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The DeStazio gets 200th win See Sports

Lawsuit claims son injured in grid hazing

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By J. Patrick Eaken Press Staff Writer news@presspublications.com

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The study is just one more pinhole in the mythical balloon of the detached father. John Szozda See inside

Honoring the fallen

Funerals were held for two firemen, Stephen Machcinski and James Dickman, who lost their lives fighting a north Toledo fire. Pictured, David Henninger, a volunteer firefighter with Lake Township, and others, salute as the funeral procession for firefighter James Dickman heads down Navarre Ave., Oregon. (Press photo by Harold Hamilton/hehphotos.com)

Mayor Collins

A promise to bring back respect ‘to ‘05’ By J. Patrick Eaken Press Staff Writer news@presspublications.com Seventy-one percent of the East Toledo electorate voted for Mayor D. Michael Collins when he defeated incumbent Michael Bell last November. Mayor Collins says that helped get him elected, and promises “the ’05 is going to regain the respect that it has lost.” To East Toledo residents, “the ‘05” is a commonly used term for their community’s zip code, 43605. “Thank you for your confidence in me and that confidence in me is not going to be misplaced,” Collins told about 50 East Toledo residents Monday night. Collins spoke at the Birmingham Development Corporation’s monthly meeting at Birmingham Branch Library. He was asked by BDC President Father Frank Eckart to talk about housing stock code enforcement, safety issues, and a need for more youth recreational facilities. Collins, who took office January 3, went further and talked about Toledo’s antiquated infrastructure and sewer problems, potholes in the city’s streets, snow removal, a return to neighborhood policing, and his desire for the city to employ new technology. For example, on his first day at his of-

...what do you think is going to happen when that next knucklehead comes down there and decides he is going to throw tires into that alley?

A federal Civil Rights Action was filed against Woodmore Local Schools and football coaches Britton Devier and Todd Bringman stemming from an alleged hazing incident in which a player suffered a traumatic brain injury. The case involves a 16-year-old student represented by the Charles E. Boyk law firm of Toledo and is assigned to Judge Jeffrey J. Helmick in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio Western Division. Plaintiffs Daniel Sprinski and Amy Sprinski, the 16-year-old’s parents, are asking for $75,000 or more in compensatory damages for personal injuries, pain and suffering, disability, medical and hospital expenses, sanctions, exemplary damages, and other damages, along with reasonable attorney’s fees and costs, pre-judgment costs, and other relief the court deems just. The school district responded with a statement reading, “The Woodmore School District maintains a high standard of safety consistent with schools in the State of Ohio and the safety of our students and studentathletes is a top priority. This concern was immediately investigated and addressed and all required reports were made. “Not only did the district conduct a thorough investigation, but the Ohio Attorney General’s office conducted an investigation along with the Bureau of Criminal Investigation and presented testimony from 49 witnesses to a grand jury, resulting in no indictment and no charges against Woodmore Schools or its employees. “While we cannot discuss specifics at this time due to student privacy laws, the district strongly disputes the false allegations in the lawsuit and looks forward to providing its response to the court.” Board member Steve Huss said two attorneys have been retained, including one representing the insurance company. A statement from the Boyk law office alleges, “On September 10, 2013, Head Coach Devier and Assistant Coach Bringman organized and implemented an attack against players as part of an effort to punish and

fice on the 22nd floor of One Government Center, he looked around for his computer but found none. He was then told that no previous mayor had ever used a computer in the office, which he changed immediately. Add to that, he plans to employ new technology on reporting crime, housing nuisances, domestic violence issues, and other neighborhood disturbances, by taking advantage of social media networks. He also talked about changing the culture of families and neighborhoods in Toledo. “Call City Hall is gone — we’re putting it all under one umbrella,” Collins said. “We are not going to do things the way we used to do them because obviously that doesn’t work. We’re never going to fix it unless we fix the fundamentals, like responsible parenting.”

Collins added that he plans to hire 40 police officers, with an estimated attrition of 28 retirees per year, and says the net gain will gradually get the city’s manpower back up to the 700 officers that is needed. “Right now, we are a police department which is reactive rather than proactive,” Collins said. He promised the city will become more aggressive on burglaries, property crimes, and crimes against persons. The mayor, a former city police officer, recalled days when an officer was assigned a beat, and often walked that beat. He said he wants to bring back neighborhood policing, including pairing up officers in patrol cars and assigning policemen to a specific neighborhood. “Indeed, we’ve scratched the surface, but it’s going to happen,” Collins said. Former city and state lawmaker Peter Ujvagi, a Birmingham native and resident, said he would like to see an officer, when paired with another in one patrol vehicle, get out of the car and walk the streets for three or four blocks at a time. He said the officer’s presence, although brief, will benefit the neighborhood. Tidy Towns Collins said along with the police officer, a code inspector and nuisance inspector will be “exclusively assigned to this (Continued on page 2)

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THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Lawsuit claims son injured Continued from front page

Mayor’s promise Continued from front page area, reporting every quarter, and aggressively moving at nuisance properties and all the contaminants, if you will, that have a negative effect on our quality of life.” “They are going to be directly responsible to network with Block Watch and we are going to turn our neighborhoods around one at a time,” the mayor continued. Collins said he believes a pilot project, to start soon in Point Place before coming to East Toledo, will build partnerships between the city and residents. The program has been altered slightly since he announced it during his campaign. “I’m sort of getting away from this Tidy Towns, because we’re not a town, we’re a community of neighborhoods,” Collins said. “To call us a bunch of tidy little towns isn’t really correct. It works in Ireland but it doesn’t work very well in Toledo, because we have neighborhoods which have exclusive identities and have their own culture and structure. One size doesn’t fit everybody. “We’re not in a situation where government can come and say, ‘This is the way it’s going to be.’ Nobody should tell you what your neighborhood should be, you should tell government what you would like to see that neighborhood be. After all, you are

the stakeholders in that neighborhood. The government is merely an entity that provides the structure, the support, and the core services which go to an urban setting,” the mayor continued. The mayor said the city could help find business partners for neighborhood projects, but added that residents must do their part in taking back neighborhoods. “This is not the city’s project. This is the city’s way of filling our responsibilities to your project,” Collins said. “I used an analogy, I said, ‘If we come out and clean an alley, we can spend three days cleaning an alley, and that alley can be pristine when we get done. We get everything clean and a month later what is that alley going to look like? It’s going to be right back to what it looked like. “Now, if we engage the people who live on those streets near that alley, and we get sweat equity across the board, and people are out there participating and we are out there participating, and we have a partnership, what do you think is going to happen when that next knucklehead comes down there and decides he is going to throw tires into that alley? “There’s going to be a license number, there is going to be a report, and there’s going to be an arrest, and that’s the way we keep our neighborhoods because we have to take control of our own neighborhoods as well.

Miranda Derringer

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Marcus & Isabelle

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haze certain members of the football team for lack of ‘hustle.’ “Due to the extreme heat, that day’s practice was planned as a ‘non-contact’ practice, meaning the players were instructed not to wear their full uniforms; only helmets, shoulder pads, girdles with hip pads, and shorts. “When the players failed to complete their non-contact drills to the satisfaction of Devier and Bringman, they were ordered to return to the locker room and change into full uniforms, making sure to be back on the field within eight minutes. The players were also warned that failure to return to the field within the allotted eight minutes would result in several consequences. “Of the approximately 45 players on the team, only 6-10 returned to the field within eight minutes. Those not returning in time were instructed to stand shoulder-to-shoulder in a single file line and were from that point referred to as ‘Old Woodmore.’ The ‘New Woodmore’ players were those who had made it back in time. The ‘Old Woodmore’ players were instructed to ‘take a hit’ before they could join the ‘New Woodmore’ team, which is when the ‘New Woodmore’ players were instructed to hit the ‘Old Woodmore’ players as hard as possible. The ‘Old Woodmore’ players were also forced to participate in the ‘Bull in the Ring’ drill in which any behavior against the victim was allowed: grabbing face masks, pulling, pushing and hitting, among other acts. “The ‘Old Woodmore’ players were not allowed to make any effort to defend themselves,” Boyk’s statement continues. In the complaint, the plaintiffs allege that Bringman pushed the “New Woodmore” players to help get them running at the “Old Woodmore” players. “Our 16-year-old client was one of the ‘Old Woodmore’ players who were hit with such force that he subsequently vomited, became disoriented, and collapsed, which are all tell-tale signs of a severe brain injury. No ambulance was called. “Our client was unresponsive while his older brother and teammate drove him home. His parents took him to Mercy St. Charles Hospital before he was transported via ambulance to St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center where he was ultimately diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury after spending the night at the Intensive Care Unit.” The lawsuit claims the 16-year-old was initially diagnosed with a concussion and a spinal injury “causing transient weakness and sensory changes in his arms and legs.” It adds that he was subsequently diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury. The Boyk law office says the 16-yearold is no longer attending Woodmore

Sweethearts Happy Valentine’s Day

Drills in any sport should be used as a tool to increase skill and performance, not to punish players.

Top photo, At the Birmingham Library, Toledo Mayor D. Michael Collins speaks at the Birmingham Development Corporation’s monthly meeting. Bottom photo, Linda Hendricks, left, and Barb Halasz had questions for the mayor. (Press photos by Ken Grosjean)

Schools and that doctors say he can never play contact sports again. The plaintiffs allege “the football drills in question did not comply with the Ohio High School Athletic Association’s guidelines regarding the reduction of head and neck injuries in football.” In conversations with The Press, Dan Sprinski said he believes Bringman’s role being in charge of the drill led to the incident and injury to his son, but says Devier was on the practice field at the time. Devier was contacted by email but declined to comment on the advice of counsel. Bringman resigned after the incident. Bringman’s mother, Rebecca Migliori, told The Press in September that parents are running a “witch hunt” against her son and notes all the positive things he has done for the youth athletic programs in the Woodmore district. “In light of the recent Super Bowl, we hope that parents take the time to talk to their child athletes about the types of drills that are being run during practice,” Charles Boyk stated. “Drills in any sport should be used as a tool to increase skill and performance, not to punish players. When coaches use retaliation and punishment instead of encouragement to drive their drills, lines are quickly crossed and injuries occur. “The purpose of the lawsuit is to stress the importance of protecting child athletes, especially since their bodies and brains are still developing.”

Volunteer opportunity The Migratory Bird Center in Magee Marsh in Oak Harbor is seeking volunteers. The Friends of Magee Marsh will be sponsoring many special events throughout the year and are in need of volunteers to assist with these events. A volunteer training session will be held Saturday, March 8 at noon. A pizza lunch will be provided. For more information or to sign up for the session, email store@friendsofmageemarsh.org or visit Friends of Magee Marsh on Facebook, click on “message” and include contact information including name, phone number, and address. The Magee Marsh Wildlife Area and Sportsmen’s Migratory Bird Center are located at 13229 W. SR 2.

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SUBURBAN EDITION

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

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State monitoring propane fuel situation By Larry Limpf News Editor news@presspublications.com State officials continue to address complaints about the price and supply of propane fuel. Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office said it is “actively monitoring� complaints about price-gouging and that it plans to work with attorneys general in other states on possible anti-competitive activity related to the sale of propane. About six percent of the Ohio’s population uses propane to heat homes, according to Census data. “We want to assure Ohioans that we will carefully monitor reports of potential price gouging or other unfair business practices related to the extreme cold,� DeWine said. Ohio doesn’t have a statute dealing directly with price gouging but state law bans “unconscionable sales practices,� he said, which could be described as a supplier knowing at the time of the transaction the price was substantially higher than the price at which similar goods or services could be readily obtained. DeWine is having consumers contact his office when their tank is 10 percent or less full. A staff member will call the con-

sumer’s supplier to determine why a fill has been delayed. Suspected price gouging should be reported to his office by calling 800-2820515. The assessment room of the state’s emergency operations center has remained in operation to coordinate the response to counties affected by the shortage, said Tamara McBride, a spokesperson for the center. An emergency declaration by Gov. John Kasich to allow commercial haulers of propane and heating oil to spend more time on the road for deliveries is scheduled to expire Feb. 16. The U.S. Department of Transportation issued a similar declaration for interstate highways. Congressman Bob Latta said he’s joined with other members of the Ohio congressional delegation to request the federal emergency exemption is extended past the Feb. 11 scheduled expiration. In the Midwest, delivery and supply problems surfaced in the autumn when many farm areas had better than average yields of grain crops. Many fields, however, were wet, requiring large of amounts of propane for drying before storage. The National Propane Gas Association last month issued a statement saying “in-

frastructure re-alignments� caused transportation problems. “The Cochlin pipeline, which provided 40 percent of the product used by Minnesota suppliers, was shut down for repairs,� the statement said. “This triggered a chain reaction causing suppliers to go further out to load their supply.� Another factor is the sharp increase in exports. “In 2013, more than 20 percent of total U.S. propane was exported, up from 5 percent in 2008,� the NPGA said. According to the Energy Information Administration, residential propane prices in Ohio rose from $2.86 a gallon on Dec. 30 of last year to $3.90 by Feb. 3. Wholesale price rose from $1.76 to $2.35 during the same time. A statement on the Ferrellgas website says the situation is more accurately described as a “transportation issue.� “The United States is currently producing more propane now than at any time in many years,� the statement says. “The challenge the industry is facing is moving propane from where it’s stored to the thousands of homes, farms and businesses that need it.� The transportation issues have been compounded by record agricultural use, it adds.

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Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will participate in the Meals on Wheels Association’s “Love Letters� program this Valentine’s Day. Tens of thousands of youth volunteers nation-wide are busy creating hand-crafted Valentine’s Day cards for older homebound individuals. Youth from around the Northwest Ohio area will create Valentine’s Day “Love Letters� which will be given out on Valentine’s Day to older homebound individuals in Wood County who receive home-delivered meals through the Wood County Committee on Aging. For more information on the national ‘Love Letters’ campaign, visit www.mowaa.org/love-letters. For information on programs and services at the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., call 800-0367-4935.

“Willows� dinner Otterbein-Portage Valley Executive Chef Reggie Hall and his staff will present a dining experience reminiscent of the former Willows in Toledo Thursday, Feb. 13 from 5-8 p.m. Chef Reggie and staff are planning an array of menu choices presented in a leisurely, hospitable atmosphere like that created a half-century ago by the Skaff family. Space is limited and reservations are required. Tickets must be purchased in advance. For more information call Geri Ricker at 419-833-8917.

Free zoo admission To thank Lucas County voters for their ongoing levy support, the Toledo Zoo is offering free admission to county residents throughout President’s Day weekend, from 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15 through 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17. Valid proof of residency is required. In addition, Lucas County visitors will receive coupons to use throughout the weekend, plus an additional coupon for another zoo visit in April. To make zoo visits more affordable for all area families, online coupons for a 50 percent discount on admission through Feb. 26 are available at www.toledozoo.org/visit/PDF/ ToledoZooDiscount_50_Jan-Feb.pdf.

Oregon – Unknown suspect stole a mailbox that was laying in a yard in the 5100 block of Bay Ridge Ct. on Jan. 16. • Unknown suspect obtained victim’s information in the 3100 block of Flame Dr., and used it to make a debit card purchase in Columbus on Jan. 15. • Unknown suspect(s) attempted to break open money well in dryer in the 3100 block of Navarre Ave. but were unable on Jan. 19. • Unknown suspect(s) threw an object through a bedroom window in the 2000 block of Arkansas St., on Jan. 20. Lake Twp. – A father and son have been arrested in connection with a burglary on E. Broadway last month. Police have charged Johnnie A. Barron, 20, Oregon, and his father, Nino R. Barron, 42, Toledo, each with six counts of burglary and one count of safe cracking. The resident reported someone had forced their way into the home and removed a flatscreen TV and jewelry. The Barron’s were arrested Feb. 1. They are being held in the Wood County Justice Center on bonds of $130,000. • A resident of the 5700 block of Isch Road on Jan. 30 reported someone removed a TV, saw, and cash. • A driver on Feb. 1 reported someone siphoned gasoline from his truck while parked at the Loves Truck Plaza, Baker Drive. • A resident of the 29000 block of E. Freedom Drive on Feb. 3 reported someone removed prescription medication from her home.

Senior “Love Letters�

Meeting change The Woodmore Board of Education has rescheduled its regular monthly meeting to Feb. 17 at 5:30 p.m. The board will meet at the high school library, 633 Fremont Street, Elmore. The board had been scheduled to meet Feb. 18. The library is on the second floor of the school.

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THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Genzman named interim Oak Harbor administrator By Cynthia L. Jacoby Special to The Press news@presspublications.com The Oak Harbor streets department operations manager will become the interim administrator during the upcoming search to replace outgoing administrator Robert Pauley. Monday night, village council created the interim administrator position. Mayor Bill Eberle said Randy Genzman had been asked beforehand to fill the position and he accepted. Genzman, a 22-year employee of the village, runs the streets department which also oversees the park system. Prior to coming to the village, the 1989 Oak Harbor High School graduate worked for the Ottawa County Sanitary Engineering Department. Genzman’s wage for the new position has yet to be decided. The figure will be negotiated in the days prior to Pauley’s departure Feb. 14, Fiscal Officer Debbie Carpenter said. His current wage was not available. Pauley, who has worked for the village of Oak Harbor since 2009, resigned in mid-January. His contract was up for renewal in March. In recent months, he has been under fire for the handling of the massive sewer system overflow problems, employee management and tension-filled exchanges with some members of council. The village began advertising the position almost immediately. Applications will be taken until late February and then reviewed by the mayor and a council committee, Eberle said. Adam Snyder, a landlord and regular council visitor, asked if council had set any new guidelines for the administrator. He specifically asked if the administrator would be required to live in the village. Council waived the residency rule for Pauley who lived at a Brooklyn Street residence but maintained a permanent home in Mentor, O. Eberle said those issues will all be discussed when the interview process begins. He noted so far they had received about five applications but gave no specifics other than one person is a Sylvania resident and a couple candidates called Michigan home. Genzman is not among those candidates – yet. In an interview after the meeting, he was asked if he will submit an application. “That’s something I am going to have to talk over with my wife,” Genzman replied. Right now, he planned to focus on efforts to prepare for weather-related problems. And in the days to come, he said he would learn more about the administrator job’s pressures when he assumed the duties. He felt confident he would stand up well to the test. “I have a number of great people that I surround myself with,” Genzman said.

Survey finds safety hazards at parks By J. Patrick Eaken Press Staff Writer news@presspublications.com Forty percent of East Toledo’s households have children under the age of 18 living in them, 10 points higher than the city’s rate of 30 percent. So, ask representatives for One Voice for East Toledo, why aren’t 19 city parks on their side of the Maumee River in better shape? Seven resident volunteers invested in East Toledo conducted surveys over the course of eight weeks, gathering general park information, including the park’s condition. They took hundreds, maybe a thousand photos, and detailed their findings in a 22-page report. They found water fountains not working, graffiti, boarded buildings, damaged playground equipment, heaving sidewalks, safety hazards, broken tables, and more. The report, which includes priorities and recommendations on how to resolve the issues, was presented to city council’s parks and recreation committee Tuesday. Major findings were — • The 19 parks lack regular inspections and maintenance by the city, especially when it comes to play equipment, mowing, weed control, trees, sidewalks, etc. • Twelve of the 19 parks have serious equipment or maintenance issues that could cause injury to users of the park. • Eight of the 13 parks identified may not be suitable for recreational development or have no recreational equipment at all. • Four of the parks identified are used as sports and recreation facilities (Navarre, Ravine Parks I and II, and Collins). • Hecklinger’s Pond is considered a park, however, the city has posted signs stating it is unsafe for use. It is considered an environmental hazard. “This is everything. I grew up in the Peanut Hill area, which is Oak, Oakdale, and East Broadway, then moving to Birmingham in my 20s, buying a house and raising a family. I remember a better time. The parks were clean and supervised,” said 72-year-old lifetime East Toledo resident John Stvartak. “East Toledo’s population is 10 percent of Toledo, but we have a greater number of young, low wage earning families. Twenty-two percent of them have incomes of $10,000 or less with 39 percent living at or below the poverty level. East Toledo has only 12 percent of the 139,000 housing issues in the city. Fifty percent of the families here in East Toledo rent houses and I would say most of the ones who own homes are the elderly ones who have been there for quite a while. This means more young, wage-earning households with more children under the age of 18. “To have a good city, one needs to have a good infrastructure, and I realize in East Toledo we have a big infrastructure problem, and that’s not only the parks. Roads and parks are two of the important things that people rely on and this is very important for the value placed on neighborhoods. These are what other people see when visiting our town and when looking for a place to live. It very much affects the property values in the whole city.” One Voice recommendations Twenty-five residents, who were commended by council members for the report, were in council chambers to help One

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The sign at Prentice Park, Toledo's first city park, shows disrepair and wear. The One Voice for East Toledo parks subcommittee found 14 maintenance, repair, and clean-up issues at this park, one of 19 in East Toledo. (Press photo by Ken Grosjean)

...the upkeep...has... come to a complete standstill.

4

Voice liaison Jodi Gross present the report. Speakers included Stvartak, Bev Piper, Mary Wilson, Linda Hendricks, and Larry Avery. “That’s one of the reasons why it is so important. If they are living at the poverty level, a quality park is so very important to the growth of our children,” said Wilson, an East Toledo resident. “In that I grew up in East Toledo, I knew how valuable it was to me and how many pleasant and wonderful memories I have from having a park and playground that was safe and beautiful and allowed me to use my imagination. Parks used to be one of our most valuable resources that gave our children the OK to be a kid and to have fun and to use their imagination, and to grow and just be comfortable. “Of the 19 parks we have over in East Toledo, the cleanliness and upkeep we have has sort of just kind of come to a complete standstill. We have a lot of beautiful land with a lot of potential, it just needs a little TLC from the people who live here, which is us, and with help from the city to do their part in helping us to make our neighborhood a little better and something that the children can be proud of.” Their recommendations included grant opportunities to bring in funding for projects and area churches that are willing to sponsor nearby parks. The report also identified businesses and organizations as potential funding sources and partnerships. “We want to work closely with city and we know there are not a lot of funds,” Piper, a lifelong East Toledo resident, said. “I’m not afraid to push mulch around, collect garbage, trim trees, whatever we need to do, but we want to work somehow with

the city to get these (issues resolved). I want the parks to be like they were when I was a child.” However, they were told that having volunteers clean up and maintain the parks could present liability issues, which was verified by council members as something for the city’s law department to research. They were also told that volunteers working in the parks could present a conflict with labor unions representing city employees. Piper and Gross said the committee met with the city’s Parks and Recreation Department in September, and Piper acknowledged “that a couple days later they ‘fixed’ slides by putting up boards at the top of slides.” “Because the top of the slide is boarded up, but if you’re a child, and the slide is down here and the cracks are down here and the mammoth holes are at the bottom, children are going to climb the other way up. I’ve seen that at the park at Ravine by my house,” Piper said. District 3 Councilman Mike Craig responded, “Repairing the slide does not mean putting up $2 worth of plywood to keep somebody from sliding down the slide. I understand that there are financial concerns, but we need to look at a more holistic approach than that. A number of parks, if you look through the report, have some significant maintenance issues. We need to have those addressed. Some council members suggested discussions with the Metroparks of the Toledo Area to see if they could offer a solution or partnership. Craig would like to see remedies before the summer park season. He noted that he is pursuing remediation for Hecklinger’s Pond, but backed up with his own testimony many of the issues the One Voice subcommittee presented. “Basketball courts are almost non-existent and there are some real opportunities to provide recreation for people,” Craig said. “Birmingham Park has a concrete slab, but there are no basketball hoops. You know, in order to disturb a neighbor from that basketball court, you’d probably have to set off a bomb because it’s literally hundreds of yards away from the nearest house.”

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THE PRESS

Lake Township

Township cemetery gets makeover

Grant sought for improving Libbey Road By Larry Limpf News Editor news@presspublications.com

About 5,000 trucks a day use the exit, McLargin said, citing a traffic survey conducted a few years ago.

The Lake Township trustees heard a report Tuesday from Dan McLargin, road supervisor, that an application for a grant to pay for replacing a stretch of Libbey Road has been submitted to the Ohio Department of Transportation and the Ohio Turnpike and Infrastructure Commission. The department announced late last year it is accepting applications for funding from the Turnpike Mitigation Program, which was established to assist communities that are adversely affected by turnpike traffic. Projects being considered include bridge preservation, resurfacing, noise walls, drainage improvements and other related infrastructure work. Proposed projects must be within one mile of the turnpike. The program will allocate about $5 million annually to projects with a cap of $1 million on individual projects. McLargin said it would cost about $140,000 to replace 240 feet of the road west of I-420 near exit 71 of the turnpike. He said the road was repaired about seven years ago but its condition has deteriorated because of the volume of traffic using the exit and Libbey Road.

Truck purchase Overtime costs for snow removal and other related expenses are having an impact on how Lake Township will pay for a new dump truck. The purchase will require revenues from the general fund because the cost of road salt and over-time costs for department personnel have strained another fund dedicated to road improvements, the township trustees were told Tuesday. The trustees, by a 2-1 vote, authorized the purchase of a 2014 Freightliner for $129,500 from a Lima, O. dealership and agreed to a recommendation by Vicki Schwamberger, fiscal officer, to make a down payment of $29,500 and finance the balance over three years. Schwamberger said the cost of snow removal and other expenses this year have strained the balance of the road fund The new truck will replace a 1994 International that broke down recently. Dan McLargin, road supervisor, said two estimates for repairing it were about $10,000 and $20,000. Trustee Jeff Pettit voted against the resolution to purchase a new truck, saying

the township should get three bids for repairs, but later voted with trustees Melanie Bowen and Richard Welling to adopt Schwambergers’ recommendation on how to pay for it. The purchase has been discussed at two other meetings as the trustees weighed the pros and cons of repairing the old truck versus buying new. McLargin said crews plow more than 70 miles of township roads during the winter and trucks are often idling during other work. He said the old truck can be kept and used for parts.

By Kelly J. Kaczala Press News Editor kkaczala@presspublications.com Jerusalem Township Trustee Joe Kiss has, in the last two years, led the effort to raise funds for a new entrance way to the historic Oakwood Cemetery. It’s expected to be completed by spring. When Kiss was first elected, he wanted to make improvements to the cemetery, he said. “It was always one of my plans to try and get a new entrance gate. So just through efforts of my own and some other people throughout the township, we got it to the finishing stages. We got the pillars up and we got some marble coming in. It’s just been a project we’ve been working on and it’s finally coming to fruition,� he said. “When the cemetery turned 100 in 2012, we put a new flagpole up,� he added, “but didn’t really have enough funds to get going on the new entranceway,� he said. “I always wanted it to have an authentic antique look with something like an archway, over two pillars on each side of the entrance of the drive. Basically, there are two eight foot columns on each side of the drive, and there is a stainless steel arch that goes over the top. There has never been, to the best of my knowledge, a real entrance marker to the cemetery. If there was, it’s been long gone.� Funds from the cemetery budget, as well as donations from individuals and businesses have helped pay for the improvements, he said. “A good portion is funded through donations and from different people in the community. It is going to cost the township and cemetery some money. Some of the project is being done with in-kind services from people who know what they’re doing,� he said. Oakwood is the township’s only cemetery, and Kiss felt “there needed to be some identity to it.� “There’s a sign that says `Oakwood Cemetery’ but it’s weathered. I really wanted something there that was more permanent for the next several generations of people,� he said. He did research and found the names of the trustees who passed a motion to start the cemetery in 1912. Their names will be etched into an historical marker as part of the project, said Kiss. “Then we went ahead and put on one of the pillars `Dedicated to the families of the Oakwood Cemetery.’� The names of the township’s present trustees will also be etched in another marker, he added.

Insurance discussed After meeting in executive session for two hours, the trustees voted unanimously to increase the share for health insurance contributions for non-union employees to 12 per cent from 10. The change affects all covered employees who aren’t members of the police department; the only unionized employees of the township. The trustees also discussed cemetery personnel and how the cemetery should be staffed after sexton Gary Schulte retires but took no action. Schulte, who’s been sexton for 27 years and employed by the township for 30, recently informed the trustees he plans to retire.

Road salt running low in Northwood By Kelly J. Kaczala Press News Editor kkaczala@presspublications.com

“

“

The freezing temperatures and frequent snowstorms this winter have left Northwood short of road salt. “We’re basically running day to day,� said Northwood City Administrator Bob Anderson. “I think we’ve got enough to cover this storm and the next. But we’re going to have to scramble some more to have enough.� Northwood and Oregon, as do many communities, piggyback onto Toledo’s contract with a salt supplier. “We all bid it together. However, we all put in for a certain amount. Once you reach that quote, you try to get more, but if there’s great demand, you might not be able to get what you want. So it’s tight right now. We’re down to one more snowfall,� said Anderson. Currently, the city relies on plowing and only salts the intersections. “Right now, we’re plowing and scraping all the roads. We don’t put a whole lot of salt on the main roads right now. It depends on the condition of the roads. If the main roads are icy, we’ll put salt down. However, if it’s just packed snow, we’re not putting it down. Typically we do, and salt the subdivisions, too. We’re not doing that anymore. We’re tightening up. As long as it remains packed snow, it’s not too much

We’re going to have a lot of patching to do. of a problem. We scrape them pretty good. That’s where getting cars off the streets really, really helps. The plows sometimes go into the subdivisions and have all these obstacles they have to get around. If there’s a car that a plow has to go around, it’s only rational to ticket that car. We’re ticketing them and we’re talking about towing them,� he said. The Ohio Department of Transportation is trying to help entities with more road salt, he added. The city has also been able to get it from smaller private contractors. “We’re looking for different sources,� said Anderson, including the City of Oregon, which has offered to sell some from their own stockpile. “It’s very nice of them. Obviously, Oregon is going to have to take care of their own roads, first,� he said. Martin Wineland, superintendent of streets in Oregon, said the city “is doing ok on salt.� “If things continue like they are, we

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should, with our current state of usage, be OK,� he said. Oregon typically contracts for 6,000 tons of salt annually, he said. “This year, we started out with 11,000 tons. We were able to not use as much the last couple of years, so our stockpile grew a little bit,� said Wineland. The city leases dock space on the Maumee River, where the salt is brought in by ship. Oregon salts the roads once a storm has passed. “Our policy changed numerous years ago when everyone ran out of salt. “We don’t put any salt down other than at intersections until the storm is completed. Once we’re in the cleanup mode after the storm has left, then we’ll salt city roads. When we go through the subdivisions, we will only salt intersections and the entrance and exits of the streets. Very seldom do the side streets get salted,� he said. The condition of the streets, as a result of the freeze and thaw cycles, will become more apparent once the snow melts. “We’re going to have a lot of patching to do,� said Anderson of the numerous potholes marking the roads. “We won’t see a whole lot of problems until the winter is over,� said Wineland, “then we’ll find out what the damage is to the base of the road and how much heaving we got from the frost. Those things will start to appear in the spring when the frost leaves the pavement.�

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THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10,

2014

Oregon Actor Jeff Smith makes audience laugh By Alex Sobel Press Contributing Writer news@presspublications.com For Jeff Smith, a core member of The Oregon Community Theater, comedy is just something that comes out naturally, if he likes it or not. “I can do drama, but I keep getting cast in comedic roles,� he said, “Even in a serious production like Les Miserables, I was cast in a comic role (as Thenardiers).� Looking down Smith’s acting credits with the theater, only one of his parts could be considered a truly dramatic role. But for Smith, that doesn’t make his job easier. “Comedy is harder than drama,� he said. “Comedy is work, it’s about timing. Something as simple as a look can be funny if done right.� Though a majority of his credits are acting, Smith has recently gotten into directing, as well, a move that seemed inevitable to him. “I think all actors, after being in a lot of shows, start thinking, ‘I could (direct a show) just as good, if not better,� Smith said. While Smith said he loves acting, he enjoys the ability directors have to shape every part of a production, even if that means more work. “When you’re (acting) in a show, you only have to worry about yourself and your performance,� he said. “With directing, you’re worried about everything.� The Oregon Community Theater’s upcoming production of M*A*S*H will mark

Jeff Smith center with Reed Steele and Tammy Halay. Smith’s third solo venture in directing. The play, a comedy that takes place during the Korean War, presents a particular challenge to a director who needs to balance the funny elements with the serious setting. “I have to go through each scene and say, ‘Where’s the funny?’� Smith said, “That’s our motto for the show.� To make scenes work, Smith draws from his own comedic experience to help his actors make the most out of the play’s

funniest moments. “You have to let the audience laugh,� Smith said. “If you rush through your lines, the audience will stop laughing so they don’t miss the dialogue. Before long, they’ll just stop laughing.� M*A*S*H is premiering on the wave of some increased attention The Oregon Community Theater has received after its successful production of Les Miserables. For Smith, though, the main goal is still

getting the word out to people that don’t even know the Theater exists. “We put a lot of work into these (productions), and all we want in return is for people to show up,â€? he said. “And for the dollar, it’s a good deal.â€? Those that attend one of M*A*S*H’s performances at Fassett Theater will not only get to experience Smith and company’s hard work on stage, but will also witness the added production value that comes from some extensive new renovations. “We’ve replaced all the rigging, all the curtains, all the lighting, the sound system, everything is computer run, computer controlled, we just bought all new spotlights,â€? he said. “(Equipment) doesn’t make a (poorly produced) show good, but it really does help when the show is well done.â€? For Smith, putting on quality productions is an opportunity to take part in something he’s truly passionate about. “(Theater) is like a second family,â€? Smith said. “The core group of us are really close and work our butts off to put on great shows.â€? And though it’s a lot of work, there’s nothing else Smith would rather be doing. “And the end of my bio, I always have, ‘I like to thank my family‌ for letting me come out to play,’â€? he said. “When you look at all of the comedies, it shows. It’s just so much fun.â€? The Oregon Community Theater’s production of “M*A*S*Hâ€? runs February 14, 15, 21, and 22 at Fassett Auditorium. For tickets, call 419-691-1398.

Genoa Council forges ahead with police chief search By Cynthia L. Jacoby Special to The Press Genoa Village Council hopes to quickly wrap up the search for a new police chief within weeks. On Monday, council hired consultant Mark Putnam, a Clay Township resident, to lead the search to replace former Police Chief Bob Bratton. The village accepted applications until 5 p.m. Feb. 5, Village Administrator Kevin Gladden said. Applications were to be turned over to Putnam on Thursday. Putnam is slated to return Feb. 10 to talk to the full council and whittle applications down to the main contenders. Gladden said he had received a handful of applications. He was unsure, however, of the total number of submissions because others may have been turned into Mayor Mark Williams in recent days. Putnam, who has an extensive law enforcement background with several local agencies, has worked for the village before in the same capacity. He was instrumental

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in helping Genoa officials in their previous – and politically charged - search to replace Police Chief Randy Hill, who resigned without notice in November 2010 amid allegations of a hostile work environment and harassment. In the end, Bratton, then Ottawa County sheriff, stepped up to take the position for an annual pay of about $60,000. Bratton, 60, who was chief for slightly more than two years, resigned in January - days after federal officials filed a misuse of public funds charge against him in U.S. District Court in Toledo. The charge claimed that while serving as Ottawa County sheriff in 2010 Bratton mishandled about $5,000 of Furtherance of Justice funds on uniforms, prescription medicine

and various gift cards for deputies and volunteers. Bratton pled guilty to the charge Jan. 29, effectively ending his law enforcement career that spanned more than four decades. He is scheduled to be sentenced May 28. The misappropriations were discovered in a 2012 audit conducted by State Auditor David Yost’s Office. Bratton paid back the money as well as the costs for the audit. The Ottawa County Prosecutor’s Office decided not to file charges because Bratton fully cooperated with the investigation and returned the money. Yet, in recent months, members of the Cleveland office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Justice Department

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Sometimes when I first awake I think that you’re still here, And for a fleeting moment The clouds all disappear. For you brought endless sunshine Until you went away, And now I miss you desperately Each minute of the day. You would not like to see me sad So what I try to do, Is live a bright and happy life In memory of you. For though I’ll always miss you And it’s dreadful being apart, I haven’t really lost you You’re still here in my heart.

revived the investigation, leading to the single charge against Bratton. Putnam’s concentration on the search for a new village police chief will not be as intense as before, Gladden noted, because a couple of the candidates were among the previous contenders and Putnam is familiar with them from previous interviews. In addition, the state of the police department is different. Four years ago, Putnam’s workload included talking to current police staff as well as conducting a survey among residents and business owners regarding their impressions of the department and how relationships could be improved. That won’t be necessary this time around, Gladden said.

Bridge Playing Lessons Tuesdays through March 11 ~ 1:30pm A nine week course presented by Bill Ryan, Silver Life Master, for current Bridge players looking to improve their game. Registration $40 and includes all lessons and a book. Reserve your spot. Bucket List Book Club Monthly February 28 ~ 1:30pm Do you like to read but are wondering about what to pick next? Enjoy sharing great books? The club will select 10 books to read in 2014 as a group. Join anytime.

Heart Healthy Lunch and Learn Thursday, February 20 ~ Noon Celebrate Heart Month by eating foods that are tasty and good for you. Chef Reggie will prepare a delicious lunch designed to improve cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure. Recipes will be provided! After, enjoy a discussion by health professionals to assist in a healthy lifestyle. Breakfast of Champions ~ Complimentary Meet the Doctor Wednesday, February 26 ~ 9am Enjoy Chef Reggie’s Breakfast Buffet. Afterwards, our speaker, Dr. Ronald Levey, oncologist, will present info on the New Radiation Therapy Center at Wood County Hospital. Please RSVP.

Call Jamie at 419-833-8917 to reserve your spot for any of these events. &RQVLGHULQJDPRYHWRDVHQLRUOLYLQJFRPPXQLW\" &DOO*HUL5LFNHUDWIRUDSHUVRQDOWRXU See all the events planned on our website www.otterbein.org 20311 Pemberville Road, between Luckey and Pemberville


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THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Your Voice on the Street: by Stephanie Szozda

The Press Poll

What are your plans for Valentine's Day this year?

If you were able, would you feel safe traveling to Sochi, Russia for the Olympics? Yes No

Rosemary Flury Northwood "Just looking forward to a quiet night in with my husband."

Amber Gleason Toledo "I'm going to see a play with my sister at the Toledo Repertoire Theater called Love Letters."

A necessary investment To the editor: Nearly five years ago, President Obama proposed a six-year, $53 billion investment into developing a system of high-speed passenger rails throughout 10 regions across the nation. According to the President, the rail would reduce travel time, congestion and air emissions while increasing productivity, mobility and job creation. Studies from The Environmental Law and Policy Center show high-speed rail to be three times as energy efficient as cars, and six times more than planes. The ELCP states the high-speed rail plan would provide $1.3 billion in highway congestion relief, and $700 million in airport congestion relief. A single track can carry as many people as a modern 10-lane highway at a fraction of the cost. Train stations would bring jobs and business back into the cities, ergo reversing urban sprawl and reducing the need for investment in new highways. Obama’s plan would significantly reduce the ongoing problem with intercity automobile congestion, overall automobile emissions, and the dependence on foreign oil. Unfortunately the President’s plan has not gone smoothly. Congress has become a road block, stating the plan would involve “overspending in the transportation department.” They are unwilling to cooperate with the President and refuse to understand that his plan is not a cost, but an investment. The United States has fallen signifi-

Ryan Wayton Toledo "Have a nice evening with my ¿ancée in our new apartment. I'll probably make her dinner and we may go out afterwards."

Letters

Steven Carter Toledo "Celebrating mine and Skyla Robinson's birthdays. Probably having a little party at the bowling alley."

Norma Salazar Oregon "Working at Michael's Gourmet Catering selling homemade Valentine goodies. In the evening I'm going to Hollywood Casino with my husband to have dinner and try my luck at the slots."

To cast your ballot, go to www.presspublications.com

Last Week's Results Did you get a ƀu shot, and if not, do you plan to do so in light of the recent ƀu outbreak ?

Letters should be about 350 words. Deadline Wed. Noon. Send to news@presspublications.com

cantly behind in transportation technologies. The President states “What we need then, is a smart transportation system equal to the needs of the 21st century.” Congress should learn the value of high-speed rail from the European and Japanese models, and know how critically U.S. competitiveness is at risk because of lack of investment. Congress simply cannot use “Overspending in the Department of Transportation” as an excuse. The Department of Transportation and Obama have worked closely in this plan and devised a goal of connecting 80 percent of the nation over the course of 25 years. Pete Sklannik, former vice president of ASCE’s Transportation and Development Institute, said, “The government is really going to have to treat this as they treated the interstate or space program and understand that this is an investment into our future.” This is true for not only the future of our transportation, but for the economy as well. Amelia Bockey Walbridge

A false impression To the editor: A letter in last week’s Press says the President, in his State of the Union address, stated 9 million Americans have signed up for health insurance or

Medicaid. The impression given is that these 9 million were uninsured and now have coverage because of Obamacare. This is false. Six million of the number is comprised of Medicaid enrollment since October. About half of that enrollment is from states that did not expand coverage under Obamacare, so the Medicaid program was unchanged. The other 3 million are from states that expanded coverage. Of that 3 million, compared to application flow from prior months, volume was up 10 percent over where it stood prior to Medicaid expansion. If we attribute all 10 percent to Obamacare, then the law added 300,000 enrollees. The other 3 million that the President claims are those who used the federal exchange. A Wall Street Journal investigation cites a study that only 11 percent (330,000) of enrollees were people who previously had no coverage. The vast majority were those involuntarily dropped from their existing plans because of Obamacare. The letter writer credits the President with leading us out of recession and notes Congressman Bob Latta voted against extending unemployment benefits beyond 73 weeks. That’s 511 days. If the President is doing such a good job leading the recovery, why should benefits be extended? Why do a record number of people receive food stamps? Why did the President’s job cre-

53% I'm not worried about it. 45% I already got one. 2% I will now. ation number ignore the 4 million jobs lost under his presidency? Why have millions stopped looking for work, dropping labor force participation to a 30-year low? No need to reply. Let’s blame Bush. It’s only been five years. As for Latta “voting against” women’s rights, why do female White House staffers make 88 cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts? Adam Swartz Walbridge Editor’s note: The White House salary figure is based on the 2013 Annual Report to Congress on White House staff and doesn’t reflect salary reductions taken due to furloughs and commissioned officer salary reductions.

Letter policy Letters must be signed and include a phone number for verification, typed, and not longer than 350 words. Letters are generally printed in the order they are received but letters pertaining to a current event are given priority. The Press reserves the right to edit letters for clarity, to maintain the word limit, and for legal reasons. Email to news@presspublications. com; fax to 419 836-2221, or mail to The Press, P.O. Box 169, Millbury, O. 43447.

Time to utilize your most powerful asset — your brain Many people look for an edge in life to help them get ahead. They search outside themselves for some type of advantage. Yet, within you exists the most powerful asset you could hope for; your brain. Going through life without thinking puts you at a significant disadvantage. Your brain controls your thoughts, which determine your attitude, which in turn guides your actions. The difference between successful people and those who struggle is their attitude. Your brain is the ultimate arbiter of what you accomplish in life. Use your brain to assess your progress and determine the course of action necessary to achieve your goals. Actively thinking about what is occurring in your life and why, is a key to success. If you don’t understand cause and effect relationships, you won’t be able to take corrective action as needed. When something doesn’t work out as intended, answer the following four questions: What happened? Why did it happen? What did you learn? What can you do to prevent it from happening again? This approach provides the most benefit from mistakes you make. In order to realize different results, you must change what you are doing. Doing the same thing over and over and expecting something to change is one definition of insanity.

Your brain is a magnet. You attract what you think about.

Dare to Live

by Bryan Golden When you feel bummed out, annoyed, upset, angry, irritated, or any other negative emotion, use your brain to determine the cause of your feelings. Once you know this, you can formulate a strategy to deal with the cause. This is a more intelligent approach compared to either ignoring your emotions or waiting for your feelings to go away. Unfortunately, too many people consider their attitude a response rather than a cause. They wait until things are good to feel happy. They will develop a positive attitude once they encounter positive circumstances. These people act as passengers rather than drivers. They are passive instead of proactive. Sadly, they are not taking advantage of even a fraction of their brain’s power. Your brain gives you the ability to learn from the past. You can learn what works and what doesn’t. The obvious goal is to repeat what works and avoid what doesn’t. It’s a colossal waste of time to do the opposite. Learning from the experience of others is far more efficient than learning from your own. Use your brain to research what has worked for those who are where you want to be. Emulating their approach is the intelligent thing to do. Think before you act. This is especially true when you are angry or upset. Allow yourself enough time to calm down before deciding what action is appropriate. Decisions made while in emotional turmoil are often regretted. Avoiding problems takes much less effort than repairing damage caused by acting in haste. Don’t live in a fog. Use your brain to

pay attention to the direction you are heading. Is it where you want to go? If not, what needs to be done to get you back on track? Be honest about your circumstances. You do yourself a disservice by living in denial. You’ve undoubtedly asked yourself, “what were they thinking?” in response to obviously stupid things other people do. Don’t be one of those people. Always be aware of your thoughts along with how they are impacting your life. Your brain is a magnet. You attract what you think about. Monitor your thoughts to ensure you are thinking about only those situations you want in your life.

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P.O. Box 169 • 1550 Woodville Rd. Millbury, OH 43447 (419) 836-2221 Fax (419) 836-1319 www.presspublications.com General Manager: John Szozda News Editors: Larry Limpf, Kelly Kaczala Sports Editor: J. Patrick Eaken Assistant Editor: Tammy Walro Writers: Mark Griffin, Cindy Jacoby, Melissa Burden, Jeff Norwalk, Alex Sobel, Yaneek Smith Photographer, Graphics: Ken Grosjean, Stephanie Szozda Sales: Julie Selvey, Lesley Willmeth, Leeanne LaForme, Alyce Fielding, Abbey Schell Classifieds: Cindy Harder, Melinda Sandwisch, Peggy Partin Circulation: Jordan Szozda Webmaster: Alyce Fielding Publication Date: Monday Classified Deadline: 1:00pm Thursday Display Advertising Deadline: Noon Thurs. News Deadline: Noon Wednesday Audited by: Hours: M.-Th. 9:00-5:00 CIRCULATION Classified Dept. Closed Friday VERIFICATION C O U N C I L Printed with Soy Ink. Member of IFPA

People with a negative attitude think about what they don’t want which actually attracts that which they are looking to avoid. Keep your brain engaged to constantly assess where you are and where you want to be. Change course as needed. Don’t let your most powerful asset be underutilized. NOW AVAILABLE: "Dare to Live Without Limits," the book. Visit www.BryanGolden.com or your bookstore. Bryan is a management consultant, motivational speaker, author, and adjunct professor. E-mail Bryan at bryan@columnist.com or write him c/o this paper. © 2013 Bryan Golden

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THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Opinion

9

The Press

National survey shows the “detached father� is a myth It doesn’t surprise me that a recent government study shows American fathers are active parents. The study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services concludes fathers bathe, diaper and dress their children, read to them, help them with homework and take them to their activities. The study is just one more pin-hole in the mythical balloon of the detached father. For nearly two centuries American fathers shared child rearing responsibilities working on their farms and in their shops side by side with their sons, and sometimes daughters. That changed with the second industrial revolution (1840-1870) when fathers seized the opportunity to improve the financial situation of their families and began working long hours in factories located in large cities. The Greatest Generation was the last generation of the stereotypical father as sole bread winner and mother as housewife. Women’s rights and a change from a manufacturing to a service economy saw more women from the Baby Boomer generation move into the workplace and that trend continues today, necessitating a change in a father’s role. The study, conducted from 2006 to 2010, measured child rearing involvement

Page Two

by John Szozda of 10,403 men aged 15-44. It measured interaction between residential and non-residential fathers and their children in two age groups: those under age five and those five to 18. For the younger group, the study looked at the frequency men ate meals with or fed their children, played with them, read to them or bathed, diapered or dressed them. For the older group, the study looked at talking with their children about their day, eating meals with them, helping with homework and taking them to their activities. Naturally, fathers who lived with their children showed a greater level of involvement, but surprisingly, non-custodial fathers were not totally absent. The study concludes fathers who lived with their biological children age five and under did the following daily or several times a week: • 96 percent fed or ate meals with

them; • 90 percent bathed, diapered or dressed them; • 98 percent played with them; • 60 percent read to them. Fathers who lived with their biological children ages 5 to 18 also showed these levels of involvement daily or several times a week: • 93 percent ate meals with them; • 55 percent took their children to their activities; • 93 percent talked to their children about what happened in their day; • 63 percent helped with homework. These involvement categories were chosen because previous research has shown them to have a relation to positive outcomes. Active fathers can increase the chances of academic success and reduce the chances of delinquency and drug abuse. Two parent households tend to be more stable than single parent and married parents more stable than co-habiting parents. Children growing up in married families tend to be physically and emotionally healthier. A 2005 study conducted for Princeton University by Paul R. Amato concludes children who grow up in stable two-parent families have a higher standard of living, receive more effective parenting,

experience more co-operative co-parenting, are emotionally closer to both parents and are subjected to fewer stressful events and circumstances. As you might expect step-fathers and co-habiting fathers are involved less and single fathers even less so. Two surprising results stuck out: a higher number of black fathers who lived with their biological children helped with homework every day for a four-week period and they were also more likely than whites or Hispanics to bathe, diaper and dress their small children every day. No explanation was given and researchers stated the sample size was too small to draw conclusions however black men have a higher rate of unemployment so that could be one reason for greater involvement. All fathers want to leave behind a better person than the one they see in the mirror. Changing the stereotype of the detached father will take many years. But this study offers a glimpse into today’s quiet reality, one that isn’t evident on the six-o-clock news or one that isn’t distorted through pop culture. Comment at zoz@presspublications.com

Some ideas for making Valentine’s Day more meaningful By Jill Richardson Valentine’s Day, it seems, has all the trappings of a made-up Hallmark holiday. It’s a holiday created purely to encourage us to go out and give our money to a few select industries: greeting cards, candy, roses, restaurants, etc. As it turns out, the holiday has a history. Obviously, there’s the link to St. Valentine — but given the Catholic Church’s views on sex, why would they turn their saint’s day into a romantic night for couples? Some historians think the holiday actually dates back before Christianity to a Roman fertility festival called Lupercalia. Others theorize that the actual St. Valentine was a hero of love, secretly performing marriages during Roman times after the Emperor forbid them. Or perhaps the link between Valentine’s Day and love — or at least sex — was solidified in the Middle Ages, thanks to the belief that February 14 marked the start of birds’ mating seasons.

“

Why should profitseeking corporations tell couples when and how to celebrate their love?

“

These ideas almost redeem the holiday for me. I wouldn’t want to sacrifice a goat and a dog as the Romans did in their Lupercalia festivities, but I do like the notion of celebrating the time in mid-February when spring is almost upon us. Maybe instead of engaging in ritual sacrifice, we could celebrate by eating some goat cheese and going for a walk with our dogs. This is the time of year when chickens begin laying more eggs, gardeners begin planting seeds indoors, and farmers welcome newborn calves, kids, and lambs to their herds and flocks. This time of year, I spend hours in the chaparral seeking out wildflowers. But that’s not how our celebration of Valentine’s Day seems to play out. Instead, we buy mountains of pink and red heartshaped crud, loads of candy, pricey jewelry, and who knows what else. Roses, as a symbol of the day, are particularly ridiculous, because roses don’t grow in February. At least not in most of the United States. All in all, Valentine’s Day can be a day of pressure to “get it right� by surprising your special someone with the perfect gift and a romantic evening in which you spend a lot of money to show how much you care.

Guest Editorial If you believe a billboard near my house, then you’re supposed to consider popping champagne and popping the question — while giving your love a diamond ring. Why should profit-seeking corporations tell couples when and how to celebrate their love? Celebrating one’s love is a beautiful idea, and treating your loved one to gifts or

date nights ought to be more than an annual occurrence. But the value of such a gift increases with the thoughtfulness put into it. Chocolate and roses are boring and generic. They tell your sweetheart, “I didn’t do too much work to come up with this.� And if they are given out of a sense of obligation, that’s even worse. Gifts are best when they commemorate your relationship with the person you give them to. What do you have in common? What makes your love so special? If you both love the outdoors, then planning a hike with your loved one to a hot spring could be the right way to go. Given the weather, February 14 might be the wrong day to do it. Or you could go the opposite route and honor a part of your loved one’s personal-

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ity that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share in common. For years, my mom has felt frustrated with the amount of camera equipment my father â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a talented photographer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; takes on vacation. If she could have her wish, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d quit the hobby altogether. So it was really an act of love when she bought him the Nikon DSLR camera heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always wanted as a gift. Instead of following the suggestions given by corporate marketing experts who want to celebrate your love by making big bucks this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, celebrate in a way that is special to you, and do so throughout the whole year.

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10

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Health Published second week of month.

“Angels” come to aid By Tammy Walro Press Staff Writer twalro@presspublications.com

After the story ran in the paper, the phone started ringing.

When Pam Brown stopped into The Press office just before Christmas, she was desperate but hopeful. Pam needed help – any kind of help – to get a ramp for their Genoa mobile home. In a few days, her husband Randy was scheduled to have his right leg amputated from just under the knee down due to diabetes and neuropathy. Without a ramp, she wouldn’t be able to get him in and out of their home. She hoped and prayed there might be a Good Samaritan out there, or someone in the Christmas spirit who would come to her aid. “After the story ran in the paper, the phone started ringing,” she said. “I got about 50 phone calls in five days. It was incredible.” she said. “I was answering the phone all the time – calls from people wanting to donate wood, people wanting to donate their trucks to carry the wood to help build the ramp,” she said. A gentleman who lives down the street – someone she went to school with but doesn’t know all that well – was among the callers. “Apparently he has helped build ramps through a community program the Home Depot has,” she said. “He contacted a gentleman from the Home Depot in Rossford and they arranged for a crew of four guys who donated their time to come out and build a ramp for me and Randy. “Home Depot donated the lumber, and these kind men donated their time,” Pam said. “None of them want any recognition or anything in return,” she said. “But we’ll

be forever grateful. They were a godsend.” The ramp was finished Jan. 3. “Randy had surgery Jan. 2 and I brought him home on the 5th,.” Pam said. “Our mobile home has a long porch with five wooden steps going down. “The ramp goes all the way down to my van door,” she said. “There’s no way I would have gotten him in the house without that ramp…none.” While Randy was in the hospital, a gentleman from Oak Harbor called the family with another offer. “My son took the call with an offer to donate a Hoveround,” she said. “He said it was sitting in his garage collecting dust and he wanted to know if my husband could use it. “We accepted his generous offer,” she said. “We’re looking forward to being able to use it when the weather gets nice to go to the zoo or other outings. My husband was just tickled pink.” “You hear so many bad things… but there are so many wonderful, generous people in our community,” Pam said. “They don’t know what their help meant to me. We’re just so pleased and grateful for them and all the angels who called and offered to help.”

Healthcare enrollment assistance Those looking for information or assistance with enrolling in a health insurance plan may sign up to get help at a pair of programs being offered at the Harris-Elmore Fire Station, 321 Rice St. Feb. 8 and March 22. The free assistance will be available from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Trained counselors from the Toledo/Lucas County CareNet and the Ohio Association of Foodbanks will be on hand to answer questions and help uninsured or underinsured individuals figure out which plan is best for them.

Those interested may sign up at the Elmore Public Library, 328 Toledo St. Visit www.healthcare.gov to apply for private insurance or www.benefits.ohio.org for Medicaid Expansion. Those who are unable to attend the Elmore events may receive help from a navigator available every Friday at The Sutton Center, 1854 E Perry St., Suite300, Port Clinton. Call the United Way at 419734-6645 or contact Fremont Community Health Services, 410 Birchard Ave., Fremont, at 419-334-3869.

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Lisa Barrett, Riverview Activities Director, and Gurneth Berndt, who received a prize for attending the most events during Activity Professional’s Week.

Riverview Healthcare celebrates Shopping trips, dining out experiences, Mud Hens games, movies and activities planned for morning, noon and night – there’s always something going on at the Ottawa County Riverview Healthcare Campus, thanks in great part to Riverview’s Activity Staff. While the Activity Staff members have fun implementing all of the facility’s events and activities, it also takes considerable work setting up, transporting residents, keeping score, and making snacks to ensure a successfully event, according to Kendra German, administrator.” All of this while also completing resident assessments and attending resident and family care conferences.” The Riverview Healthcare Campus dedicated the week of Jan. 19-25 to celebrate the hard work of the facility’s Activities Department. The department, which is overseen by Director Lisa Barrett, who has 31 years of service at Riverview, also includes four state tested nursing assistants who act as Activity Assistants – Mary Diefenthaler, Michelle Curns, Joanne Craft and Nicole Buehler. Last year, 653 residents participated in various outings outside of the facility. The Activity Department also kept busy pro-

viding activities within the facility, with a combined total attendance of 20,288 residents in 2013. On Friday Jan. 24, the facility celebrated with frosted chocolate chip cookies and a party to announce the winners of the various trivia and other contests throughout the week. The Activity Department offered a challenge to residents to see who could attend the most activities during the celebration week. Nursing Stations 2 and 6 attended the most activities and won a bowl of treats as well as root beer float party. Three residents tied for attending the most events during the week with attendance at 12 events. All three residents were placed in a drawing for a $5 lottery ticket, which was won by Gurneth Berndt. Donna Whetstone and Carol Rutherford were given $1 lottery tickets as consolation prizes. The Riverview Activity Department is looking forward to another fun busy year in 2014, because, as they tell residents, “you can’t bloom in your room.” Ottawa County Riverview Healthcare Campus has been county-owned and operated 143 years. The facility has maintained Medicare 5-Star status since January of 2010.


THE PRESS

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11


10

THE PRESS FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Health

The Press

Weight loss, healthy lifestyle promoted

Blast Off Nutrition opens in Oak Harbor Program designed to help victims of domestic violence Local domestic violence victims with limited resources now have additional support to help them break free from abuse and get a fresh start to their lives. Thanks to a $75,000 grant through Lucas County Department of Job and Family Services, Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center has developed “Project Access.” The new program educates victims about domestic violence, parenting, their legal rights and the keys to having healthy relationships. The goal is to empower victims to eliminate violence in their lives. Project Access helps domestic violence victims to create a safe and stable environment for themselves and their children Victims will meet with a case manager to understand how the violence in their lives acts as a barrier to self-sufficiency; the case manager then works with the client on a case plan that outlines specific goals and strategies for accomplishing them. This may include safety planning and linking the client with crucial community resources (i.e., legal services, shelter). Project Access services will be provided free of charge to all families eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds. Services will be made available at both the Lucas County Department of Job and Family Services office at 3210 Monroe St., and at the Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center, 2460 Cherry St. Anyone interested in participating in the program call 419-244-3053. Studies show that 50 to 80 percent of women receiving public benefits have experienced physical abuse by an intimate partner at some point during their adult lives, compared to 22 percent of the general population.

Board accredited The Ottawa County Board of Developmental Disabilities has been accredited by the State of Ohio, based on the quality services and support it provides to people with disabilities. An accreditation certificate was issued Jan. 7. The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) conducted a comprehensive review of the county board late last year. The team of surveyors reviewed all areas of board operations, including personnel administration, services and support, and other indicators of the general efficiency and effectiveness in the community. The results of the review determined the Ottawa County Board achieved substantial compliance with minimum standards and subsequently obtained a four-year period of accreditation.

By Yaneek Smith Press Contributing Writer news@presspublications.com Brian and Kattie Richards are hoping to bring some of the good fortune they’ve experienced and spread it to Oak Harbor. The Elmore couple recently opened a store downtown called Blast Off Nutrition, a place that offers alternative and holistic health options for people looking to lose weight and to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Brian spoke about his experience using the products offered at the store, which is located at 156 W. Water St., and how he and his wife were able to drastically improve their health. “We joined a wonderful team of people that helped us get healthy and lose weight,” said Richards, who notes that he was skeptical of weight-loss products for virtually his entire life before his recent success. “Now we want to spread that good health to others. We found out there wasn’t a nutrition club in Oak Harbor and decided that it was the perfect spot and we’re look-

ing forward to helping people get healthy.” The store, which is open from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Friday, offers, among other things, a healthy meal which consists of a shot of aloe, herbal tea and a nutrition-rich shake. “The aloe helps clean and soothe the digestive tract and the tea comes in five flavors and can be served warm or cold,” he said. “(The tea) boosts the metabolism, and the shake contains over 20 essential nutrients and is filling and tastes great. “We have over 60 flavors of shakes ranging from blueberry muffin to oatmeal cookie,” he said. Blast Off also offers energy-drink tablets and protein snack bars. The tablets, which contain vitamins C, B6 and B12, are designed to help enhance mental clarity and alertness without the “crash,” because they do not contain the added caffeine and sugar that is contained in many energy drinks. The snack bars, made with healthy ingredients, offer a nutritive alternative to less healthy snacks like potato chips and

candy. Brian, 35, who grew up in Florida before moving to the area, currently works as an EMS first-responder. He also volunteers his time and works as a lieutenant with the Harris-Elmore Volunteer Fire Department when he’s not at the store. Kattie, 29, is a graduate of Clay High School who previously worked as a police officer but is now a dispatcher for the Ohio Highway Patrol. Together, they have three children. “The program we’ve used is about giving the body proper nutrition,” Richards said. “We have lost 35 pounds each using this program, and the company has helped numerous people get healthy. The body is an amazing thing, and once you give it the nutrients it needs and wants, it does amazing things.” The grand opening of the store will be held Feb. 22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call 419-4676846 or visit the company’s Facebook page.

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8

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Opinion

The Press

National survey shows the â&#x20AC;&#x153;detached fatherâ&#x20AC;? is a myth It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t surprise me that a recent government study shows American fathers are active parents. The study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services concludes fathers bathe, diaper and dress their children, read to them, help them with homework and take them to their activities. The study is just one more pin-hole in the mythical balloon of the detached father. For nearly two centuries American fathers shared child rearing responsibilities working on their farms and in their shops side by side with their sons, and sometimes daughters. That changed with the second industrial revolution (1840-1870) when fathers seized the opportunity to improve the financial situation of their families and began working long hours in factories located in large cities. The Greatest Generation was the last generation of the stereotypical father as sole bread winner and mother as housewife. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights and a change from a manufacturing to a service economy saw more women from the Baby Boomer generation move into the workplace and that trend continues today, necessitating a change in a fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role. The study, conducted from 2006 to 2010, measured child rearing involvement

Page Two

by John Szozda of 10,403 men aged 15-44. It measured interaction between residential and non-residential fathers and their children in two age groups: those under age five and those five to 18. For the younger group, the study looked at the frequency men ate meals with or fed their children, played with them, read to them or bathed, diapered or dressed them. For the older group, the study looked at talking with their children about their day, eating meals with them, helping with homework and taking them to their activities. Naturally, fathers who lived with their children showed a greater level of involvement, but surprisingly, non-custodial fathers were not totally absent. The study concludes fathers who lived with their biological children age five and under did the following daily or several times a week: â&#x20AC;˘ 96 percent fed or ate meals with them;

â&#x20AC;˘ 90 percent bathed, diapered or dressed them; â&#x20AC;˘ 98 percent played with them; â&#x20AC;˘ 60 percent read to them. Fathers who lived with their biological children ages 5 to 18 also showed these levels of involvement daily or several times a week: â&#x20AC;˘ 93 percent ate meals with them; â&#x20AC;˘ 55 percent took their children to their activities; â&#x20AC;˘ 93 percent talked to their children about what happened in their day; â&#x20AC;˘ 63 percent helped with homework. These involvement categories were chosen because previous research has shown them to have a relation to positive outcomes. Active fathers can increase the chances of academic success and reduce the chances of delinquency and drug abuse. Two parent households tend to be more stable than single parent and married parents more stable than co-habiting parents. Children growing up in married families tend to be physically and emotionally healthier. A 2005 study conducted for Princeton University by Paul R. Amato concludes children who grow up in stable two-parent families have a higher standard of living, receive more effective parenting,

experience more co-operative co-parenting, are emotionally closer to both parents and are subjected to fewer stressful events and circumstances. As you might expect step-fathers and co-habiting fathers are involved less and single fathers even less so. Two surprising results stuck out: a higher number of black fathers who lived with their biological children helped with homework every day for a four-week period and they were also more likely than whites or Hispanics to bathe, diaper and dress their small children every day. No explanation was given and researchers stated the sample size was too small to draw conclusions however black men have a higher rate of unemployment so that could be one reason for greater involvement. All fathers want to leave behind a better person than the one they see in the mirror. Changing the stereotype of the detached father will take many years. But this study offers a glimpse into todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quiet reality, one that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t evident on the six-o-clock news or one that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t distorted through pop culture. Comment at zoz@presspublications. com

Some ideas for making Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day more meaningful By Jill Richardson Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, it seems, has all the trappings of a made-up Hallmark holiday. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a holiday created purely to encourage us to go out and give our money to a few select industries: greeting cards, candy, roses, restaurants, etc. As it turns out, the holiday has a history. Obviously, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the link to St. Valentine â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but given the Catholic Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s views on sex, why would they turn their saintâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day into a romantic night for couples? Some historians think the holiday actually dates back before Christianity to a Roman fertility festival called Lupercalia. Others theorize that the actual St. Valentine was a hero of love, secretly performing marriages during Roman times after the Emperor forbid them. Or perhaps the link between Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and love â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or at least sex â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was solidified in the Middle Ages, thanks to the belief that February 14 marked the start of birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mating seasons.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Why should profit-seeking corporations tell couples when and how to celebrate their love?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

These ideas almost redeem the holiday for me. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to sacrifice a goat and a dog as the Romans did in their Lupercalia festivities, but I do like the notion of celebrating the time in mid-February when spring is almost upon us. Maybe instead of engaging in ritual sacrifice, we could celebrate by eating some goat cheese and going for a walk with our dogs. This is the time of year when chickens begin laying more eggs, gardeners begin planting seeds indoors, and farmers welcome newborn calves, kids, and lambs to their herds and flocks. This time of year, I spend hours in the chaparral seeking out wildflowers. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not how our celebration of Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day seems to play out. Instead, we buy mountains of pink and red heartshaped crud, loads of candy, pricey jewelry, and who knows what else. Roses, as a symbol of the day, are particularly ridiculous, because roses donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow in February. At least not in most of the United States. All in all, Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day can be a day of pressure to â&#x20AC;&#x153;get it rightâ&#x20AC;? by surprising your special someone with the perfect gift and a romantic evening in which you spend a lot of money to show how much you care.

Guest Editorial If you believe a billboard near my house, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supposed to consider popping champagne and popping the question â&#x20AC;&#x201D; while giving your love a diamond ring. Why should profit-seeking corporations tell couples when and how to celebrate their love? Celebrating oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love is a beautiful idea, and treating your loved one to gifts or

date nights ought to be more than an annual occurrence. But the value of such a gift increases with the thoughtfulness put into it. Chocolate and roses are boring and generic. They tell your sweetheart, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do too much work to come up with this.â&#x20AC;? And if they are given out of a sense of obligation, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even worse. Gifts are best when they commemorate your relationship with the person you give them to. What do you have in common? What makes your love so special? If you both love the outdoors, then planning a hike with your loved one to a hot spring could be the right way to go. Given the weather, February 14 might be the wrong day to do it. Or you could go the opposite route and honor a part of your loved oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal-

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FIORITTO'S ACCOUNTING & TAX SERVICE Michael A. Fioritto Certified Public Accountant

Enrolled agents (EAs) are Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tax Experts. EAs are the only federally licensed tax practitioners who specialize in taxation and also have unlimited rights to represent taxpayers before the IRS.

860 Ansonia St. Suite 7, Oregon (419) 693-1941 Confidential and Personalized Attention

OtherWords columnist Jill Richardson is the author of Recipe for America: Why Our Food System Is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It. OtherWords.org

TIME

THE PRESS 0LQLPL]H,QFRPH7D[HV

ity that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share in common. For years, my mom has felt frustrated with the amount of camera equipment my father â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a talented photographer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; takes on vacation. If she could have her wish, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d quit the hobby altogether. So it was really an act of love when she bought him the Nikon DSLR camera heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always wanted as a gift. Instead of following the suggestions given by corporate marketing experts who want to celebrate your love by making big bucks this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, celebrate in a way that is special to you, and do so throughout the whole year.

419-697-7777 In Freeway Plaza

(Across from St. Charles Hospital)

Mayberry Tax Service 419-309-2552

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Income Tax Season is just around the Corner Sarah Szymanski, Accountant

Payroll Physicians, LLC

Your Prescription for Payroll, Accounting & Income Tax Services

Accepting new clients

Staff concerned with your financial health â&#x20AC;˘ Years of experience and integrity Conveniently located in Downtown Pemberville, 217 E. Front Street 419-287-1018


THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Opinion

9

The Press

National survey shows the â&#x20AC;&#x153;detached fatherâ&#x20AC;? is a myth It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t surprise me that a recent government study shows American fathers are active parents. The study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services concludes fathers bathe, diaper and dress their children, read to them, help them with homework and take them to their activities. The study is just one more pin-hole in the mythical balloon of the detached father. For nearly two centuries American fathers shared child rearing responsibilities working on their farms and in their shops side by side with their sons, and sometimes daughters. That changed with the second industrial revolution (1840-1870) when fathers seized the opportunity to improve the financial situation of their families and began working long hours in factories located in large cities. The Greatest Generation was the last generation of the stereotypical father as sole bread winner and mother as housewife. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights and a change from a manufacturing to a service economy saw more women from the Baby Boomer generation move into the workplace and that trend continues today, necessitating a change in a fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role. The study, conducted from 2006 to 2010, measured child rearing involvement

Page Two

by John Szozda of 10,403 men aged 15-44. It measured interaction between residential and non-residential fathers and their children in two age groups: those under age five and those five to 18. For the younger group, the study looked at the frequency men ate meals with or fed their children, played with them, read to them or bathed, diapered or dressed them. For the older group, the study looked at talking with their children about their day, eating meals with them, helping with homework and taking them to their activities. Naturally, fathers who lived with their children showed a greater level of involvement, but surprisingly, non-custodial fathers were not totally absent. The study concludes fathers who lived with their biological children age five and under did the following daily or several times a week: â&#x20AC;˘ 96 percent fed or ate meals with them;

â&#x20AC;˘ 90 percent bathed, diapered or dressed them; â&#x20AC;˘ 98 percent played with them; â&#x20AC;˘ 60 percent read to them. Fathers who lived with their biological children ages 5 to 18 also showed these levels of involvement daily or several times a week: â&#x20AC;˘ 93 percent ate meals with them; â&#x20AC;˘ 55 percent took their children to their activities; â&#x20AC;˘ 93 percent talked to their children about what happened in their day; â&#x20AC;˘ 63 percent helped with homework. These involvement categories were chosen because previous research has shown them to have a relation to positive outcomes. Active fathers can increase the chances of academic success and reduce the chances of delinquency and drug abuse. Two parent households tend to be more stable than single parent and married parents more stable than co-habiting parents. Children growing up in married families tend to be physically and emotionally healthier. A 2005 study conducted for Princeton University by Paul R. Amato concludes children who grow up in stable two-parent families have a higher standard of living, receive more effective parenting,

experience more co-operative co-parenting, are emotionally closer to both parents and are subjected to fewer stressful events and circumstances. As you might expect step-fathers and co-habiting fathers are involved less and single fathers even less so. Two surprising results stuck out: a higher number of black fathers who lived with their biological children helped with homework every day for a four-week period and they were also more likely than whites or Hispanics to bathe, diaper and dress their small children every day. No explanation was given and researchers stated the sample size was too small to draw conclusions however black men have a higher rate of unemployment so that could be one reason for greater involvement. All fathers want to leave behind a better person than the one they see in the mirror. Changing the stereotype of the detached father will take many years. But this study offers a glimpse into todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quiet reality, one that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t evident on the six-o-clock news or one that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t distorted through pop culture. Comment at zoz@presspublications. com

Some ideas for making Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day more meaningful By Jill Richardson Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, it seems, has all the trappings of a made-up Hallmark holiday. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a holiday created purely to encourage us to go out and give our money to a few select industries: greeting cards, candy, roses, restaurants, etc. As it turns out, the holiday has a history. Obviously, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the link to St. Valentine â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but given the Catholic Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s views on sex, why would they turn their saintâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day into a romantic night for couples? Some historians think the holiday actually dates back before Christianity to a Roman fertility festival called Lupercalia. Others theorize that the actual St. Valentine was a hero of love, secretly performing marriages during Roman times after the Emperor forbid them. Or perhaps the link between Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and love â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or at least sex â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was solidified in the Middle Ages, thanks to the belief that February 14 marked the start of birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mating seasons.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Why should profit-seeking corporations tell couples when and how to celebrate their love?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

These ideas almost redeem the holiday for me. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to sacrifice a goat and a dog as the Romans did in their Lupercalia festivities, but I do like the notion of celebrating the time in mid-February when spring is almost upon us. Maybe instead of engaging in ritual sacrifice, we could celebrate by eating some goat cheese and going for a walk with our dogs. This is the time of year when chickens begin laying more eggs, gardeners begin planting seeds indoors, and farmers welcome newborn calves, kids, and lambs to their herds and flocks. This time of year, I spend hours in the chaparral seeking out wildflowers. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not how our celebration of Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day seems to play out. Instead, we buy mountains of pink and red heartshaped crud, loads of candy, pricey jewelry, and who knows what else. Roses, as a symbol of the day, are particularly ridiculous, because roses donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow in February. At least not in most of the United States. All in all, Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day can be a day of pressure to â&#x20AC;&#x153;get it rightâ&#x20AC;? by surprising your special someone with the perfect gift and a romantic evening in which you spend a lot of money to show how much you care.

Guest Editorial If you believe a billboard near my house, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supposed to consider popping champagne and popping the question â&#x20AC;&#x201D; while giving your love a diamond ring. Why should profit-seeking corporations tell couples when and how to celebrate their love? Celebrating oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love is a beautiful idea, and treating your loved one to gifts or

date nights ought to be more than an annual occurrence. But the value of such a gift increases with the thoughtfulness put into it. Chocolate and roses are boring and generic. They tell your sweetheart, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do too much work to come up with this.â&#x20AC;? And if they are given out of a sense of obligation, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even worse. Gifts are best when they commemorate your relationship with the person you give them to. What do you have in common? What makes your love so special? If you both love the outdoors, then planning a hike with your loved one to a hot spring could be the right way to go. Given the weather, February 14 might be the wrong day to do it. Or you could go the opposite route and honor a part of your loved oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal-

:DJQHU·V7D[6HUYLFH 

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tax Time Again! WE OFFER: â&#x20AC;˘ Fee can be deducted from refund â&#x20AC;˘ Walk-Ins Welcome â&#x20AC;˘ FREE E-filing with With Paid Preparation â&#x20AC;˘ Hours To Fit Your Needs â&#x20AC;˘ Reasonable Fees

$15Current OFFClients

Not valid with other offers

Northwood Tax Service 419-697-7777

$25New OFF Clients

Not valid with other offers

Northwood Tax Service 419-697-7777

Northwood Tax Service 2665 Navarre Ave. â&#x20AC;˘ Oregon, Ohio 43616

FIORITTO'S ACCOUNTING & TAX SERVICE Michael A. Fioritto Certified Public Accountant

Enrolled agents (EAs) are Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tax Experts. EAs are the only federally licensed tax practitioners who specialize in taxation and also have unlimited rights to represent taxpayers before the IRS.

860 Ansonia St. Suite 7, Oregon (419) 693-1941 Confidential and Personalized Attention

OtherWords columnist Jill Richardson is the author of Recipe for America: Why Our Food System Is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It. OtherWords.org

TIME

THE PRESS 0LQLPL]H,QFRPH7D[HV

ity that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share in common. For years, my mom has felt frustrated with the amount of camera equipment my father â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a talented photographer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; takes on vacation. If she could have her wish, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d quit the hobby altogether. So it was really an act of love when she bought him the Nikon DSLR camera heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always wanted as a gift. Instead of following the suggestions given by corporate marketing experts who want to celebrate your love by making big bucks this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, celebrate in a way that is special to you, and do so throughout the whole year.

419-697-7777 In Freeway Plaza

(Across from St. Charles Hospital)

Mayberry Tax Service 419-309-2552

Keep your money where it belongs...WITH YOU. Affordable pricing. Trust experience.

Redeem this ad for $10 OFF tax preparation FREE E-Filing One Rate for State & Federal Call for Appointment

1528 Woodville Rd.,Millbury Next door to Mel-O-Creme

Income Tax Season is just around the Corner Sarah Szymanski, Accountant

Payroll Physicians, LLC

Your Prescription for Payroll, Accounting & Income Tax Services

Accepting new clients

Staff concerned with your financial health â&#x20AC;˘ Years of experience and integrity Conveniently located in Downtown Pemberville, 217 E. Front Street 419-287-1018


12

THE PRESS FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Health

The Press

Weight loss, healthy lifestyle promoted

Blast Off Nutrition opens in Oak Harbor Program designed to help victims of domestic violence Local domestic violence victims with limited resources now have additional support to help them break free from abuse and get a fresh start to their lives. Thanks to a $75,000 grant through Lucas County Department of Job and Family Services, Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center has developed “Project Access.” The new program educates victims about domestic violence, parenting, their legal rights and the keys to having healthy relationships. The goal is to empower victims to eliminate violence in their lives. Project Access helps domestic violence victims to create a safe and stable environment for themselves and their children Victims will meet with a case manager to understand how the violence in their lives acts as a barrier to self-sufficiency; the case manager then works with the client on a case plan that outlines specific goals and strategies for accomplishing them. This may include safety planning and linking the client with crucial community resources (i.e., legal services, shelter). Project Access services will be provided free of charge to all families eligible for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) funds. Services will be made available at both the Lucas County Department of Job and Family Services office at 3210 Monroe St., and at the Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center, 2460 Cherry St. Anyone interested in participating in the program call 419-244-3053. Studies show that 50 to 80 percent of women receiving public benefits have experienced physical abuse by an intimate partner at some point during their adult lives, compared to 22 percent of the general population.

Board accredited The Ottawa County Board of Developmental Disabilities has been accredited by the State of Ohio, based on the quality services and support it provides to people with disabilities. An accreditation certificate was issued Jan. 7. The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD) conducted a comprehensive review of the county board late last year. The team of surveyors reviewed all areas of board operations, including personnel administration, services and support, and other indicators of the general efficiency and effectiveness in the community. The results of the review determined the Ottawa County Board achieved substantial compliance with minimum standards and subsequently obtained a four-year period of accreditation.

By Yaneek Smith Press Contributing Writer news@presspublications.com Brian and Kattie Richards are hoping to bring some of the good fortune they’ve experienced and spread it to Oak Harbor. The Elmore couple recently opened a store downtown called Blast Off Nutrition, a place that offers alternative and holistic health options for people looking to lose weight and to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Brian spoke about his experience using the products offered at the store, which is located at 156 W. Water St., and how he and his wife were able to drastically improve their health. “We joined a wonderful team of people that helped us get healthy and lose weight,” said Richards, who notes that he was skeptical of weight-loss products for virtually his entire life before his recent success. “Now we want to spread that good health to others. We found out there wasn’t a nutrition club in Oak Harbor and decided that it was the perfect spot and we’re look-

ing forward to helping people get healthy.” The store, which is open from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Friday, offers, among other things, a healthy meal which consists of a shot of aloe, herbal tea and a nutrition-rich shake. “The aloe helps clean and soothe the digestive tract and the tea comes in five flavors and can be served warm or cold,” he said. “(The tea) boosts the metabolism, and the shake contains over 20 essential nutrients and is filling and tastes great. “We have over 60 flavors of shakes ranging from blueberry muffin to oatmeal cookie,” he said. Blast Off also offers energy-drink tablets and protein snack bars. The tablets, which contain vitamins C, B6 and B12, are designed to help enhance mental clarity and alertness without the “crash,” because they do not contain the added caffeine and sugar that is contained in many energy drinks. The snack bars, made with healthy ingredients, offer a nutritive alternative to less healthy snacks like potato chips and

candy. Brian, 35, who grew up in Florida before moving to the area, currently works as an EMS first-responder. He also volunteers his time and works as a lieutenant with the Harris-Elmore Volunteer Fire Department when he’s not at the store. Kattie, 29, is a graduate of Clay High School who previously worked as a police officer but is now a dispatcher for the Ohio Highway Patrol. Together, they have three children. “The program we’ve used is about giving the body proper nutrition,” Richards said. “We have lost 35 pounds each using this program, and the company has helped numerous people get healthy. The body is an amazing thing, and once you give it the nutrients it needs and wants, it does amazing things.” The grand opening of the store will be held Feb. 22 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call 419-4676846 or visit the company’s Facebook page.

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Assessments for seniors AmeriCare Home Health of Fremont and Ottawa County Commissioners have collaborated to provide regular health assessment and education services for seniors through the “60 Plus Program.” The services are offered free of cost to all Ottawa County residents age 60 years and older. Monthly assessment clinics are conducted by registered nurses include blood pressure checks; weight measurements; blood tests for anemia, blood sugar and cholesterol; health education including medication and nutrition counseling; and referrals to private physicians, if needed. The clinic schedule includes: • Elmore Senior Center in Elmore first Tuesday of the month • Elderlife Apartments in Genoafourth Tuesday of the month • Riverview Health Care Campus in Oak Harbor- second Wednesday of the month To make an appointment, call 866-5518187.

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THE PRESS

Does Snoring Disrupt Your Sleep?

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Don’t let snoring ruin the quality of your life…

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FEBRUARY 10, 2014

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THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

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16

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Clay grad enjoying role on title-winning cheer squad By Mark Griffin Press Contributing Writer news@presspublications.com Imagine finishing second in something – anything – by 0.7 points. That’s what happened to Bowling Green State University’s co-ed cheerleading squad at last year’s Universal Cheerleading Association College Cheerleading and Dance Team National Championships. Kylee Ault, a 2012 Clay grad, was a member of that squad, which finished second to national champion Hofstra University. The Falcons turned the tables this year. BGSU’s co-ed squad captured the 2014 national title Jan. 18 in Orlando, Fla., beating runner-up Hofstra and third-place Southeastern Louisiana. Hofstra had won the last five national titles and eight of the last 11. “Once we got there, we really did realize we were the team to beat,” said Ault, a sophomore. “In the finals, the top three schools all had the best routines. Hofstra put out their best routine and we still beat it. We went out there and hit our routine as great as we possibly could. We nailed it. It was unbelievably satisfying. We knew we couldn’t have done anything more.” It has been quite a ride for the 5-foot5 Ault, who was not a cheerleader at Clay. She took up gymnastics at age 8 and became one of the top prep gymnasts in the state by her sophomore year. Her gymnastics background, naturally, helped her morph into a member of a national champion 16-person college cheerleading squad. “This year I was kind of in the ‘versatile’ role,” Ault said. “I’m a top girl for stunting, which is where if a guy would hold my feet and I would stand in the air. This year it was basically, we’re going to throw Kylee wherever we need people. I am a top girl for stunts and a middle layer. We do pyramids and three people are stacked on top of each other. I was the second person. We have another separate part of the routine where I was the third person at the top of the pyramid. I like the versatility, doing different things instead of the same thing over and over.” Ault said this year’s BGSU squad talked about last year’s second-place finish at Nationals “a lot.” Winning this year’s title was even sweeter, given the fact that all four male members of the 2013 squad had graduated. “For Small Co-Ed, which is our division, there are four guys on the mat and 12 girls,” Ault said. “All four guys from last year were gone and we knew we had some work to do filling those spots. We were elated with second last year, but we felt that would have been our year to clinch the title. When that didn’t happen, we were ready to

Bowling Green State University cheer team member Kylee Ault, a Clay graduate, is in the middle, being lifted by three other female cheerleaders, at the national championships. It will air on ESPN this spring. (Photo courtesy of BGSU cheer team) work for whatever we could get this year. “At the beginning of training for Nationals, we sat down and looked at everybody and said there weren’t any superstars, just good players. We declared ourselves the Dream Team because as a whole, we had something special that other teams didn’t have. We just have that family bond, that atmosphere in the gym where we were willing to do whatever we could to benefit the other people on the mat.” Gymnastics teaches discipline Ault said she and her teammates prepared for Nationals by practicing six hours a day for three weeks over Christmas break. “Three hours in the morning and three in the afternoon,” she said. “It was rough. It was body-beating, that’s for sure. But, you have to do it.” Gymnastics taught Ault discipline, hard work and the benefits of repetition, but as a cheerleader she had to learn to work alongside several teammates. One of Ault’s childhood gymnastics friends, Molly Dedo, is an Oregon resident who attended St. Ursula Academy. Dedo competes for BGSU’s all-girl cheerleading squad and introduced Ault to the sport.

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in the semifinals in its division, and the dance team placed in the top 20 in Jazz in Division 1A. Brandeberry, a junior health care administration major, said four years as a Clay cheerleader prepared her well for her experience on the BGSU dance team. “I thought so, because Clay was a lot of game-day stuff, which was our first priority before the nationals,” Brandeberry said. “Once we’re ready for our games, basketball and football, then that is when we start working on our national routine. We basically work on that for the whole year. Everything I worked on before I came here pretty much prepared me for that.” For Ault, an exercise science major, hearing her co-ed team being announced as the 2014 national champion was something she will never forget. Twelve teams made it to the finals. “It was shock, almost,” Ault said. “It was so surreal. We wanted to put out our best routine and we knew we had a chance of winning. When they announced first place, it was unbelievable to know that what we did actually paid off.” The event will air on ESPN later this spring.

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“I thought, ‘I’ll give that a shot,’ ” Ault said, “and it turned out to be a great opportunity for me. Gymnastics definitely helped me out in some areas, and in others it did no good. Just the overall body awareness I had to develop with gymnastics carried over to cheerleading, but the skills we do in cheerleading are totally different because you rely on what other people do. You’re not just relying on yourself.” Bowling Green’s head cheerleading coach, Anne Marie King, a former BGSU cheerleader, said Ault has been a fine addition to the squad. “BGSU is fortunate to have Kylee as a member of our cheer program,” King said. “Above all, Kylee is a true ambassador of the university. Kylee is a great example of a team player and role model both inside and outside of the gym. Her natural athletic ability combined with her leadership skills make her an asset to our program.” The Falcons are the first Mid-American Conference squad to win a national cheerleading championship. BGSU’s all-girl cheer squad and dance squads, which includes Dedo and Clay grad Kelsey Brandeberry, also competed in Orlando. The all-girl squad placed ninth

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FEBRUARY 10, 2014

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18

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Genoa grapplers defend Northern Buckeye trophy By Mark Griffin Press Contributing Writer sports@presspublications.com Genoa’s entire wrestling roster can take a bow. Never before in the school’s history had the Comets’ wrestling program won backto-back league/conference championships – until last weekend. Genoa posted 161 points to beat runner-up Otsego (138.5) and Woodmore (117) for the Northern Buckeye Conference tournament title at Elmwood. The championship was Genoa’s third overall and marked the first back-to-back conference titles in program history. The Comets’ other title came in the Suburban Lakes League in 2003. Genoa has also won the Northcoast Holiday Duals and the Napoleon Gold Medal Duals this season. “It has been a collaborative effort from the coaches and the kids and their families,” Genoa coach Bob Bergman said. “We’re blessed to have kids with a good work ethic and it’s a pleasure to coach them.” Bergman admitted that, despite being the preseason NBC tournament favorites, defending their title was not a given for the Comets last weekend. Genoa lost NBC regular-season dual matches to Elmwood and Rossford. “We’ve had a lot of ups and downs this year,” Bergman said. “We had some kids get to weight classes where they need to be. Tyler Rozak, a senior (24-10 at 170 pounds), really helped us out, and so did freshman Matt Herrick (195). Without them, a league title would have been hard to come by. The upperclassmen have stepped up. We had injuries, and it took a whole team effort.” Bergman said winning the NBC tourney title gives the Comets a boost heading into the 15-team Division III sectional tournament Feb. 14-15 at Lake. “A lot of teams in our league are in our sectional,” Bergman said, “so it’s a good indicator of where the bar’s at and how close we are to it. It teaches us to learn from some of our mistakes we need to get corrected. Otsego has a talented group and it’s going to be a barnburner next weekend.” Senior 138-pounder Max Reeder played a huge role in Genoa’s path to the conference championship. Reeder (20-2) brought the crowd to its feet in the title

Jay Nino (53-1) takes down a Rossford wrestler on his way to defending his 220 pound Northern Buckeye Conference title. (Press photo by Harold Hamilton/ HEHphotos. smugmug. com) match when he pinned Otsego’s Austin Glosser late in the second period. Reeder also won NBC titles at 119 pounds as a freshman and at 132 last season. “Up to that point (138 pounds) we hadn’t won a finals match yet,” Bergman said. “That was our first victory. There was a big swing between (Otsego) winning and us winning. That was a big momentum killer for the Knights. Max kind of just grabbed the bull by the horns. He’s wrestled about a third of the season (with injuries) and he’s been an absolute trooper. We’ve just been using him when we absolutely need him. Now is the time for him.” Three other Genoa wrestlers – juniors Tyler Baird at 182 and Jay Nino at 220, and senior heavyweight Cody Buckner – all won NBC titles. Baird (36-2), who had a sub-.500 record a year ago, “was a treat to watch” en route to the championship, Bergman said.

Baird pinned Otsego’s Collin Kitchen in 3:30 in the finals. “He’s coming into his own,” the coach said. “He’s hands down our most improved. He went from ‘flip a coin’ to untouchable this year. His drill partner is Jay Nino and that’s definitely paying dividends.” Nino (53-1) has been pretty much untouchable this season. He defended his 220-pound title at the NBC tourney with a pin of Woodmore’s Henry Flores (2:26) in the finals. “He’s a gamer-type guy,” Bergman said. “The lights are on now and he’s putting in the extra time and working with the coaches and conditioning up. We’re excited here the next couple weeks to watch him roll. He’s salivating at this opportunity.” Buckner, the fifth-ranked heavyweight in the state, put away Elmwood’s Jack Hagemeyer with a 12-2 decision in the semifinals. He pinned Rossford’s Brandon

Vasquez in 1:39 in the finals. “Cody had a slobberknocker in the semifinals,” Bergman said. “It went the distance, which is unusual for him. He’s having a great year. Two weeks ago he beat the fourth-ranked kid in the state from Dayton Christian, and he dominated (last) weekend.” Genoa also got second-place finishes from 113-pounder Damian D’Emilio, who is 48-6, Rozak, Nathan Moore (26-4 at 145) and Brandon Bates (44-6 at 132). Freshmen Herrick and Adam Bates (126) both placed fourth. Genoa will vie for its third straight sectional title next weekend at Lake. “We just hope we can get as many kids as we can in those top four spots,” Bergman said. “A lot of our guys have the potential to do that, and more. It’s all about individuals now and it doesn’t have to be pretty all the time. Just advance.”

Golden Bears just miss third straight wrestling title By Yaneek Smith Press Contributing Writer sports@presspublications.com Since joining the Ohio Wrestling League, Gibsonburg had been dominant. They won two straight league titles, but this year just missed out on winning a third, finishing second at the OWL meet. Led by senior Jacob Auld (220 pounds), 37-6, Gibsonburg finished with 144 points, just six short of Van Buren, who won the title. Arcadia finished third, followed by Northwood, Cory-Rawson, McComb, Toledo Christian, Cardinal Stritch and Danbury. Auld was joined in the winner’s circle by teammates Bryce Mendoza (106), Griffin Geary (145), Antonio Vasquez (152) and Dan Henline (182). All 10 of the team’s wrestlers finished in the top four, including Izaak Arriaga (132), who finished second, Wesley Campbell (126), Damien Schmeltz (138) and Marcus Kreais (170) came in third and Troy Ickes was fourth at 160. There were other area wrestlers who placed high, among them Devon Dunbar (126) and Trevor Mack (138) of Northwood, both of whom won championships in their weight class. In fact, Dunbar was named the meet’s Most Outstanding Wrestler for his efforts, and teammate Brad Meeks finished second at 113. And Cardinal Stritch Catholic had three wrestlers finish in the top four — James Dobson (second at 170), Ricky Pratt (third at 182) and Josh Kramer (fourth at 220). Gibsonburg coach Justin Edgell was pleased his team’s performance. “I was very excited,” said Edgell. “We came away with five champions and all 10 (of our wrestlers) placed in the top four. We have 10 guys and they made sacrifices (at the meet). Van Buren had 12 wrestlers and that made a little bit of a difference. Our kids were a little disappointed, but we didn’t let them hang their heads.” The sacrifices Edgell is referring to are the eight wrestlers who moved up a weight class to ensure that the team could field 10 wrestlers. “All of our wrestlers from 132 and

Gibsonburg senior Jacob Auld (37-6) moved up two classes to 220 pounds to take his third straight league championship. (Press photo by Harold Hamilton/ HEHphotos. smugmug. com) above moved up a weight classes for the league tournament,” Edgell said. “This allowed us to put (Arriaga) at 132 and fill 10 weight classes.” The Bears performed well during the season, going 6-2 in dual meets while finishing fourth at the Golden Bear Invite, sixth at the Woodmore Classic and ninth at the Van Buren Invite. Auld finished first at two of those events, Henline was first at the Golden Bear Invite and third at the Van Buren Invite while Schmeltz finished third

at both and Geary and Vasquez each came in second at the Golden Bear Invite. The team has done consistently well under Edgell, now in his fourth year at the helm. During his tenure, Gibsonburg has a 47-27 record in dual meet action. He’s built a solid foundation within the program, one that will see just one player graduate and has five quality sophomores, two of whom won OWL titles. The junior high team, which has won the league three years running, will supply seven new wrestlers to

the high school next season. The varsity is led by Auld, the captain. After wrestling at 182 pounds for the duration of the year, he jumped up two slots and wrestled at 220 pounds at the league tournament, defeating all of his opponents. In fact, it was the second time in three years Auld has moved up two weight classes at the OWL tournament. On top of that, he won the league title three years in a row and was a district qualifier last season while going 29-10. Auld said responsibility comes with being the leader and lone senior on the club. “I’ve really enjoyed the season I’ve had so far,” Auld said. “The team is doing well, and we’re very young this year. But we have made up for our age with experience — our guys have wrestled a long time and are very dedicated to getting themselves and each other better. “Being the only senior and our heaviest guy, it can put a bit of stress on me (because) the guys are looking up to me. There have been several (tight matches) this year where it’s my match that either makes or breaks (the result). But even with the stress, I really enjoy saying that I am a captain on the Gibsonburg wrestling team and our guys represent us very well. Not just on the mat, but also in the bleachers.” In addition to his efforts on that mat, Auld has had a stellar athletic career at Gibsonburg. Last fall, he was named the Toledo Area Athletic Conference Defensive Player of the Year in football for his performance as a defensive end. Auld, who also started at left tackle and served as the punter, earned four varsity letters in the sport and helped to rebuild the program, one that saw the Bears go 0-10 during his freshman year when they were competing in the final year of the old Suburban Lakes League. During his final three years with the club, however, Gibsonburg went a combined 14-16 and 12-6 in the Toledo Area Athletic Conference, and has a chance to become one of the top teams in the league in the coming years. Auld also plays catcher and outfield for the baseball team and was part of the squad two years ago that advanced to the Division IV regional semifinals.


THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

19

The Press Box Stritch 1973 state runner-up wrestlers honored By Press Staff Writer sports@presspublications.com The 1973 Cardinal Stritch Class A-AA state runner-up wrestling team was inducted into the school’s hall of fame at a banquet before the holidays. It is the second wrestling team inducted — the 1985 state championship team, with four seniors and two juniors qualifying for state, became part of the hall of fame membership in 2000. Stritch also took second at state in 1972, 1974, and 1983. Members of the 1973 team are wrestlers Dennis Bihn, Paul “Matt” Chovanec, Chris Covill, Bruce Kirby, Paul Luther, Jim Reeves, Fred Toensing, Ray Wilson, Jake Sanchez, Rusty Menchaca, Brian Haynes, Paul Sepeda, Tony Guerrero, Alex Sofalvi, head coach Karl Pankratz, and assistant coach Bob Reynolds. Luther, a 1974 graduate, excelled in wrestling as a two-time state champion his junior and senior years. He was also High School All American (SWN), third in the nation in Freestyle in 1974, was a USA Team member in the USSR in 1974 and Poland in 1976, as well as AAU Open Champion (Jr. World) in 1976. Luther won his first Class A-AA state championship in 1973 in the 145 pound class and in 1974 at 155 pounds. He is one of 235 two-time state champions in Ohio wrestling history. According to data compiled by Dan Cosimi of The Ohio Wrestling Network, Luther counts for two of Stritch’s 11 individual state champions that also include Scott Zapadka (1987, 88), Jim Reindel (1984), Fritz Ackerman (1983), Jim Derr (1978), Dave Talbott (1978), Bryan Haynes

The 1973 Cardinal Stritch wrestling team — front row, l to r: Bruce Kirby, Jake Sanchez, Jim Reeves, Rusty Menchaca, Ray Wilson, Brian Haynes. Back row l to r: Head Coach Karl Pankratz, Paul Sepeda, Tony Guerrero, Fred Toensing, Chris Covill, Denny Bihn, Paul Luther, Alex Sofalvi, and Assistant Coach Bob Reynolds. Inset: Captain Matt Chovanec. (1975), Jim Bergman (1972), and Pat Curley (1967). Curley had a 20-match win streak and won the state final with pin. Stritch wrestling won eight Toledo City League titles, even though competing against the likes of St. Johns Jesuit and St. Francis DeSales. For one span of 28 consecutive years, at least one Stritch wrestler qualified for the state tournament. After graduation, Chovanec, the 1973 team captain, attended Marshall University and was named the Thundering Herd’s Most Valuable Wrestler for the 1975-76 season. Wilson was a member of the wrestling team for three years and was the Northwood Invitational and sectional champion both his junior and senior years. Coach Pankratz, a 1966 graduate of St. Francis de Sales High School, brought plenty of experience with him. At St. Francis, he was an all-state football player and an undefeated state champion in Wrestling. He received a full football scholarship to Indiana University, played in the 1968

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Rose Bowl, and was the captain of the 1969 team. He was also an All-Big Ten linebacker. After graduating from Indiana University in 1970, Pankratz began teaching business at Stritch in 1971. While teaching, Karl also coached football and wrestling, was the Dean of Men, and became the head wrestling coach in 1973. Pankratz moved on to teach and coach at Start in 1976, and then to Central Catholic. In a career spanning almost 40 years he served as a Guidance Director, Assistant Principal, Dean of Men, and Counselor. He also coached football, wrestling and golf during that time. Coach Reynolds is certainly one of the most recognizable faces associated with CSCHS. A member of the first graduating class — 1965, he returned in 1970 and spent the next 35 teaching, coaching and working at his alma mater. While a student, Reynolds was active in all aspects of high school life, including student government, and playing on the

football and wrestling teams. He was also a member of the track team, setting a school record in the long jump. He attended Bowling Green State University, graduating in 1969 and spent one year teaching shop at Fremont Junior High. Reynolds returned to CSCHS in 1970 to teach graphic arts and theology. Along with his teaching duties, he was the head cross country coach, head track coach, assistant wrestling coach, and started the girls cross country team. Reynolds also acted as the on-site athletic administrator for sporting events for 10 years. He served on the board of directors for the East Toledo YMCA and is currently a trustee with the Oregonian Club.

Sports announcements Genoa Little League registration will run until Feb. 28. Players ages 5-14 as of May 1, 2014 are eligible to play. To download a form, visit www.leaguelineup.com/ genoa. Contact Lee Nissen 419-351-2398.

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Open for kids from 4-13 regardless of whether they have played before or not. Registration from 5:30-7:00pm at the Lake Elementary Library. Or send registration form to: P.O. Box 464, Walbridge, OH 43465 (online registration @ www.lakesoccer.net) Referees Needed $11-$17 per game for details contact Sarah 419-376-9767

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20

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Coach Mike DeStazio’s 200th career win no secret now By Mark Griffin Press Contributing Writer sports@presspublications.com Genoa girls basketball coach Mike DeStazio will accept a few pats on the back for getting his 200th career victory, but he’d much rather spread thanks to everyone who helped him reach that milestone. DeStazio said he tried to keep it quiet as he neared No. 200, but it was too late. The jig was already up, thanks to word of mouth and social media. “I didn’t want the girls to know,” he said, “but they knew.” DeStazio, who took over the Comets’ program in 2010 after several years away from the high school game, got his 200th victory on Jan. 31, a 74-56 win over visiting Elmwood. It was the Royals’ first Northern Buckeye Conference loss of the season. Genoa was 14-5 overall and 8-3 in the NBC heading into Thursday’s game at Rossford. DeStazio’s career mark is 201-88, for a winning percentage of 70 percent. “It came up last year,” DeStazio said. “One of the school board members said, ‘How many wins you got?’ I told them and they said, ‘You need 13 wins to get to 200.’ About the 10th game we won, somebody said, ‘You’re getting close.’ ” Genoa nipped Lake for DeStazio’s 199th win, and DeStazio said he mentioned to a few people that he was one win away from 200. “I was talking with Denny Mock, our superintendent, and said, ‘boy, what a way to get my 199th win,’ ” DeStazio said. “Then word started traveling and we got to the Elmwood game and I saw some of my former players sitting across from me. I thought, ‘the word got out.’ My daughter, Tammy, I saw on Facebook, was talking about it.” DeStazio said he was inundated with congratulatory messages after the Elmwood win. “What was really neat about it was the comments people gave me afterwards,” he said. “I got hit with about 30 text messages right afterwards. Facebook was unbelievable. There must have been 200 hits. The 200 wins (milestone) didn’t nearly have the impact on me as what the comments were

BOYS BASKETBALL Team (League) Overall Lake (8-1, NBC) 15 1 Gibsonburg (6-3, TAAC) 12 3 Eastwood (6-3, NBC) 10 5 Genoa (6-4, NBC) 8 9 Cardinal Stritch (5-5, TAAC) 6 9 Waite (1-5, TCL) 5 12 Oak Harbor (0-10, SBC) 5 12 Woodmore (2-8, NBC) 2 15 Clay (0-11, TRAC) 2 16 Northwood (0-9, TAAC) 0 13

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Genoa girls basketball coach Mike DeStazio celebrates with sophomore standout Haley Pickard after the Comet’s 45-44 win over Lake. (Press photo by Harold Hamilton/HEHphotos.smugmug.com) from kids who played for me 20 years ago. Nothing but great comments.” DeStazio was Woodmore’s junior varsity girls coach in 1993-94 and was elevated to varsity girls coach in 1994-95. The Wildcats won the Suburban Lakes League title that first season. He spent nine seasons as Woodmore’s coach, compiling a 149-54 record, before “retiring” in 2003. He is 5234 in three-plus seasons at Genoa. DeStazio’s first wife, Sharon, died of cancer in 2008. Their daughter, Tammy,

Pancake Breakfast Sunday, 17th Sunday,November February 16th 8am-1pm Millbury Firemen’s Hall 28410 Oak St. Proceeds are to benefit the Toledo Fire and Rescue Foundation Firefighters Machinski and Dickman. Featuring Al’s Alaskan Sourdough Pancakes, eggs, sausage,coffee, juice, milk

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Oak Harbor (9-3, SBC) 14 4 Genoa (8-3, NBC) 14 5 Clay (6-4, TRAC) 11 7 Lake (5-5, NBC) 8 9 Cardinal Stritch (7-4, TAAC) 8 10 Woodmore (6-5, NBC) 8 11 Waite (4-5, TCL) 7 10 Gibsonburg (5-5, TAAC) 5 12 Northwood (3-7, TAAC) 3 13 Eastwood (1-11, NBC) 2 15 (Records updated to February 6)

played for Mike at Woodmore and helped the Wildcats win 52 games during her three seasons. “Tammy made a nice message on Facebook,” DeStazio said. “She said, ‘Mom would be so proud of you. She would be proud of your 200 wins.’ That really hit home, because (Sharon) wasn’t here to share that.” DeStazio eventually remarried and said his current wife, Connie, “has been tremendous” and deserves a lot of credit. “She knew the passion I had to coach again,” he said. “I said to her, ‘you don’t

know how much time this takes’ and she said, ‘I know you love to coach.’ She films my games, she keeps my stats. She does all the things behind the scenes like an assistant coach. She helps feed the kids for film night. She understood that I wanted to coach again and she supported it, and the rest is history.” Genoa’s junior varsity girls coach, Doug Perkins, has been on the bench with DeStazio every step of the way, at Woodmore and Genoa. “In 1990 we ended up being neighbors,” DeStazio said. “We both love basketball. Our families were like one big family. Doug and I became very good friends. When we coached together, we both had the same philosophy. We had a great rapport with the kids and we’re very competitive. When you surround yourself with people like that, and the players, 200 wins is easy.” Perkins said DeStazio still gets the same thrill out of coaching as he did in the mid-1990s. “The passion is there, the preparation is there,” Perkins said. “He’s the reason I’m still in it. I enjoy it. We have a love for the game that we just don’t lose. Mike’s changed a little bit. He used to get so intense, little blowouts on the bench to try to motivate the kids. He’s maybe softened a little bit from the real crazy Mike. He’ll give the kids what they need, but not go overboard. “He treats the kids well and makes the game fun. It’s all business on the court and fun off the court. That’s what’s great about him. The preparation – scouting, breaking down game film and setting up a game plan - he’s still got that. He’s a master at it.” DeStazio also wanted to thank Genoa varsity assistant Lisa Cruickshank, a volunteer who also runs the fifth and sixth grade program, and the Genoa school administration. “I think coaching is a privilege,” he said. “I’ve still got the energy. I love it. The biggest thing is the fact that you have an opportunity to give something back to some young kids that maybe they’ll never get in life. To be in sports and be a great role model and help them become a great adult, it makes coaching all that much more worth it all.”

9th Annual

Chili & Soup Cook-Off

Sat., Feb. 22, 2014

Lake Twp. Administration Building 27975 Cummings Rd., Corner of SR 795 & cummings rd. Entry Requirements

A great Chili Recipe 8qt. Electric Slow Cooker or Electric Roaster of Chili or Soup, Bake-off requirements please precut into bite size pieces

Chili & Soup Registration New Category 12:00 this Year! Chili & Soup Judging 1:00 Dessert Cook Public Tasting Off! (for Donation) 1:30 Silent Auction Ends For Pre Registration 2:30 Call Ron Hanely (Highest Bidders Announced) 419-392-3235 Awards People’s Choice Award : Soup, Chili, Desserts Judge’s Choice Award : Soup, Chili, Dessert Savory Soup Award Business Category Award Friends of Lake Township Parks is a volunteer organization made up of dedicated men and women who help raise money to help purchase many different items for our parks (gazebos, trees, Àowers, playground equipment etc.) Friends of Lake Township Parks is a non pro¿t organization. All proceeds to bene¿t Lake Township Parks. Lake Township Parks is a non pro¿t organization. Lake Township, Lake Township Trustees, Friends of Lake Township and volunteers are not responsible for accidents or injuries.


THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

21

Rockets again look to make noise in the postseason By Yaneek Smith Press Contributing Writer sports@presspublications.com Another year, another set of expectations fulfilled for Oak Harbor wrestling. So far, anyways. Over the weekend, the Rockets finished second at the Sandusky Bay Conference tournament, the third year in a row they’ve finished in the top four after winning the league five years in a row from 2007-11. As a team, the Rockets finished with 191½ points, second to Perkins, which won its second straight conference title with 235 points. Clyde was third with 171 points, followed by Margaretta (131), Edison (127½), Sandusky St. Mary Central Catholic (106), Huron (61) and Port Clinton (37). Oak Harbor freshman Bruce Hrynciw and junior T.J. Lawrence led the way, finishing first at 106 and 285 pounds, respectively. It was the second league championship for Lawrence and the first for Hrynciw. It was a also well-earned victory for Lawrence who, for much of the season, had to battle injuries, making his triumph that much sweeter. “It’s not been the year I wanted but I was able to get the second title,” said Lawrence, who finished eighth in the state meet at Division II last year in the heavyweight division. “Hopefully I’ll be able to win it for the third time next year. And since we have a young team, we have a good shot at finishing first next year.” Lawrence defeated Clyde’s Collin Mange, 4-2, in the final, scoring two late points to claim victory while Hrynciw pinned SMCC’s Dominic Rosin in one minute, two seconds to win the title. Oak Harbor’s second place finishers included Rhett Petersen (132), Ben Petersen (145) and Kian Thompson (160), all of whom are expected to make noise when the postseason rolls around. Rhett Petersen fell just short of winning a title in his weight class, falling, 5-4, to Perkins senior Nate Boggs. Coach George Bergman, now in his 21st year at the helm, was pleased with the performance of his club.

Oak Harbor wrestler Ben Petersen, a second place finisher at the Sandusky Bay Conference meet. (Press photo by Harold Hamilton/ HEHphotos. smugmug.com) “We had 12 wrestlers finish in the top four, the same as Perkins,” Bergman said, “and I was happy with that. We wrestled better than we had against Delta (in the state duals), but you’re never satisfied. We won a few rematches that we had lost and we lose some rematches that we had won before. “I was impressed with Kian Thompson’s performance. And T.J. had a good year after some ups and downs and battling injuries.

Genoa Soccer Club Spring 2014 Soccer Registration Pre-School through age 14 Print registration forms at www.genoarecsoccer.org Forms also available at Genoa Library

Open registration at Genoa Library Saturday, Feb. 15 from 10am-1pm Registration deadline is February 20. Forms postmarked after February 19 will not be accepted. Board Members and coaches needed. Please visit us at www.genoarecsoccer.org Questions? Call or text Kristina 330-204-0021 or email kristinamtt@yahoo.com

It was great to see Bruce win the title as a freshman, too.” Five Rockets placed third, including Nick Bergman (120), Jeremy Balboa (138),

Brody Hennig (152), Steve Simkus (170) and Brandon Garber (220), while Dylan Mansor (113) and Jake Huston (126) each finished fourth. It was especially sweet for Nick Bergman, a state alternate as a freshman, to finish third considering that he’s consistently battled injuries over the last two seasons. A number of his teammates also overcame obstacles to get to this point, too. “Nick took third and it was good to see him on the mat,” George Bergman said. “And I was real happy with Steve (Simkus). Steve never started in seventh or eighth grade and now he’s contributing. He’s about 155 pounds and we put him in at 170. He’s an example of a guy that has stayed with our program and it’s paid off. And Brandon and Brody did a nice job taking third. It was a total team effort.” This performance certainly wasn’t a fluke. In addition to competing in two prestigious tournaments, the Iron Man Competition and the Medina Invitational, the Rockets fared well at some of the local events, finishing 13th out of 35 teams at Clay’s Mike Casey/Maumee Bay Classic, which included larger schools, and the Perrysburg Invite (PIT), which saw them place fourth out of 22 teams. But the Rockets are used to making the most noise in the postseason. Home to 22 state champions, Oak Harbor has finished outside the top five in Division II just twice since ’07, coming in seventh last year and 19th in ’12. Bergman believes if this unit is able to stay healthy and things break right for them, there’s no reason to believe they can’t have another solid showing in Columbus. The sectional tournament takes place on Feb. 14-15 and the district tournament is one week later. Both events will be held at the Stroh Center at Bowling Green State University.

EFREE TOUR GROUP CARWitzler-Shank Funeral Home Walbridge, Ohio 419-666-3121

BUS TRIPS FOR 2014 Thursday, March 27, 2013- Genetti’s Hole in the Wall Join us, as we embark on the little town of Northville, Mi., where we will once again get to enjoy the wonderful smells of the Great Harvest Bread Co., and purchase some of their delicious breads. Then we’ll head over to Genetti’s for their famous 7 course Italian style dinner, which features, homemade soup, pasta, antipasto salad, Italian sausage with green peppers and onions, Italian steak with potatoes, baked chicken, and a wonderful cannoli for dessert. After our wonderful and ſlling meal we will sit back and enjoy the interactive show Murder at the Fountain of Youth. Cost of the trip is $ 65.00 LUNCH IS INCLUDED! Wednesday, April 16, 2014 – Jiffy Mix Factory Tour and the Purple Rose Theatre Join us, as we take an hour guided factory tour of the famous Jiffy Mix Factory. The tour explains the history of the Jiffy Mix plant, past, present, and future. You will also be able to see the manufacturing, boxing, and distribution of the products they sell. After our tour you will be eating at Big Boy Restaurant and then venturing on to the Purple Rose Theatre, which is owned by the actor Jeff Daniels, to see the show Lovers, Liars, and Lunatics. Cost of trip is $ 55. 00 LUNCH IS ON YOUR OWN! Wednesday, May 28, 2014 – Shipshewana, In. – Brown Bag Tour Join us, as we head to Amish Country, for the famous brown bag tour. We will start out with a brief shopping trip to the ƀea market, then board the bus for a little shopping expedition, while we ſll our bags with goodies from the shops we stop at. We will be enjoying lunch in an Amish home. Cost of the trip is $ 70.00 LUNCH IS INCLUDED! Wednesday, June 25, 2014 –Lolley the Trolley Sightseeing Tour and West Side Market- Cleveland, OH Join us, as we embark on a 2 hour long narrated sightseeing tour of the city of Cleveland in a covered trolley car. We will visit areas such as the Flats, The Warehouse District, and many other interesting sights of the city. After our tour, we will be eating at the University Inn, which is a popular cafeteria in Cleveland, then we will make a trip to the West Side Market. West Side Market, is one of Cleveland’s oldest publicly owned markets. The market is home to over 100 vendors and has a little bit of everything from produce, to meat and cheese, to candy and nuts. Some market vendors take both cash and credit cards, but some ONLY take cash. We recommended that you bring cash. Cost of trip is $ 55.00 LUNCH IS ON YOUR OWN! Wednesday, August 27, 2014 – Canal Fulton, Ohio- Canal Boat Ride, glass blowing exhibit, and shopping Join us, for a trip to Canal Fulton, for a ride on the St. Helena III, which is a replica canal boat. The St. Helena III will be pulled by two Persian horses, down a section of the Ohio & Erie Canal. This one hour ride, will give history into the life during the Canal Era. We will enjoy a buffet lunch at an Italian Restaurant. After lunch, we will go and visit a glassmaker and watch him work his magic, transforming molten glass before your own eyes. We will also be doing some shopping in the town of Canal Fulton. Cost of trip is $ 65.00 LUNCH IS INCLUDED! Thursday, September 25, 2014 – Berlin, Ohio Join us, as we embark on the town of Berlin, to visit our friends the Amish. We will be taking a back roads guided tour through Amish country, and embarking on the town Berlin. We will be stopping at all the local shops in the area. After our tour, we will stop for lunch at Sunset Home Cooking with all the food made by Esta Hershberger and her family. After lunch we will continue to shop some more. Cost of the trip is $ 60.00 LUNCH IS INCLUDED! Wednesday, October 15, 2014 – The Christmas Story House and Museum and the Cleveland Aquarium Join us, for a trip back in time to Ralphie’s house from the movie Christmas Story. We will visit the original house from the movie, as well as the museum, which features original props, memorabilia, and costumes from the movie. After our tour we will be stopping Panini’s Restaurant for lunch. After lunch we will then head to the aquarium which is an indoor aquarium with a variety of ſsh from, lake to salt water. Cost of trip is $ 60.00 LUNCH IS NOT INCLUDED! Friday, November 14, 2014 – The Fabulous Food Show at the I-X Center in Cleveland Join us, as we take a trip to the Fabulous Food Show in Cleveland. This show features the country’s largest presentation of ſne food, ſne art, craft breweries, wineries, restaurants and purveyors all under one roof! Taste, try & buy your way through the expansive show ƀoor with over 450 exhibiting companies. Watch nearly 100 live demonstrations on 6 stages by world renowned celebrity chefs and culinary professionals. Cost of the trip will be determined at a later date the I-X Center will be providing information. LUNCH IS NOT INCLUDED! All trips will include a morning send off of pastries and coffee. Snacks and beverage will be provided. RESERVATIONS WILL ONLY BE HELD WITH PAYMENT. PAYMENT IS REQUIRED NO LATER THAN 30 DAYS PRIOR TO TRIP. NO REFUNDS WILL BE GIVEN 20 DAYS PRIOR TO THE TRIP.


22

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10,

2014

Valentine Treats Order Early!

Bulletin Board Bulletin Board policy As a service to our community, Bulletin Board items are published at no cost, as space permits. The Press makes no guarantee that items submitted will be published. To ensure publication of events/news items, please speak to one of our advertising representatives at 419-836-2221. A complete listing of events is available at www. presspublications.com.

Elmore

Blood Drive Feb. 10, noon-6 p.m., American Legion Post 279. Walk-ins welcome or call 1-800-/ RED CROSS for an appointment. Elmore Book Discussion Group meets the fourth Thurs. of the month at 11 a.m. at the Elmore Library. Call 419-862-2482 for info. Storytime for Preschool-Age Children Wed. at 11 a.m. at the Elmore Library, 328 Toledo St. Call the library at 419-862-2482 for more info. Elmore Senior Center-Elmore Golden Oldies, Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church, 19225 Witty Rd. Lunch served Tues. & Thurs. at noon. Reservations required by 10 a.m. the day before. Blood pressure & blood sugar checks the 4th Tues. of the month; bingo the 4th Tues. of the month after lunch. Reservations: 419-862-3874. Elmore Conservation Club Trap Shooting every Wed. from 6-9 p.m. and every Sat. from 5-9 p.m. Questions: 419-392-1112.

Post #114, 221 Park St. Sandwiches and dinners available. Dine in or carry out. Public welcome. Food for Thought Food Pantry at Oak Harbor Alliance Chapel, 11805 W. SR 105, the last Wed. of each month from 5 to 7 p.m. Info: 419-707-3664.

Peace by Piece Quilters February Meeting Feb. 10, 7 p.m., United Methodist Church, 360 E. Ottawa St., (back entrance). Public Dinner Feb. 15, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Pemberville United Methodist Church, 205 Perry St. Serving choice of ham loaf or meat loaf, green beans, salad bar, roll, homemade dessert and beverage. Carryouts available. Info: 419-287-4040. Pemberville Area Senior Center at Bethlehem Lutheran Church provides programs & activities for adults 60 & over. Open 10 a.m.-2 p.m. M-F. Lunch served at noon. Community Food Pantry at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 220 Cedar St. open M-Th, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. (excluding holidays). Open to Eastwood School District residents. ID & proof of residency required. Info available at Pemberville churches.

Walbridge

Fremont

Free Hands-On Computer Basics Classes offered Wednesdays and Fridays Feb. 19, 21, 26 and 28 from 1-2:30 p.m. at the Birchard Library. Registration is required and may be completed by calling 419-334-7101, ext. 216.

Genoa

Woodville

Gibsonburg

Bookworms Book Club will meet the last Thurs. of the month at 1:30 p.m. at the Gibsonburg Branch of Birchard Library. The Bookworms will meet for light refreshments and good discussion about a book that members chose at the prior meeting. For info or to reserve a copy of the book, call 419-6372173. Active Seniors invited to Meet & Eat at Gibsonburg Senior Center, 100 Meadow Lane. Lunches every weekday, educational and social programs, health assessments and more. Transportation and homedelivered meals available. 419-637-7947.

Holland

Glass City Singles Yearly Cupid Dance Feb. 14, 8 p.m.-midnight, Holland Gardens, 6530 Angola Rd., Holland. All ladies dressed in red will receive $1 off the $8 admission. www.toledosingles.com.

Lake Twp.

Ageless Wonders of Lake Twp. will meet for lunch at The Skillet, 101 S. Main St., Walbridge, Feb. 13, 12:30 p.m. Info: 419-836-3811. Mobile Food Pantry sponsored by the fire department auxiliary every 3rd Mon. of the month, 5-7 p.m., Fire Station 1, 4505 Walbridge Rd.

Luckey

Food Pantry open to the public the last Wed. of the month, 1-3 p.m. & the last Thurs. of the month 6-8 p.m., Main St. & Krotzer Ave. Contact local church offices for info.

Millbury

Chicken BBQ sponsored by the Millbury Firemaids March 2, 11 a.m. until sold out, Millbury Fire Hall. Tickets available at the door Dine in or drive-through. Prepared by BBQ Traveler.

Oak Harbor

All-You-Can-Eat Pancake and Sausage Breakfast Feb. 16, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., American Legion Post #114, 221 Park St. Carryouts available. Public Welcome. Fish Fry Feb. 21, 4-7:30 p.m., American Legion

Woodville Township Trustees will hold their regular meetings in 2014 on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Fiscal Office at the Woodville Township Fire Station, 321 East Main St. Woodville Public Library, 101 E. Main St., Storytimes, Mondays, 7 p.m., featuring stories and crafts. Lego Club (grades K-6), meets the 1st Sat. of the month from 10-11 a.m..; KidzArt (grades K-6) meets the 1st Sat. of the month from 1111:45 a.m. Info: 419-849-2744 or www.birchard. lib.oh.us/Wdv.htm. Movie Matinee Feb. 15, 1 p.m., Woodville Public Library, 101 E. Main St. Bring a blanket; popcorn supplied. Pete the Cat Party Feb. 19, 7 p.m., Woodville Public Library, 101 E. Main St. Stories, crafts and cupcakes.

Jerusalem Twp. nd th

Trustees Meet the 2 and 4 Tues. of the month at 6 p.m. at the township hall, 9501 Jerusalem Rd. Jerusalem Twp. Food Pantry, open 2nd Wed. of every month, 9-11 a.m. at the township hall, 9501 Jerusalem Rd.

Toledo

Youth Dance sponsored by STARS (Standing Together Against Real Slavery) Feb. 15, 5-8 p.m., 441 Oakdale. Open to 6th to 8th graders. $5 admission. STARS’s mission is to raise awareness about and to prevent bullying and human trafficking. Info: 419-245-8023. Lenten Fish Fries weekly March 7 through April 18, 5-7 p.m., Epiphany of the Lord Parish – St. Thomas Aquinas, 729 White St. Featuring Alaskan Pollock, scalloped potatoes, green beans or corn, cole slaw or salad, roll and butter, coffee and homemade desserts. Kids’ meals and carryouts available. Info: 419-698-1519. Block Watch 410-N for the East Toledo Old Heffner School Area meets every 4th Monday of the month 6:30-7:30 p.m. at 2075 Kelsey Ave. Residents who live within the boundaries of Starr, the RR tracks (Belt Street), Dearborn and Lemert, Seaman to the I-280 Bridge and any surrounding neighbors/ business owners are also welcome. Block Watch 420-C Meeting Martin Luther Lutheran Church, 601 Nevada, the 4th Thurs. of every month from 6-7:30 p.m. VFW Post #2510 offers Friday-night dinners from 4-7 p.m. Public welcome. Meetings are held Tues. at 7 p.m.; Men’s Auxiliary meets the 1st Tues. and Ladies Auxiliary meets the 4th Tues. Waite High School Alumni from the Class of 1951, meet the 2nd Mon. of every month. For info, call Betty at 419-691-7944 or Fran at 419-6936060.

Oregon

Lecture on “Restoration of Burrowing Mayflies in Western Lake Erie: Have We Jumped the Gun?” presented by Donald Schloesser, research fishery biologist, SUGS Great Lakes Science Center, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. Lake Erie Center, 6200 Bayshore Rd. Info: utoledo.edu/nsm/lec. Basic Boater Education Class presented by Toledo Sail and Power Squadron starts Feb. 12 for five nights from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Mercy St. Charles Hospital. Fee is $40 and $20 for additional family member sharing a book. For info, contact Chris Hoover at 419-343-0251 or cshoover@ yahoo.com. Clay High School Band Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser Feb. 20, 4:30-7:30 p.m. in the high school cafeteria, 5665 Seaman Rd. Drive-thru and carry-out service available. 50/50 and gift basket raffles. James “Wes” Hancock Oregon Senior Center Annual Chili Cook Off Feb. 28, 5-8 p.m. at St. Michael’s Centre, 4001 Navarre Ave. Prizes for Judges’ Choice, People’s Choice, and Best Chili Name. Deadline for entries is noon Feb. 25. Tickets $6. Call the center at 419-698-7078 for tickets, rules, and entry forms.

Chris Crozier

2306 Starr 419-698-2000

Chris ChrisCrozier invites

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Pemberville

Walbridge Library, 108 N. Main St., offers the following programs: Family Storytime Tues. at 11 a.m.; Arts & Crafts for kids of all ages Wed. at 4 p.m. Fiction Book Discussion Group meets the 2nd Mon. at 1 p.m. (discussion of “Dodger” by Terry Pratchett on Feb. 10); Mystery Book Club meets the 4th Mon. at 1 p.m. (discussion of “Frozen Heat” by Richard Castle on Feb. 24); Inspiration Book Club meets the 1st Thurs. at 1 p.m. (discussion of “The Guardian” by Beverly Lewis on Feb. 6). For info, call 419-666-9900 or visit wcdpl.org.

Christian Moms’ Group meets from 9:30-11:30 a.m. the 1st and 3rd Monday of each month January through May at Our Lady of Lourdes. The group is open to all moms who desire encouragement and support in the vocation of motherhood. For info, contact Patti Greenhill at 419-862-0128 or email pattijsd@yahoo.com. Tail Waggin’ Tutors Therapy Dogs visit the Genoa Branch Library, 602 West St. the 3rd Wed. of the month from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Children may practice their oral reading skills by reading aloud to the dogs. Storytimes for preschoolage children are held Tues. at 11 a.m.; Morning Book Discussion Group meets the 3rd Thurs. of the month at 9:30 a.m.; Evening Book Discussion Group meets the 3rd Tues. of the month at 7 p.m.; Adult Craft Classes offered the 1st Mon. of the month from 6:30-7:30 p.m. Call the library at 419855-3380 to register. Genoa Senior Center 514 Main St., serves lunch Mon., Wed. & Fri., 11:30 a.m. (call 419-855-4491 for reservations). Card playing Mon. & Wed. at 12:30 p.m.; blood sugar checks offered the 2nd Wed. of the month; bingo Mon. at 9:30 a.m. Trinity Thrift Shop, 105 4th St., hours are Fri. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. & Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Clothes & small household items available at reasonable prices. Proceeds benefit mission projects. Genoa Community Food Pantry Open monthly on the 3rd Thurs.3:30-5:30 p.m. and the following Saturday of the same week, 10 a.m. - noon. Serving those who are in Genoa School District. Proper ID and billing address within the district required. Pantry is located at Christ Community Church, 303 West 4th St. Info: 419-855-8539 or 419-341-0913.

Cookies-Cakes

Haas Bakery

Mon. - Fri. 11am - 3pm Dinner Fridays 5-9pm Sunday Breakfast 9am-1pm Closed Feb.9th Check out our website for menu details www.blackforestcafe.net

419-593-0092

18039N.N.Dixie Dixie Highway 18039 Highway Bowling Green, OH Bowling Green, OH 1-888-440-5271 ccrozier793@yahoo.com 1-888-440-5271

3624 Seaman Road, Oregon, Ohio

More Than Just Tires A Full-Service Mechanical Facility Auto • Farm • Truck Electrical • Tune-Ups • Suspension Brakes • Batteries • Oil Changes

Tri County Tire, Inc. 7511 Jerusalem Road, State Route 2, Oregon

419-836-7788 www.tricountytire.com Mon-Fri 8-6, Sat 8-12

The Press

Church Worship Guide Deadline: Thursday 11:00 am

nspirational

essage of the

eek: Where is Our Security

It seems only natural that everyone wants to have a strong sense of security in their lives; however, we must all be aware of just how temporary and fleeting the things of this world can be. Good health, financial security, and loving relationships can all disappear seemingly in an instant. When we realize that nothing of this world is permanent and that everything in our lives is subject to change, we are then faced with the fuller realization that the only thing that can be secure in our lives is our relationship with our Heavenly Father. God will never leave us or forsake us, and the Bible tells us in Proverbs 8:17, that God loves those who love Him,

and that those who seek Him diligently will find Him. Also, we are told that God will supply all of our needs according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:19). Whenever we feel like everything is going wrong and that everyone has deserted us, we should know that God is always there waiting for us to call upon Him. The most important things in our life should be our love, faith, and trust in God. With Him we are never alone, especially during those times that test and challenge us. He is our true Security. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life; and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever. New K.J.V. Psalm 23:6

Elliston

Williston

ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Every Sunday: 9am Breakfast. Communion 9am - 9:15am 9:30 am Classes for all ages. 10:30 am Worship. Handicap Acces. Nursery Available 18045 N. William St. 419-862-3166 www.ellistonzion.com

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH Williston, Ohio

Route 579-center of Williston Shawn O’Brien, Pastor 419-836-5514 www.StJohnWilliston.org

Sunday School 8:30am Sunday Worship 9:45 am Contemporary Service Saturday 5:00 pm Handicapped accessible-Nursery Available

See you in church! Genoa Trinity United Methodist Main at 4th, Genoa

Sunday School 9:15 am Worship 10:30 am Ramp & Elevator

Pastor Cherl Matla

www.genoatrinity.com

Lake Twp. Zion Lutheran Church

26535 Pemberville Rd.837-5023 Between 795 & Genoa Rd. (163) Just east of 280 Sunday Worship 9:00 am Worship 10:15 am Pastor Sarah Teichmann

Don’t Hide Your Light under a Basket! Invite your friends and future friends to worship & experience the joy of fellowship with you. With rates as low as $8.25 per week (Suburban) or $9.50 per week (Metro), you can be listed in The Press Church Directory. Call us at 836-2221 or 1-800-300-6158.

Woodville

Northwood Calvary Lutheran Ch.

1930 Bradner Rd./Corner of Woodville & Bradner Rds. 419-836-8986 Sunday School 9:00 am. Sunday worship:10:00 am Wed. 7:30 p.m. Pastor Robert Noble Every 2nd Sun. 10:00 am Praise Service

Elmore Trinity Lutheran Church Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod 412 Fremont St. 419-862-3461 Stephen Lutz, Pastor

Worship 8 am - 10:45 am Sunday School - 9:30 am

Sunday worship - 8am & 10:30am Wednesday worship - 7:30pm Sunday School for all ages 9:15am

Solomon Lutheran Church and School 305 W. Main St. 419-849-3600 Sunday Worship 8am & 10:30 am Sunday School 9:20 am Pastor Kristina Ahlman School Open Enrollment-Nursery thru 6th grade

See you in church!


THE PRESS

Grocery chain speaks strategy Mike Thiel, food safety manager of the Kroger Co., will speak about the grocery chain’s sustainability strategy at the Northwest Ohio Ag-Business Breakfast Forum set for Thursday, Feb. 20 at the Agricultural Incubator Foundation, located at 13737 Middleton Pike (SR 582), Bowling Green. Thiel will focus on operations, government relations and consumer affairs as it relates to food safety in the 124 stores he oversees in Ohio and West Virginia. He is president of the Ohio Association for Food Protection and a member of both the Ohio and National Environmental Health Associations. He will be accompanied by Marne Fuller, retail operations, who focuses on the overall management of all waste removal practices, waste reduction and recycling programs, supply procurement and expense containment. The program will begin at 8 a.m. with informal networking hosted by the Center for Innovative Food Technology (CIFT). The cost is $10 per person, payable by cash or check at the door, which includes breakfast and networking opportunities. Walk-ins are welcome, but guests are encouraged to reserve a seat in advance by emailing rsvp@ciftinnovation.org. The breakfast form, offered monthly, offers members of the agricultural community and those who support its advancement the opportunity to network.

Breakfast signups In conjunction of National Agriculture Week, the Agricultural Committee of the Chamber of Commerce of Sandusky County will host its annual Ag Week Kickoff Breakfast March 14 at Ole Zim’s Wagon Shed, 1375 SR 590, Gibsonburg. Doors will open at 6:30 a.m. and breakfast will be served at 7 a.m. The cost is $15 for adults and $10 for students.

Ag Notes Reservations, which are required by March 5, may be made by calling the Chamber of Commerce of Sandusky County at 419-3321591. The annual Farmer of the Year and Agriculture Service Awards will be presented during breakfast. Nominations are currently being accepted for both awards and are due by Feb. 20. Nomination forms are available online at www.scchamber.org, by calling 419-332-1591 in person at the Chamber of Commerce office, 101 S. Front St., Fremont.

2014 AG Breakfast To celebrate agriculture and honor local producers, local ag agencies and sponsors will celebrate National Agriculture Week by hosting a Community Breakfast Friday, March 21, at 8 a.m. at St John Lutheran Church in Oak Harbor. The cost for the all-you-can-eat scrambled egg, pancake and ham breakfast is $5. The event is not just for the agricultural community, but open to all individuals and businesses that eat meat, fruit, vegetables and bread – items grown by farmers! J Featured Speaker will be Bruce McPheron, Vice President of Agricultural Administration and Dean of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Proceeds from the breakfast go back into the agricultural community through various scholarships. For more information call Kathy Booher at 419-898-3631. For tickets please contact the Ottawa Soil and Water Conservation District (419) 898-1595.

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

23

Real Estate Transfers Week ending Jan. 24 Bay Township 1-22-14 Daniel L. Armbuster to Robert W. Armbuster, 0 Fostoria , vacant land $35,000. 1-24-14 EMML LLC to Jason C. and Cortine N. Hefflinger, 0 South Wonnell Road, vacant land $125,000. Clay Township 1-22-14 DBFRAD LLC to ARC DBPPROP001 LLC, 21991 State Route 51 West, $2,198,054. 1-24-14 Nationstar Mortgage LLC to Ashley Recny, 2147 North Centerfield Drive, $55,250. Catawba Township 1-23-14 Michael C. and Susan J. Weis to John R. and Janis A. Shriver, 3540 East Oak Lake Drive, $359,600. 1-23-14 Timothy A. Dinneen to Todd Kirkpatrick, 132 North Windward, $1,000. 1-23-14 Timothy A. Dinneen to Patricia M. Murphy, 124 North Windward, $2,000. 1-24-14 Robert T. and Diane M. Wilden to Gerald L. and Suzanne W. Herrmann, 4395 B Marin Woods, $270,000. Danbury Township 1-21-14 Nana B. Stauffer to Steve L. and Molly E. Adams, 436 Sycamore Avenue, $184,000. 1-24-14 Marion E. Sewell to Keybank National, 2301South Commodore Court, $115,000. Port Clinton Corp. 1-24-14 Jon A. and Lisa M. Lundwall to Adam L. and Erica M. Bledsoe, 530 East Third Street, $57,000. Oak Harbor Corp 1-21-14 Clark H. and Rebecca A. Sams to U S Bank , 127 North Maple Street, $48,334. Week ending January 31 Allen Township 1-30-14 Tina M. Helle to The Huntington National Bank, 20191 West route 579, $56,667. Clay Township 1-30-14 James K. and Pam S. Heninger to Joseph W. Shepard Jr., 20876 West Camper Road, $247,000.

Genoa Corp. 1-28-14 Mark A. and Julie L. Simmons to Timothy Charles Woodward, 402 West 6th Street, $115,900. 1-30-14 Karen L. Dunn to Fred’s Investments, LLC, 1505 Superior Street, $60,000. Catawba Township 1-27-14 Donna Kelley to Nicholas M. and Elizabeth G. Paul, 2289 North Carriage Lane, $176,250. 1-28-14 William R. and Julia A. Quayle to Dennis F. McKenna Jr. and Karin L. McKenna, 4204 East Stonehedge Road, $305,000. 1-28-14 John E. and Marilyn M. Kirkbride to Timothy R. and Jill D. Holdsworth, 5951 East Catawba Shores Drive, $310,000. Danbury Township 1-27-14 U S Bank National Association to Heather Kight-Isaly, 170 North Erie Beach Road, $91,000. 1-30-14 Eric W. Baizer to Joseph J. Boss, 143 Laser Lane, $77,000. 1-30-14 Cynthia R. Bolte to The Lakeside Association, 217 Walnut Avenue, $340,000. 1-30-14 John Rader and Kevin Newcomer to Brian and Stacy Upton , 216 Strause Lane, $69,000. Elmore Corp. 1-27-14 Household Realty Corporation to Ryan M. Mitchell, 425 Lincoln Street, $69,900. 1-30-14 Richard A. Blausey to Kenneth E. and Carolyn J. Neeb, State Route 51, $65,000. 1-30-14 Federal National Mortgage Association to Bonnie J. Billups, 656 Rice Street, $66,000. Harris Township 1-30-14 Becky Magsig, and Laura Hartley to Sam Harrison, South Schutt, $91,030. Port Clinton Corp. 1-30-14 Nancy L. Nelson to John Rader, 334 Harrison Street, $26,000. 1-30-14 Everett M. and Angela M. Woodel to Molly A. Bauman, 621 Laurel Street, $109,900. Portage Township 1-30-14 Winkoe, LLC to Keith and Kathy Joy, 4125 East Kirk Road, Unit 223 & 225, $69,350. 1-30-14 Winkoe, LLC to Robert Speck, 4125 East Kirk Road,Unit 226, $33,900. .


24

THE PRESS, FEBRUARY 10, 2014



 



 



 

1341 Penny Lane, Millbury, Apt A Totally Remodeled 1024 SqFt twinplex, 2-bedroom, 1-bath, appliances , washer/dryer hookup, no pets/smoking, water included, electric heat, full basement, $650/month plus electric 419-309-0398

Walbridge, 3-bedroom, 2-bath house, washer/dryer hookup, ½ basement, references, first/last month, $860/month, 419-836-7604 after 5pm.

3-bedroom apartment $635/month, Cedar Run Apartments. 419-6912499

Wheeling Street Is Open

Tanglewood Landings Apartments

Call for new tenant rate 1105 S. Wheeling

in Woodville UNIT AVAILABLE

414 Oswald, Upper Unit: $550/month+$550deposit; Lower Unit: $650/month+$650deposit; 1 bedroom, Includes Utilities, No Pets, 419-351-0831 East 3-bdrm lower $425/month, 3 bedroom upper $425/month, 1.5 bedroom upper $325/month plus deposit/utilities. appliances, washer/dryer hookups, no pets. 419-691-3074

419-693-6682

Piccadilly East Apartments

East Houses Genesee Street 3-bedroom, bsmt, $450 Clark Street 4-bedroom, garage, $575 419-855-7250

Starting At

East Toledo twinplex, 145 Juhasz, 2-bedroom, washer/dryer hookup, stove & refrigerator included. Large yard. No pets. $495/mo. +deposit. 419-266-5793. East Toledo, 2 bedroom house, very nice and well maintained. $500 + deposit. Cozy 1 bedroom upper, all utilities paid, $435. 419-787-6043 East Toledo, Genesee Street 1-bedroom upper apartment, $475/month, all utilities furnished, near bus line, no pets. Butler Street Nice Large 2 bedroom upper, $425/mo., + utilities. 1 small pet considered

* 1 Bed $400 * 2 Bed $500

â&#x20AC;˘ Oregon Schools â&#x20AC;˘ No Deposit â&#x20AC;˘ No Gas Bill â&#x20AC;˘ Small Pets OK! â&#x20AC;˘ Storage Units On Site

419-693-9391 Mon.-Fri. 9am-6pm, Sat. 11am-4pm 2750 Pickle Rd., Oregon Visa & MasterCard Accepted

Caledonia Street 1 bedroom upper $375/mo., + utilities 419-698-9058 East, 361 Lemert/Starr, 2-bedroom house, washer/dryer hookups, fenced yard, basement, $525/mo +deposit. 419-693-1673 Leave Message Elmore, 3-bedroom, basement, A/C, stove, w/d hookup, no smoking/pets, $675 plus deposit. 419-862-2832

GENOA 1 Bedroom Lower $390/mo. each, +utilities/deposit, no pets. 419-862-2000 Genoa twinplex, 2 bedroom, washer/dryer hookup, no pets allowed, $485/mo. 419-277-1749. Home for rent/sale. Three bedrooms, 2 baths, dining room, living room, kitchen, appliances, full basement. 3637 Burton Ave., West Toledo. $600/mo., + utilities. 419-349-4948

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

A Place To Call Home

Swimming Pool Basketball/Tennis Courts Playground 24 hour emergency maintenance Laundry facilities Ask about our new tenant specials Featuring

1 bedroom $405 2 bedroom $495 2 & 3 bedroom Townhomes starting at $599

Millbury, VERY SMALL 1 bedroom house, screened patio, all electric, $425/mo. $425/deposit, garbage & cable included. 419-350-9703 Northwood house, rent to own, 3bedroom, 2-bath, 2-car garage, C/A, $795/month. 419-855-7250

OREGON ARMS 1 bedroom, Patio, C/A, $395/mo. + utilities 2 bedroom, spacious, C/A, patio, appliances, new carpet $495/mo. + utilities.

Waterville Historical duplex for rent or sale. Spacious 2-3 bedrooms, appliances, storage, separate yards, additional storage available in barn. 419-261-3949

COPPER COVE APTS.

So Are We! Easy In - Easy Out! $99 Move In

419-698-1717 3101 Navarre Ave., Oregon

For People 62 or Older or Handicapped Our Apartments are one story and one bedroom Rental Assistance Available Pets Are Welcome

Please call 419-849-3730 or our TTY/TTD@ 1-800-750-0750 â&#x20AC;&#x153;This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.â&#x20AC;?

Your New Home For 2014 Ask about our specials â&#x20AC;˘Oregon Schools â&#x20AC;˘ Pool â&#x20AC;˘ Intercom entry â&#x20AC;˘ Washer/Dryer hookups â&#x20AC;˘ Cat Friendly

Featuring 1 bedroom apt. $425 2 bedroom apt. $495 2 bed. Townhouse $625 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make your first Big Move!â&#x20AC;?

EASTWYCK APTS. 3148 Corduroy Rd. Oregon, Ohio 419-691-2944 



   

Northwood 3800+/- Sq. Ft. On Woodville Road Can Be Split Smaller Space Available 419-392-8210

Dee Cottrell 419-360-8001

www.deecottrell.com

dcottrell37@yahoo.com

Visit us on our website at:

www.oregonarms.net Call 419-972-7291 419-277-2545 Oregon House, 1831 James Road, South of Bayshore Road, 3 Bedroom/2 Bath, Appliances, $750/month+Deposit, Nice Carpeting, Good Schools. 419-855-4481 Oregon, 1905 Metz, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, car port, large shed, all appliances, $750./mo., + deposit/utilities, 419-343-3421 OREGON- 2251 Wilkes Rd., 2 bedroom apartment with washer/dryer hookups, $500/mo +deposit. 419392-1121

OREGON/STARR SCHOOLS 3 bedroom house, full basement, 2½ car garage, sun porch, dining room, remodeled bath/kitchen, $1,100/mo. Rent, or will consider rent-to-own. 419-360-3776 or 419-691-6442 PERRYSBURG, 2 bedroom apt., appliances, A/C, laundry hookup, water included, no pets/non-smoking, $540/mo. 419-972-8003

1 & 2 Bedroom Townhouses & Apartments Join Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest Community â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Laundry â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Swimming Pool â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Spacious Floor Plans â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Private Patios â&#x2DC;&#x2026; 24 hr. Emergency Maintenance

419-693-9443

119.7 acres (87.6 tillable, 32.1 woods) Location: Co. Rd. 41, 1/3 mile east of Co. Rd. 32 (31/2 miles east of US23) on north side of road. Sandusky Co. parcel numbers: 24-10-00-0004-00 and 24-10-00-0005-00 Ă´RIÂżHOGLVGHHSULFKPHUPLOOVRLO 3ULRU\LHOGV&DEEDJHÂąWRQVSHUDFUH WRPDWRHVÂąWRQVSHUDFUHFRUQÂą EXVKHOVSHUDFUH &RPSOHWHO\WLOHGHYHU\IHHW %LGVVKRXOGEHVXEPLWWHGWR-DFRE0 /RZHQVWHLQYLD)D[DWRU HPDLOWRMPORZHQVWHLQ#VNLYHUODZFRP on RUEHIRUHWKHFORVHRIEXVLQHVVRQ )HEUXDU\3OHDVHLQFOXGH FRQWDFWLQIRUPDWLRQDORQJZLWKELG Serious bidders will be invited to PHHWDWKLVRIÂżFHORFDWHGDW 28350 Kensington Ln., Perrysburg, Ohio 43551 on Tuesday, March 4, 2013 at 3:00 IRUVXEPLVVLRQRIÂżQDOELG Owner reserves right to refuse any or all bids. Questions may be directed to owner, Donald Knepper, at 419-260-0533

Deadline: 419-836-2221ororor1-800-300-6158 1-800-300-6158 Deadline: Thursdays Thursdays atat 1:00 1:00 p.m. p.m. 419-836-2221 419-836-2221 1-800-300-6158 classified@presspublications.com - (Closed Fridays) classified@presspublications.com Delivered to - 36,047 Homes, businesses and newstands Delivered to - in38,358 Homes in Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky & Wood Countie Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky & Wood Counties 

 

Mike's Hauling We buy junk cars, trucks and vans Scrap metal hauled free. 419-666-1443



  

Build your own beauty business from home. You are invited to discover the FINANCIAL FREEDOM offered by Avon's unlimited earning potential. Call today for your FREE consultation. 419-666-5680 Care giver needed, Curtice area, hours flexible. Must be dependable. $8.00/hr. Call 419-836-8050 ask for Pat. Dental Assistance Position Available for Qualified Candidates; Part to Full Time, Experience with Dentrix and Dexis a plus. Excellent communication skills and teamwork ability essential, x-ray license and references required. Please Call 419898-6633 Drivers: Call GSTC 855-202-5066. No Touch Freight! Vacation, 401K, Benefits! Rider Policy. Quarterly Bonuses. EZ Pass/Pre-Pass. 23yoa, 2yrs recent OTR exp. Drivers: Carter Express-Now Hiring. CDL-A: Lots of Miles. Great Pay/Benefits & Bonuses. Dedicated Solo Routes. Home Weekly. No Slip Seat. No Touch, Newer Equipment. (855) 222-3243 Drivers: Home DAILY, Dedicated Runs! No Touch Freight, Insurance, 401K, PAID Vacation, CDL-A, 1 yr OTR. Apply: mtstrans.com 800-7480192 x 2. Drivers: OTR & Regional Home Weekly/Bi Weekly Guaranteed! Paid Weekly + Monthly Bonuses 90% No Touch/70% Drop & Hook Paid Loaded & Empty/Rider Program BC/BS, Rx, Dental, Vision, 401k etc. 877704-3773 Drivers; Home Weekends! Competitive Wages! Paid Vacation, Personal Days, Health, Dental, 401k. No-touch Freight. Dedicated. 24hr dispatch. CDL-A. 419-465-2100 Help wanted screen printer. Please send resume to: P. O. Box 197, Elmore, OH. 43416 or email to: applications@cros.net MIG Welder Position Open $11.00 per hour starting Final pay based on production and other applicable skills. Email resume to: tfager37@yahoo.com or call 419-855-2083

Northwood and Oregon Industrial Openings We are recruiting for entry level assembly and manufacturing jobs. Great Opportunity for long term positions that can possibly lead to hire with an increase in pay. Pay rate is $8.00 per hour. 2nd and 3rd shift openings available. Drug and Bkg checks will be conducted. HS Diploma or GED is required. Call MANPOWER for appointment and mention this ad. 419-893-4413

Help Wanted Discover the road to success New job opportunities each week in The Press Classifieds

PRESS The

Since 1972

Metro Suburban Maumee Bay

The Genoa Quarry is looking for lifeguards for their upcoming 2014 season. Applicants must be 16 years of age, must be certified as a lifeguard, and have the water front module, as well as CPR and First Aid prior to May 17, 2014. Certification must be through the American Red Cross. Interested persons may pick up an application at the Village of Genoa Administration building during regular business hours. All applications will need to be returned no later than Feb. 28, 2014 Fire/EMS Captain Allen-Clay Joint Fire District The Allen-Clay Joint Fire District will be accepting resumes for the position of Fire/EMS Captain. To be considered the applicant must have at minimum Ohio Level II Firefighter, Ohio Paramedic, High School Diploma or GED and a valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license (Copies of all to be submitted with the resume.) successful candidate will submit to a pre-employment drug screening, physical examination and a background investigation. A minimum of 5 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience in a combination or full time Fire/EMS department as well as supervisory experience is required. Enjoy excellent benefits and a salary range of $42,000.00 to $47,000.00 depending on qualifications. Resumes will be reviewed and ranked with the top 3 receiving interviews. For additional information contact Chief Dennis Hartman at 419-855-4733 during normal business hours. Resumes, including references and supporting documentation must be submitted in person or by mail at the Allen-Clay Joint Fire District Headquarters, 3155 N. Genoa-Clay Center Rd., Genoa, Oh 43430 on or before 16:00 February 21, 2014. No faxed resumes will be accepted!

Looking to sell your home? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll bring the buyer to you A study by The National Association of Realtors shows that most households move within 10 miles of their current location.

Discover Untraveled Roads New auto listings each week in The Press Classifieds

The Press delivers more of these prime buyers to you than any other media. We deliver The Suburban Press and the Metro Press to more than 32,000 homes in 23 communities in Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky and Wood Counties including: Curtice, East Toledo, Elmore, Genoa, Gibsonburg, Lake Township, Luckey, Millbury, Northwood, Oak Harbor, Oregon, Walbridge and Woodville. If you live in one of these communities, make sure you get maximum exposure with those most likely to buy.

LD

Yorktown Village

FOR SALE

Classifieds

SO

Stony Ridge, 24665 Hickory Court 2bed, C/A, extra lockable storage, coin-op w/d, garbage paid, toy dogs neutered, front declawed cats, $675/month 419-266-5863 for appt.

The Press Circulation

Call 419-836-2221

PRESS The

PRESS The

Since 1972

Metro Suburban Maumee Bay

Since 1972

Metro Suburban Maumee Bay

P.O. Box 169 â&#x20AC;˘ 1550 Woodville, Millbury, OH 43447

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THE PRESS, FEBRUARY 10, 2014



  

Now Hiring Home Health Aides, STNA, MA & CNA. (HHA training is available) In the Oregon, Walbridge, Genoa, Elmore, Woodville and surrounding areas. Contact Comfort Keepers at 866-230-2624 M-F 8-4

Part-time Secretarial Position in a warehouse environment in Northwood. Business Hours: Example 9am to 2pm can be flexible. 419-836-1046, call for initial phone interview. Quality Control Technician Kokosing Materials Inc. operates 15 asphalt plants in Ohio and produces high quality asphalt products & services. KMI is looking for a QC Technician in the Woodville/Toledo area. Responsible person with good mathematical skills needed to perform testing services on Ohio Department of Transportation projects for large paving contractor. Responsibilities will include asphalt testing and analysis, aggregate testing, density testing on asphalt pavements, and profilograph work on finished roadway. ODOT Level 2 or ODOT Level 3 certified technician preferred; training is available for qualified candidates. Competitive wage, excellent benefits. Send resume to Kokosing Materials, Inc., Attn: QC Rep 215 Oak Street, Mansfield, OH 44907 email: kld@kokosing.biz or fax: 866-557-8023. EOE

81

Doing Daycare in my Northwood home, transportation available and am very reasonable. Can work AM or PM. Also do elderly care and housekeeping. Call Lori 419-6911275 Leave message. Experienced Caregiver, Excellent References, Full or Part-Time, 419-269-5402

Experienced IT Professional looking for FT work, college degree with management experience. Please call 419-350-3132 Handy Man looking for Work Home repairs, Painting, Concrete, Plumbing, Siding, Windows, Gas Lines, Sub pumps. 24 years experience and fully insured. 419-307-0548 I do elderly care-home assistance , part-time. References upon request. 419-836-5293

TESCO has an opening for a parttime bookkeeper. Experience in AP, AR, fixed assets and account reconciliations required. Candidate must be proficient in Excel. Send resume to hr@tescobus.com.

The Press Newspapers is looking to hire an independent contractor for a delivery route in the rural Gibsonburg area. If interested contact Jordan 419-836-2221, ext. #32. Windsor Lane Health Care is seeking applications for STNAs. Inquire within at 355 Windsor Lane, Gibsonburg, OH, 419-637-2104

TRAINCO

Truck Driving Schools Day - Eve - Weekend Class Job Placement

Perrysburg 419-837-5730 Norwalk 419-499-2222

Do you need to speak with confidence or better clarity? Be our guest at the next Toastmasters Club Meeting. No Classes - No Pressure Just an inviting, supportive environment. We all have similar goals. Come to Bay Park Community Hospital the first and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 P.M. Visitors always welcome. Call Ken for more info 419-378-1777 or check our local website: tinyurl.com/7475cv6 or the district: www.d28toastmasters.org



   

Electrical Service Changes from fuses to breakers, 100/200 etc., House Wiring Specialist, 567-277-5333 (local)

For Your Wedding Grosjean Photography Call Ken or LaRae at 419-836-9754



TLC, does your loved one need quality care? 20 years experience caring for elderly, CHHA, CR/PN, Leave message for Helen 419-5429619 or 330-759-6814

BAY AREA All Types of Services *Demolition *Hauling *Concrete *Brick & Block *Landscaping *Bobcat Services Mike 419-350-8662





A Mechanic looks at vehicles, pays accordingly, anything w/wheels 419-870-0163 We buy most anything from your garage! 419-870-0163





Farmland Wanted to rent, cash rent or shares. Call 419-266-6420 or 419-266-0127. 

TESCO has an opening for a Marketing Associate. The candidate will work with the Marketing Manager and sales staff to market our products nationally. Associates or Bachelors degree in marketing required. Send resume to hr@tescobus.com

 

  

I will work any shift. Reliable transportation. Any hours, any days. I am willing to do most any kind of work. 419-559-9235.

 SALES OPPORTUNITY NABF College World Series media publications/sponsorship. Commission only. Call 419-936-3887, leave name and phone number.



Child care provided in my Oregon home or your home, volunteer parttime at Lucas County Children Services, references and very reasonable. Robin 567-218-4251

 Regional janitorial company looking for detailed and reliable people to fill several part-time janitorial positions. Evening and weekend shifts available. Great opportunities for advancement. Reliable transportation required. To apply, visit www.cleanteamclean.com or call (419) 537-8770 for information.

 

 

Hardwood Flooring, Refinishing, Installation, and Repair Work. 19-yrs experience. Call Kyle 419-343-3719

Thanks St. Jude, Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Anne and all for prayers answered. JAH











BAY AREA CONCRETE New or Replace Concrete Driveways, Sidewalks, Pole Barns, Porches, Stamped & Color Concrete Brick & Block work etc. Veterans & Senior Citizens' Discounts Free Estimates, Licensed & Insured "No job to big, no job to small"

Mike Halka 419-350-8662 Oregon, OH. "Serving all of N.W. Ohio"

Charter Bus Tour!

NEW! AUCTION ADS ON THE PRESS WEBSITE

April 26-30 - Virginia International Military Extravaganza plus Azalea Festival They will be honoring the Vietnam Veterans 2 nights DC & 2 Nights Balcony Ocean front rooms in Virginia Beach. Very exciting tour!! Call for detailed flier!! $749

Evelyn's Excursions 419-737-2055 1-877-441-4401

www.presspublications.com



 

 

KNIERIEM PAINTING & WALLPAPERING EXTERIOR-INTERIOR Painting & wall papering; Interior wood refinishing; man lifts; airless spray; power wash & blasting; silicone seal; refinishing aluminum siding; residential; church, farm. EXPERIENCED FREE ESTIMATES *SENIOR & WINTER RATES* 419-862-2000 GRAYTOWN OR 419-697-1230 NORTHWOOD

           Jake's Drywall We service Northwest Ohio. No job is too big or too small. 20 years experience. Fully insured. Free estimates. 419-360-3522



www.evelynsexcursions.com



  

Spring Travel Party

BOWLING GREEN FLEA MARKET Wood County Fairgrounds February 15th & 16th (9am-4pm) 2 Buildings open and full! Antiques, collectibles, books, jewelry, coins, lamps, rag rugs, tools,crafts, sports cards, new vendors added. Lunch stand 9am-4pm.

Sunday, March 16th 1:30-4:00pm - Ramada Inn, Exit 13 - Ohio Turnpike Lots of New and Exciting Tours now being planned! New fliers will be available!

Evelyn's Excursions 419-737-2055 1-877-771-4401 www.evelynsexcursions.com



 

     2 French Provincial End Tables. Leather styled inlay top. Early 1960's vintage. $60.00. 419-836-9754

For Your Wedding Grosjean Photography Call Ken or LaRae at 419-836-9754

4-PC. Living room outfit Chocolate, purchased Nov. 2013 to large! Asking-$2,200 419-3508319

         

/MTSTRANS

RAY'S HANDYMAN SERVICES Carpentry, Drywall Repairs, Painting, Siding, Electrical Problems, Help for the Do-It-Yourselfer. Small Jobs Welcome, 35+ Years Experience Member BBB 419-836-4574/419-304-0583







Rest Lawn, Memorial Park, 4 connected lots in Garden Of Gethsemane, $1,500.00, 419-638-3995



St. Jude, From My Heart, Thank You â&#x20AC;&#x201C; You are my cure. V.R.C.



 





  

House Cleaning. Do you love to clean? Do you like to have evenings and weekends off? We provide all supplies and company car. We just need you! For more information call 419-873-0948, M-F, 9-4. EOE

MIKE'S PROFESSIONAL SNOW REMOVAL Residential ~ Commercial â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Prices in townâ&#x20AC;? Become a seasonal customer and receive 25% OFF! Call 419-350-6780



>> FULL BENEFITS

>> PAID VACATION

START DRIVING THIS WEEK!

 

Mike's Tree Service Tree and Stump Removal Trimming & Shaping Very clean & professional Yard Clean up leaves, branches etc. Also gutter cleaning and repair. Haul alway all debris We also do Storm Damage Cleanup Bobcat services Licensed & Insured 419-350-6780

Solomon Lutheran School seeks Christian State certified Kindergarten teacher for the start of the 2014-15 school year and Summer Child Care Director/Aide beginning in June. Applicants should send resume with references to nschiets@solomon.pvt.k12.oh.us.

320 Matzinger Rd Toledo, OH 43612

ONLINE - www.mtstrans.com om PHONE - 800-748-0192

Welcomes

EDDIE CUTCHER to our sales team! Stop by to see Eddie for a great deal on a car or truck. Ask about our Free Oil Changes for 6 months Free with purchase.

NOTICE The annual financial report of the Village of Woodville for 2013 has been completed and sent to the State Auditor. The report is available for inspection at the office of the Fiscal Officer, 530 Lime Street, Woodville, Ohio during normal business hours.

Call Eddie at 419-698-4444 Cell 419-705-9262

Barbara J. Runion Fiscal Officer

2811 Navarre Ave., Oregon

Frozen February Savings! Fuel SAVER Package 95* The Works Package

$19

Â&#x2030;3UZUXIXGLZÂŽ 6XKSO[S9_TZNKZOI(RKTJ5OR)NGTMK

Â&#x2030;:OXK8UZGZOUTGTJ6XKYY[XK)NKIQ Â&#x2030;(XGQK/TYVKIZOUTÂ&#x2030;3[RZO6UOTZ/TYVKIZOUT Â&#x2030;,R[OJ:UV5LLÂ&#x2030;(GZZKX_:KYZÂ&#x2030;,ORZKX)NKIQ Â&#x2030;(KRZYGTJ.UYKY)NKIQ

uik

TIRE & LUBE CENTER

6XOIKY\GROJZNXU[MN 9[HSOZXKHGZKH_

25

your final cost

Regularly $39.95

*includes Ford $10 mail-in rebate plus Mathews $10 instant rebate. Retail purchases only. Taxes, deisel vehicles & disposal fee extra

Stop in Anytime ~ Mon.-Fri.: 7am-6pm, Sat.: 7am-1pm

Located at Mathews Ford 2811 Navarre Ave. Oregon 419-698-4444


26

THE PRESS, FEBRUARY 10, 2014



 

Black wood bunk bed, $100. 419697-0200 Misc. Furniture. Cloth Rocking Chair, medium brown, barely used, $25. Bar Stool Chair, blue cloth with back 26â&#x20AC;? high $10. Two Retro Lamps from early 1960's, $20 each, Call 419-836-9754.

 

    5 Garden Rakes and 1 Snow Shovel, $15. Call 419-836-9754. 9 Assorted Grout Trowels & Plaster, Cement Stirrer. $50.00 Call 419260-8174 Cabbage Patch Dolls $5 each and other Collectibles. 419-855-7038. Door Weather Strip. Universal Door Jamb. 36â&#x20AC;? standard. Never used, still in wrapper. $5. 36â&#x20AC;? wide roll of packing paper, $5. Call 419836-9754. Fertilizer Spreader, $5.00. Call 419-836-9754. Go Kart, 1 Seat, 8 Horsepower, 3 years old, Like New, $500.00 OBO, 419-638-3995. Old Kerosene Heater. Looks antique. $5. Call 419-836-9754.

 

    Reliance Propane Tank, Weight 18.5lbs. $15.00. Call 419-836-9754

 

    Net

The Press Five Finger Discount

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a steal! Classified line ad $5.00 per week per item, on merchandise of $100 and under, 15 word limit, 20¢ each additional word.

The Press 1550 Woodville Rd. Millbury, OH. 43447 Call 419-836-2221 or 1-800-300-6158 classified@presspublications.com

MELBA

Sharper Image Razor Xtreme push/kick scooter-$40. 419-8369754



 

Mag, 17â&#x20AC;? Flat Square Tube Monitor (15.9â&#x20AC;?VS) Still in Box, Never used. $40.00. 419-836-9754 VCR LX1 $10, Computer Speakers Harman/Kardon HK-198 $10. Call 419-836-9754.



 



Puppies (mixed) need a good home, born on Christmas, ready by Valentine's Day. 419-3603469

Miss Melba here is looking for a valentine! Melba is about 7 years old and is a laid back and easy going hound dog who loves to play in the snow. She has been patiently waiting at the shelter for several weeks to find a home. She came into the Lucas County Canine Care & Control (FKA the Lucas County Dog Warden) as a stray and she along with 50+ other lovable canines are all looking to share their love and warmth with a new family. Come meet them today at 410 S Erie St Toledo, 419213-2800, open Mon-Fri 11-7, Sat & Sun 11-5. If you are missing a dog please come and walk through the kennels. Impounded as well as adoptable dogs can be viewed on PetHarbor.com. Stay up to date with all the exciting happenings at LCCC&C on Facebook, and lucascountydogs.com. Sat Feb 15th - 11-5 - third Annual Puppy Love Adoption event, complete with doggie speed dating and a puppy kissing booth!

THE PRESS EXPERTS Appliance Repair In Home Service

APPLIANCE WORKS INC. Washers, Dryer, Ranges, Microwaves, Refrig., Air Conditioners, Dishwashers, Disposers, Freezers

Operated By Mark Wells

419-836-FIXX (3499) Automotive

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Get Stuck In The Cold! â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Fall Specialâ&#x2DC;&#x2026; Come & See Our Professionals For A FREE INSPECTION

- Now Offering special prices on tires & batteries. 21270 SR 579 Williston

836-7461

Carpet Cleaning

COUNTRY CHARM

Cleaning & Restoration LLC Since 1988 Carpeting & Upholstery Cleaning Emergency Water Removal General House Cleaning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Certified By I.I.C.R.C. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

419-836-8942

countrycharmcleaning.com

Electrical Contractor

SCHNEIDER SONSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ELECTRIC CORP. Whole House Generators Licensed & Insured New & Old Homewiring Specialists 1556 Oak St/At Oakdale Toledo, OH 43605

(419) 691-8284 Family Owned & Operated Since 1942

Excavating

BELKOFER EXCAVATING â&#x20AC;˘ Septic Systems â&#x20AC;˘ Sewer Taps â&#x20AC;˘ Snow Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Care Backhoe/Bobcat/Dozer Work Stone and Dirt Hauling See Us on Facebook

419-836-8663 419-392-1488 Excavating/Water Pumps GL HENNINGSEN EXCAVATING AND WATER SYSTEMS Septic Systems Installation & Repair Water, Sewage & Sump Pump Installation & Repair

419-836-9650/419-466-6432 Handyman

Call The Press to be an Expert! 419-836-2221

Home Maintenance

Interior / Exterior painting, plumbing, decks, drywall repair, electrical

Call Dave @ (419) 266-5793

Basement Waterproofing Concrete â&#x20AC;˘ Roofing Interior â&#x20AC;˘ Exterior Lawncare â&#x20AC;˘ Stone & Dirt Hauling Bobcat Service â&#x20AC;˘ Espaniol

Rob 419-322-5891

BAY AREA CONCRETE & WATERPROOFING

New or Replace Concrete Driveways, Sidewalks, Pole Barns, Porches, Stamped & Color Concrete Brick & Block work etc.

Veterans & Senior Citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Discounts Free Estimates, Licensed & Insured

Mike Halka

419-350-8662 Oregon, OH

KELLER CONCRETE INC. Tear Out & Replace Concrete, Driveways, Patios, Porches, Pads, Sidewalks & Stamped/Colored Concrete ** Quality & Affordable Work **

Insured & Bonded â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FREE ESTIMATES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BOBCAT SERVICES AVAILABLE

419-697-9398

2001 Dodge Dakota, Flame Red, 2wheel drive, Excellent Condition, Showroom! Never Smoked In, $3,000.00 OBO. 419-356-3562.



B & G HAULING

Gray Plumbing

COLLINS ROOFING

25 Years Experience **** 24 HR. SERVICE **** D.O.T. Certified. Insured/Bonded All Major Credit Cards Accepted â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Senior Discount â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LICENSED MASTER PLUMBER

Jim Gray

Hauling

Plumbing

OREGON PLUMBING No Jobs Too Small Insured - Bonded

If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heavy ... and you want it hauled in or out ...

Call Us! â&#x20AC;˘Dirt â&#x20AC;˘Stone â&#x20AC;˘Debris â&#x20AC;˘Cars â&#x20AC;˘Equipment â&#x20AC;˘Trucks

419-693-8736 Licensed Master Plumber Roy Bomyea

SNOW REMOVAL

Remodeling

BOBCAT SERVICES We can work directly with your Insurance Company 21270 SR 579 Williston

836-7461

Home Improvement

Musser

Restoration & Remodeling, Inc

Additions - Decks - Bathrooms Exteriors - Windows - Kitchens Licensed - Insured - Bonded In Business for over 30 years â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Free Estimates â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BBB Senior Discounts PRO

419-691-0131 O PRProfessional

Freddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Improvement Electrical, Paneling, Concrete, Roofing, Drywall, Kitchens, Bathrooms, Floors, Decks, Tile, Porch, Additions, Dormers â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Free Estimates â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lawn Care

Lawn Mowing Your Ad Low Priced Could Be and Local. Here! Call 419-367-6474 Call The Press Lawn Service to be an MUSSERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOME AND Expert! PROPERTY MAINTENANCE 419-836-2221 Lawn Care & Snowplowing â&#x20AC;˘ Home Repair Specialists â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial & Residential

MANY DISCOUNTS & OTHER SERVICES â&#x20AC;˘ FULLY INSURED â&#x20AC;˘ FREE ESTIMATES

419-304-8666 Painting

S andwisch Painting â&#x20AC;˘Interior â&#x20AC;˘Exterior â&#x20AC;˘Residential - Commercial

Terry 419-708-6027 Josh 419-704-7443 Call An Expert for those big jobs

â&#x20AC;˘Repairs â&#x20AC;˘Small Jobs â&#x20AC;˘Big Jobs â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimates

419-322-5891 Septic Tank Cleaning

419-691-7958

419-340-0857 419-862-8031

Remodelers Organization

  

1997 Dodge Ram 1500, runs good, lots of new parts, $2,000. 419-8623112.

    

Burkin Self Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Camper Storage

Basic Boater Education Class by Toledo Sail/Power Squad at Mercy St. Charles. Hospital. Cert. after pass exam. Starts 2/12 for 5 nights from 6:30-8:30. Fee $40 & $20 for additional family member sharing book. Contact Chris Hoover 419343-0251 or cshoover@yahoo.com

Roofing

Got Junk & Garbage? We do: Clean Ups/Clean Outs





 

Plumbing

WEEKEND DELIVERIES â&#x20AC;˘Stone & Dirt Hauling â&#x20AC;˘Bobcat Service â&#x20AC;˘Demolition & Hauling â&#x20AC;˘Concrete Removal

Cycleman We repair Chinese Pocket Bikes and Scooters, and Mopeds, many parts available, also repair motorcycles, Call Wed. - Sat (10-6pm) 419-244-2525.

 



Hauling

Concrete

A.A. COLLINS CONSTRUCTION & RENTAL PROPERTIES



    

Inside & Outside

â&#x20AC;˘ Inside Auto Storage â&#x20AC;˘ Personal Storage

St. Rt. 51, South of Elmore 419-862-2127

If Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re an Expert and want to get involved... CALL 836-2221. Deadline: 11 a.m. Thursday

www.musserremodeling.com E-mail: remoc1@bex.net No job too small or too big

419-276-0608 TRACKER CO.

     

Cadillac Head Gasket Repair Is your Northstar engine losing coolant? Have it tested free at TMZ Automotive. 419-837-9700.

Snowblower For Sale, Toro 3,000 GTS 5.0, Good Condition, $275.00 OBO, Call 419-250-0176 or 419-6930336. Storage Cabinet, plastic, 69â&#x20AC;? high x 30â&#x20AC;? wide x 17 1/2â&#x20AC;? deep. Double doors, 4 shelves. $90. Call 419-8369754.



Roofing

ACE ROOFING - FREE ESTIMATES Senior Discounts Roofs/Gutters Siding/Windows

INSURED/ Lifetime Warranty PREFERRED CONTRACTOR â&#x20AC;˘ Better than the typical A+ BBB rated contractor. We have a clean record. Call BBB at 419-531-3116. Check on all contractors. RECENTLY CHOSEN TO INSTALL ROOFS FOR OWENS CORNING PRESIDENT & COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION PRESIDENT BECAUSE OF OUR EXCELLENT REPUTATION

419-836-1946 419-470-7699 ACEROOF.net

BLUE LINE ROOFING Licensed & Insured Since 1964

419-242-4222 www.BlueLineRoofers.com

Storage

MAUMEE BAY SELF STORAGE 7640 Jerusalem Road (Rt 2) (419)836-4000 Multi-sized Units - Outside storage Security fence - 7 day access â&#x20AC;&#x153;We make every effort to accommodate YOU.â&#x20AC;?

Call An Expert for those big jobs

C & L SANITATION, INC. Septic Tank Cleaning & Portable Restrooms For All Events

419-874-4653

Serving the area for over 50 years

Tree Service

Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TREE SERVICE

Residential - Commercial â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Prices in townâ&#x20AC;? Become a seasonal customer and receive 25% OFF!

Tree and Stump Removal Trimming & Shaping Very clean & professional Yard Clean up Leaves, Branches, etc. Also gutter cleaning & repair Haul away all debris We also do Storm Damage Cleanup Bobcat services Licensed & Insured

Call 419-350-6780

419-350-6780

Snow Removal

MIKEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PROFESSIONAL SNOW REMOVAL

Your Services Change, Your Prices Change, Why Does Your Yellow Page Ad Stay The Same? An ad should be flexible... Like your business. Not chiseled in stone like a stagnant yellow page ad. So if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re choosing between The Press Expert Section and the yellow pages, consider this... cell phones, caller i.d., internet directories, search engines and competing 1 With phone books there is less reason to go to a phone book with your ad in it. On the other hand, you have The Press in your hands just like your potential customers living or working in 33,892 homes and businesses in your market area. For less than $21 a week, you can reach them in The Press Expert Section. can frequently change the size and copy of your ad in The Press to adver2 Youtise seasonal offers, special prices, new products & new services. lively issue of The Press is full of news, information and features from 20 towns and their surrounding areas in Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky and Wood 3 Each Counties. More than 475 businesses and individuals use The Press each week to sell goods and services. For more information, call the classified department. 419-836-2221

PRESS The

Since 1972

Metro Suburban Maumee Bay

P.O. Box 169 â&#x20AC;˘ 1550 Woodville, Millbury, OH 43447 (419) 836-2221 Fax 836-1319 E-Mail classifieds@presspublications.com


THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

‘10 FORD ESCAPE

‘07 FORD EDGE SE

Open Sunday 12-5 ‘13 CAPTIVA SPORT

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‘06 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER

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$11,900

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‘97 F-250 4X4

‘97 F-350 4X4

‘04 MAZDA RX8

‘05 CHRYSLER PACIFICA

‘05 FORD E-350

‘04 RANGER SUPERCAB

‘06 VOLKSWAGON JETTA

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$7,900

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‘03 EXPEDITION XLT

‘04 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

‘06 PONTIAC G6

‘06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER

‘01 F-150 4X4

‘05 CHRYSLER ‘03 EXPEDITION TOWN & COUNTRY EDDIE BAUER

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‘04 EXPLORER XLT

‘05 F-150 SUPERCAB

‘01 CHEVY CAMARO

‘04 MAZDA 3

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‘00 PONTIAC GRAND AM

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‘03 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

‘01 FOCUS WAGON

‘95 F-250 4X4

‘01 GMC JIMMY

‘92 RANGER XLT

‘02 FORD FOCUS ZTS

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‘04 FREESTAR SES

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$3,400

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‘00 RANGER XLT

‘97 OLDS 88

‘94 OLDS 88

‘97 OLDS SILHOUETTE

‘03 FORD TAURUS

‘00 F-150 SUPERCAB

‘00 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER

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$2,700

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‘99 MERCURY VILLAGER

‘00 CHEVY MALIBU LS

‘94 GEO PRISM

‘99 CHRYSLER CONCORDE

‘90 RANGER XLT

‘99 CHEVROLET VENTURE

‘94 LINCOLN TOWN CAR

‘98 FORD WINDSTAR

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$1,700

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2811 Navarre Ave. Oregon, Ohio

Tel: 888.303.5636 buymathewsford.com

Hours: M-Th: 9-9, F: 9-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 Service Hours: M-F: 9-6, Sat: 7-1

27


28

THE PRESS

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

You love that

he loves you.

Now love what he gives you.

Sterling silver charms from $25

INTRODUCING PANDORAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 2014 VALENTINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY COLLECTION.

.AVARRE!VEp/REGON /HIO pALANMILLERJEWELERSCOM Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Wed & Fri 10:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:00 4HURSqp3ATq

VALENTINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY IS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH


Suburban 02/10/14