travel, procurement, sport, hospitality, restaurants, bars and leisure activities continue, anyone with expertise in those sectors, with a few dollars in savings, has the time to qualify themselves and staff, with internet technology and applications which offer the greatest opportunities for the future. Financial wizards can guide businesses through acquisitions of what remains of competitors forced to close, freeing up professional skills to staff new start-ups and mergers. COVID-19 has affected businesses all over the world, and job markets everywhere have tightened. Traditional escape routes through emigration are more difficult to find. Post COVID-19, businesses will be highly digital as official Government and international stakeholders will also be moving to more electronic and leaner staff structures. Managers and professionals will be expected to handle a larger portion of their own administrative functions electronically. The highly overstaffed Government services will have to face tightening as well, putting more expertise on the market and professionals with the knowledge and skills to navigate the corridors of Government bureaucracy will be available, and many with hefty severance payments to invest in service industries. Those resource opportunities are critically needed in the private sector. The outlook for 2021-2022 is deeply uncertain but in that uncertainty may be the opportunities where innovative managerial consultants may find their futures.

103


104


105

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES


106


107

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES


108


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

www.icatt.org

Follow Us!

109


Celebrating

10 Years

Nigel Matthew Founder/CEO

A Management and Leadership Consultancy Practice Product Lines Strategic Direction Organizational Behavior Technical Programs

Organizational Effectiveness Anti-Money Laundering Services FIBA AML Programs

Inquire about our Unique Leadership Development Program

Let Us Host Your Virtual Meetings Email virtual@nemlctt.com

Orchard Gardens, Chaguanas 501328 - Trinidad & Tobago

110

info@nemlctt.com

(868)-665-6381

(868)-222-8928

www.nemlctt.com

NEM Leadership Consultants


Sandra Welch-Farrell Chief Executive Officer

W

ith over a quarter-century of experience and hundreds of satisfied clients, SWF&Co. is the leading public relations company in the Caribbean. OUR TEAM

The company, which is a Preferred Agency of the global Porter Novelli public relations network, celebrated its 25th Anniversary in July 2017. The dedicated and talented team of SWF&Co. makes us the most effective Public Relations Company in the region. Clients come to us for our sound strategy, compelling creativity, and measurable results. OUR SERVICES

Our agency provides a range of public relations services, from helping companies

Nasha Khan

Mary Esdelle

Alixander Paz

Melissa Farfan

Project Management Team

set up businesses, to publicity campaigns, to crisis management. Our unparalleled knowledge and understanding of the Caribbean marketplace and the political landscape ensure that new businesses are established smoothly and quickly. Our network within the media and social landscape guarantee that company messages reach a wide or targeted audience effectively. When it comes to crises, SWF&Co has assisted local and international corporations to navigate all types of PR challenges, ensuring that brands and reputations remain intact. Our tried and tested strategies enable organizations to retain credibility, restore confidence, and safeguard their prospects.

WHERE WE ARE

SWF&Co. provides a full range of Public Relations Services in Antigua, the Bahamas, Barbados, Curacao, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, St. Croix, St. Lucia and St. Thomas. WHO WE HELP

Our client list includes some of the major multinational corporations, one of the world’s largest airlines, international agencies and blue chip companies within the energy, transportation, communications, and financial services sectors. Sandra Welch-Farrell & Company 11A Gray Street, St. Clair, Trinidad & Tobago W.I. Tel: (868)622-0046 Mob: (868)374-5438 Email: swfco.pr@gmail.com Find us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/SWFCo. www.swfandco.com

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HR AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANCIES

Sandra Welch-Farrell & Company

111


112


LEADERSHIP PROFILE

LARA QUENTRALLTHOMAS, MBA. CHAIRMAN AND FOUNDER OF REGENCY RECRUITMENT AND RESOURCES LIMITED

“Leadership is about making others better as a result of your presence and making sure that impact lasts in your absence.” – Sheryl Sandburg COO, Facebook

T

hose words sum up the life’s work, thus far, for Lara Quentrall-Thomas, MBA. Chairman and Founder of Regency Recruitment and Resources Limited, Lara came back to Trinidad from her native UK in 1996 and embarked on what may be her most widely known portfolio. This year, as Regency celebrates its 25th year in business, Lara is proudly leading one of the most respected recruitment agencies in the region. But Lara is much, much more than just a businesswoman. She is a mentor, philanthropist, teacher, fur-baby mama, daughter, sister and friend. In her professional life she has chosen a vocation that reaches out to persons and finds a way to make their lives better, either through gaining employment, support in times of downturn or training for personal and professional betterment and in her personal life, she strives to do the same. She has held/currently holds Board positions where she believes she can make a difference: - President – Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries (TTCSI) - Acting President – T&T Organization of Recruitment Service Providers (TTORSP) - Board Member – National Training Agency (NTA) - Board Member – Youth Business Trinidad and Tobago - Former Director – Office of Procurement Regulation Board (OPR) - Former Director – National Economic Advisory Board - District Governor, District 7030 – Rotary International - Founding Member – Association of Female Executives of Trinidad and Tobago (AFETT) Outside of her work at Regency Recruitment this powerhouse is always busy and is involved in a myriad of other nation building and charitable works. Where does she find the time to pursue other passions and personal interest?? It’s hard to say, but Lara is determined to work to the benefit of society and in particular women, while enjoying time invested in city travel, book stores, historical European fiction, British murder mysteries, animal welfare and mahjong. Truly a well balanced and inspirational leader, making an impact that will be felt for generations to come!

www.regencytrinidad.com

113


REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND SECURITY SERVICES

INTERVIEW

MARK EDGHILL

PRESIDENT ASSOCIATION OF REAL ESTATE AGENTS (AREA)

R

eal estate will always have a place.” So said Mark Edghill, President of the Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA) as he spoke on the real estate sector’s survival during the COVID-19 pandemic. He noted, “If economies are collapsing, people need to liquidate their properties – there will always be people there looking for the opportunity to take advantage of prices being low.”

Real estate is always still one of the best and safest places to invest your money.

How has the pandemic affected the sector?

The AREA President added that the pandemic has affected people’s buying power. “It has affected people’s jobs so there has been some shifting in terms of who has job security that can qualify for mortgages if they are interested in buying, and most of those are in the below three-million bracket.” Pointing out that the commercial sector has been terribly impacted upon, Edghill noted that there have been many business closures in the retail sector so a lot of retail and office space has become available. “Even pre-COVID, commercial rental space was high,” said Edghill, “but since COVID, the commercial sector, in particular, has been very hard hit and we are still looking to the end of the pandemic to say exactly what percentage of businesses is going to resume operations close to what they were doing before, or if a lot of them are going to be implementing work-from-home and virtual platforms. That seems to have been working for people during the last year.”

114

REAL ESTATE MAINTAINS ITS PLACE DESPITE CHALLENGES AND LOWER PRICES

He explained that some jobs still require attendance at an office so the sector may see marginal downgrades in office space requirements. “On the other side, based on the social distancing and the health and safety requirements, we may actually see certain businesses needing to expand their space to accommodate the same number of employees.” People’s buying power and ability to pay a mortgage have also been affected. “We don’t know the impact of COVID on businesses and how many closures there will be or what the unemployment level will look like. The Government is not in a position financially to help so we are going to feel the brunt of the effects of COVID economically, after the fact” Edghill said. He further pointed out that prices have come down between 10% and 20% already because of the high volume of people vacating properties due to unemployment. “Because of the increasing inventory in properties for sale and rent, the competition is high, inventory is high so prices would have come down because it is more competitive,” he said, “so we don’t expect a collapse of the real estate sector because, in the long term, real estate is always still one of the best and safest places to invest your money to mitigate inflation and devaluation.”


REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND SECURITY SERVICES

Future Challenges for the sector

And while he sees the sector not collapsing, what does he foresee as challenges impacting it post-COVID? “I think we will still see a lot of use of virtual platforms for marketing purposes and for property viewings,” he said, “but I don’t see that necessarily as a challenge because that is to the benefit of all parties.”

INTERVIEW

SELVONNE MITCHELL

However, he expressed concern over the banks’ position when providing assistance. “So far, their assistance has just been to defer payments with interest…the bank is not sharing the losses being incurred by its customers.” The AREA president recommends that banks step up and realise it is a time when they also need to compromise on their income and their profit. “Instead of having deferrals have forgiveness and suspension of payments without additional charges or interest to the mortgage customer/homeowner to assist them in their recovery as well because, in the long term, their recovery means they can maintain their payments to the bank.”

Significant initiatives in the sector

Despite the pandemic, several significant initiatives in the past year help to give hope for the sector. “We have aligned ourselves through an international bilateral agreement with the North American Association of Realtors and that links us with 1.2 million brokers globally to give us the ability to market Trinidad and Tobago and our real estate market to potential investors and prospects internationally with the hope of attracting direct foreign investment which is crucially needed and US-dollar buyers.” Another significant initiative for the sector occurred in June 2020 with the passage of the Real Estate Brokers Bill which puts regulation and structure to the real estate sector. This now requires registration and licensing so the public will be protected from people who are not trained or qualified to represent them as real estate agents.

What is in place for Trinidad and Tobago to tackle affordable housing deficit and expanding commercial real estate? Edghill pointed out, “I think we have been consistently increasing in our prospects and projects to handle the housing issue in Trinidad. Middle-income housing has been a focus over the last six or seven years and there are many projects that are targeting the middle-income bracket which are still incomplete, so that sector has been receiving a lot of attention and it is still very dependent on job security.” While a lot is uncertain due to the pandemic, one thing that is sure is the real estate sector’s place.

DEPUTY CEO ALLIED SECURITY LIMITED

Security

The Ministry of National Security received an allocation of $5.227B in the 2021 budget. This is $1.217B less than the previous year but while the financial allocation decreased, crime also seemed to decrease. There was a 30% reduction in serious crimes in 2020 compared to 2019. This was according to Commissioner of Police Gary Griffith in an address at the start of 2021. He pointed out that is the highest percentage reduction in crime from one year to another in over 30 years. Griffith said in 2019 there were 539 murders, adding, “As I speak today, we are at 395 murders for this year – which is more than a 25% reduction in murders, the lowest murder rate in eight years.” He said there has also been a 41% reduction in kidnappings and a 70% reduction in kidnapping for ransom. Selvonne Mitchell, Deputy CEO of Allied Security Limited, expressed similar sentiments noting that for 2021 thus far, he has not seen a major increase in crime during the pandemic. “We do vigilance response for 4,500 persons and we have not seen any increase in home invasions and robberies.” He disclosed that he has seen an increase in pilfering of Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (TSTT) cables possibly for copper – TSTT is one of Allied’s clients. Aside from criminal activity, how has the pandemic impacted the Security industry? Mitchell noted that the pandemic had no major impact on the industry. He stated, “We are a security company and being part of the essential services, we continued working as normal. The only negative impact would have been that some of our clients’ businesses were closed and that resulted in a decline in revenue to some extent.” Consequently, this has caused a small decline for security, so Mitchell is now tasked with the challenge of assigning work to surplus workers trying to divide the number of hours among them, not wanting to send anyone home. Another challenge brought on by the pandemic, one which Mitchell describes as “insignificant really”, is that the company now has to employ a number of sanitation systems – sanitizers, fumigation, personal protective equipment for the officers. This has affected the company’s revenue but in a small way. So, how does Allied Security intend to move forward? Mitchell explained, “Generally, in the industry, our focus is on being vaccinated. However, one challenge we may have is the absence that stems from an officer being unvaccinated. I had about 13 (out of approximately 750 workers) or so officers who would have been quarantined for a period of time and therefore unable to work – so officers not being vaccinated can affect us.” However, Mitchell expressed that the industry plans to deal with the pandemic head-on and to keep doing what they have been doing since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. “We also plan to continue fumigating, sanitizing and maintaining COVID-19 protocols even after the pandemic.”

115


The Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA) is a professional organisation of real estate practitioners, established in 1990 and Incorporated by Act Parliament in 2012. AREA’s aim, through its regulations, standards of practice and code of ethics, is to provide structure to the industry to ensure professionalism and quality of service to both buyers and sellers of real estate.

76 Picton Street Newtown 190205 Trinidad and Tobago.

116


117

REAL ESTATE, PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT AND SECURITY SERVICES


118


PROPERTY TRENDS WE DID NOT EXPECT FOR 2021 Affordable SMART homes – Tech has also become an emergent force in our daily lives since lock down of 2020

www.terracaribbean.com

P

BY TERRA CARIBBEAN LIMITED

ost lock down 2020, the Real Estate outlook for the rest of 2020 was dismal. With the phased reopening of Trinidad & Tobago in June 2020, many businesses contracted or closed their doors, leading to widespread job loss, diminished spending power and decreased economic activity. We were preparing for the worst.

However, one year later, a closer look at the residential segment shows some concrete trends that have sustained through to 2021, that we did not anticipate: 1.

Staycation homes are on the rise! – Between an increase in enquiries and listings, sales of staycation homes in Tobago, Blanchisseuse and Mayaro have increased over 250% in 2020/2021 from 2019. Travel restrictions and health and safety fears have grounded many T&T citizens, and we foresee that staycation properties are here to stay for the rest of 2021.

2.

Houses are more popular than apartments and townhouses – Before the pandemic, townhouses and apartments were on the rise and had become more popular than houses from 2014 through to 2018. However, this has since changed due in part to work from home norms. Our homes have doubled as workspaces and recreational spaces for almost a year for some, and the reversion from condo living to a stand-alone home is gradually developing.

3.

Larger price reductions – Price reductions are usually within the 5% to 10% range. However, throughout 2020, vendors have adjusted their expectations and prices have decreased incrementally from their initial asking prices, at times by as much as 20%. As reality sets in that the market has changed and, in some segments, contracted, vendors who have had to sell, made the decision to drop the price for quick disposals. On the other side of the transaction, buyers have been offering up to 20% below asking prices. Thus, as vendors accept offers below their asking prices, the gap between asking and offer prices continue to close. This has resulted in an overall increase in the velocity of transactions in the market.

4.

Affordable SMART homes – Tech has also become an emergent force in our daily lives since lock down of 2020. Thus, with connectivity and technology at the forefront, residential developers have incorporated SMART systems into newer homes without the exorbitant cost.

5.

Starter homes for that first-time homeowner – In the last year, we have seen an increase in homes specifically built for the first-time buyer. Floor areas are on the smaller size to match smaller price tags. This comes at an opportune time with the Stamp Duty concession up to $2m for first-time homeowners.

119


SHIPPING, PORTS, COURIER SERVICES AND TRAVEL INTERVIEW

HAYDEN ALLEYNE

PRESIDENT SHIPPING ASSOCIATION OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (SATT)

H

ayden Alleyne has been a huge proponent of getting our shipping, logistics, and allrelated individuals vaccinated and back to work in a safe and responsible manner. The organisation, before COVID-19, would have been involved in seeking ways to continue developing the local maritime industry with a view to overall national development. Today that has changed into ensuring safety for returning persons involved in all-related sectors and navigating the new changes in electronic services in the industry, designed to reduce contact spread of the virus. However, there are also many other issues on the horizon.

How would you describe the last year for the sector?

“It’s been challenging on the local front, with contraction in demand due to restrictions and the lockdown. Restaurants, in particular, not operating to capacity, affected imports to feed that demand with products from fresh produce to foreign imported food. And internationally, this situation is even worse,” Alleyne explained. “Trade finds a pattern. It’s not just the cargo but the movement of equipment to carry this cargo that matters.” In the past highs of the pandemic, containers were getting bottlenecked at some ports, while others were waiting for these to be returned to continue trade. It was not just that a series of blips disturbed the system, but that the highly intricate

120

Trade finds a pattern. It’s not just the cargo but the movement of equipment to carry this cargo that matters.

by Kieran Andrew Khan

SHIPPING AND LOGISTICS FACES NEW STORMS AHEAD supply chain dynamic required to keep business moving was disrupted, with numerous delays along with it and once you have delays, you have increased costs,” he highlighted. “And on the ground, it gets grimmer, with several freight forwarders and importers closing their operations in the past year.”

What were the significant challenges? What, if anything, is being done, or can you advise, to address them? “We have to move the conversation on trade from one of just Customs and the State seeking to earn revenue, to one where it’s about a greater ease of doing business. That’s where our thinking needs to be,” he advised. “In moving to be a real First World player in trade, we have taken a collaborative and understanding approach in recent times in how we work with the State through the Customs and Excise Division. But with that in mind, we can’t let a crisis go to waste! We have seen great strides being made in electronic documentation, so we have more e-delivery of documents, and are moving to make


SHIPPING, PORTS, COURIER SERVICES AND TRAVEL that the status quo,” he noted. This approach not only reduces personal contact with documents but is also in line with the move to digitise and digitalise Trinidad and Tobago.

What are the most significant initiatives/projects in the last year, and are any expected by 2022? According to the SATT President, with COVID-19, everything has to be reimagined and made as contactless as possible, along with everyone coming on board with working remotely and meeting virtually. “Most of our executive council now meets virtually and it’s both a cost and time savings,” he pointed out. “We have also made use of freely available technology - using VIP WhatsApp Groups for ease of communications in terms of vessel sailings, times and updates, for persons in the industry,” he added.

Any benefit to the installation of the new Ship-to-Shore crane? The Port of Port of Spain commissioned a new state-of-the-art, rail mounted, Ship-to-Shore (STS) crane replacing the Port Authority of Trinidad and Tobago’s oldest Paceco STS crane, which was 42 years old.

According to Minister of Works and Transport, Senator the Honourable Rohan Sinanan, who noted at the installation, “The crane was about 17 years past its shelf life and it will be auctioned off by the Port Authority. The new STS crane can move more containers in a shorter space of time so that will improve the efficiency of the port. This crane does about 35 containers an hour, the cranes we used before that probably did half that amount.” The SATT President believes this will bring very measurable improvements to efficiency at the Port.

What is your outlook for the industry in 2021-2022?

“We will start to see recovery in the economy soon, once things continue as they are locally and globally, but there are expectations we need to be aware of. The price of freight will continue to be high for some time - in the last year the cost of a container has moved from TT$4-5,000 to TT$11-12,000 per container,” he mentioned. According to Hayden, the price may never return to pre-pandemic levels, but it will stabilise. “We have to consider that climate change and weather is coming into play as well more and more, and coupled with supply chain delays, we will have some challenges ahead.” Still, the SATT President is optimistic that the economy will see an upswing, but it is heavily contingent on the population being vaccinated as best and as fast as possible.

INTERVIEW

DEREK TELFER

MANAGING DIRECTOR AND FOUNDER ACCLAIM FREIGHT & LOGISTICS SERVICES LIMITED

The last year has been a turbulent one for the shipping industry, and not just those who operate it, but also those who depend on it for business survival. Numerous challenges arose in 2020 when shipping container shortages met existing challenges and limited foreign exchange availability. Many had to pivot, but all stakeholders look forward to resurgent trade in the next two to three years. For Derek Telfer, Managing Director, Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited, the pandemic has been a double-edged sword. “As an industry, a large part of our survival was contingent on the fact that Trinidad and Tobago largely remains an import economy, so shipping will always take place. But then we also have had to retool and consider other lines of income as a company, which is always a good thing - to pause, to consider, to diversify,” he pointed out. However, one major challenge for the operators in the industry and their customers was access to foreign exchange - even for companies where you think exemptions could apply. “We have a customer who works with the regional health bodies importing medical grade supplies and equipment, but even with the necessary nature of the product, US currency could not be easily accessed. As such, Telfer’s business depended on another aspect of shipping. “Since (Hugo) Chavez’s rise to power, Venezuela’s fishing fraternity lost access to the US market, as such, Trinidad has been used as a transshipment point for many years for their fishing products. The Venezuelan fishing fleet is larger than all the fishing fleets combined from here to Puerto Rico, so in our role in helping, we are actually helping to earn foreign exchange; these fishermen are helping to support their families and ours too. Another area that impacted the shipping industry was the global shortage of shipping containers. There were many causes for this - the slowdown in global demand leading to bottlenecking of containers at specific ports and the decrease in empty containers being picked back up. This shortage was also impacted by the slowdown in container production early in the pandemic. The company also offered containers for local use, the supply of which dried up during this time. Having started his company in 2007, Telfer has undoubtedly weathered several economic storms with this latest one being one of the most challenging. However, he urges positivity in the outlook ahead. “We need to encourage greater honesty and transparency in our leadership as a country, but we also need to leave our ‘nine days’ mentality behind and really plan for the future in a meaningful way as a country,” he suggested. With larger Northern economies opening up as of writing in mid-2021, the expectation is that the rebound from this pandemic will outpace many of the last rebounds from recessions. The only difference is that an adaptive and cunning virus fuels this economic downturn. A return to regular transglobal trade, which will alleviate the economic impact, could be the very element that facilitates future pandemics.

121


122


123

SHIPPING, PORTS, COURIER SERVICES AND TRAVEL


https://www.patnt.com/

124


SHIPPING, PORTS, COURIER SERVICES AND TRAVEL Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited 9B Fondes Amandes Rd., St. Anns, P.O.S. Trinidad Mobile: (868) 620-1989 Email: caribbeandiscoverytours@yahoo.com Website: www.caribbeandiscoverytours.com

Caribbean Discovery Tours, a pioneer of eco-tourism in Trinidad and Tobago, offers expertly guided kayaking, hiking, camping and scuba adventures, and services for academics and film-makers.

Stephen Broadbridge Managing Director

On his travels, Stephen Broadbridge, Managing Director, has photographed wildlife, birds, wetlands, forests and urban landscapes, and his images have been widely published. Caribbean Discovery Tours co-produced the film Wild T&T, documenting the country’s flora and fauna, which won a Green Leaf Award in 2005. Stephen has held positions on several private and state boards including the EMBD as deputy chairman, Creative TT, Papa Bois Conservation, and was a director on state owned company TT Free Zone Company and is currently the vice president of the T&T Incoming Tour Operators Association.

125


INFORMATIONAL LISTS AND INDICES

FAST FACTS Time Zone Trinidad

Time Zone: Greenwich Mean Time: Minus four hours (GMT -4)

Capital: Port of Spain Main Towns: City of San Fernando, Arima, Point Fortin, Chaguanas

In US Winter: Eastern Standard Time plus one hour (EST +1)

Tobago

There is no Daylight Saving Time (DST).

Nationality

Trinidad and Tobago has a tropical climate with high relative humidity. There are two distinct seasons: dry, from January to May and wet, from June to December. There is a short dry period around mid-September called Petit Carême. The hurricane season runs from June to November, peaking between August and October. Given Trinidad’s southern geographical location, the island is not affected by storms as frequently as the sister isle, Tobago. Tobago can experience inclement weather as a result of such weather systems.

Capital: Scarborough

Trinidad: Trinidadian Tobago: Tobagonian

Official Language English

Population

Mid Year Estimate (June 2020): 1,366,725 1,366,700 as at December 2020 (Source: Central Statistical Office)

Electricity

110 volts/220 volts (+/-6%); 60 Hz

Telephone

1 (868) + seven-digit local

Geography and Location

Tucked below the hurricane belt, the country is located in a safe haven. It is bordered by the Caribbean Sea in the north and by the Atlantic to the east. On the west coast, it is separated from Venezuela by the Gulf of Paria and to the south, the Columbus Channel.

Trinidad

Once attached to the South American mainland, Trinidad is situated at 12 km (7 miles) northeast of the coast of Venezuela and is separated from it by the Gulf of Paria. Trinidad has three mountain ranges — the Northern Range, the Central Range and the Southern Range. The highest point, El Cerro del Aripo, is 940 m (3,084 ft) above sea level. About 40% of all land is undeveloped forest and woodlands, although the island continues to experience rapid development. Trinidad’s Pitch Lake is the largest natural reservoir of asphalt in the world. Total Area: 4,828 km2 (1,864 sq miles) 81.25 km long by 57-73 km wide (50 miles by 35-45 miles) Location: Latitude 10.5° N; Longitude 61.5° W

Tobago

Tobago lies 34 km (21 miles) northeast of Trinidad. Though of volcanic origin, there are no active volcanoes here. The island is a single mountain mass, although the southwestern tip has a coral platform. The highest peak, the Main Ridge, reaches an elevation of about 576 m (1,890 ft) and its lower-lying lands include a protected reserve area. The coastline is broken up by inlets and sheltered beaches, and there are several uninhabited islets. Total Area: 300 sq km (116 sq miles) Location: Latitude 11.5° N, Longitude 60.5°W

126

In US Summer: Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Climate

Trinidad and Tobago’s southerly location keeps temperatures consistent year-round, about 30/32 °C (86/90 °F) during the day and somewhat cooler at night.

People and Society

Ethnic Groups (2011 census) East Indian: 35.4% African: 34.2% Mixed: 15.1% Dougla (mixed African and Indian): 7.7% Other: 1.4% Life Expectancy: 73.91 years Male: 71.2 years Female: 76.7 years https://www.worldometers.info/demographics/ trinidad-and-tobago-demographics/#life-exp Mid Year Population Estimate (June 2020): 1,366,725 Birth Rate: 11.9/1,000 (2018) https://cso.gov.tt/

Providers of such services are now prevalent on both islands, and cable television and internet services are readily available. The more prominent agencies are Digicel (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited (Digicel) and Columbus Communications Trinidad Limited (Flow). Digicel provides fixed line and domestic wireless services while Flow offers cable television, internet and landline telephone services. With broad coverage throughout the islands, mobile phones are an easy and available option. Wireless internet services are commonplace at hotels, restaurants and many other establishments. International Access Code: 1 Country Code: 868 2021 Q1 Estimates* 1. Fixed Internet Subscriptions: 381,200 2. Mobile Internet Subscriptions: 828,400 3. Mobile Voice Subscriptions: 1,970,100 4. Penetration for Fixed Internet Subscriptions (per 100 inhabitants): 28 5. Mobile Internet Penetration (per 100 Inhabitants): 61 *Data estimates http://tatt.org.tt/

Media

Newspapers Daily: Trinidad Express, Trinidad Guardian and Newsday. Monday – Friday: Newsday Tobago Weekly Newspapers: Catholic News, Trinidad and Tobago Sunshine Television Stations: CNC (Channel 3), CCN TV6 (Channels 5 and 18), Gayelle Television (Channel 7), IBN (Channel 8), CTV (Channel 6), IETV (Channel 1 and 16), Parliament (Channel 11), Synergy (Channel 15), TTT (Channel 11), Tobago Channel 5 (Tobago only), WESN TV

The festivals, music, customs, cuisine, religions and races of Trinidad and Tobago reflect a rich and unique cultural diversity. The nation has a passionate and colourful history spanning five centuries. Festivals and religious and cultural observances include Divali (the Hindu festival of lights), Eid-ul-Fitr (Muslim festival marking the end of the fast of Ramadan), Emancipation Day (which commemorates the emancipation of enslaved people of African descent), Indian Arrival Day (which commemorates the arrival of the first Indian Indentured labourers from India to Trinidad) and Corpus Christi (Catholic festival in honour of the Eucharist). Trinidad Carnival is a world-famous event that brings together artists, musicians, masqueraders and revellers for a month-long celebration that culminates in a two-day parade. http://www.culture.gov.tt/

Top News and Media Websites • T&T Newsday. • Loop TT News. • Trinidad Guardian. • Trinidad Express. • Wired868. • Breaking News T&T| Facebook • Cnc3.co.tt • Online Radio Stations FM Radio Stations TBC Network (95.1, Vibe CT 105, Sangeet 106.1, Aakash Vani 106.5, Slam 100.5, Sky 99.5) CL Communications (90.5, 104.1, 97.1) Caribbean New Media Group (Talk City 91.1, Next 99.1, Sweet 100.1) T&T Radio Network (Star 94.7, 96.1, 107.7) Gem Radio 5 Limited (Red 96.7, i95.5, the Word 107.1, Hott 93.5, Taj 92.3) Lit 102.3FM, Boom Champions 94.1, Isaac 98.1, Street 91.9, Radio Jaagriti 102.7, Wack 90.1, Love 91.5 (Tobago), Radio Toco 106.7, 103.1, Radio Tambrin 92.7 (Tobago), 104.7, and Heritage (Lime) 101.7.

Telecommunications

Government

Culture

State-owned Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT) and bMobile have traditionally been the major provider of landline and mobile telephone services.

Trinidad and Tobago follows the Westminster model of government and upholds the traditions of parliamentary democracy it inherited from Britain. The Government is stable. The Head


FAST FACTS CONTINUED of State is the President, who is elected by an Electoral College of members of the Senate and House of Representatives for a five-year renewable term. Executive power, however, is vested in the Prime Minister and Government, following elections at least every five years. The next general election will become due in 2025. Tobago has its own elected House of Assembly and its seat is in the capital city, Scarborough. https://www.ttconnect.gov.tt/ gortt/portal/ttconnect https://www.tha.gov.tt/

Legal System

The legal system is based on common law and statutes. The judicial system comprises magistrates’ courts and the Supreme Court, which is made up of the High Court and the Court of Appeal. There is a separate Industrial Court that deals with most labour matters. The Judicial and Legal Service Commission appoints judges of the Supreme Court. The Attorney General is responsible for the administration of the legal and judicial system. Final appeal from Trinidad and Tobago courts is to the Privy Council in England, but consideration is being given to replacing the Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice, which was inaugurated in April 2005 and headquartered in Port of Spain. http://www.ttconnect.gov.tt/gortt/portal/ ttconnect https://www.otp.tt http://www.opm.gov.tt/ http://www.tha.gov.tt/ https://www.ebctt.com

Banking

The financial system consists of commercial banks, trust and mortgage finance companies, finance houses and merchant banks. Number of Commercial Banks: 8 Number of Branches: 123 Number of Automatic Banking Machines: 254 ATMs https://batt.org.tt/banking-industry/

Standard Bank Hours of Operation

City Centres: Monday to Thursday – 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday – 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. RBC and Scotiabank (not mall branches) 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 8 RBC Branches open on Saturday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Shopping Centres (Daily): 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exchange Rate: TT$6.78: US$1 (August 2021) The Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT) acknowledged the announcement issued by the Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago (CBTT) that with effect from 1st July 2021, the following currency notes – $1, $5, $10, $20 and $50 – bearing series dates before 2020 (essentially the cotton notes) would be withdrawn from circulation. However, based on their advisory, while said currency notes will remain legal tender until 31st December 2021, the CBTT has committed to indefinitely redeeming these notes from the public until further notice. As such, redemption opportunities will be available beyond 31st December 2021.

Therefore, as the banks continue to focus on the safety of customers and staff, BATT reassures all customers that there is no need to rush into their respective banks for the sole purpose of upgrading from cotton to polymer notes. In respect of the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, customers are encouraged to explore low touch alternative channels such as ATMs or night bags to deposit their cotton notes. Customers are asked to visit www.batt.org.tt for updated information on our member banks’ operating hours as the situation continues to develop.

Economic Data

GDP 2020 (US$ Billion) = 21.53 Labour Force 2019 (persons with jobs) = 617,500 Headline Inflation Rate 2020 = 0.6% (average) Major Exports: Natural gas and oil, ammonia, alcohol, fertilisers, iron and steel. Major Trading Partners: US, CARICOM, Spain, Mexico, France, UK, China, Venezuela, Japan, Nigeria, The Netherlands, Dominican Republic Globally, the gradual ease of COVID-19 restrictions and the impact of fiscal and monetary stimuli resulted in a moderate improvement in world output in the third quarter of 2020. However, on the domestic front, economic activity declined because of the relatively large fall in energy output. Crude oil and natural gas prices declined over the period July 2020 to January 2021 compared to the same period one year earlier. Despite pandemic-induced supply challenges, headline inflation remained subdued. Labour market adjustments included furloughed employment, layoffs, pay cuts and reductions in working hours. The scaling back of business and economic activities was reflected domestically in an increase in retrenchments – 2,744 in 2020 (2019: 1,530). The fallout from COVID-19 significantly impacted the country’s fiscal performance in 2020 and how the pandemic continues to evolve will shape the economic landscape for some time to come. References: Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago: Economic Bulletin 2021; Financial Stability Report 2020; Annual Economic Survey https://www.central-bank.org.tt Central Statistical Office, Trinidad and Tobago https://cso.gov.tt/ www.tradingeconomics.com https://data.worldbank.org/

Health

Trinidad and Tobago’s health system continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic. Initially praised internationally for its robust handling of the crisis in early 2020, the drive to vaccinate is now fully underway with both public and private enterprises urging persons to ‘vaccinate to operate’. The sector consists of Government-funded and private hospitals. There are well-qualified specialists, private medical practitioners and clinics scattered throughout the islands. Specialists trained in ophthalmology/optometry, gynaecology, paediatrics, radiology, physiotherapy, cardiology, gastrology, urology and orthopaedics work both in private practice and healthcare facilities.

Medical services are free at Government-funded institutions and clinics, but a fee is charged at all others. Twenty-four-hour emergency services are available at several public and private medical facilities. There is also a 24-hour Emergency Air Ambulance Service. http://www.health.gov.tt/

Education

The educational system is based on the British model and produces one of the highest standards of education in the Caribbean. Primary and secondary level education at most institutions are free, but private school options are available for a fee. Post-secondary and tertiary education providers include The University of the West Indies (The UWI), the College of Science, Technology & Applied Arts of Trinidad & Tobago (COSTAATT), distance learning tertiary-level institutions, vocational/technical training schools and colleges, the technology-based University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT), and the National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST).

Eco-Tourism

Trinidad and Tobago, although relatively distinct ecologically, are both blessed with rich natural environments well suited for ecotourism. Once part of the South American mainland, Trinidad’s flora and fauna have comingled, leading to a great density of plant and animal types in a relatively small location. Trinidad and Tobago has more than 97 mammal species, 400 bird species, 90 reptile species, 30 amphibian species, 600 butterfly species and over 2,100 species of flowering plants. The island’s nature reserves attract major international traffic from naturalists and nature watchers. The terrain is just as diverse, with tropical rainforests, mangrove swamps, mountainous terrain and savannahs. Birdwatching is a major attraction in Tobago as well, with Little Tobago island recognised as one of the Caribbean’s top seabird sanctuaries. Tobago is also a hub of aquatic tourism. The waters off the island are a haven for wildlife, an attraction for both divers and boat tourists. Buccoo Reef (a large coral reef and protected marine park) is a popular destination. Tobago’s Main Ridge Forest is known to be the oldest protected rainforest. http://www.tourism.gov.tt/ https://www.insandoutstt.com

Meeting Places and Conference Centres

Trinidad and Tobago is one of the top five Caribbean meeting and conference destinations. Many hotels have facilities for conferences, including international brands such as the Hyatt Regency Trinidad and the Hilton Trinidad and Conference Centre. In addition, the state-of-the-art National Academy for the Performing Arts (NAPA), South Academy for the Performing Arts, awardwinning spots like Coco Reef and the Magdalena Grand Beach Resort in Tobago are ideal for corporate meetings and team-building retreats.

127


FAST FACTS Public Utilities Electricity

Trinidad and Tobago has a reliable supply of electricity with rates still among the lowest in the Caribbean. The domestic and commercial supply voltage is 110/220 volts, 60 cycles. The Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) is the agency responsible for the country’s electrical supply. http://www.ttec.co.tt/

Water

The Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (WASA), a State enterprise, is the sole provider of water and wastewater services in Trinidad and Tobago. http://www.wasa.gov.tt/

Post/Courier Services

Regular mail, express mail and courier delivery are reliable and available from local provider TTPost at excellent rates. International courier services are efficient and readily available. http://www.ttpost.net/

Transportation Airports

Piarco International Airport is a vital hub for international air traffic in the Caribbean. It is located about 45 minutes from the capital city, Port of Spain and there are non-stop daily scheduled flights to and from major international cities. Caribbean Airlines Limited, Trinidad and Tobago’s national airline, offers routes that include direct flights to major cities like Toronto, New York and Miami. CAL also flies regionally with regular flights to Jamaica, , Barbados, Guyana and Suriname, to name a few destinations. International flights are also available direct from Tobago’s ANR Robinson International Airport. Airlines that fly directly to Tobago include British Airways, Condor and Monarch. International and regional airlines that fly to Trinidad and Tobago include American Airlines, British Airways, Caribbean Airlines, United Airlines, West Jet, JetBlue, LIAT and several charter flight companies. http://www.tntairports.com/

Roads

Trinidad and Tobago has an extensive transportation network of paved roads. Highways link the north and south of the island (Uriah Butler Highway, Solomon Hochoy Highway), and the east and west (Churchill-Roosevelt Highway). Traffic is extremely heavy at peak hours when a high number of vehicles head into and out of the capital city and environs. Driving is on the left-hand side. http://www.mowt.gov.tt http://www.ptsc.co.tt/

Seaports

The main seaports are located in Port of Spain and Point Lisas. The Port of Port of Spain handles dry and general cargo, break bulk, containers and passenger traffic. The Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Ltd. (PLIPDECO), mainly a bulk port for industrial

128

CONTINUED commerce, also handles container and general cargo traffic. Ferries travel the inter-island route daily. Several cruise lines stop at Port of Spain during the peak season from November to April. Cruise ship operation was temporarily suspended as part of the global response to COVID-19. Port of Spain Ferry: (868) 625-3055 Tobago Ferry: (868) 639-2417 The CARICOM Jetty, which is located at the Port of Port of Spain and operates the passenger inter-island ferry, receives, stores and delivers CARICOM cargo and multipurpose containers for trade within the Caribbean region. A water taxi ferry connects Port of Spain and San Fernando. Scheduled sailing times are Monday to Friday. Tickets cost TT$15 one-way and can be purchased at the Water Taxi Terminal located at Flat Rock, Lady Hailes Avenue, San Fernando or the Cruise Ship Complex, Port of Spain. Free parking is available at both ports. There is a Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC) shuttle service, which costs TT$3 through the city of Port of Spain. For further information, visit: www.nidco.co.tt or call 624-3281/674-5593 (POS) or 800-4WTS (San Fernando).

Immigration, Work Permits and Visas

Trinidad and Tobago has published travel protocols setting out its entry requirements in relation to COVID-19. Masks should be worn at all times during travel to the country and passage through the airport. Social distancing and hygiene protocols are in place. The borders of Trinidad and Tobago were reopened on 17 July 2021 with some restrictions. All travellers, regardless of nationality or residency, are required to acquire a TTravel Pass. This digital document is a mandatory requirement for anyone eligible to enter the country. It can be printed or saved on a mobile device for use to board the flight and to gain entry into Trinidad and Tobago. Visit https:// ttravelpass.gov.tt/ to apply for a TTravel Pass and get more information about travel requirements to Tobago. It should be noted that the possession of a TTravel Pass does NOT guarantee access to board the flight nor to enter Trinidad and Tobago. All travellers will still be subjected to the validation processes of both the relevant airline and the Border Control Authorities in Trinidad and Tobago. All travellers must also submit a negative nasopharyngeal (nasal swab) RT-PCR test result. This test should have been taken no earlier than 72 hours before arrival in Trinidad and Tobago. At the time of writing, non-nationals who are NOT fully vaccinated are not being allowed entry to Trinidad and Tobago. For updated guidelines for travel to or from Trinidad and Tobago, visit the following websites: https://health.gov.tt/ and https://nationalsecurity.gov.tt/immigration/ Work permits are required for business stays beyond 30 days. Visa extensions can be obtained from the Immigration Office at 67 Frederick Street, Port of Spain, while work permits can be obtained from the Ministry of National Security, Temple Court II, 52-60 Abercromby Street, Port of Spain. www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt

MAJOR AIRLINES

Piarco Airport American Airlines...........1 (868) 821-6000 Caribbean Airlines..........1 (868) 625-7200 British Airways.................1 (800) 247-9297 Copa Airlines....................1 (868) 669-5189 LIAT.....................................1 (800) 669-2982 Surinam Airways.............1 (868) 627-0102 United Airlines.................1 (800) 864-8331 West Jet Airlines.............1 (888) 937-8538 1 ..............................................(888)-WESTJET JetBlue................................1 (800) 538-2583 Rutaca.................................1 (868) 625-4324 ANR Robinson Airport Virgin Atlantic..................1 (800) 744-7477 British Airways.................1 (800) 247-9297 Approximate Flying Times to Trinidad and Tobago London.– 8.2 hours New York – 4.5 hours Miami – 3.3 hours Houston – 5.3 hours Toronto – 5.5 hours

EMERGENCY CONTACTS Police/Rapid Response.................................... 999 Fire.........................................................................990 Ambulance............................................................. 811 Global Medical Response..................... 653-4343 Coast Guard.............................................634-4440 Port of Spain General Hospital.............623-2951 San Fernando General Hospital............652-3581 Scarborough General Hospital............................ ..................................................660-4SGH (4744) Roxborough Health Centre and Hyperbaric Facility, Tobago............. 660-4392 The Office of Disaster Preparedness and Management (ODPM)...... 800-ODPM (6376) Trinidad...................640-1285/8905/8653/6493 Tobago.......................................................660-7489 Crime Stoppers..........................800-TIPS (8477) Directory Services (Trinidad).........................6411 Directory Services (Tobago)..............................211


REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONS ASSOCIATION OF CARIBBEAN STATES (ACS)

Rodolfo Sabonge Secretary-General 5-7 Sweet Briar Road St. Clair, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9575, 628-0936 / 6756 / 7222 Fax: (868) 622-1653 Email: mail@acs-aec.org http://www.acs-aec.org/

CARIBBEAN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE (CARDI) Debra Maharaj Executive Director (Ag.) Frederic Hardy Building The University of the West Indies St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-1205-7 Fax: (868) 645-1208 Email: executive@cardi.org Website: http://www.cardi.org/

CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY IMPLEMENTATION AGENCY FOR CRIME AND SECURITY (CARICOM IMPACS)

CARIBBEAN PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCY (CARPHA) Dr. Joy St. John Executive Director 16-18 Jamaica Boulevard Federation Park Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-4261, 299-0895 Fax: (868) 622-2792 Email: postmaster@carpha.org Website: https://carpha.org/

CARIBBEAN TELECOMMUNICATIONS UNION (CTU) Rodney Taylor Secretary General 4 Mary Street St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-5871 Fax: (868) 623-1523 Email: rodney.taylor@ctu.int Website: https://www.ctu.int/

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF LATIN AMERICA (CAF)

Lt. Col. Michael Jones Executive Director (Ag.) 19 Keate Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 235-5511 Fax: (868) 627-3064 Email: secretariat@carimpacs.org Website: https://caricomimpacs.org/

Gianpiero Leoncini Director Representative 8th Floor Albion Plaza Energy Centre 22-24 Victoria Avenue Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 222-1540/1541 Email: trinidadandtobago@caf.com Website: https://www.caf.com/en/

CARIBBEAN COURT OF JUSTICE (CCJ)

INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (IADB)

The Honourable Mr. Justice Adrian Saunders President 134 Henry Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-2225 Fax: (868) 627-1193 Email: info@ccj.org Website: https://www.ccj.org/

CARIBBEAN COURT OF JUSTICE TRUST FUND (CCJTF)

22 Cornelio Street Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-8500 / 8501 Fax: (868) 625-5608 Email: trustee@ccjtrustfun.org Website: https://www.ccj.org/about-the-ccj/ccj-trust-fund/

CARIBBEAN FINANCIAL ACTION TASK FORCE (CFATF) Dawne Spicer Executive Director Level 21, Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-9667 Fax: (868) 624-1297 Email: cfatf@cfatf.org Website: https://www.cfatf-gafic.org/

CARIBBEAN FOOD CORPORATION (CFC)

Debra Maharaj Executive Director (Ag.) c/o The Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) CARDI Headquarters P.O. Box 212 The University of the West Indies Campus St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-1205 / 3573 Fax: (868) 645-1208 Email: hresources@cardi.org

CARIBBEAN METEOROLOGICAL ORGANISATION (CMO) Dr. Arlene G. Laing Co-ordinating Director 27 O’Connor Street Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-4711 / 0277 Fax: (868) 622-4711 Email: cmohq@cmo.org.tt Website: http://www.cmo.org.tt/

Carina Cockburn Country Representative 17 Alexander Street St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 822-6400 / 6421 Fax: (868) 622-6047 / 5422 Email: idbtrinidad@iadb.org Website: https://www.iadb.org/en/countries/ trinidad-and-tobago/overview

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (IFRC) Country Cluster Support Team 110 Picton Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-4700 Website: https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANISATION (ILO) Lars Johansen Director, a.i. Stanmore House 6 Stanmore Avenue Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-7704 / 7178 / 3359, 625-0524, 627-6304, 624-8751 Fax: (868) 627-8978 Email: ilocarib@ilo.org Website: https://www.ilo.org/caribbean

ORGANISATION OF AMERICAN STATES (OAS) TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO OFFICE (OASTT) 15 Wainwright Street St. Clair, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9272 Email: oastrinidadandtobago@oas.org Website: http://www.oas.org/en/

REGIONAL JUDICIAL AND LEGAL SERVICES COMMISSION (RJLSC)

The Honourable Mr. Justice Adrian Saunders Chairman 2nd Floor, 134 Henry Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-2225 / 8376 Fax: (868) 625-4004 Email: rjlsc@rjlsc.org Website: https://www.ccj.org/about-the-ccj/rjlsc-2/

THE PAN AMERICAN HEALTH ORGANIZATION (PAHO), WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION Country Office in Trinidad and Tobago 1st Floor, Briar Place 10-12 Sweet Briar Road St. Clair, Trinidad Tel: (868) 612-2000, 622-5445 Website: https://www.paho.org/en

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR UNESCO

Ministry of Education, Level 5 Education Towers Tower A, 5 St. Vincent Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Phone: (868) 622-2181 Fax: (868) 622-8909 Email: unesco.info@moe.gov.tt Website: www.unesco.org.tt

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME (UNDP) (TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO) Randi Davis UNDP Resident Representative, a.i. UN House 3A Chancery Lane Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-7056 Fax: (868) 623-1658 Email: registryTT@undp.org Website: https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/ home.html

UNITED NATIONS INFORMATION CENTRE (UNIC) Juan Miguel Diez Jiménez Bretton Hall – 2nd Floor 16 Victoria Avenue Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-4813 / 8438 Fax: (868) 623-4332 Email: unic.portofspain@unic.org https://unic.un.org/

INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATION FOR MIGRATION (IOM) Ministry of National Security Temple Court 2 50-62 Abercromby Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-2441 Ext.13138/9 Direct No: 627-6969 Fax: (868) 625-5009 Website: https://www.iom.int/

INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL CENTRE FOR THE CARIBBEAN (CABI)

Naitram Ramnanan Regional Representative, Caribbean 59 Gordon Street St. Augustine, Trinidad Tunapuna 331323 Tel: (868) 662-4173, 645-7628 Email: n.ramnanan@cabi.org Website: https://www.cabi.org/what-we-do/ cabi-centre/trinidad-and-tobago/

129


HONORARY CONSULS ACCREDITED TO THE REPUBLIC OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO REPUBLIC OF AUSTRIA

REPUBLIC OF FINLAND

MOROCCO

SLOVENIA

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

GERMANY

NEW ZEALAND

REPUBLIC OF SURINAME

Mr. Karl Pilstl Honorary Consul Blue Haven, Bacolet Bay PO Box 8 Scarborough, Tobago Tel: (868) 660-7500 Fax: (868) 660-7900 Email: kpilstl@yahoo.com

Dr. E. Monica Davis Honorary Consul PO Box 56 St. Vincent Street Port of Spain Office Address: c/o Faculty of Medical Science The University of the West Indies Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex Bldg 35 Room 101, Uriah Butler Highway Champs Fleurs, Trinidad Tel: (868) 663-8986 Email: thebahamasconsulatett@gmail.com

BARBADOS

Dr. Roosevelt S. Rock Honorary Consul 16 Jackson Street Curepe, Trinidad Tel: (868) 636-8696 Email: rooseveltrock@yahoo.com

PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF BANGLADESH

Razai Azard Rahaman Honorary Consul - General 1 Shafik Drive, Cross Crossing San Fernando, Trinidad Tel: (868) 657-8425 Fax: (868) 652-7108 Email: azard_rahaman@rahamutgroup. com imtiaz_rahaman@rahamutgroup.com

KINGDOM OF BELGIUM

Paul Jay Williams Honorary Consul 2 Sixth Avenue Barataria, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-1677 Fax: (868) 675-9831 Email: honoraryconsulbelgium@gmail.com

BELIZE

Thomas Chanona Honorary Consul Corner Warren and Smart Streets St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-4062 Fax: (868) 645-4064 Email: tchanona@kee-chanona.com/ admin@kee-chanona.com

BOTSWANA

Rubindra Debideen Honorary Consul Ultra Cool Limited 96 Wrightson Road Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-7770/2888 Fax: (868) 625-4875 Email: boss@ultracoolgroup.com

KINGDOM OF DENMARK

Ravi R. Dolsingh, LLB, PG, Dip, LPC Honorary Consul, General Mansfield House, Mansfield Chambers 1st Floor, No. 24 Abercromby Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 780-3772 Fax : (868) 627-8191 Email: rav@ravidolsingh.com

130

Troy Garcia Honorary Consul 153 Eastern Main Road Barataria, Trinidad Tel: (868) 638-1277 Ext 240 Fax: (868) 674-2644 Email: tgarcia6@hotmail.com / officeadmin@partsworldlimited.com Frank Wuenstel Honorary Consul LP97 Milford Road Tobago Tel: (868) 313-1260 Email: Frank.wuenstel@gmx.de

GRENADA

Michael Brizan Consular Officer Grenada House 127 Henry Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-9235 Fax: (868) 624-1257 Email: grenadaconsulate@gmail.com

CO-OPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA Maharine Deborah Yaw Consul General (Ag.) 12 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 622-2913 Email: dyaw@minfor.gov.gy

REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA

Ian Anthony Honorary Consul Building 5, Christina Courts 33-35 Boissiere No. 1 Maraval, Trinidad Tel/Fax: (868) 628-4818 Email: iananthony@renavatio.net / ianpanthony@gmail.com

STATE OF ISRAEL

Barbara Malins-Smith Honorary Consul Tel: (868) 785-3054 Email: malinssmith@yahoo.com

ITALIAN REPUBLIC

Shira Serena Mohammed Honorary Consul 8 Hillcote, Scott Street St. Augustine, Trinidad Tel: (868) 756-3939 Email: italconstt@gmail.com

REPUBLIC OF LATVIA

Kirby Anthony Hosang Honorary Consul 112 Saddle Road Maraval, Trinidad Tel: (868) 657-9653 Fax: (868) 653-1331 Email: hosanganthony@gmail.com

Mario Sabga-Aboud Honorary Consul 80 Lower Boundary Road San Juan, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-2697 Ext 2258 Fax: (868) 638-4711 Mobile: (868) 680-3597 Email: mario@pizzaboys.com Donald Kelshall Honorary Consul 31 Alberto Street, Woodbrook Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-3829 Fax: (868) 624-6521 Email: dkelshall@savannahcomputing.com

KINGDOM OF NORWAY

Stuart Jardine K.F.O. Honorary Consul 101 St. Anthony’s Drive Westmoorings PO Box 13 Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-7687 Fax: (868) 637-6203 Email: norkonpos@gmail.com

ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF PAKISTAN Amjad Ali Honorary Consul General LP16 Orange Grove Estate Tacarigua, Trinidad Tel: (868) 640-7971 Fax: (868) 640-6594 Email: amjad@adfoam.com

REPUBLIC OF PERU

Jerome Khan Honorary Consul 24 Fitzgerald Lane PO Box 437 Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-4747 / 0102 Fax: (868) 627-1936 Email: jeromekhan.slm@gmail.com

KINGDOM OF SWEDEN

David O’ Brien Honorary Consul c/o Massy Motors, Lady Young Road Morvant, Trinidad Tel: (868) 674-4200 Ext. 1103 Fax: (868) 674-7761; 675-6523 Email: david.obrien@massygroup.com

THE SWISS CONFEDERATION Michele Khan Honorary Consul General 70 Dundonald Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-7816 Fax: (868) 624-8544 Email: portspain@honrep.ch

SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC

Patrick A. Ferreira Honorary Consul Furness Court, 1 Richmond Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 221-8642 Email: patrickaidenferreira@gmail.com

Marwan Yousef Honorary Consul 15 Queen Street Arima, Trinidad Tel: (868) 667-3927 Fax: (868) 667-7019 Email: syrianconsolatect@gmail.com

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES

REPUBLIC OF TURKEY

Dr. Marie Magno Advani Honorary Consul General (Ag.) B41 Ridgewood Towers Four Roads, Diego Martin c/o Caribbean Partnerships Co. Ltd. Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2988 Fax: (868) 633-6946 Email: philhoncongentt@gmail.com

REPUBLIC OF POLAND

David Lewis Honorary Consul Lot 25 Frederick Settlement Industrial Estate Caroni, Trinidad Tel: (868) 645-5522 Fax: (868) 663-0897 Email: davidl@labelhouse.com

REPUBLIC OF PORTUGAL

LEBANESE REPUBLIC

Amer G. Haidar Honorary Consul (Dean) 7 Adam Smith Square Woodbrook, Trinidad Tel: (868) 782-4700 Email: aghaidar3@gmail.com

William A. Ferreira Honorary Consul Furness House - Second Floor 90 Independence Square PO Box 283, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-1745 / 1131 Fax: (868) 625-1243 Email: furness@furnessgroup.com

MALTA

SLOVAK REPUBLIC (SLOVAKIA)

John Hadad Honorary Consul HADCO Ltd. JRJ Warehousing Compound Bhagoutie Trace San Juan, Trinidad Tel: (868) 675-7628 Ext. 1201 Email: john.hadad@hadcoltd.com

Om Prakash Lalla Honorary Consul c/o K R Lalla & Co. 41 Edward Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-5074 Fax: (868) 625-6110 Email: omlalla@krlalla.com

Lawrence S. Naipaul Honorary Consul Port Authority of Trinidad and Tobago Administration Building 1st Floor Dock Road Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-6273 Email: lsnaipaul@msn.com

Michael Llanos Honorary Consul General 19 Western Main Road St. James Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-3222 Fax: (868) 622-6661 Mobile: (868) 324-4989 Email: mike@llanosgroup.com

REPUBLIC OF UGANDA

Dr. Dinesh Mor Honorary Consul 133 Columbus Circle Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-2215 Email: dinesh12mor@Gmail.com


EMBASSIES AND DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS APOSTOLIC NUNCIATURE

His Excellency Archbishop Apostolic Fortunatus Nwachukwu Titular Archbishop of Acquaviva Apostolic Nuncio 11 Mary Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-5009/6359 Fax: (868) 222-9814 Email: apnuntt@googlemail.com

EMBASSY OF THE ARGENTINE REPUBLIC Minister Carlos Tagle Chargé d’Affaires, a.i. 4th Floor, Tatil Building 11 Maraval Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-7557/7587 Fax: (868) 628-7544 Email: etrin@mrecic.gov.ar

HIGH COMMISSION FOR THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

His Excellency Bruce Lendon High Commissioner 18 Herbert Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 822-5450 Email: ahc.portofspain@dfat.gov.au Website: https://trinidadandtobago.embassy. gov.au/

EMBASSY OF THE FEDERATIVE REPUBLIC OF BRAZIL

His Excellency Rodrigo do Amaral Souza Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 18 Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-5779/5771 Fax: (868) 622-4323 Email: amboffice.portspain@itamaraty.gov.br

HIGH COMMISSION OF CANADA

His Excellency Sharad Kumar Gupta High Commissioner 3-3A Sweet Briar Road, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-6232 Fax: (868) 628-2581 Email: pspan@international.gc.ca Website: https://www.canadainternational. gc.ca/

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CHILE

His Excellency Juan Aníbal Barría García Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 4 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-0540/4763 Fax: (868) 622-9894 Email: echilett@minrel.gob.cl

EMBASSY OF THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA

His Excellency Song Yumin Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 76 Long Circular Road, Maraval, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-1832, 628-6417 Fax: (868) 622-7613 Email: chinaemb_tt@mfa.gov.cn Website: http://tt.china-embassy.org/eng/

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA

EMBASSY OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

EMBASSY OF JAPAN

DELEGATION OF THE EUROPEAN UNION TO TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA

His Excellency Wellington Darío Bencosme Casataños Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 10B Queen’s Park West, Suite 101 Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-7930, 627-2605 Fax: (868) 623-7779 Email: cubasec.tt@gmail.com/ embajada@tt.embacuba.cu

His Excellency Peter Cavendish Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 5th Floor, 11 Queen’s Park East 101002, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-6628 Fax: (868) 622-6355 Email: delegation-trinidad-and-tobago-hod @eeas.europa.eu Website: https://eeas.europa.eu/ delegations/trinidad-and-tobago_en

EMBASSY OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC His Excellency Serge Lavroff Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 7 Mary Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 232-4808 Fax: (868) 628-2632 Email: info@ambafrance-tt.org Website: https://tt.ambafrance.org/English-

EMBASSY OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY

EMBASSY OF THE KINGDOM OF THE NETHERLANDS

Her Excellency Harriet Cross High Commissioner 19 St Clair Avenue, St. Clair Newtown 190125 Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 350-0444 Fax: (868) 622-4555 Email: generalenquiries.ptofs@fcdo.gov.uk Website: https://www.gov.uk/world/ organisations/british-high-commissiontrinidad-and-tobago

His Excellency Sándor Marnix Raphaël Varga van Kibéd en Makfalva Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Trinre Building 69–71 Edward Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-1210/1722/2532 Fax: (868) 625-1704 Email: por@minbuza.nl Website: https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl/ your-country-and-the-netherlands/trinidadand-tobago/about-us/embassy-in-port-ofspain

GRENADA CONSULAR AND TRADE OFFICE

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

HIGH COMMISSION FOR THE COOPERATIVE REPUBLIC OF GUYANA Maharine Deborah Yaw Consul General (Ag.) 12 Alexandra Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-2616, 622-2913 Fax: (868) 622-5158 Email: dyaw@minfor.gov.gy

HIGH COMMISSION FOR THE REPUBLIC OF INDIA

His Excellency Arun Kumar Sahu High Commissioner 6 Victoria Avenue Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 225-4340 Fax: (868) 225-4248 Email: hcipos.hc_ss@yahoo.com Website: https://www.hcipos.gov.in/

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF CUBA

HIGH COMMISSION FOR JAMAICA

His Excellency Arthur H.W. Williams High Commissioner 2 Newbold Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-4995 Fax: (868) 622-9043 Email: jamaica@jhcpos.org

His Excellency Fernando Nogales Álvarez Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 7th Floor, Tatil Building 11 Maraval Road Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-7938, 628-2560, 622-1151 Ext. 237 Fax: (868) 622-3032 Email: emb.puertoespana@maec.es

CONSULATE OF SURINAME

HIGH COMMISSION FOR THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA

Grenada Trade and Economic Commissioner Michael Brizan Grenada House 127 Henry Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-9235 Fax: (868) 624-1257 Email: grenadaconsular@gmail.com

EMBASSY OF THE KINGDOM OF SPAIN

His Excellency Moon-Up Sung Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 36 Elizabeth Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9081/1069 Fax: (868) 628-8745 Email: trinidad@mofa.go.kr http://overseas.mofa.go.kr/tt-en/index.do

Her Excellency Ute König Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 19 St. Clair Avenue, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-1630/1632 Email: info@ports.diplo.de Website: https://port-of-spain.diplo.de /tt-en/embassy

Her Excellency Martha Cecilia Pinilla-Perdomo Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 4th Floor, Newtown Centre 30-36 Maraval Road Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-5656, 222-2275 Email: Cpuertoespana@cancilleria.gov.co Her Excellency Tania Diego Olite Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 74 Elm Avenue, Bayshore Westmoorings, Trinidad Tel: (868) 633-3268, 632-8691 Email: cubasec.tt@gmail.com or embajada@ tt.embacuba.cu

His Excellency Tatsuo Hirayama Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 5 Hayes Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-5991/5993 Fax: (868) 622-0858 Email: embassyofjapan@po.mofa.go.jp Website: https://www.tt.emb-japan.go.jp/ itprtop_en/index.html

Tahiru Haruna Chargé d’Affaires, a.i. 3 Maxwell-Phillip Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-4002 Fax: (868) 622-7162 Email: chancerynig@yahoo.com

Selvia Miller-Palmer Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 7 Ground Floor, Gray Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-9956/9957 Fax: (868) 622-8992 Email: embpanamatyt@mire.gob.pa

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF PERU His Excellency David Malaga Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 4 Trinidad Crescent, Federation Park Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 221-8642/2939 Email: missiontt@embassyofperutt.net

HIGH COMMISSION FOR THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

Her Excellency Xoliswa Nomathamsanqa Ngwevela High Commissioner 4 Scott Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-9869, 628-6997 Fax: (868) 622-7089 Email: sahctt.general@dirco.gov.za or sahctt.consular@dirco.gov.za Website https://www.gov.za/aboutgovernment/contact-directory/ representatives-rsa/ representatives-rsa/trinidad-and-tobago

Jerome Khan Honorary Consul PO Box 43 , Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 680 7254 Email: jeromekhan.slm@gmail.com

HIGH COMMISSION FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED MEXICAN STATES

Her Excellency Rosario Asela Molinero Molinero Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 12 Hayes Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-1422 Fax: (868) 628-8488 Email: embttobago@sre.gob.mx

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Shante Moore Chargé d’Affaires, a.i. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 15 Queen’s Park West Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-6371/6376 Fax: (868) 822-5905 Email: POSexecutiveoffice@state.gov https://tt.usembassy.gov/

THE EMBASSY OF THE BOLIVARIAN REPUBLIC OF VENEZUELA

His Excellency Carlos Amador Perez Silva Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 16 Victoria Avenue Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-9821/9823/9824 Fax: (868) 624-2508 Email: embve.ttpsp@mppre.gob.ve

EMBASSY OF THE REPUBLIC OF TURKEY

Her Excellency Bengü Yiğitgüden Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 3 Scott Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 794-2465 Email: melis.altuntas@mfa.gov.tr embassy.portofspain@mfa.gov.tr

131


THE GOVERNMENT OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO THE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

Circular Road, St Ann’s, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 225-4687 Email: otp.mail@otp.gov.tt Website: https://otp.tt/

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER

Office of the Prime Minister White Hall, Lot 29 Maraval Road Queen’s Park West, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-0644 Email: pmsec@opm.gov.tt Website: https://www.opm.gov.tt/

OFFICE OF THE PARLIAMENT

Parliamentary Complex Cabildo Building St. Vincent Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-7275 Fax: (868) 624-4672 Email: webmaster@ttparliament.org Website: http://www.ttparliament.org/

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, LAND AND FISHERIES

Corner Narsaloo Ramaya Marg Road & Soogrim Street Chaguanas, Trinidad Tel: (868) 220-6253 Website: https://agriculture.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL AND LEGAL AFFAIRS AGLA Tower, The Government Campus Plaza Corner London & Richmond Streets Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 223-2452 Fax: (868) 226-5145 Website: https://agla.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION Level 7, NALIS Building, Corner Hart and Abercromby Streets Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-9081 / 4724 Fax: (868) 624-4216 Website: http://www.mpac.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Education Towers, Level 15 No. 5 St. Vincent Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-2181 Fax: (868) 624-2035 Website: https://www.moe.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF ENERGY AND ENERGY INDUSTRIES

Levels 22-26, Tower C, International Waterfront Centre 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 225-5750 Ext. 2633 Fax: (868) 622-3635 Email: info@energy.gov.tt Website: https://www.energy.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF FINANCE

Eric Williams Finance Building Independence Square, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-5633 Fax: (868) 625-8354 Website: https://www.finance.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT HDC Building, 44-46 South Quay Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 624-5291 / 0595 PBX: (868) 623-4663 Ext. 2171 Fax: (868) 625-2793 Email: info@housing.gov.tt; ttministryofhousingandurbandev@gmail.com Website: http://www.housing.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF LABOUR

Levels 5 & 6, Tower C International Waterfront Complex 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-8448 Ext. 1313 Fax: (868) 624-9126 Website: https://www.molsed.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF NATIONAL SECURITY

Temple Court 1, 31-33 Abercromby Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-7579 Fax: (868) 625-2820 / 627-4930 Email: corpcomm@mns.gov.tt Website: http://www.nationalsecurity.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Level 14, Eric Williams Financial Complex Independence Square, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 612-3000 Ext. 2009, 2010, 1389 Website: https://www.planning.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Level 7, NALIS Building Corner Hart and Abercromby Streets Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-9081 / 4724 Fax: (868) 624-4216 Website: http://www.mpac.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC UTILITIES

One Alexandra Place, 1 Alexander Street St. Clair, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-9500 Fax: (868) 628-5467 Website: http://www.mpu.gov.tt

MINISTRY OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT Kent House, Long Circular Road, Maraval Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 622-4713, 628-1323 Ext. 3102/3 Fax: (868) 622-8202 Email: RDLGComms@gov.tt Website: https://rdlg.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY SERVICES

Colonial Life Building 39-43 St. Vincent Street, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-2608 Ext. 5607 Fax: (868) 625-6095 Email: info@social.gov.tt Website: https://www.social.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF SPORT AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

St. Clair Circle, St. Clair, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-6894 / 285-5029 Fax: (868) 623-5853 Website: https://foreign.gov.tt/

Level 20, Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-6322, 625-6088 Ext. 5113 Fax: (868) 627-1941 Email: minsecretariat_cdca@gov.tt Website: https://cdca.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF HEALTH

MINISTRY OF TOURISM, CULTURE AND THE ARTS

MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AND CARICOM AFFAIRS

CHIC Building, 63 Park Street Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 623-2741 Fax: (868) 627-2139 Website: http://www.health.gov.tt/

132

Levels 8 & 9, Tower C, International Waterfront Complex 1 Wrightson Road, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: 624-1403 Ext. 223 Fax: 624-6737 Email: mintourism@tourism.gov.tt Website: http://tourism.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

Level 17, Nicholas Towers 63-65 Independence Square, Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 627-3300 Fax: (868) 627-8488 Email: mti-info@gov.tt Website: https://tradeind.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF WORKS AND TRANSPORT Level 6, Main Administrative Building Corner Richmond and London Streets Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 625-2643 / 624-3541 Fax: (868) 625-8070 Email: communications@mowt.gov.tt Website: http://www.mowt.gov.tt/

MINISTRY OF YOUTH DEVELOPMENT AND NATIONAL SERVICES

2 Elizabeth Street, St. Clair Port of Spain, Trinidad Tel: (868) 628-6792 Ext. 4029, 4045 Fax: (868) 623-5006 Email: info@mydns.gov.tt Website: https://mydns.gov.tt/youth-development/


INDEX BY SURNAME A

Abdulla Ali Taib, Alya ..................................................................84 Acevero, Samson ..........................................................................64 Adams, Eric A. ............................................................................... 37 Adams, Omaalade ........................................................................39 Agostini, Gabrielle ......................................................................100 Ahamad, Reyaz ..............................................................................16 Alcazar, Alan ..................................................................................82 Alexander, Liesel ...........................................................................39 Alexis, George .................................................................................14 Alexis, Lee Ann ............................................................................109 Ali, Amir ..........................................................................................60 Ali, Anissa ........................................................................................15 Ali, Darren .................................................................................16, 37 Ali, Kyria ..........................................................................................86 Ali, Nazra .........................................................................................83 Ali, Salisha .......................................................................................63 Ali, Shazan ......................................................................................42 Allahar-Cape, Nicole .................................................................... 33 Alleyene, Hayden ......................................................... 16, 120, 122 Alli, Tariq .........................................................................................26 Amow, Edward ..............................................................................82 Andrews, Michal ...........................................................................96 Archie Lewis, Kirlyn ......................................................................26 Arieatas, Tristan.............................................................................63 Arjoon, Neeraj ................................................................................50 Arjoon, Vaalmikki...........................................................................15 Arneaud, Gregory .........................................................................63 Arneaud, Sarah ..............................................................................82 Attong, Bianca ...............................................................................34 Austin, Daniel..................................................................................15 Austin, Tracy ................................................................................. 116 Awai, Anthony ...............................................................................30 Awai, Sherry ................................................................................... 111 Ayoung, Jason-Leigh .................................................................. 122

B

Baah, Emmanuel ..................................................................... 19, 20 Baboolal, Sarah ..............................................................................34 Baboolal, Sharon .........................................................................106 Baksh-Johnson, Alycia ..................................................................21 Balbirsingh, Valmiki ......................................................................94 Baldeo-Ramchan, Dessire .......................................................... 53 Baldeo, Annie .................................................................................74 Balgobin, Sasenath ........................................................................21 Ballah-Tull, Lindi ............................................................................26 Balwah-Frontin, Dianne ..............................................................42 Bansee, Jainarine Eng. ........................................................... 16, 40 Baptiste Candice ......................................................................... 124 Baptiste Assee Kathryna ............................................................96 Baptiste, Nigel M. ...................................................................28, 29 Baptiste, Pamela ............................................................................82 Barcant, Daniel .............................................................................. 57 Barcant, Jonathan ......................................................................... 57 Basdeo, Damion Dr. ......................................................................17 Battoo, Anthony .......................................................................... 107 Beaubrun, Alana ............................................................................96 Beckles, Cecile ............................................................................. 107 Beharry, Vishi Y. Dr. ...............................................................17, 56 Best, Thora H.B.M........................................................................ 107 Bharath, Terrence .........................................................................96 Bhola, Dinesh ...............................................................................109 Bishop, Nicolyn .............................................................................. 33 Bissessar, Vidya .............................................................................91 Blake, Septimus ............................................................................. 33 Boodhu, Kenneth ............................................................................16 Boodhu, Sanjiv ................................................................................16 Boodoo, Russell .............................................................................42 Boodram, Winston .......................................................................30 Boopsingh, Robert M. ..................................................................83 Bosse, Wendy .........................................................................28, 29 Bowrin, Ingrid .................................................................................82 Brijbassie, Arvind ..........................................................................30 Broadbridge, Stephen ................................................................ 125 Bryan, Patricia ................................................................................83 Budhooram, Kathryn ....................................................................36 Bute-Seaton, Kelly........................................................... 16, 24, 39

C

Callender-Gordon, Melissa .........................................................21 Campbell, Jonathan ......................................................................97 Cardinez, Joy .................................................................................. 32 Castillo, Renée Camillo................................................................34 Celestine, Gerard...........................................................................97 Chamely, Anna ...............................................................................31 Chan, Jonathan .............................................................................. 33 Chang, Robert ................................................................................76 Charles, Adrian ...............................................................................21 Charles, Anthony ..........................................................................82 Charles, Roland ..............................................................................65 Charran, Vishnu..............................................................................15 Chattergoon, Reval.........................................................................16 Chinpire-O’Reilly, Denise ...................................................16, 109 Cipriani-Ortiz, Marisa ................................................................. 116 Clarke, Adrian ................................................................................34 Clarke, Jason ........................................................................... 16, 80 Clarke, Peter ...................................................................................82 Clarke, Suszanna .........................................................................108 Clarke, Tricia ..................................................................................34 Claxton, Bunny-Lue .......................................................................21 Cole, Joel........................................................................................ 122 Connelly, Clint................................................................................34

Contant, Kimberley ......................................................................83 Coosal, Tricia .................................................................... 10, 17, 92 Couch, Indira Dr........................................................................... 102 Cowan Rodney ................................................................................17 Creese, Marli .................................................................................. 33 Crockshaw, Gerald ........................................................................17

D

D’Arcy Adrienne .........................................................................109 Dalla Costa, Garry ...................................................................... 122 Dan, Dilip Prof.................................................................................85 Daniel, Maria .................................................................................. 25 Daniell, K. Michael ........................................................................ 37 Darbasie, Karen .............................................................................26 Darsan, Samuel .............................................................................30 Dasent, Karyn ................................................................................87 Dass-Mungal, Riah ................................................................28, 29 Dass, Amit .......................................................................................15 Dass, Nisa .......................................................................................83 Dass, Wayne ..................................................................................36 Davis, Kevin ....................................................................................87 Davis, Natasha M. ........................................................................ 35 de Meillac, Jean-Paul .................................................................. 116 De Silva, Chris ................................................................................97 De Souza, Ian R. ........................................................................9, 14 De Verteuil, Acacia ..................................................................... 117 Debysingh-Persad, Nirmalla ...............................................93, 99 Decle, Paula ................................................................................... 118 Dennie, Curtis............................................................................... 124 Dennis, Ancil K. The Hon. .......................................................9, 41 Deokiesingh, Keisha ......................................................................17 Des-Vignes, Michelle ..................................................................39 Dhaniram, Danelle ........................................................................42 Dhoray, Bobby................................................................................42 Din Chong, Marcus.......................................................................49 Diptee, Rajiv........................................................................ 14, 15, 17 Dolsingh Ravi................................................................................. 116 Dookeran, Anil.................................................................................21 Dookeran, Navin............................................................................82 Douglas, Adeola .............................................................................71 Douglas, Deneisha ........................................................................98 Douglas, Karel.................................................................................74 Downie, Richard .............................................................. 16, 24, 39 Driver, Thackwray Dr. .....................................................11, 14, 46 Drummond Jason .........................................................................98 Dukharan, Nirvana ........................................................................ 33

E

Edghill, Mark .......................................................13, 16, 17, 114, 116 Edwards, Andy ...............................................................................34 Edwards, Marcia ............................................................................91 Edwards, Nigel .............................................................................. 35 Elder, Irwin K. ................................................................................ 116 Erriah-Ali, Kimberly ...............................................................28, 29 Escalante, Andre ...........................................................................47 Esdelle, Mary .................................................................................. 111

F

Gordon-Bedeau, Anika ................................................................34 Gordon, Winston ...........................................................................31 Grant, Jerome .............................................................................. 107 Griffith, Albert.................................................................................20 Grosvenor, Vanessa ......................................................................91 Guy, Montgomery ...................................................................... 107 Guyadeen, Vashti G. ...............................................................13, 17

H

Hackett, Alan..................................................................................86 Hackett, David................................................................................83 Hadad, Diane........................................................................... 10, 14 Hadeed, Christian..........................................................................83 Hadeed, Gerald ..............................................................................83 Hamid, Sajjad...................................................................................15 Hamilton, Dinesha .........................................................................71 Hamlet, Keith..................................................................................36 Hanamji, Rudy................................................................................. 25 Harrynanan, Kavita .......................................................................30 Hart, Zoë......................................................................................... 116 Hassanali, Karlene .......................................................................110 Haywood, Ian Jr. ..........................................................................106 Henderson, Anna ..........................................................................76 Hepburn, Karrian ........................................................................... 35 Hernandez, Jody .............................................................................31 Hilton-Clarke, Jacqueline ............................................................39 Hoadley, Alison ............................................................................ 118 Homer-Caesar, Carol ...................................................................96 Hosein, Kazim.................................................................................99 Hosein, Neil.....................................................................................99 Hosein, Safiyya ..............................................................................99 Howell, Derwin M. .................................................................28, 29 Howell, Keston ...............................................................................81 Huggins, Chaz ................................................................................86 Hunte, Andrew Dr. .....................................................................106

I

Imbert, Colm, Minister of Finance The Hon. .........................18 Indar, Lisa Dr...................................................................................58 Inglefield, Sharon ...........................................................................41

J

Jackman, Kyle.................................................................................47 Jaglal, Errol ..................................................................................... 116 James, Christopher ........................................................................17 James, Tosca.................................................................................. 112 Jardine, Yuri............................................................................. 16, 122 Joab, Martyn....................................................................................17 Jobe, Yolan ....................................................................................109 John, Marsha R. .......................................................................16, 37 Johnson, Jamal ............................................................................. 107 Johnson, Keith ..............................................................................108 Johnson, Sandra .............................................................................91 Joncilla, Renee ...............................................................................96 Jones, Rawl...................................................................................... 23 Joseph-Felice, Ingrid.................................................................... 112 Joseph, Andre.................................................................................36 Joseph, Cavelle................................................................................17 Joseph, Marsha..............................................................................97 Joseph, Zola ....................................................................................20 Joyeau-Flores, Arlene................................................................... 33 Julien, Jason ....................................................................................26

Fagien, Zakiya Dr. .........................................................................99 Farah, Anthony D. .........................................................................90 Fares, Francesca .............................................................................21 Farfan, Melissa .............................................................................. 111 Farrell, Mark .................................................................................. 116 Farrow, S. Naz ................................................................................83 Fergusson, Devon ........................................................................ 116 Ferreira, Adriana V. .......................................................................91 Ferreira, Patrick A. .........................................................................91 Ferreira, William A. .......................................................................91 Figaro-Richard, Litalia ................................................................. 112 Fingal, Stephanie .....................................................................13, 16 Forbes, Ian .......................................................................................96 Forde, B. Roxanne .......................................................................109 Fortuné, Stefan ..............................................................................36 Francis, Lynette ............................................................................. 111 Frankland, Steven ..........................................................................60 Fraser-Lee Wen, Mekeisha ........................................................30 Fraser, Peter ................................................................................. 107 Frederick, Karen ............................................................................49 Fridy, Joanna ..................................................................................20 Frost, Sterling Prof. ......................................................................26 Fulchan-Lakhan, Amanda ...........................................................34 Fuller, Michelle ..............................................................................83

Kabeera, Denish............................................................................. 33 Kallian, Sharda................................................................................ 32 Kalloo, Aeron ................................................................................. 23 Karamath, Raymond ....................................................................42 Karim, Candice ...............................................................................15 Kenny, W. Martin..........................................................................83 Khan, Bari......................................................................................... 23 Khan, Feyaad...................................................................................34 Khan, Kieran Andrew...........................................................79, 100 Khan, Nasha.................................................................................... 111 Khan, Rehana.................................................................................. 32 Khan, Sade.......................................................................................42 Khan, Shabir....................................................................................82 Khan, Sherifa................................................................................... 53 King, Christine................................................................................97 King, Dalia.........................................................................................31 King, Keith M. .................................................................................31 King, Maxine....................................................................................31

Gabriel, Melesha ...........................................................................89 Gabriel, Troy ...................................................................................89 Gall, Charlotte ..............................................................................108 Galt, Dylan ......................................................................................50 George, Carla ..................................................................................21 Gibbons, E. Graham (Grant) Dr. The Hon .............................83 Gibbons, J. David ..........................................................................83 Gierbolini, Eduardo .......................................................................82 Gittens, Kevon ............................................................................... 32 Glaisher, Dawn ............................................................................. 116 Gobin, Candace ............................................................................. 53 Golding, Stacy-Ann ....................................................................109 Gomez, Aqiyla Dr. .........................................................................60 Gomez, Blayne ...............................................................................60 Gomez, Camie ..............................................................................110 Gooden, Samantha ....................................................................... 33 Gooden, Steven ............................................................................. 33 Gopaul, Carolyn ........................................................................... 107 Gopee-Scoon, Paula, Senator The Hon. ................................... 8 Gopeesingh, Anyl Dr. ...................................................................60

La Foucade, Jean ........................................................................... 23 La Roche, Cheryl-Ann ..................................................................26 Laing, Damian ................................................................................89 Lall, Fatima ......................................................................................63 Lalor, Dennis Hon. .........................................................................91 Lalor, Paul..........................................................................................91 Lambie, Ginelle...............................................................................96 Lashley, Ingrid.................................................................................96 Latchu, Ryan........................................................................16, 18, 23 Laurayne, Damian ..........................................................................21 Lazzari, Robert ...............................................................................82 Le Gendre, Esther ........................................................................109 Le Maitre, Sonya .........................................................................108 Lee Loy, Angela ............................................................................. 33 Lee Wo-Mollenthiel, Anouk ......................................................83 Lewis, David ...................................................................................94 Lewis, Kingsley Jerome .............................................................109 Lewis, Marcus .................................................................................71 Lewis, Mark ....................................................................................94 Lewis Richard .....................................................................4, 83, 94

G

K

L

133


INDEX BY SURNAME CONTINUED Lewis, Robin ....................................................................................26 Lewis, Ryan ............................................................................. 50, 94 Lewis, Shane ...................................................................................94 Lezama, Renato .............................................................................83 Llanos, Stephanie ..........................................................................60 Look Kin, Richard ..........................................................................26 Look Loy, Khari ..............................................................................49 Look-Hong, Randy .........................................................................21 Loquan, Mark ................................................................................. 52 Lord-Lewis, Marleen ..................................................................106 Lungren, Lochinvar ........................................................................91 Lushington, Naomi .......................................................................63 Lyman, Richelle............................................................................. 124 Lynch, Vanessa ..............................................................................63

M

Mahabir-Wyatt, Diana ............................................................. 103 Mahabir, Dwight ...................................................................... 11, 14 Mahabirsingh, Glenn ............................................................. 17, 40 Mahabirsingh, Justin ....................................................................65 Mahadeo, Ricardo .........................................................................42 Maharaj, Baldath.............................................................................15 Maharaj, Chris Dr. Eng. ................................................................16 Maharaj, David ..............................................................................97 Maharaj, Kerri ................................................................................ 35 Maharaj, Ravindranath ................................................................42 Maharaj, Varun ..............................................................................85 Mahase, Deoraj ..............................................................................15 Mahase, Nesha................................................................................15 Maingot, Anthony .........................................................................82 Maingot, Kristi ...............................................................................60 Mallalieu, Kim Dr. .........................................................................74 Manning, Brian ............................................................................. 40 Mano, Dianne A. .........................................................................109 Manraj, Shiva .................................................................................26 Manson, Jamie ...............................................................................86 Maraj, Shawn ................................................................................ 116 Marcano, Tanisha ......................................................................... 32 Marcelle-Kennedy, Lois ..............................................................86 Marcus, Kriss .................................................................................39 Mark, Sekou .................................................................................... 35 Marks, Moreen ...............................................................................91 Marquez, Maxim .....................................................................81, 87 Marshall, Jayne ..............................................................................97 Martyn Joab ....................................................................................17 Masaisai, Tafara Hove ...............................................................106 Mathews Sandy, Alanna ............................................................. 32 Matthew, Nigel .............................................................................110 Mc Clean, Kevin ...........................................................................110 Mc Leod-Marshall, Marsha ................................................28, 29 Mc Nish, Courtney Arthur ........................................................108 McCarthy, Marsha .......................................................................87 McDonald, Akeisha ......................................................................49 McDonald, Nicholas .....................................................................21 McMillan, Sherry ...........................................................................74 Meahjohn, Inshan .........................................................................87 Melville, Sharon .............................................................................86 Menal, Kurt ....................................................................................20 Mills, Keith Andre .......................................................................109 Mitchell, Brent ...............................................................................82 Mitchell, Selvonne ....................................................................... 115 Modeste-Clarke, Deborah Ann ................................................83 Mohammed Stephens, Alisha ....................................................15 Mohammed-Maharaj, Maria ................................................15, 17 Mohammed, Curtis ...................................................................... 52 Mohammed, Faiyyaz ....................................................................21 Mohammed, Lisa ..........................................................................42 Mohammed, Nicholas ..................................................................31 Mohammed, Nicholas .................................................................97 Mohammed, Rahim ......................................................................96 Mohammed, Stefan .................................................................... 122 Moonasar, Sunil...............................................................................15 Moonilal-Kissoon, Neela ............................................................26 Morton, Gerard .............................................................................30 Moses, Josann ............................................................................. 107 Moss, Jesse .................................................................................. 107 Mottley, Mia Amor QC The Hon............................................. 102

N

Nancoo, Keston ........................................................................13, 16 Narine, Trisha .................................................................................65 Nedd, Nisha .................................................................................. 107 Nelson, Brendon ............................................................................34 Nelson, Farrington .........................................................................21 Newton, Hayden ...........................................................................20 Nobie, Alan ................................................................................... 107 Norville, Yvonne .......................................................................... 107 Nurse, Andrew .......................................................................... 122

O

Oliver, Marlon ................................................................................86 Olton, Larry .....................................................................................26 Oudit, Anelia ..................................................................................36 Oumade Singh, Roopnarine ................................................28, 29

P

Paltoo, Vernon Dr. ........................................................................ 52 Panchoo, Kim ................................................................................ 53 Pantin, Averne ............................................................................. 124 Parasram, Barry ...........................................................................106 Parris, Nigel .................................................................................. 107 Pashley, Charles ........................................................................9, 14 Patrick, Cole ....................................................................................31

134

Patrick, Dexter ............................................................................... 32 Patrick, Stuart ................................................................................110 Payne, Renee ..................................................................................49 Paynter, Allison .............................................................................76 Paz, Alixander ................................................................................ 111 Pereira, Camille ............................................................................83 Persad-Poliah, Niala......................................................................34 Persad, Marlon .......................................................................28, 29 Peterson, Gilbert S.C. ...................................................................74 Philip, Renée-Lisa ........................................................................109 Phillips, Edmund ..........................................................................109 Phipps, Wanda ..............................................................................97 Pilgrim, Nigel ...................................................................................21 Plimmer, Ann ................................................................................ 118 Plimmer, Steve .............................................................................. 118 Pollidore, Rueben ..........................................................................49 Pottie-Salandy, Michelle ............................................................. 53 Pouchet, Lorraine ...........................................................................17 Praim, Videsh ..................................................................................91 Primus, Brandon ............................................................................87 Pulchan, Melissa ......................................................................... 107

Q

Quan, Greer ....................................................................................87 Quashie, Marissa ........................................................................109 Quentrall-Thomas, Lara ..................................................... 110, 113

R

Ragbir, Sana ....................................................................................26 Ragoonanan, Jeffrey ..................................................................... 23 Ragoonath, Dave ...........................................................................42 Rajkumar, Gerard ..........................................................................65 Rajkumar, Kadishia ..................................................................... 122 Rajkumar, Navin ............................................................................34 Ramaya-Hingoo, Stephanie .......................................................65 Ramcharan, Ancil .......................................................................... 33 Ramcharan, Bradley ......................................................................71 Ramdhan, Alana ............................................................................ 111 Ramdial, Sherene ..........................................................................86 Ramdin, Rosemarie ...................................................................... 32 Ramgoolam, Aldrin ................................................................28, 29 Ramgoolie, Kevin............................................................................15 Ramjit, Christopher ....................................................................109 Ramkaran, Donna-Marie ............................................................63 Ramkissoon, Adrian ..................................................................... 32 Ramkissoon, Baldath .............................................................28, 29 Ramkissoon, Dave ........................................................................85 Ramkissoon, Hema .......................................................................96 Ramkissoon, Savina .......................................................................21 Ramlal, Arjay ..................................................................................86 Ramlochan, Rajesh ....................................................................... 23 Ramlogan, Serala ...........................................................................15 Ramnarine, Denyse ...............................................................28, 29 Ramnath, Wayne ...........................................................................21 Rampersad, Avinash .....................................................................21 Rampersad, Dominic .................................................................... 52 Rampersad, Rahul ..........................................................................15 Ramrekha, Richard .......................................................................62 Ramroop, Selvon ...........................................................................78 Ramroop, Shevvon ........................................................................78 Ramsamooj Rajendra ................................................................. 124 Ramsaran, Bal Dr. .........................................................................63 Ramsaran, Racquel ..................................................................... 124 Ramsaran, Shari Dr. ......................................................................63 Ramsingh, Mukesh ..................................................................14, 15 Ramsingh, Yogendranath ...........................................................85 Ramsubhag, Robert .................................................................... 124 Raphael, Edison ..................................................................... 82, 84 Reddock-Downes, Cynthia .........................................................74 Regis, Kyron......................................................................................15 Renie, Rachel .................................................................................101 Resaulsingh, Partap ......................................................................42 Reyes-Mc Nish, Lisa ...................................................................108 Ribeiro, Marva Dr. ......................................................................... 111 Roberts, Debbie .............................................................................60 Robinson, David .....................................................................28, 29 Robinson, Glenroy ........................................................................98 Robinson, Joan M. .........................................................................98 Robinson, Reuel .............................................................................98 Rodriguez-Greaves, Crystal ....................................................... 35 Rodriguez-Seijas, Dwayne ........................................................109 Romany-Fournillier, Paulesca ....................................................84 Roopchan, Sarona ......................................................................... 53 Rowley, Keith Dr. The Hon..........................................................58 Rudd, Shannon ...............................................................................20 Ryan, Robert ...................................................................................98

S

Salick, Brenton ...............................................................................99 Salickram, Parasram .............................................................28, 29 Sam, Preston ...................................................................................14 Samaroo, Chaitram .......................................................................21 Samaroo, Lawrence ..................................................................... 116 Sammy, Richard .....................................................................28, 29 Samuda, Samantha ........................................................................91 Sandy-Roper Malika .....................................................................82 Sandy, Christopher .......................................................................26 Sanhai, Anitra ...............................................................................108 Santiago, Alejandro ......................................................................96 Santos, Devin .................................................................................60 Schaechter, Roberto .....................................................................85 Scoon-Moses, Donna ................................................................ 107 Scoon, Siddiq I.K. ..........................................................................110

Scotland-Benjamin, Pamela .......................................................20 Scott, Jevorn ...................................................................................76 Sealy, Lennox Dr............................................................................ 112 Seenath, Arun ..............................................................................109 Seepersad, Dawn .......................................................................... 35 Seeraj, Anthony .............................................................................30 Semper, Carlton .............................................................................14 Senhouse, Melissa .........................................................................14 Seow, Wendy ................................................................................. 52 Seudat, Carlene .....................................................................28, 29 Sheppard, Patrick .......................................................................... 23 Sieuraj, Rampersad ........................................................................14 Simon, Davita ..................................................................................14 Singh, Adrian .................................................................................. 23 Singh, Mark ......................................................................................31 Singh, Rishi ......................................................................................86 Singh, Sally ..................................................................................... 116 Singh, Stephen A............................................................................ 37 Sinanan, Rohan, Senator The Hon. ....................................41, 121 Sirju, Peter .......................................................................................42 Sirju-Ramnarine, Caroline Toni............................................. 11, 14 Skinner-Rocke, Natasha.............................................................106 Small, David ....................................................................................83 Smith, Patrick ..................................................................................15 Solomon, Candace .........................................................................71 Sookdeo, Ravi .................................................................................42 Sookhai, Richie ................................................................... 12, 14, 15 Sookhoo, Olivia .............................................................................. 32 Sookoo, Vishal ...............................................................................30 Sookram, Julie ................................................................................ 33 Sookram, Kirk ................................................................................74 Sorzano, Marc ................................................................................49 Soverall, Robert ......................................................................28, 29 Spence, Joanne Dr. ..................................................................... 107 Spencer, Janelle ........................................................................... 122 Spiljard, Maarten ............................................................................14 St. Clair, Anthony ..........................................................................26 St. Louis, Ayana ............................................................................ 117 St. Hill-Ramdass, Nicole .............................................................. 111 Stephen, Greta ...............................................................................34 Stevenson, Frances .......................................................................82 Subiah, Niegel .............................................................................. 124 Sukhu, Karena..................................................................................15 Supersad, Sabrina .........................................................................30 Sylvester, Carmen .........................................................................86 Sylvester, Jenson ............................................................................71

T

Tai Chew, Larry ..............................................................................17 Tang Yuk, Robert .......................................................................... 33 Taylor, Ashley .............................................................................. 124 Taylor, Cordell ...............................................................................45 Taylor, Eric .................................................................................... 107 Teeluck, Raphael ...........................................................................88 Teeluckchan-Maraj, Madhavi ...................................................34 Telesford-Pierre, Trudie ..............................................................39 Telfer, Derek ..........................................................................121, 123 Telfer, Kyle .................................................................................... 123 Tewari, Marcus ............................................................................. 117 Tewarie, Nirad .......................................................................... 11, 14 Thom, Hassel ...........................................................................12, 17 Thomas, David ..............................................................................101 Thomas, Davlin ..............................................................................56 Thompson, Blair ............................................................................65 Thompson, Kevin .......................................................................... 57 Thompson, Kieran ........................................................................65 Thompson, Robert ........................................................................ 23 Ticklal, Dinesh ..............................................................................76 Titus, Heather ................................................................................30 Tom Yew-Jardine, Karen .....................................................28, 29 Torres, Joesette .............................................................................82

V

Valley-Gordon, Kieran .................................................................39 Valley, Kerwyn ...............................................................................39 Villafana, Raúl ................................................................................87

W

Walcott, Michael ...................................................................28, 29 Walkins, Kheston ........................................................................106 Wallace-Shanklin, Carmela .......................................................20 Walter, Kendal ...............................................................................86 Ward-Smith, Candice ................................................................. 116 Warrick, Kerel ................................................................................84 Wattley, Patricia ......................................................................... 124 Welch-Farrell, Sandra .................................................................. 111 White, Ann-Marina ...................................................................... 111 White, Graham .............................................................................. 111 Wight, Jane .....................................................................................97 Williams, Patrick ..........................................................................91 Wilson, Kris ....................................................................................30 Woo, Brian ......................................................................................26 Woodhams, Christopher ............................................................83 Wooding, Bevil M. ........................................................................66 Wright, Carlos .............................................................................. 117 Wyke, Keith ....................................................................................82

Y

Yearwood, Wendell ................................................................... 124 Yip Chuck, Karen ..................................................................28, 29 Young, Angus P. ............................................................................ 33


INDEX BY COMPANY 1 On 1 Realty....................................................................................................................... 116 Access Trinidad...............................................................................................................108 Acclaim Freight & Logistics Services Limited................................................ 121, 123 ActionEDGE TT...............................................................................................................102 Agostini Insurance Brokers Limited............................................................................82 Airports Authority of Trinidad & Tobago (AATT)........................................... 19, 20 Alliance Software and Technology Systems Limited.............................................78 Allied Security Limited................................................................................................... 115 Amaranth Business Solutions Limited....................................................................... 76 American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad and Tobago (AMCHAM T&T)......................................................................................................... 11, 14 American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN)..................................................66 AMPLIA Communications Ltd .....................................................................................78 Angostura® Solera Wines and Spirits...........................................................................3 Angostura Limited............................................................................................................96 Aon plc..................................................................................................................................85 Arima Business Association...........................................................................................16 Arrive Alive..........................................................................................................................41 ASCO.................................................................................................................................... 53 ASPIRE Fund Management............................................................................................39 Association of Professional Engineers of Trinidad and Tobago (APETT)........................................................................................................................16, 40 Association of Real Estate Agents (AREA).............................................. 16, 114, 116 Association of Trinidad and Tobago Insurance Companies (ATTIC)...................................................................................................................16, 80, 81 Automotive Dealers Association of Trinidad and Tobago............................. 16, 18 Ben Lomond Industrial & Safety Solutions (B.L.I.S.S.) Limited.......................... 53 Bankers Association of Trinidad and Tobago (BATT)............................. 16, 24, 39 Beacon..................................................................................................................................83 Biomedical Enterprises of Trinidad & Tobago Limited .........................................65 bMobile...........................................................................................................5, 72, 73, 104 Boss.......................................................................................................................................97 Broadview Surveillance Systems Ltd......................................................................... 117 Business Supply Group Limited (BSG).......................................................................97 C&W Business............................................................................................................ 70, 71 Capital Signal Company Limited.................................................................................. 55 Cardea Benefits Limited..................................................................................................84 Cargo Consolidators Agency Limited (CCA)......................................................... 123 Caribbean Centre for Leadership Development Ltd.(CCLD)............................105 Caribbean Discovery Tours Limited.......................................................................... 125 Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association...............................................................58 Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI).................................................59 Caribbean Information & Credit Rating Services Limited (CariCRIS)..............36 Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA)..........................................................58 Caribbean Shipping Agencies Inc.............................................................................. 122 Caribbean Shipping Agencies Ltd.............................................................................. 122 Caribbean Tourism Organisation.................................................................................58 Caribbean Traceability & Packaging Solutions Limited (CTPSL)......................98 Carvalho's Construction Ltd..........................................................................................43 CGA Limited.....................................................................................................................100 CIBC FirstCaribbean Financial Centre........................................................................30 CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank....................................................................30 Click Media.........................................................................................................................95 Concepts and Services Company Ltd.........................................................................43 Concepts in Freight Ltd................................................................................................. 122 Congress WBN..................................................................................................................66 Cornerstone Properties..................................................................................................118 Couva/Point Lisas Chamber of Commerce........................................................ 14, 15 CPRC Realty....................................................................................................................... 116 CRESTCOM......................................................................................................................105 Crism Automotive Sales and Service Centre........................................................... 23 Cuba Trin Medical Supplies...........................................................................................62 CUNA Caribbean Insurance Society Limited.......................................................... 90 CUNA Mutual Group...................................................................................................... 90

D'Market Movers......................................................................................................99, 101 Digital Broadcast...............................................................................................................79 Employers’ Consultative Association of Trinidad and Tobago (ECA)........ 13, 16 Energy Dynamics Limited...............................................................................................47 Engineering Associates Limited...................................................................................98 Environmental Management Authority (EMA)...................................................... 57 EPL Properties Limited................................................................................................... 117 Errol Jaglal Real Estate.................................................................................................... 116 European Business Chamber in Trinidad and Tobago............................................14 EXIMBANK Export - Import Bank of Trinidad & Tobago Ltd..............................36 exporTT........................................................................................................................93, 101 Fair Deal Real Estate........................................................................................................ 116 Farah Insurance Brokers Limited................................................................................. 90 Farm & Function...............................................................................................................101 FinTech Association of Trinidad and Tobago (FinTechTT)..................................25 First Citizens................................................................................................................26, 27 Firstline Securities Limited..............................................................................................31 Flow Business...............................................................................................................69, 71 Funds International Limited...........................................................................................38 Furness Anchorage General Insurance.......................................................................91 Furness Chemicals.............................................................................................................91 Furness City Park................................................................................................................91 Furness Group of Companies.........................................................................................91 Furness Investments.........................................................................................................91 Furness Properties.............................................................................................................91 Furness Rentals...................................................................................................................91 Furness Shipping & Marketing.......................................................................................91 Furness Trinidad.................................................................................................................91 G.A. Farrell & Associates Limited............................................................................... 116 Genesis Insurance Brokers & Benefits Consultants Ltd.......................................85 Goodhealth Medical Centre..........................................................................................65 Guardian Group.................................................................................................................88 Guardian Preservation Systems...................................................................................50 Gulf Shipping Ltd............................................................................................................. 122 Happi Products Limited..................................................................................................99 HealthNet Caribbean Limited.......................................................................................62 HHSL Safety Systems Limited.......................................................................................48 High Tide Custom Steel Fabricating Ltd................................................................... 44 Hot-Hed Trinidad Ltd.......................................................................................................54 HR Technologies Ltd......................................................................................................108 Huckleberry Media Co. Ltd............................................................................................79 IAMovement...................................................................................................................... 57 Institute of Banking and Finance of Trinidad and Tobago (IBF).................. 16, 38 Institute of Chartered Accountants of Trinidad and Tobago (ICATT)....................................................................................................................... 16, 109 ISD Health Solutions........................................................................................................63 Island Finance Trinidad and Tobago............................................................................ 32 Kalloo's Holdings Ltd....................................................................................................... 23 KCL Capital Market Brokers Limited...........................................................................39 Key West Real Estate...................................................................................................... 116 La Brea Industrial Development Company Limited (LABIDCO)....................... 52 Lab Medica Group of Companies................................................................................62 Lab Medica Services Limited........................................................................................62 Label House Group................................................................................................... 94, 95 LABIDCO Ltd.................................................................................................................... 122 Lennox H. Sealy & Associates Ltd (LSA).................................................................. 112 LFR Consulting Services................................................................................................. 112 LFR Educational Services............................................................................................... 112 LH Group...................................................................................................................... 94, 95 Lifestyle Motors...........................................................................................................21, 22 Marine Consultants (Trinidad) Ltd..............................................................................49 Market Movers Design............................................................................................99, 101 Marsids Consulting.........................................................................................................110

135


INDEX BY COMPANY CONTINUED Medcorp Limited.........................................................................................................61, 65 Melville Shipping Ltd...................................................................................................... 122 Ministry of Digital Transformation .............................................................................68 Ministry of National Security....................................................................................... 115 Ministry of Trade and Industry................................................................................ 8, 93 Ministry of Works and Transport.................................................................................41 NAGICO Insurances (Trinidad and Tobago) Limited............................................86 National Agricultural Marketing and Development Corporation (NAMDEVCO)........................................................................................................... 93, 99 National Energy Corporation Of Trinidad and Tobago (National Energy).............................................................................................................. 52 National Institute of Higher Education, Research, Science and Technology (NIHERST)........................................................................106 NCB Merchant Bank (Trinidad and Tobago ) Limited (NCBMBTT)................. 33 NEM Leadership Consultants......................................................................................110 NGC CNG Company Limited (NGC CNG)................................................................ 52 NORSTROM...................................................................................................................... 116 North Central Regional Health Authority.................................................................56 Occupational Safety and Health Agency (OSHA)................................................. 57 ODYSSEY CONSULTinc Limited................................................................................. 112 Offshore Innovators Trinidad and Tobago Ltd.........................................................50 O.J.’s Electrical and Instrumentation Services Limited (O.J.’s)......................... 44 ORIGITEK Solutions Limited.........................................................................................45 Pan-American Life Insurance Group...........................................................................87 Panolin..................................................................................................................................50 Penal/Debe Chamber of Commerce...........................................................................14 Personnel Management Services Limited (PMSL)..............................................103 Phoenix Park Gas Processors Limited (PPGPL)...................................................... 52 Plimmer Real Estate........................................................................................................118 Point Fortin South Western Chamber of Industry and Commerce....................14 Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Corporation Limited (PLIPDECO)...................................................................................................................... 124 Port Authority of Trinidad and Tobago............................................................. 121, 124 Port of Port of Spain....................................................................................................... 124 Process Systems Limited................................................................................................54 ProTec Group..................................................................................................................... 117 Public Transport Service Corporation (PTSC)..........................................................41 Purivo Dialysis Centre Ltd..............................................................................................64 Raphael Teeluck Financal Legacy Services Limited...............................................88 RBC Financial (Caribbean) Limited............................................................................. 37 Regency Recruitment Limited..............................................................................110, 113 Regional Compliance Consultants Limited.............................................................109 RelyOn Nutec......................................................................................................................51 Renew Star Serpentine Ltd............................................................................................ 60 Republic Bank Limited..............................................................................................28, 29 Salitavo Trinidad Ltd......................................................................................................... 55 Sangre Grande Business Association..........................................................................16 Sangre Grande Chamber of Commerce......................................................................14 Screenplay Advertising Network.................................................................................95 Scrip-J...................................................................................................................................97 Seaboard Marine Trinidad............................................................................................ 122 Sea Jade Investments..................................................................................................... 116 Shipping Association of Trinidad and Tobago........................................16, 120, 122 Shipping Solutions & Services Ltd............................................................................. 125 Simply Intense (Si) Media..............................................................................................77

136

Sital College of Tertiary Education.............................................................................. 111 Solera Wines & Spirits........................................................................................................3 Solid Waste Management Company Ltd. (SWMCOL)......................................... 57 South Coast Medical Center.........................................................................................62 South Homes Real Estate.............................................................................................. 116 St. Augustine Medical Laboratory Limited...............................................................63 St. Clair Medical Centre...................................................................................................61 SWF & Co (Sandra Welch-Farrell and Company).................................................. 111 Sygma Environmental......................................................................................................65 T&T Petroleum & Marketing........................................................................................ 122 Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT)...............74, 75 Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT)........................ 73 Terra Caribbean: Trinidad......................................................................................118, 119 The Chaguanas Chamber of Industry and Commerce (CCIC)............... 12, 14, 15 The Deepwater Hub.........................................................................................................50 The Energy Chamber of Trinidad and Tobago.............................................11, 14, 46 The Greater Tunapuna Chamber of Industry and Commerce.............................14 The Human Resource Management Association of Trinidad & Tobago (HRMATT)...........................................................................................................................17 The Insurance Company of the West Indies (ICWI)..............................................91 The NAGICO Group.........................................................................................................86 The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (NGC)............... 52 The National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT).......................34 The Pouch Company........................................................................................................95 The Supermarket Association of Trinidad and Tobago (SATT)............. 14, 15, 17 The Trinidad and Tobago Incoming Tour Operators Association (T&TITOA)...........................................................................................................................17 Tobago Division of The Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce............................................................................................................10, 14 Tobago Hotel and Tourism Association (THTA).....................................................17 Tobago House of Assembly (THA)............................................................................... 9 TOSL Engineering Limited..............................................................................................42 Toyota Trinidad and Tobago Limited........................................................................... 23 Trinidad & Tobago Bureau of Standards (TTBS)..................................................... 57 Trinidad & Tobago Medical Association (T&TMA)...............................................56 Trinidad & Tobago NGL Limited................................................................................... 52 Trinidad and Tobago Association of Insurance and Financial Advisers (TTAIFA)...............................................................................................................................17 Trinidad and Tobago Chamber of Industry and Commerce (T&T Chamber)............................................................................................................. 9, 14 Trinidad and Tobago Coalition of Services Industries Limited (TTCSI).....13, 17 Trinidad and Tobago Contractors Association (TTCA)................................ 17, 40 Trinidad and Tobago Institute of Architects (TTIA)...............................................17 Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association (TTMA).................. 10, 17, 92 Trinidad and Tobago Medical Association (T&TMA).....................................17, 56 Trinidad and Tobago Unit Trust Corporation (UTC).............................................. 35 Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants and Tourism Association (THRTA)...............12, 17 Trinidad Project Management Services Limited (TPMSL).......................... 55, 112 Tropical Express Couriers............................................................................................. 125 Twin Island Shipping Agencies Ltd............................................................................ 122 Unified Networking Development Systems Limited (UNDSL)..........................79 Universal Insurance Brokers Ltd...................................................................................89 Vetiver TT Ecological Engineering Solutions Ltd.................................................... 57 Youth Training & Employment Partnership Programme (YTEPP) Ltd........... 107