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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Amazingly close, from so far away. The Leica A PO-Telev id plus new 1.8x Extender.

NEW! 1.8x Extender Accessory Broadens APO-Televid magnification range to 25x-90x Easy to use bayonet mount with intergrated locking mechanism

Optically, mechanically, and ergonomically matched system

Leica’s obsession with providing birders with the finest imaginable views has resulted in our performance standards-setting APO-Televid spotting scopes. A true apochromatically-corrected lens system features four Fluorite crystal (FL) lens components that deliver brilliant edge-to-edge color fidelity and clarity. Superior light transmission provides the finest detail resolution at the highest magnifications. Incredible viewing from great distance; an elegant and ethical solution with minimal impact on the wildlife being viewed. Obsessive? Test them to see for yourself. ___ models: 82mm and compact 65mm, straight or angled body ___ available 25-50x WW ASPH variable wide angle eyepiece ___ new 1.8x Extender accessory for angled APOTelevid extends magnification range to 45-90x

Learn more at leica-sportoptics.com Join the conversation on Facebook at /LeicaBirding

Seeing is believing. Visit Leica in Optics Alley at the Black Swamp Bird Observatory throughout the Biggest Week.

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Index

How to Use the Visitors’ Guide Free Activities Optics Alley Black Swamp Bird Observatory Binoculars & Birding 101 Blog Team Plight of Passenger Pigeon Duck Stamp Artists Timing of Spring Migration Boardwalk Code of Ethics A Birder’s Guide to Everything Parternship With Local Schools Festival Schedule Fun Places to Visit Pearson Metropark Thriving Responsible Wind Energy Biggest Week Volunteers Ebird Tips for Bird Sightings Celebrate Tom Bartlett’s Big Sit Bird-Friendly Coffee A Walk in the Metropark Wildlife Viewing Opps First Annual Bird Ohio Day Lake Erie’s Best Birding Sites

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6 8 9 10 13-14 16 18 20 22 24-25 26 30 33-36 37-41 42 44-45 50 52-53 54 56 58 60-61 62 64

A Birder’s Guide to Everything 48 American Bird Conservancy 23, 29, 46 Bayshore Supper Club 66 Bayview Bed & Breakfast 65 Beacon Point Golf 61 Bench Farms 31 Birds & Beans Coffee 57 Birds & Blooms 43 Birding Ecotours Back Cover B.J.’s Hide-A-Way Steakhouse 66 Black Forest Cafe 66 Blackberry Corner Tavern 13 Bono Tavern 66 Canopy Family 55 Carruth Studio 13 Cheepers! Birding on a Budget 49 Cousino’s Steakhouse 66 Crosswinds Restaurant & Bar 47 Cullen Park 59 Denny’s Restaurant 66 Destination Toledo 7 DG’s Soft Serve 47 Eagle Optics 65 Eagle’s Nest Sweet Retreat 56 El Camino Real 66 Friends of Magee Marsh 28 The Five Bells Inn B & B 51 Kaufman Field Guides 67 Lake Erie Shores & Islands 63 Leica 3 Mancino’s Pizza & Grinders 66 Marblehead Lite B & B 61 Maumee Bay General Store 61 Maumee Bay Lodge 31 Metroparks of the Toledo Area 17 NuttyBirder.com 51 Oregon Inn Restaurant 66 Our Sunset Place B & B 51 Rockjumper Worldwide Birding 19 Rotary Int’l Port Clinton 64 Rudolph Libbe 63 Sabrewing Nature Tours 2 Sandusky Co. Visitor’s Bureau 59 Sawmill Creek Resort 47, 51 Sunny Side Tower B & B 51 Time & Optics, Ltd. 15 Toledo Zoo 49 Toledo Museum of Art 19 Vanguard 27 Victor Emanuel Nature Tours 59 Victorian Inn B & B 51 Water’s Edge Restaurant 66 Wildside Nature Tours 50 Yellowbilled Tours 65

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A welcome message from Kimberly Kaufman Executive Director, Black Swamp Bird Observatory

On behalf of BSBO and our co-hosts at Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center, Destination Toledo, and Lake Erie Shores & Islands, I’d like to welcome you to The Biggest Week in American Birding, and to fabulous northwest Ohio, also known as “The Warbler Capital of the World.” It’s all about conservation… In addition to information about the festival and the region, this year’s guide also carries several thought-provoking conservation messages. From the importance of properly siting wind turbines and keeping cats indoors, to the value of drinking bird-friendly coffee and how helium balloon releases endanger birds and wildlife, we hope these conservation messages help all of our readers understand the impact that our actions have on birds and the natural world.

Kimberly Kaufman

Special thanks… I want to give a major shout-out to Pat Eaken, John Szozda, and Abbey Schell at the Press Publications. They’re great partners and I am honored to work with them. I’d also like to thank Scott Arvin for designing another marvelous cover, Brian Zwiebel for sharing his stunning bird photos, and Kenn Kaufman for his editorial input. Be safe… This area welcomes birders with open arms. You’ll see “Welcome Birders!” messages gracing marquees, banners on light posts through the main thoroughfares, and birding specials of all kinds. The only complaint we ever receive about birders is in regard to driving. And while I know how tempting it can be, please, I implore you, do NOT stop along the roads to watch birds. It jeopardizes your life and the lives of others. The side roads in the area are narrow and typically flanked by deep drainage ditches. It is not ever okay to stop along the road to look at birds, and the county sheriffs will be patrolling the area and doing their job to ensure the safety to residents and visitors to the area. Birding northwest Ohio in the fall… Yes indeed, the birds pass through this region in the fall, too! Come back to visit us again and experience northwest Ohio—and the warblers—dressed in fall colors! It’s more than just great birding… If you’re visiting for the first time, you’ll soon discover that, while the birding is indeed world-class, it is the wonderful people who live and work here that make it a truly superb destination. I encourage you to extend your visit—or come back again when the birding isn’t so good that you can’t tear yourself away—and visit some of the other wonderful places this area has to offer. With museums, historic lighthouses, the world-famous Toledo Mud Hens, waterparks, great fishing, and of course, the charm and charisma of the Lake Erie Islands, northwest Ohio is one of the country’s most alluring travel destinations at any time of year. We hope you’ll come back again, soon! We have some great things in store for this year’s Biggest Week, and we hope you have a safe and sensational experience. Sincerely,

Kimberly Kaufman

Biggest Week in American Birding Visitors Guide Published by the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in conjunction with The Press Newspapers and The Beacon. Kimberly Kaufman, Executive Director, BSBO, www.bsbo.org 419-898-4070, 419-898-1363 (fax), kimkaufman@bsbo.org John Szozda, General Manager, The Press Newspapers John Schaffner, General Manager, The Beacon J. Patrick Eaken, Editor, Visitors Guide, 419-836-2221, ext. 20 Editors/Graphics...Tammy Walro, Ken Grosjean, J. Patrick Eaken & Abbey Schell Sales/Graphics...Lesley Willmeth, Alyce Fielding, Leeanne LaForme, Abbey Schell, Julie Gentry, Connie Roberts, Vicki Theobald, Bill Derivan, Mark Schaffner, & Farin Blackburn Cover artwork graciously donated by Scott Arvin, Indianapolis, Indiana. Bird images donated by Kaufman Field Guides


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Black Swamp Bird Observatory offers sincere gratitude to our Biggest Week Co-hosts, Sponsors, Visitors’ Guide Partners, Tour Company Partners, Major Supporters, and of course, our outstanding team of volunteers! Without them, the festival would not be possible.

2014

Tour Company Partners

Festival Hosts:

Visitors’ Guide Publication Partners

Kirtland’s Warbler Level Major Support provided by:

Connecticut Warbler Level

Blackburnian Warbler Level

Cape May Warbler Level

Yellow Warbler Level With special thanks to our partners at Press Publications and The Beacon for their unwavering support for the festival, for BSBO, and for bird conservation.

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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HOW TO USE THE BIGGEST WEEK VISITORS’ GUIDE If you have already registered for the Biggest Week In American Birding, this guide offers you the overall festival schedule (centerfold), travel tips, coupons, many conservation messages, and much more. If you’re new to the area, the ‘Fun Places To Visit’ section is something you should check out. In addition to the fabulous birding in this area, we also have an outstanding variety of activities to partake in while you’re here this spring– and when you’re planning your return visit! Take in a Toledo Mud Hens game, visit the Toledo Museum of Art, the Toledo Zoo, or have your picture taken in front of the Marblehead Lighthouse…the possibilities are endless!

If you have NOT registered for the Biggest Week In American Birding, there’s still time! While there are many free activities during the festival that do not require registration, registration IS required in order to participate in many of the programs, bus and boat trips, workshops, and presentations. Additional benefits of registering include access to free guided birding walks every morning at Magee Marsh from May 6th through May 15th at 8:00 and 10:30 AM; evening socials at Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center; and discounts at dozens of local businesses through our Biggest Week Birder Discount Program. You just show up and flash your Biggest Week name badge to cash in on the savings. Register online now at: www.bwiab.com

Find Biggest Week on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/TheBiggestWeekInAmericanBirding

Follow Biggest Week on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/BiggestWeek


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Great waterfront dining, river cruises, shopping, historic tours and more!

Welcome to Greater Toledo, Birders! Visit our world-renowned Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo Zoo, new Hollywood Casino Toledo, famous Tony Packo’s Café along with a variety of great restaurants. Spend some time exploring Toledo and you’ll discover one visit won't be enough. Visit www.doToledo.org for more details!

Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition

Now on display through June 15 at Imagination Station featuring ocean floor artifacts.

Tony Packo’s

The original location of Tony Packo’s made famous by Jamie Farr of M*A*S*H fame!

National Museum of the Great Lakes

Grand Opening on April 26 featuring original Great Lakes artifacts, hands-on exhibits & tours.

Hollywood Casino Toledo

Featuring 2,000 slot machines, table games, a sports bar, restaurants and entertainment.

Toledo Museum of Art Exhibition

The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden explores the art of Paris’ famed Garden (through May 11).

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

BIGGEST WEEK ACTIVITIES THAT ARE FREE AND OPEN TO EVERYONE! For more information visit www.bwiab.com, call Black Swamp Bird Observatory at: 419-898-4070, or email staff@bsbo.org SONGBIRD BANDING AND MIGRATION PROGRAMS

Date: Every Saturday in May Time: 10:00 AM Where: Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 West State Route 2 / Oak Harbor, OH 43449 Fee: FREE and open to the public!

These programs offer detailed information on BSBO's migration studies, provide up close looks at beautiful spring warblers, thrushes, vireos, and other migrants, and share more about the critical stopover habitat that the Lake Erie Marsh Region represents. Basic bird identification will be included, so bring your favorite field guide!

WORLD BIRDING PRESENTATIONS

May 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15 Time: 11 a.m. Where: Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR) West State Route 2 / Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 Fee: FREE and open to the public! Our tour company partners lead birding trips to some of the most astonishing destinations on the planet. In these presentations, our partners will take you around the world and into the lives of some of the most beautiful, bizarre, and fascinating birds in the world.

BIRDING THE METROPARKS OF TOLEDO

Date: Tuesday, May 6th Time: 10:00 - 11:30 a.m. Location: Swan Creek Preserve Metropark 4659 Airport Hwy, Toledo, OH 43615 Fee: FREE and open to the public!

You do not have to be a bird expert nor hike to some remote forest to find wonderful birds. The Metroparks of Toledo offer amazing opportunities to enjoy birds. This trip is presented with a very relaxed approach that will make it fun for everyone, even if you've never gone birding in your life! Our field trip leader is Doug Gray. Doug has led birding tours around the country and has a passion for introducing people of color to the world of birding. Doug will be assisted by Metroparks staff, and they’ll bring binoculars and bird books to loan to those that need them.

YOUNG BIRDERS FIELD TRIP (AGES 12 - 18)

Date: May 10 Time: 9 a.m. to Noon Where: Meet in the parking lot at east end of the Magee Marsh Wildlife Boardwalk Area 13229 West State Route 2 / Oak Harbor, Ohio Call 419-898-4070 if you have any questions Fee: Free and open to ages 12 - 18 (Parents welcome!) The Magee Marsh Wildlife Area is famous for the sensational birding during spring migration! Join young birders from all over the state - and all over the country and meet some really cool field trip leaders, too!

FAMILY BIRD WALK

Date: Sunday, May 11 Time: 10:00 AM - Noon Where: Pearson Metropark Visitors' Center Parking Lot 761 Lallendorf Rd. / Oregon, OH 43616 Fee: FREE and open to the public Meet in Parking Lot #3 * Sponsored by Birds and Blooms Magazine! Gather up the kids and join us for a family nature walk. We’ll provide binoculars, field guides, and the birds, you simply provide enthusiastic families.

YOUNG BIRDERS FIELD TRIP (AGES 12 - 18)

Date: Wed, May 14 Time: 6 - 8:00 p.m. (EVENING EVENT!) Location: Woodlawn Historic Cemetery 1502 W Central Ave. / Toledo, OH 43606 Fee: Free and open to ages 12 - 18 (Parents welcome!)

Birding in a cemetery might sound kind of weird, but this cemetery has amazing bird habitat and the people who manage the area encourage birding on the grounds! The tranquility of Woodlawn makes the cemetery a popular place for more than 208 confirmed varieties of birds found in the Toledo area.

GETTING STARTED IN BIRDING: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW!

Date: Thursday, May 15 Time: 10:00 AM - Noon Where: Pearson Metropark Visitors' Center Parking Lot 761 Lallendorf Rd. / Oregon, OH 43616 Fee: FREE and open to the public * Binoculars and field guides will be available to borrow for this workshop. You've decided birding sounds interesting and you'd like to give it a try, but what do you do next? In this fun and easy workshop, our leaders will walk you though everything you need to know to get started birdwatching. We’ll bring binoculars and bird books to loan to those that need them.

BIGGEST WEEK BIRD TATTOO CONTEST May 14 at 6:00 p.m. Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center Free and open to the public! We had such a great response to last year's contest that we've decided to make this an annual Biggest Week event! We can't wait to see all the wonderful, creative, bird tattoos that enter the contest this year! There WILL be prizes and they WILL be awesome! So bring your bird tattoo (publicly shareable, please!) and prepare to impress our judges for your chance at fabulous prizes! Sponsored by Eagle Optics www.eagleoptics.com

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2014


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

May 6-15 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Black Swamp Bird Observatory

13551 West State Route 2 • Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 (Located inside the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area)

OPTICS ALLEY will feature: Many different optics dealers with an amazing variety of binoculars, spotting scopes, and other birding gear to try before you buy!

2014

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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BSBO Staff, Volunteers, and Friends Celebrate Birds and Birding.

Black Swamp Bird Observatory

The group behind ‘The Big Week’ Black Swamp Bird Observatory is much more than the organization behind the Biggest Week In American Birding. “Bird conservation is the core of our mission.” says BSBO executive director Kimberly Kaufman. “In everything we do—research, education and outreach, and The Biggest Week—the overarching goal is building support for bird conservation.” BSBO’s research team has been conducting studies of migratory birds in this region for more than 20 years. BSBO operates one of the country’s largest songbird banding operations, banding more than 550,000 birds in its history. The data collected by BSBO’s research team helps private land owners and government agencies manage habitat for birds. The data gathered is also helpful to birders, as it has helped to pinpoint the timing of arrival of many of the most sought-after species of birds. BSBO is determined to help connect young people with the marvels of migratory birds and the importance of conserving their habitat. Their programs for schools are offered free of charge.

These programs bring thousands of students out to the marshes for hands-on, standards-based learning. Students help collect data by banding wild songbirds before releasing them back into the wild. These programs are a partnership with Magee Marsh Wildlife Area and Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. Students visit all three locations during each visit. BSBO is also the founder of the Ohio Young Birders Club, a statewide club for young nature enthusiasts aged 1218 that takes students on monthly field trips across the state. In recent years, BSBO has made strides to connect the Lakeshore communities with the valuable asset that birds and bird habitat represent for this region. Ecotourism, or more specifically “bird-tourism,” has become a major part of BSBO’s conservation efforts. BSBO’s goal for organizing the Biggest Week In American Birding is

to generate support for habitat conservation. While birders are here, BSBO gathers economic impact and travel data. These figures help build support for conserving the habitat these birds depend on for their survival—and that the region has come to depend on as a source of revenue. In 2010, BSBO collected economic data from participants in Biggest Week In American Birding. Using data from Ohio Division of Wildlife documenting visitors to Magee Marsh for a one-month period, they estimate that birders spent more than $19 million in this area between midApril and mid-May. In 2011, visitation climbed significantly, visitors stayed longer in the region, spent more as a result, and the figure for the same time period rose to just under $29 million. That trend continued in 2012, when birders spent more than $37 million in the area during spring migration. Birds and birding business have become an important source of revenue for this region. Businesses are opening earlier in the spring season, expanding their hours, and hiring more people. Working together with visitors’ bureaus, chambers of commerce, and their business alliance partners, BSBO has built a tourism season where there hadn’t been much happening before. This makes bird conservation relevant to an ever-increasing audience and allows the BSBO team to speak to more and more people about the value of habitat conservation.

BSBO is a nonprofit supported by members and donations. For more information on supporting their work, please see page 11 of this guide, or visit them online at: www.bsbobird.org BSBO is located at the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area. They maintain year ‘round hours in their gift shop and window on wildlife where visitors can observe birds visiting the feeders.

Young Birders Club promotes service, career opportunites The Ohio Young Birders Club (OYBC), created in 2006 by Black Swamp Bird Observatory, is now expanding to include chapters through-

out Ohio. The OYBC is for young people age 12 – 18 that have an interest in birds and nature. Members go on monthly outings, conduct service proj-

ects, and host an annual conference where the students give all of the presentations. Visit the OYBC website at: www.ohioyoungbirders.org


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

New to the Area or to Birding? Visit Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO) for FREE birding maps of the best places to go birding in this area.

Magnolia Warbler (Kenn Kaufman)

2014

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BLACK SWAMP BIRD OBSERVATORY PROUDLY PRESENTS...

SONGBIRD BANDING & MIGRATION PROGRAMS

Date: Every Saturday in May Where: Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 West State Route 2, Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 Time: 10 a.m. Fee: FREE and open to the public

Each map includes information on when to visit and what to expect when you go. BSBO is located at the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area 13551 West State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 Open every day in May!

These programs offer detailed information on BSBO’s migration studies, provide up close looks at beautiful spring warblers, thrushes, vireos, and other migrants, and share more about the critical stopover habitat that the Lake Erie Marsh Region represents. Basic bird identification will be included, so bring your favorite field guide! The Observatory is proud to offer these educational programs FREE to the public; however, donations are always welcome and help support all the Observatory’s research and education efforts! Join us for this unique birding opportunity!

BLACK SWAMP BIRD OBSERVATORY www.bsbobird.org

Northwest Ohio’s Premier Bird Conservation Organization

BECOME A MEMBER TODAY and help support all the great things the Observatory does for birds and birders!

$15 STUDENT • $25 SENIOR $35 INDIVIDUAL • $40 FAMILY $100 SUPPORTING • $250 FRIENDS $500 SUSTAINING To join or donate call 419-898-4070, visit www.bsbobird.org, or stop by and visit us at Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 W. State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449

(Just inside the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area)

Visit us on...

facebook.com/bsbobird


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Birding 101: How to Get Started... By Kenn Kaufman So you’ve caught the buzz about birding. You know that thousands of people have taken up this hobby, or outdoor sport, or whatever it is, and they’re having a great time. And now you want to give it a try, but you’re not quite sure how to start? First thing to know is that birders are an incredibly friendly and welcoming bunch, always glad to welcome new people into the fun. If you show up at a birding site and admit that you don’t have much experience, you won’t be shunned – more likely, you’ll have people wanting to share information and show you birds that you haven’t seen before. There’s no secret handshake and no test that you have to pass. Just say that you’re interested, and the birders will accept you as part of the gang. But here are a few tips to help you get started. Question: Do I need a lot of special gear? No, there’s hardly anything that you really need at the start. When I got into birding as a kid, I had nothing except a burning interest. But things became a lot easier after I got my hands on a field guide and binoculars, and those two items are almost essential – along with some kind of small notebook and pencil, for jotting down notes. Question: What’s a field guide? A field guide is a special kind of book, designed to help you figure out what kind of bird you’re seeing. Usually it’s a fairly small book, so that you can slip it into a large pocket or day pack to carry along. It won’t tell you a lot about each kind of bird – just the basics for telling one kind from another. Question: Couldn’t I just go online and look up the birds there? Well, you could, but that could turn out to be a slow, frustrating process. How do you look it up if you don’t know its name? You could look through thousands of pictures online, and maybe find pictures that matched the bird you saw, but it could take hours. With a field guide, you could look it up on the spot in mere minutes, because these books are designed to get you to the answer quickly. Several good field guides are available, and for 20 bucks you can save yourself hours of online frustration. By the way, here’s a good tip on choosing a field guide, if you can go to a store that has a good selection (like a bird observatory, nature center, or wild bird store). Choose a bird that you already know well – a cardinal, maybe, or a robin, something like that – and look it up in each of the field guides. Find which book has your favorite treatment of the bird that you chose. Chances are, you’ll like the way that book illustrates and describes other kinds of birds, too. Question: What about binoculars. Are they really necessary? As a kid, I got started bird watching without binoculars, and learned some birds that way; but when I finally saved up money to get binoculars, it made a huge difference. Suddenly I could see all kinds of details I had missed before, and I could tell different birds apart so much more easily. The article in this publication by Nina Cheney from Eagle Optics has good advice on how to choose your first binoculars. Question: Where should I go to look for birds? You can find some birds practically anywhere, including back yards and city streets. To see more different kinds of birds, visit more habitats: the birds that like open fields are different from the ones that live in the forest. Areas near

Birders using the Kaufman Field Guide. (Photo courtesy BSBO) water often have more variety of birdlife, and edges between habitats – such as where a meadow meets the edge of a woodlot – can be very good as well. If you’re in northwestern Ohio, you can find maps and directions for several good birding spots at: http://www.bsbo.org/BIRDING/LocalBirdingHotspots.aspx Question: Is there some kind of birding uniform? Will other birders know I’m a beginner if I don’t wear the right stuff? No, there’s no uniform! Just go for comfort. Sometimes you can get closer to birds if you avoid bright colors and bright whites, but often it makes no difference. If you’re going to be wading in swamps or snowdrifts, rubber boots may be necessary; but most of the time, tennis shoes will be fine. When the day starts cool and then warms up, it’s helpful to be dressed in layers that you can peel off as the temperature rises. Squeaky windbreakers or raincoats can be a pain if you’re trying to listen for bird calls. Sunscreen and bug repellant can be useful accessories. But again, comfort is the main goal. Question: Any other advice for getting started? As long as you’re not harming the birds or their habitat, or trespassing on private property, or causing problems for other people, there’s no “wrong” way to go birding. The best approach is the one that works best for you. Don’t get discouraged if you can’t recognize every bird you see – just make the most of the ones that you do recognize. Birding is something that we do for enjoyment, so if you enjoy it, you are already a good birder.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

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Binoculars for beginning birders By Nina Cheney Eagle Optics

less bright, and more narrow the field of view will be. A wide field of view is beneficial when trying to locate a bird or follow its movement.

Just because you’re a beginning birder doesn’t mean you don’t deserve a good quality binocular. In fact, when you think about it, beginning birders benefit more from good quality glass. Why? Because better glass means better resolution: clearer, brighter, and sharper images than in less expensive models. While more experienced birders are familiar with birds’ flight patterns, coloration and characteristics, beginners are just learning these things. So, seeing the best detail possible now, combined with lots of practice time in the field, will get you on a fast track beyond the greenhorn stage. When recommending binoculars for the beginning birder, we first consider size and specifications. With a wide variety of shapes and sizes available, the choices can seem daunting. Before you buy, it’s good to educate yourself about the basics of optics. If you’re more of a visual learner, many of these concepts are explained in our YouTube videos on the Eagle Optics web site (see “Understanding Optics” in our playlist). Magnification Let’s start with the numbers on a binocular. What do the numbers mean? The power and size of a binocular is defined by numbers. A fullsized 8x42 binocular is by far the most popular choice for birders, for several reasons. The first number, 8, refers to the magnification, which in this case enables you to view something 8 times closer than you would with the naked eye. While some birders may prefer a 10-power (10x) magnification for more detail, there are tradeoffs. The 10x is harder to hold steady than the 8x. That’s why we give the nod to 8x42 for those new to birdwatching. Magnification also greatly affects the field of view, the distance seen from

Objective Lens Size The second number, in this case 42, is the size of the objective (front) lens, measured in millimeters. The objective lens is the light gathering lens; the bigger the lens, the brighter the image. That brings me back to the newcomer with the low-quality compact: the small lens of a compact binocular gathers less light, making it difficult to see details, especially in low light conditions. Remember, birds are more active during dawn and dusk. Also, birding often takes place in the woods or under a canopy of trees where sunlight is diffused.

While it isn’t necessary to spend a lot of money on binoculars, be aware that the more you spend, the better the quality of the glass, and the less need to upgrade in years to come.

side to side through the binocular. This is something that is built into the optics of the binocular, but generally speaking, the higher the magnification, the

Blackberry Corner Tavern The

5975 N. Elliston Rd. • Martin, OH Open for Breakfast Wed.-Sun. 6 a.m. Owners: Jim & Brenda Lowe

Features Eyeglass wearers, take note: If you want to use your binocular with eyeglasses or sunglasses, look for one that offers 15mm or more of eye relief. Eye relief refers to the distance images are projected from the ocular lens to their focal point, and the measurement can vary from 10mm to 23mm. Close focus is another feature to consider when buying a binocular. Many prefer a close focus (3’-6’) in order to observe butterflies, dragonflies, and wildflowers. For birdwatching, consider a binocular with a close focus of 10 feet or less. Also, waterproofing and fogproofing are fairly standard in today’s optics. We recommend buying a waterproof and fogproof binocular; you won’t have to worry about using your binocular around water and in any type of weather. It makes sense to spend as much as you can afford. It’s possible to spend upwards of $2,000 for a binocular. We stock nearly every major brand, and we’ll be happy to consult with you one-on-one.

garden smiles

Welcome birders! Visit Garden Smiles to find wonderful handcrafted and American-made gifts for home and garden.

Beer • Wine • Sandwiches Soups • Pies • Pizza Made-to-Order

419-836-8377 Mon. 9 a.m. - Midnight Wed.-Sat. 6 a.m. - Midnight Sun. 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday

Good Drinks • Good Food • Good Times Eat-In or Carryout • Catering Available • Homemade Desserts

Open Daily

211 Mechanic St, Waterville

419.878.5412 800.225.1178 www.carruthst www.carruthstudio.com udio.com


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Conservation is the heart of The Biggest Week In American Birding For Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO) and our partners, the effort we put forth on the festival is worth it because the event raises awareness and appreciation for birds and habitat conservation in a major way. The bottom line is this: we want to help people fall in love with birds, and this is a perfect place to make that happen! We believe that connecting people to the joys of birding is the first step in building support for conservation because people care more about the things they love. And when spring migration has winged its way through the area, and the Magee Marsh Boardwalk is once again draped in quiet shadows, the folks at BSBO will gather up the economic impact you helped generate during your visit and we will trumpet that to all those who will listen. The heart of conservation keeps beating! Below, we offer some simple, fun, beautiful, and even tasty ways to help give something back to the birds that bring such joy to our lives. Buy a stamp, drink some bird -friendly coffee, take a kid (or any beginner) birding, and help us help the birds.

1) HELP US SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE WIND ENERGY IN NW OHIO: SIGN OUR PETITION The Issue Wind turbines are creeping their way into the Lake Erie Marsh Region from the east and west. They are being proposed for schools, small businesses, and private residences. These are not the massive, commercial turbines, but “smaller” units, seemingly innocuous by comparison. But there are some facts that everyone should know. These so called “midsized” turbines can exceed 300 feet and there are currently no regulations whatsoever to control where they are installed in relation to bird and wildlife sensitive areas. Visit www.bsbobird.org for more information.

2) DONATE THE GUIA PROGRAM Visit Black Swamp Bird Observatory to learn how you can donate copies of Guia to important bird conservation programs through our partners at Sonoran Joint Venture and Connecting Cultures, a program of Environment for the Americas. They help us distribute copies of Kenn’s Spanish language bird guide to people across the southwestern US and northern Mexico. These books will be used as valuable tools for bird guide training workshops.

3) DRINK SHADE-GROWN COFFEE Drinking certified shade-grown coffee is an easy way to support bird habitat conservation. This brand can be purchased at the Black Swamp Bird Observatory Gift Shop. Your host at the “Biggest Week” is happy to recommend Birds & Beans for all of your shade-grown coffee needs.

4) DON'T RELEASE HELIUM BALLOONS: They can kill birds and other wildlife!

Releasing helium balloons seems innocent enough - and many people release them to celebrate events or memorialize a lost friend or loved one. Sure, they look nice going up, but once they come down they create horrible looking litter and they pose very serious dangers to birds and wildlife. We know that most people just don't understand the dangers and we're trying to help get the word out. We also believe that no one would want to celebrate some event or memorialize a friend or loved one in a way that could kill a beautiful bird, sea turtle, or other wildlife. For more information visit: www.balloonsblow.org.

5) PUT YOUR MONEY TO WORK HELPING BIRDS: LEAVE A BIRDER’S CALLING CARD Pick up these cards at event site locations and use them when you visit area businesses. We want the region’s business owners to know that you are here because of the great birds you will see so they will lend support to habitat conservation!

6) PURCHASE CONSERVATION STAMPS

All of these conservation stamps are available for purchase in the Black Swamp Bird Observatory for $15.

OHIO WILDLIFE LEGACY STAMP Buying this collectable wildlife stamp will show you support for:  habitat restoration, land purchases, conservation easements  keeping common species common

 endangered & threatened native species

 educational products for students & wildlife enthusiasts

 wildlife and habitat research projects FEDERAL DUCK STAMP

Federal Duck Stamps are a vital tool for wetland conservation. Ninety-eight cents out of every dollar generated by the sales of Federal Duck Stamps goes directly to purchase or lease wetland habitat for protection in the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Junior Duck Stamp is another stamp that every birder should purchase! The Junior Duck Stamp (JDS) is a pictorial stamp produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to recognize the conservation efforts of young people and support environmental and conservation education programs in the United States. The stamp design is selected from a national art contest.

7) TAKE A KID BIRDING The future of bird conservation depends on keeping the next generation tuned in to nature. Take a few minutes to take your kids out for a walk. Volunteer to lead nature hikes for kids at a nature center, for your local Audubon Chapter, for your family and friends.

2014 Biggest Week in American Birding


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Meet the Biggest Week 2014 Blog Team Kim Smith – An Ohio native who now lives in southeastern Michigan, Kim can’t figure out how she lived almost 40 years before discovering the amazing world of birds. Kim is the editor of “The Nuthatch,” the Kim Smith newsletter of the Oakland Audubon Society. In her blog she writes about how nature helps her navigate through life’s difficult patches. http://natureismytherapy.com/ Birds & Blooms Blog Team Stacy Torino & Kirsten Sweet, editor and associate editor for Birds and Blooms magazine, look forward to reStacy Torino & Kirsten Sweet turning to Biggest Week in 2014. Two years ago, they put together an “I Like Birds” video at the festival, and they have something up their sleeves for this year. In the meantime, follow their Biggest Week coverage on the Birds & Blooms blog www.birdsandblooms.com/blog Jennifer Callaway – “Veery” – Jennifer Outcalt (Birdfreak’s sister), is an avid birder and blogger with a teenage son who is also into birding in a major way. Jennifer helps BirdJennifer Callaway freak - birdfreak.com write posts and brainstorm new ideas about conservation. Dawn Simmons Fine, and her husband, Jeff, are full-time RVers who travel the country on one birding adventure after another. Follow along on their perpetual road trip at Dawn’s Dawn Fine Bloggy Blog http://dawnandjeffsblog.blogspot.com/ Cheryl Harner is interested in all forms of flora and fauna, and is fascinated by the connections between botany and wildlife. She is an avid gardener and lifelong wildflower Cheryl Harner and butterfly enthusiast. A staunch proponent for conservation, Cheryl promotes environmental education and the use of native plants in the home landscape. Visit www.cherylharner.blogspot.com

Jerry Jourdan, a Michigander who has been birding for more than 30 years, has a passion for bird photography. Like most avid birders unable to afford “the big glass,” he Jerry Jourdan discovered the art of “digiscoping” or photographing birds through a spotting scope with a point-and-shoot camera. An active blogger, he keeps an online field journal of his adventures and photos at http://jerryjourdan.blogspot.com/ and also has a second blog dedicated to digiscoping at: http://jerryjourdan2.blogspot.com/ Greg Miller has been birding for almost 50 years. In 1988, he and two other birders did a “Big Year” and broke the 700 mark. Their individual stories are documented in Mark Obmascik’s book, Greg Miller “The Big Year, 2004.” Filming was completed in the summer of 2010 for a comedic movie, “The Big Year,” released in 2011 and starring Jack Black, Steve Martin and Owen Wilson. Greg blogs at gregmillerbirding.com Nemesis Bird Blog Team www.nemesisbird.com

Nemesis Bird Blog Team

Anna Fasoli, is a field biologist who has traveled all over the U.S. working on different research projects. AnnaFasoli

Drew Weber

es.

Melissa Penta

Drew Weber is an ornithologist from Pennsylvania, who now lives in New York state. He is pursuing a master’s degree at Penn State studying grassland birds and their relationships with agricultural practicMelissa Penta’s passion for birds began looking through the camera lens in 2008. Realizing she needed to get to know her subjects better in order to improve her photography, she began studying field

guides to learn about local birds around her. She shares her work through various social networks and on her website, mydigitalmind.com Kelly Riccetti is a lifelong artist and student of nature, with a specific interest in ornithology. In 2009, she launched the popular bird and nature blog, “Red and the Peanut,” where she shares Kelly Riccetti her nature research, photos and paintings, along with product and book reviews. http://redandthepeanut.blogspot.com/ Rob Ripma, a lifelong resident of Indiana, has birded extensively in the Midwest for more than 10 years. Rob works for Wild Birds Unlimited and manages a birding blog and Rob Ripma website, http://www.nuttybirder.com/ Linda Rockwell feels fortunate to have grown up near Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Roswell, N.M, and to have parents who loved birds. She blogs and shares her bird photos on her Linda Rockwell blog at: http://photofeathers.wordpress.com/ and her other photos may be found at http://photoflurries.wordpress.com/ A proponent of social media for birders, find her on Twitter as LRockwellatty. Robert Setzer, aka “Dr. Bob” and his wife Judy have been birding since 2009 after Bob escaped the corporate “cubicle world.” Bob earned a Ph.D. in marine biology (seaweeds), and traveled and taught on the West Coast Robert Setzer for a dozen years before launching a new career in software engineering. Follow Bob and Judy’s travels at http://drbobsbirdblog.blogspot.com/ Chris West, a lifelong birder, can’t remember not having a pair of binoculars in his hands. His passion has taken him to every corner of the U.S. and Canada, as well as to the American tropics. He particularly enjoys Chris West photo-documenting vagrants wherever they show up. He blogs at http://swallowtailedkite.blogspot.com/


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Bird Metroparks Metroparks are popular with birds – and birders – especially this time of year. The Lake Erie coastal zone. The Maumee River corridor. The incredibly rare Oak Openings Region. Nine Metroparks preserve some of the region’s most important natural areas. Oak Openings is home to more rare and endangered plants and animals than anywhere else in Ohio. Pearson (North) and the river parks are excellent places to view water-loving birds.Windows on Wildlife in six parks are warm, dry places to view birds at feeding stations. Spend your life in the Metroparks.

MetroparksToledo.com Birding highlights at Twitter.com/mptbirding

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Author brings plight of passenger pigeon to life By Mark Griffin Press Contributing Writer Joel Greenberg has always been interested in animals. “That has been the dominant theme in my life,” said Greenberg, 59, an environmental consultant. “Everything in my college life as an undergrad was based on where I could see birds. I (also) majored in political science because I was interested in environmental policy.” An author of five books, Greenberg will be one of the keynote speakers at this year’s Biggest Week in American Birding festival. He will give his keynote address and sign copies of his latest book, “A Feathered River Across the Sky: The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction,” on Wednesday, May 7 from 4-5 p.m. at the Maumee Bay Lodge & Conference Center. Greenberg, who said he normally does about 10 speaking engagements a year, has been on the road a lot in the past several months. He said he has done 63 engagements in 18 states and one in Ontario, Canada. “Ordinarily I do like to speak publicly, and I do talks at local groups,” he said. “The last couple years I have been focused on both the book and the passenger pigeon.” Greenburg’s latest project has been with Project Passenger Pigeon, which will mark the 100th anniversary of the bird’s extinction and promote the conservation of species and habitat, strengthen the relationship between people and nature, and foster the sustainable use of natural resources. “I have been trying to get institutions to participate in this year’s anniversary of the passenger pigeon’s extinction,” Greenberg said. “We have about 160 organizations in the United States and Canada. To me, this is an amazing story and a powerful enough story that if we tell it in as many different ways we can, through music and exhibits, it might be possible that we can attract people who may not otherwise be involved in conservation. We want to tell people about the story and use it to underline the messages in the story that I think are really critically important today.” Greenberg started working on “A Feathered River Across the Sky: The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction” in August 2009. The book was released on Jan. 7 and is being made into a documentary that should be completed in May, Greenberg said. There is also an audio version of the book. “The passenger pigeon was unlike any bird human beings have ever known,” Greenberg said. “It was amazingly abundant, the most abundant bird in North America — as many as three to five billion. They were not even-

Joel Greenberg and the subject of his book, a passenger pigeon. ly distributed across the landscape; they formed unbelievable aggregations.” Greenberg said that famed French naturalist and painter John Audubon witnessed a massive flight of passenger pigeons on the Ohio River near Henderson, Ky., in 1810. Audubon wrote that the sheer number of birds “eclipsed the sun for three days.” “He said the (bird) droppings fell like snowflakes,” Greenberg said. “In 1860 there was a flight near Toronto that probably exceeded two billion birds. Forty years later the bird was wiped out as a wild bird. The last one died in the Cincinnati Zoo on Sept. 1, 1914.” Humans drove to extinction Greenberg’s book illustrates that what is significant about the passenger pigeon is the speed at which humans drove the birds to extinction. “We killed them,” he said. “We drove the birds to extinction in decades. From billions, to none. They were shot and netted, mostly. To me, it underlines the fact that just because something is common — water, fuel or something that is alive — we need to take care of it or we could lose it.” Greenberg asserted that the huge demand for passenger pigeons, which weighed about 10 ounces, came about because they were cheap. “They would sell for pennies apiece,” Greenberg said. “As many as 40,000 could be shot over the course of a three-day (shooting) tournament. Primarily they were used for food by the wealthy, middle class and the poor. They appeared on menus of Delmonico’s in New York, and they were served at feasts for presidents.” Greenberg and his wife, Cindy, who was born in Toledo, live in Westmont,

Illinois, a western suburb of Chicago. Cindy is a special education teacher, and her husband travels the country and around the world speaking about wildlife and environmental issues. “My passion has always been nature,” Greenberg said. “When I was real little, the first job I wanted was to be a farmer. I’ve always been interested in animals. As time has progressed I went into birding and then into a more general interest in nature. “Nature is beautiful and intellectually challenging, and nature is important. It has caused me to go places most people don’t go to. I’ve been fortunate that I had a period where I did international travel. I saw gorillas in Rwanda. It becomes your world view and allows you to see things that a lot of people wouldn’t see.” Kim Kaufman, executive director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory, said she is thrilled that Greenberg agreed to be a keynote speaker at the Biggest Week in American Birding. “We selected Joel as one of our featured speakers for this year’s festival, not only because the subject of his presentation and his wonderful book are so important, but also because Joel is an eloquent and engaging speaker who connects with every person in the audience,” Kaufman said. Greenberg is an acknowledged authority on the natural history of the Chicago area, having authored three books on the subject: “Of Prairie, Woods, and Waters: Two Centuries of Chicago Nature Writing”; “A Natural History of the Chicago Region”; and “A Birder’s Guide to the Chicago Region.” Greenberg has been a blogger for Birdzilla.com since 2009 and has received several awards.


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ROCKJUMPER Wo r l d w i d e B i rd i n g A d ve n t u re s

INBirds, FINE F EATHER Art & Science April 25–July 6 | Free Admission

toledomuseum.org | 419.255.8000|

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Wildlife artist, daughter, design duck stamps By: Stephanie Szozda Press Staff Writer The love of nature and a skill in art run deep in the Grimm family. Elyria, Ohio native Adam Grimm and his daughter Madison, age 7, both took first place in the 2013 Federal Duck Stamp Contests for their age categories and have both received the honor of having their paintings appear on this years duck stamps. The Federal Duck Stamp Contest is nothing new to professional wildlife artist Adam Grimm. His 1999 contest-winning painting for the special 2000 Millennial Federal Duck Stamp kicked off his professional painting career at age 21 and also made him the youngest person to have ever won the federal contest. Grimm takes the competition very seriously. Although there is no monetary prize for winning, the prestige and notoriety associated with the contest can provide a plethora of career opportunities for the wildlife artist – enough to justify the months of work that can go into creating a painting worthy of entering. “Since the 1999 competition, I’ve gotten fourth place a number of times, a fifth place and I got second place the one year, but I just didn’t quite hit it right where the judges picked it to win, and that’s just the way it goes sometimes,” he said. Multiple winners Not only did Grimm and his daughter win the federal contests, he also won this year’s Ohio Wetlands Habitat Stamp contest with his painting of a Northern Pintail in flight. “It’s a great honor and just a neat thing to have both,” he said. “The way it came together was really just almost divine in nature.” There is a lot more that goes into painting wildlife than most people realize, Grimm said. Only five species are eligible each year for the Federal Duck Stamp Competition; artists who choose to use a photo as reference may only use unpublished ones. Most artists start collecting as many good unpublished photographs of eligible species as they can years ahead of time so they are prepared for future competitions, Grimm said. He added being a successful wildlife painter is not just about an ability to paint; artists have to have good detailed references, so it’s helpful to be an accomplished photographer, birder and outdoorsman as well. “I go out to take pictures just about every sunny day this time of year,” Grimm explained in a telephone interview from his Burbank, S.D. home. “I was out this morning and I’ll probably go back out this evening and probably tomorrow as well. It’s like a non-stop quest trying to get the best references you can get. The first thing you have to do to prepare for the competition is to choose which species to paint,” he said. “I knew most people would want to paint Mallards, and I don’t usually like to paint the species that I think most of the other people are going to paint. “Canvasbacks, I figured would probably be the second most popular bird,” he said. “They’re a beautiful bird and I have a lot of fond memories about Canvasbacks from past experiences, so I really wanted to paint them but I didn’t really have a lot of very good references.” He had little luck trying to get good photo references near his home; and when his daughter Madison won the Federal Junior Duck Stamp contest with a Canvasback on the water, he realized just how limited his references were for that year. “I was thinking, ‘I don’t want to do a Canvasback on the water now because I don’t want it to look anything like what

Adam and Madison Grimm with their winning stamp designs. she won with,’” he said. A friend of Grimm’s suggested they drive a few hours away and spend a week or so trying to get better reference photos. After stopping at a number of locations, they found what they affectionately coined “Canvasback Lake.” “It’s a lot, a lot of work – way more work than I think most people would ever think that it is,” he said. “I mean we had boats, we had the decoys, the waders, the camouflage and all of the camera supply stuff.” The pair would set up before daylight, take a break midday to recharge the cameras and go back in the evening for more, Grimm said. Fortunately, all the hard work paid off, and he left after five days with more than 4,000 photos of Canvasbacks and some good photos of other species of birds as well.” Grimm picked his best reference of standing, swimming and flying Canvasbacks and polled friends and family on their favorites. The 2013 contest was held in September at the Maumee Bay Conference Center in Oregon, and being a native of Elyria, it was a great opportunity for Grimm to attend, and to visit family and friends. National headlines Madison has not only sold her winning painting and made national headlines as the youngest artist to have ever won the Federal Junior Stamp Contest but she has sold other paintings and took commissions for new paintings. “I heard that there was a contest and I really wanted to do what my Dad does, so I wanted to enter it – that’s kind of what started it,” she said. Madison started the painting when she was 5. “It took a little over a year I think because I took a little break in between and I couldn’t get to work on it right away,” she said. The home-schooled young artist plans to continue painting, exploring wildlife, and hopes to one day become a biologist. Birdwatching is a daddy-daughter event, explains Madison. “She gets pretty excited about seeing the warblers when we come (to the Biggest Week in American Birding); I know she’s been reading about the different ones,” he said. “I mean we get some of the common ones here but we don’t see nearly the variety as seen down there.”


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A Special Evening with artists Adam & Madison Grimm Winners of the Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp Contests

Come meet these two extraordinary artists, see their work, & get their autographs! Saturday, May 10 5–7:PM

Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center Refreshments, music, raffles, and more!

Ninety-eight cents of every $1 spent on the Duck Stamp goes to acquire habitats for birds. Stamps are available at the Black Swamp Bird Observatory gift shop or online at www.bsbobird.org. It is estimated that sales of the $15 stamp raise $25 million each year for wetland habitat conservation efforts.


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TIMING OF SPRING MIGRATION IN NORTHWEST OHIO The Lake Erie shoreline in northwest Ohio is famed as one of the best birding areas in North America, especially during spring migration. Although May is the peak season for visiting birders, spring migration is actually under way from mid-February to mid-June. Here’s an overview of what to expect at each point in the season. Late February: Waterfowl (ducks, geese, and swans) are beginning to move, along with early returning birds like American Woodcock and blackbirds. Flocks of American Crows are moving along the lakeshore. March 1 - 15: Waterfowl migration is fully under way. Raptor migration begins, with passage of Red-shouldered Hawk, Bald Eagle, and Turkey Vulture on southerly winds. Snow Buntings are moving around and an influx of Eastern Meadowlarks, Song Sparrows, and others is evident. March 16 - 31: Peak waterfowl migration, with huge numbers of ducks, geese, and swans on Lake Erie and in area marshes and ponds. Raptor migration still picking up. Pectoral Sandpiper and other early shorebirds begin to appear in flooded fields. Hardy birds like Tree Swallow and Eastern Phoebe are returning. Large numbers of Rusty Blackbirds, Fox Sparrows, and Golden-crowned Kinglets are present by the end of the month near the lakeshore. April 1 - 15: Waterfowl migration is still heavy, gradually declining through April. Raptor migration continues, with the last passage of Red-shouldered and Rough-legged Hawks. Early shorebird migrants are evident, including yellowlegs and American Golden-Plover. Big numbers of flickers, Hermit Thrushes, Winter Wrens, Yellow-rumped Warblers, and other early migrants are here, and by the middle of the month, a sprinkling of other warblers turns up. Fox Sparrows are still numerous, and many other migrant sparrows are arriving. April 16 - 30: First arrivals for many species, including Neotropical migrants like warblers, vireos, and orioles. Early warblers like Black-and-white, Palm, Nashville, and Black-throated Green are numerous by month’s end. In migrant traps along the lakeshore, this is the best time to find Pine and Orange-crowned Warblers, and a time when “southern” warblers like Worm-eating, Hooded, and Yellow-throated may appear. Typical migrants in this period include Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and sparrows such as Swamp and White-throated. Herons, egrets, and rails have their main arrival here. Raptor migration features Broad-winged and Sharp-shinned Hawks and Osprey. Shorebird variety and numbers continue to increase. May 1 - 10: Sometime in this period, weather conditions will produce the first really massive arrivals of Neotropical migrants. In the migrant traps along the lakeshore, warbler counts may jump from about a dozen species to nearly 30 species literally overnight, and other Neotropical migrants will abruptly pick up in numbers and variety also. After this big wave, numbers of individual migrants will drop off between successive waves of arrivals, but diversity will remain high through most of May. Early migrants like Rusty Blackbird and Fox Sparrow are mostly gone before May 10th. Migration of raptors and waterfowl is winding down, but shorebirds are still building toward their peak.


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SEE IT. SAVE IT.

American Bird Conservancy invites you to visit the Conservation Birding web site — the gateway to great birding and bird photography trips to the Neotropics. Conservation Birding is a window on more than 50 bird reserves throughout Latin America established by ABC and its partners, and provides details on travel and booking options for lodges and tours. The reserves protect close to one million acres, providing habitat for nearly half the total number of bird species found in the Americas, including both endemic species and Neotropical migratory songbirds that nest in North America. These reserves have been set up to host birders, and just by visiting, you will provide income to help pay for the stewardship of these special places. Reserve network partners include Asociación Armonía (Bolivia), Fundação Biodiversitas and REGUA (Brazil), Fundación ProAves (Colombia), Osa Conservation and Tirimbina Association (Costa Rica), Fundación Jocotoco (Ecuador), ECOAN and Amazon Conservation Association (Peru).

www.conservationbirding.org Marvelous Spatuletail, Huembo Reserve, Peru, by Dubi Shapiro


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MAGEE MARSH WILDLIFE AREA BOARDWALK CODE OF ETHICS: GUIDELINES TO ENHANCE THE VISITORS’ EXPERIENCE AND PROTECT THE RESOURCE The boardwalk at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area has become an iconic birding destination. Birders from around the world consider it one of the best places in the Western Hemisphere to experience the spring migration of songbirds. The area of wooded habitat along Lake Erie that the mile-long boardwalk meanders through is a concentration point for birds as they pause to rest and feed before crossing the Lake. And because the birding is so sensational, the boardwalk can become quite crowded at times. Black Swamp Bird Observatory, in conjunction with Ohio Division of Wildlife, and local birders and photographers, has developed a simple Boardwalk Code of Ethics to help ensure that your time on these bodacious birding boards is an enjoyable experience. Please note that since Magee Marsh is a state wildlife area, there are some regulations governing activities that are punishable by law. We list a few particularly important examples, below. The remaining information we offer simply as suggestions to make your experience a positive one and to ensure that the birds and the habitat are respected and protected.

ALL VISITORS MUST ADHERE TO THE RULES ESTABLISHED BY OHIO DIVISION OF WILDLIFE. FOR EXAMPLE: 

Littering is prohibited.

To injure, remove, deface, damage, or destroy any tree or plant on state property is prohibited.

No soliciting of any kind without a written permit from the Ohio Division of Wildlife.

Other than assistance animals, pets are not allowed on the boardwalk.

Scattering or placing feed capable of luring, enticing, or attracting birds is prohibited.

Camping, swimming, fires, barbecuing on the area is prohibited.

REPORT WILDLIFE VIOLATIONS 1-800-Wildlife and 1-800-Poacher

For a full list of wildlife area regulations, visit the Ohio Division of Wildlife website, here: http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/public-hunting-fishing-wildlife-viewing-areas/wildlife-area-laws

GENERAL GUIDELINES 

So others can enjoy the natural experience, refrain from using radios, shouting, or making other loud noises.

Turn cell phones off or set to vibrate.

Respect the habitat and protect the resource by staying on the boardwalk at all times.

For the safety and comfort of others, please don’t block the boardwalk in any way.

Be aware of your personal space and how it impacts others (i.e. backpacks, tripods, strollers, etc.).

Be mindful of those around you and allow others to pass in congested areas.

Do not stand or sit on the railing of the boardwalk at any time.

Please be considerate of the experience of those around you and do not smoke.

Please keep in mind that whether birding, photographing, or just enjoying a walk on the boardwalk during migration, we are all there for the same ultimate reason. Please be respectful of one another, enjoy the birds and company, and rejoice that there are so many people with varied interests who care for nature.

We encourage all visitors to purchase an Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp (OWLS). Proceeds of the sales of the stamp help generate funding for wildlife diversity in Ohio. OWLS are available for purchase at Black Swamp Bird Observatory and the Sportsman's Migratory Bird Center (both located at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area.) You may also purchase the stamp online at www.bsbo.org


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BIRDING & PHOTOGRAPHY ETIQUETTE 

Laser pointers: We discourage the use of laser pointers at all times.

Pishing, squeaking, playback, and other bird-attracting sounds are discouraged. They're not likely to be effective anyway: migrants passing through an area tend to be less responsive to such sounds, while resident birds at a popular spot like Magee have become habituated and mostly ignore these sounds.

This is mentioned in the first section under state regulations, but worth repeating: Do not alter the habitat in any way (breaking branches, pulling vegetation, etc.) in order to get a better view or photo of a bird, bird nest, etc.

Tripods can be a challenge for everyone when the boardwalk is crowded. During these times, we encourage the use of monopods, or photographing birds along the edge of the parking lot where bird photography can be really good! If you do use a tripod on the boardwalk, set up in such a way that you utilize the smallest area possible, try to avoid occupying more than ½ the width of the boardwalk.

Share the view: once you see the bird, move on and allow others to enjoy it.

When viewing a bird, please step as close as possible to the railing on the side the bird is on to allow others to pass safely behind you.

Whenever possible, avoid walking in front of someone who’s looking through optics or camera.

Flash photography: in areas where there are crowds of people and the birds are close, we discourage the use of flash photography on the boardwalk.

Exercise patience with beginners. The boardwalk attracts many new birders who may not know basic birding etiquette. All of these people represent potential new support for bird conservation, so it's very important to treat them with patience and courtesy.

ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS 

Restrooms: it’s a long way to the other end of the boardwalk, and the birding can be so good that hours will pass before you know it. To ensure your comfort and happiness, we encourage use of the portable toilets before entering the boardwalk.

Food: While there are many wonderful restaurants in the area, the boardwalk is a fair distance from them, so packing a picnic lunch can be a good option.

Carry water with you at all times.

On average, spring migration in northwest Ohio happens before the hatch of biting insects, so repellent is typically not necessary.

The Magee boardwalk is in a fairly remote location, at least 35 minutes from the nearest hospital. It's a good idea to carry a small first-aid kit when birding the area.

In the case of an emergency, dial 911.

Purchase your Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp at Black Swamp Bird Observatory, the Sportsman’s Migratory Bird Center, or online at www.bsbo.org


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Kenn Kaufman helps get film to big screen By Yaneek Smith Press Contributing Writer Kenn Kaufman, an internationally renowned bird expert and a resident of Oak Harbor, worked as a consultant on the film A Birder’s Guide to Everything. The movie, which stars Ben Kingsley and James LeGros, is a coming-of-age comedy built around birding. It details a 15-year-old boy (played by Kodi SmitMcPhee) who embarks on a road trip with friends to try to document a possible sighting of a bird believed to be extinct. According to its website, the film is: “Sideways meets Stand by Me in this endearing story of friendship, family and a place in bird watching’s history books. A Birder’s Guide to Everything is an alternately poignant and funny window into the thoughtful world of birding and the inner peace that can be discovered through a walk in the woods.” Kaufman spoke highly about the film’s director, Rob Meyer. “Rob Meyer is a great guy, very talented,” Kaufman said. “He’s a graduate of the film program at NYU, he has traveled around the world doing documentaries for National Geographic and Nova, and his short films have won many awards. But he’s also a very decent human being.” According to Kaufman, it was Meyer’s reputation—and the quality of the screenplay, written by Meyer with Luke Matheny—that convinced the Oscarwinning actor Sir Ben Kingsley to appear in the film. But Kaufman’s respect for Meyer as a director also rests on Meyer’s attention to accuracy in the details of birding in the film. “(Rob) wrote to me in 2011,” Kaufman said. “He was in early drafts of the screenplay and he wanted birding experts to review it for accuracy. Morgan Tingley and I became the main consultants. We started corresponding and I read thru 2-3 different versions as the script evolved, with tons of emails and lots of phone calls back and forth. Then I had a number of conversations with the set designers about how different scenes should look. When it was filming, I went to NY and got to watch some of the filming for four days. There was an amazing amount of work in filming even a short scene—they might take a 12-hour day to shoot a 3-minute scene, but that’s because they were so focused on getting things right. Including the birding part! So often in other films and television, if they mention birding at all, they get the details wrong.” Kaufman’s official title in the credits was “ornithological consultant.” By definition, ornithology is the science of bird study.

Movie actor Sir Ben Kingsley with local birding author Kenn Kaufman. Early next month, May 6-15, birding enthusiasts will take part in what is known as the The Biggest Week in American Birding. Last year, 65,000 people journeyed to the Lake Erie marsh region to observe these creatures returning home. Meyer actually visited Oak Harbor during the Biggest Week last year and screened the film, just a couple of weeks after the film’s world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York. “We had a packed house for that,”

Kaufman said. “Rob gave a talk on the making of the film and it got a really good reception.” I count myself as one of the many people who take for granted this special time of year, not thinking about how fortunate I am to live in such close proximity to a wildlife region that presents us with the opportunity to observe such beautiful animals. Kaufman, 59, who was born in South Bend, Ind., lived in Arizona before moving to Ohio in 2005. “In my late teens, I spent years hitchhiking and looking at birds,” he said. “I developed a reputation and I wrote for small nature publications in my 20s before getting my first book contract in my late 20s. After that, it made it easier to get into magazines when they’d seen my writing in other places.” Kaufman has written a dozen books, and regularly writes for a several magazines. He is a field editor for Audubon Magazine and he and his wife, Kimberly, are consulting editors for Birds & Bloom Magazine. Kimberly works as the Executive Director for the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Oak Harbor, Ohio. She has worked with the organization since the 1990s, and has served as the executive director since 2009. She also writes for various publications, including Birds & Blooms, and is the co-author of the Kaufman Field Guide to Nature of New England.

MEET KENN KAUFMAN AND SEE A SPECIAL SCREENING OF

A BIRDER’S GUIDE TO EVERYTHING DURING THE BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING Monday, May 12th, 7:00 PM Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center

$10 per person Seating is limited to 200 100% of the proceeds will benefit songbird habitat conservation! Visit www.bwiab.com to reserve your seat * Film screening is open to the public! *No need to register for the festival to attend.


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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A glimpse of the Golden-winged Warbler is a highlight for any birder. But this tiny bird is in big trouble. Help ensure a future for this species by making a small donation that offsets your travel carbon footprint to the Biggest Week. Your donation will support reforestation on the Golden-winged Warbler’s wintering grounds.

With a minimum suggested donation of $10, a little green can help save the gold!

Donate to Save the Golden-Wing: • In person: Biggest Week registration table • Online: support.abcbirds.org/biggest-week


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Balloon, lantern releases hurt environment By Melissa Burden Press Contributing Writer Schools have released balloons during elementary science classes and many people release them in remembrance of a loved one. But, what happens to those balloons once the helium runs out? Students Against Balloon Releases (SABR), a partnership between Black Swamp Bird Observatory and BentonCarroll-Salem Schools, is hoping to educate students about the dangers and wastefulness of mass balloon releases and other forms of litter. Tiffanie Hayes, BSBO Conservation Outreach Specialist, said she too remembers releasing balloons in science class. As she got older, she realized just how dangerous the practice was. “When I was in school, we released balloons as a science project,” Hayes said. “We would write our names and addresses on a postcard and hoped that whoever found our balloons would write back. We would then be able to see how far the balloon went. As I got older, I began to see how dangerous it is to have balloons released into the environment.” Hayes said she has seen firsthand what the deflated balloons can do to the environment. Both she and her daughter, Delaney, have found the balloons in the environment. “We just peeled off a latex balloon from a tree in Magee Marsh,” Hayes said. “It melted onto the tree. Balloons keep changing texture. They just do not go away. They are not biodegradable. They can float 1,000 miles and if they reach the sea, they look like jellyfish to turtles. Turtles that eat them will have their intestines blocked and they will starve to death.” Hayes also takes issue with Chinese lantern releases, claiming they are dangerous. “In Ohio, you are supposed to have a license to release them and a $1 million insurance policy, but nobody knows it,” she said. “What if one falls down on a barn?” Starting new partnership Hayes said she approached BCS Superintendent Guy Parmigian last year about the planned release of balloons for homecoming. “I asked him to not release balloons,” Hayes said. “I explained what the environmental impact was. BCS schools are now partners and will be rolling out programs for the elementary and older students explaining the issues around balloons and lantern releases. It is very exciting.” Hayes said she is also hoping to add two art contests to the program. “We would have a contest for the

mental and economic impact balloon and lantern releases have in the area. “The classes will allow us to educate students about the human footprint,” he explained. The program is about getting kids thinking about science and technology and how to be responsible citizens in general. Science, math, and social studies will all be combined in the program.” Parmigian said the program will be a good way to get students thinking about science, math, social policy and politics. “In Ottawa County, tourism is the main industry,” Parmigian explained. “We have to keep the county clean for visitors. There is also a political impact. We host the Biggest Week in Birding and we take that for granted. If our community and the marsh are littered, that may impact the number of visitors who come here. It really is about the economy of the region as well as the environment.”

Delaney Hayes with material from a balloon release she found in a wildlife area. younger students as well as one for older students,” Hayes said. “For the older kids, we may have them compete to illustrate a page in a book I am completing called Critters and Litter. I am hoping we can have the program grow throughout the state and that other districts locally will join in.” Parmigian said when he was first approached about the homecoming balloon release, he could not understand what the issue was. “Tiffany (Hayes) called me about the homecoming balloon release at the stadium,” Parmigian said. “Honestly, my first reaction was ‘why shouldn’t we release balloons? What’s the problem?’” After meeting with Hayes a few days later, Parmigian said he now knows what the issues are. The balloons and lanterns are dangerous,” Parmigian said. “They litter Magee Marsh and our community. The Mylar balloons can transfer electricity. If they get caught in power lines they can cause a fire.” The district decided to partner with BSBO after Delaney spoke to the Board Of Education in May, 2013. “Delaney did such a great job that everyone decided that the SABR program was something we wanted to be involved with,” Parmigian said. “She is a very good presenter and she made me and the rest of the board proud to have her as one of our students.” Parmigian said he is now very excited about the planned educational classes and sees them as a good way to educate students about the environ-

Environmental classes Kate Zimmerman, BSBO education director, said the group is hoping to hold a couple of classes yet this school year. The program has been stalled a little because of the amount of calamity days the students have had this winter. “We are still in the pilot stage of the program, Zimmerman said. “We hope to get it off the ground in 2014 and we have begun applying for grants. By the 2014-2015 school year, we will begin providing the program free of charge to the district. We believe the program will help satisfy the core curriculum requirements for math and science.” Zimmerman said she is also hoping the program will be adopted by the state and other districts, but she understands some people will question the issue of releasing balloons and Chines lanterns. “We are hoping to educate students and the community about the dangers and wastefulness of balloons and lanterns,” she said. “The program will empower students with the knowledge to educate others about balloons and litter in general. If you get kids connected with nature and the impact they have on it, they may think twice about littering and our ecosystem.” Zimmerman said she acknowledges that balloon releases are done in memory of a lost loved one. She said there are other ways, including releasing trained doves into the sky as an alternative. “You could plant a bush or a tree in someone’s honor instead of releasing balloons. There are a lot of environmentally friendly ways to honor someone,” Zimmerman explained. Visit www.bsbo.org or http://balloonsblow.org


• Perennials • Crafting Gourds

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~Located in the barn~ Open Thursday-Sunday A country-primitive, gift shoppe

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

VISIT THE BIGGEST WEEK

BIRDER’S MARKETPLACE The Birder’s Marketplace,

in the lobby of Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center, will feature a wonderful variety of bird & nature related items including crafts, artwork, jewelry, birding wear & gear, optics, & birding travel information.

Every afternoon & evening during the festival from 3-8 p.m. (some booths will be open longer hours) the Birder’s Marketplace will be open for business!

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Maumee Bay Lodge is located just 15 minutes west of Crane Creek, Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Magee Marsh and Metzger’s Marsh. The Water’s Edge Restaurant at Maumee Bay Lodge opens daily at 5:15 a.m. during the festival. during the festival. Box Lunches available for $9.99. Call 419.836.1466 419.836.1466 Ext. to place your order. Call 2 to place your order For availability and more information visit:

maumeebaystateparklodge.com/blackswamp or call: 800.282.7275 To take advantage of our special rate use the promo code: BLACKSWAMP

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Oak Harbor girls win first sectional title in 11 years

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Magruder Charity Ball held at Catawba Island Club

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OTTAWA COUNTY’S LARGEST CIRCULATED NEWSPAPER

SINCE 1983

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Volume 32 Number 3 Thursday, February 27, 2014

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BY JOHN SCHAFFNER

Tell Tales

ABOVE: Mayor Vince Leone shakes the hand of Alejandro Zapata

By Jasmine Cupp On the night of Saturday, Feb. 22, at Slater’s Madison Street Pub in downtown Port Clinton, Mayor Vince Leone presented Alejandro “Hondo” Zapata with a key to the city and the title of Citizen of the Year for 2013. “We usually present the award at City Hall,” said Mayor Leone, “but for Hondo, I thought this would be a better venue.” Slater’s was already packed with regular Saturday night patrons and party goers for Stella Lopez’s birthday party. Around 10:30 p.m. Mayor Leone, along with Michelle, Isaiah, Xavier and Zayden Zapata and other friends and

Mayor Leone read the Proclamation from the Office of the Mayor to Zapata and everyone in Slater’s: Proclamation from the Office of the Mayor Whereas: The true strength of any man can only be expressed by the way he cares for his fellow man, and; Whereas: Alejandro Zapata brought the heart of a City together to honor the young, brave soul of Devin Kohlman, and; Whereas: Alejandro Zapata led our community to forget their differences and bring forth the true spirit of caring, and; Whereas: He proved his love of his fellow man through his selfless acts of kindness for one family, the effects could be felt beyond our City limits and even our State and Country, and; Now, Therefore: as Alejandro Zapata not only expressed his unselfish love for his community but has proven that he is his brother’s keeper, it is for this reason that I, Vincent P. Leone, Mayor of the City of Port Clinton, Ohio, with great honor and humility present the title of Citizen of the Year for 2013! In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the Seal of the City of Port Clinton, Ohio, to be affixed this 22nd day of February, 2014. Vincent P. Leone, Mayor

Below: Wife Michelle Zapata with their children Zayden, Isaiah, and Xavier family, parted the sea of patrons to reach Hondo, who was deejaying. For one of the only times in his life, Zapata was speechless. The crowd yelled in support for Zapata. Taking in the moment, he soon gathered his thoughts. “If you are struggling, I am the example that you can make it through,” said Zapata. “Everyone has problems; some people’s problems are bigger than others. It’s all about family and all about paying it forward. Thanks for being by my side (he said to wife Michelle) and you too, boys. It’s like I always say, every day’s a blessing.” Zapata was a key player in getting the community involved with helping Devin Kohlman and his family during Devin’s illness. In the end, not only was the community involved and invested in Devin, but the county, the state, the nation and the world. Like Mayor Leone stated in his proclamation, the selfless acts of caring meant so much to Devin and to everyone in our community. “The Citizen of the Year award is strictly the mayor’s decision,” said Mayor Leone. “There are folks that have worked hard in organizations, but we are looking for individual, outstanding citizens. He brought together a community like no other. I wish I could accomplish what he has accomplished. He brought a town together despite their differences. He really deserves this.”

Bruce Winters announces his candidacy for re-election as Ottawa County Common Pleas Judge Citing his desire to continue the many new programs he has instituted while in office, the Honorable Bruce Winters has announced that he is running for re-election for Judge, of the Ottawa County Common Pleas Court as an Independent candidate. Judge Winters has served the communities of Ottawa County as Common Pleas Judge for the past 5 years. The very integral programs implemented by Judge Winters include a highly supervised bond release system, intensive probation for high need/risk offenders, drug testing for criminal defendants, drug court, inhouse intensive outpatient treatment program for drug and alcohol offenders, and a mediation program for foreclosure cases. Judge Winters has been able to decrease the Court’s annual budget while securing federal grant monies to process child support cases and state

grant monies to assist with probation. A graduate of the University of Toledo, College of Law, Winters holds a degree in Political Science and Criminal Justice from the University of Toledo. Winters was a practicing attorney for 21 years. Prior to becoming Ottawa County Common Pleas Judge, he served Ottawa County communities as a Police Officer, Juvenile Probation Officer, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney and Magistrate. Winters currently serves with the National Judicial College and the Ohio Judicial College as an instructor for new magistrates and judges.

INSIDE RECORDS 2A

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BOOMERS 5A

Q

SPORTS 1B

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SCHOOLS 3B

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CLASSIFIEDS 4B

One quest down, two to go See page 10

P

RESS March 3, 2014

FREE

Serving i The Th Eastern Eastern t Maumee M Bay Communities Since 1972

High Level closes for 19 months, creates concerns

Gals not afraid of guys See page 18

M

By J. Patrick Eaken Press Staff Writer news@presspublications.com The Ohio Department of Transportation District 2 announces that the Anthony Wayne Bridge is scheduled to close March 17 at 7 a.m. The bridge will be closed to both vehicles and pedestrian traffic through September 2015. Built in 1931, the Anthony Wayne Bridge is a nationally recognized historical bridge that connects downtown Toledo with the east side. ODOT awarded the $28.7 million project to the E.S. Wagner Company in Oregon. Work includes re-decking the bridge, replacing the existing truss end spans, rehabilitation of the existing substructures, new street lighting and rebuilding the sidewalks, railings and fence. Following the closure, lane restrictions will be put in place for an additional construction season for painting with a project completion date slated for December 2015, weather permitting. “It’s going to send a lot more cars down Main Street. It’s going to have a negative impact on some businesses, like those gas stations right at the base of the bridge — on both sides,” District 3 councilman Mike Craig said. “I’m more concerned about businesses that have drive-in traffic. The drive-up businesses will have a negative impact and what I’ve been telling people is, ‘It’s a negative-impact, yeah, and it’s going to be a long time — 19 months. But if they don’t do this now, they could close that bridge.’” Other downtown bridges open during the construction period are the Martin Luther King Bridge, which leads directly into Main Street in East Toledo, the Craig Bridge which connects Summit Street to Front Street, the Veterans Glass City Skyway Interstate I-280 span, and the DiSalle Bridge that spans I-75 near downtown. ODOT will be holding an informational meeting to discuss the Anthony Wayne Bridge project on March 5 at 6 p.m. in the East Toledo Family Center, 1020 Varland Dr., Toledo. ODOT will also post updates on Facebook and Twitter.

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of The Week o

The river is quite dynamic. It drains into hundreds of square miles of farmland. Mayor Gordon Bowman See page 4

Little Bitz is happy to be back home with George and Addie Decker. (Press photo by Ken Grosjean)

Returned

Lost Yorkie, “Little Bitz” is back home

By Kelly J. Kaczala Press News Editor kkaczala@presspublications.com George Decker had his prayers answered on Tuesday. Little Bitz, his three year old Yorkie mix that’s been missing since Feb.11, was returned to him and his wife, Addie after someone recognized a photo of the dog that appeared with an article in The Press last week. “We got her. She’s sitting right here in my lap,” George told The Press Tuesday afternoon. Decker, 80, had been inconsolable since the 10 lb. dog slipped away from him after he had opened his car door in the parking lot of Nose to Tail, a groomer at Coy and Navarre Avenue, for a 9:30 a.m. appointment. The dog, donning a pink wool coat, red collar with a pink leash trailing behind, had dashed across Navarre Avenue by the time Amie Brodie, owner of Nose to Tail, had sprinted down the street to help George retrieve it. But a motorist had picked up the dog and drove away. Crushed, George could hardly contain his pain. He considered Little Bitz, which had helped him recover from a stroke last year, his “baby.” He couldn’t sleep for days, blaming himself for losing his grip on the dog’s leash. He and Addie had filed a report with the Oregon police, checked with the Lucas County

It was so lonesome when she was gone. We had no life in us at all. I felt sick half the time.

Alejandro Zapata: Citizen of the Year, 2013

Q This column might be a bit short this week, since I was able to score passage for Mary Alice and I aboard the Brilliance of the Seas Cruise Ship last week for the Buckeyes Cruise for Cancer, hosted by OSU football coach Urban Meyer and his wife Shelly. This was the seventh annual cruise that started with Chris Spielman and his wife Stephanie, who died from breast cancer several years ago. We met a lot of very neat people, including Iris Keels, the mother of Paul Keels, the voice of the Buckeyes, who worked many years at Xavier University. It turns out that we knew a lot of the same people from back when I went to school there in the late 1960s. Then it turns out her son started his broadcast career the same place I did, at WVXU FM. One of the highlights, as indicated by the photo, was when Dr. David George and his wife Pat met Eddie George, the Heisman Trophy winner. We kidded David all week about getting together with his “Cousin Eddie”. The alumni band played every day, the alumni cheerleaders led the crowd in cheers every day, and Urban and Shelly Meyer and their family members talked about the loss of Urban’s mother, who also died from cancer. Meyer became very emotional discussing that topic. The cruise raised close to a half million dollars for cancer research. There were quite a few Ottawa Countians on the trip, including County Commissioner Jim Sass and his wife Mollie. Q Our “Find Wylie” winner this week is Nathan Holman of Port Clinton, who was one of 167 people who found our friendly fish in the ad for Mutach’s Market on page 6A in last week’s Beacon. Nathan wins our weekly $20 gift card from Friendship Food Stores. We’ll be hiding Wylie again this week, so if you find him, drop off an entry form at our office in the Beacon Place Business Center or click on the Find Wylie Icon at our website, www.thebeacon.net. Q This Saturday, March 1, is Community Preparedness Day. It will be observed at the Ottawa County Riverview Healthcare Campus near Oak Harbor. Activities start at 8:30 a.m. with a free Pancake and Sausage Breakfast followed by presentations from Ottawa County Sheriff, Steve Levorchick on Home Security; Kenan Mylander from Mercy St. Vincent’s Burn Unit on Fire Safety; Mike Drusbacky on what to do in the event of a nuclear accident, chemical spill and train derailment; Kimberly Newman, a Toledo TV meteorologist on severe weather preparation; and finally Beth Leggett from the Ottawa County office of the American Red Cross with what should go into an Emergency Supply Kit. Q The Port Clinton High School Leadership Council is hosting the Ohio Association of Student Councils State Conference from April 24 to 26. They are looking for community help in housing the 500 to 800 students who will be in attendance that weekend. What’s involved? First, select the number of students you can house (they don’t need beds, just floor space for sleeping bags). They will need transportation to and from PCHS. They will need a good breakfast on Friday and Saturday mornings. Forms are available at the high school. For more information, call 419-734-2147. This is obviously a big endeavor and your help is very much needed and appreciated. Q Even though I was gone all weekend, we still had our Editor, Jasmine Cupp, at Saturday’s Magruder Hospital Charity Ball. We always do a photo collage of the big dance, and so it is this year. Check out page 6A. Q Don’t forget our “Coffee with the Editor” session at Common Grounds every Wednesday at 9 a.m. According to Editor Jasmine Cupp, we had a good group there last Wednesday. Lots of interesting local topics are discussed. It is our opportunity to have a sit-down with our readers and learn about what you want to see in The Beacon as we enter our 32nd year of community publishing. Also, don’t forget that Common Grounds is offering their gourmet coffee for just 99-cents with one refill. Q I met Jack Miller during a breakfast speaking engagement at Otterbein North Shore a couple of weeks ago. Jack owns Beacon Point Driving Range at the intersection of State Route 2 and Lakeshore Drive. Jack has begun a “Golf Quiz” which you can find on one of our sports pages each week. Check out your golf knowledge.

The

Cruisin’ for cancer with the Buckeyes

Canine Care & Control (formerly known as Lucas County Dog Warden), posted a photo on Facebook’s Toledo Area Lost and Found Pets, and circulated fliers in hopes of finding Little Bitz, but to no avail. After their story appeared in The Press last week, calls came pouring in, said Addie. “People called me like you wouldn’t believe,” she said. “Someone called and said, `Addie, I don’t have your dog, but we’re praying for you.’ Also among the calls was a man who said “My heart breaks for you.” “He said he saw a woman in a brown midsized Chevy with two children in the back seat pick the dog up. He was right be-

hind her. He told me he was going to go that way every day to see if he could find the woman.” A staff member from the Wood County Humane Society also called, said Addie. “One of the women who works there said she would go in every day to look for our dog,” said Addie. She said `If I can’t find your dog, I will find you another little dog.’” George said he was grateful for the support from the community. “Everyone wanted to get involved,” he said. Someone suggested putting an ad in Toledo’s daily newspaper, but Addie said they had already done so before contacting The Press “and we didn’t get one call.” On Tuesday morning, they got the call they were waiting for. “A young woman said `I think I have your dog,’” recalled Addie. The woman’s grandmother had read the story in The Press and informed her the dog she had found was George and Addie’s. “I asked the woman to call Little Bitz by her name to see if she would respond,” Addie said when she got the call. The woman, according to Addie, said the dog wasn’t paying attention to her. “I said `Let her hear my voice on the phone,’ and when I called out to her, Little Bitz knocked the phone out of that woman’s (Continued on page 2)

Serious illness raises tough questions. Let our experts help with what’s weighing on your mind. ToughQuestionsStraightAnswers.org © 2014 Hospice of Northwest Ohio

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419-836-2221 OTTAWA COUNTY’S LARGEST CIRCULATED NEWSPAPER

SINCE 1983

THE

THE

PRESS

SINCE 1983

OTTAWA COUNTY’S LARGEST CIRCULATED NEWSPAPER

419-732-2154


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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2014

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2014 SCHEDULE REGISTRATION IS OPEN MAY 5, 8 AM TO 4 PM AND MAY 6 TO MAY 14, 7 AM to 7PM AT MAUMEE BAY LODGE & CONFERENCE CENTER

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TUESDAY, MAY 6 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: PRIVATE LANDS OF LITTLE PORTAGE AREA GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: PRIVATE MARSH GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: TOLEDO METROPARKS GUIDED BUS TRIP KELLEYS ISLAND GUIDED BIRDING TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: SHOREBIRD IDENTIFICATION BASICS - KENN KAUFMAN WORKSHOP: eBIRD 101 - KEN OSTERMILLER BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: THE ART OF IDENTIFICATION - DAVID SIBLEY

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MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAGEE MARSH WA MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

10:00 AM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 10:00 AM 4:00 PM 1:00 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 7 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: BIRDING BY EAR GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: SANDUSKY BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: SOUTH BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: PT. MOUILLEE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: CATAWBA/MARBLEHEAD GUIDED BUS TRIP BIRDING BY CANOE DAVID SIBLEY FUNDRAISING BIRD WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: BIRDSONG EAR TRAINING TECHNIQUES - LISA RAINSONG WORKSHOP: USING RADAR TO TRACK BIRDS - DAVID LA PUMA BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF THE PASSENGER PIGEON

EVENING SOCIAL HOSTED BY VICTOR EMANUEL NATURE TOURS 5 - 7 PM / Maumee Bay Lodge & Conference Center Free food, drinks, and music for festival registrants only, please! KEYNOTE: WHY PEOPLE LOVE BIRDS - VICTOR EMANUEL SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING NIGHT HIKE

$12 $10 $10

MAUMEE BAY LODGE BSBO MAUMEE BAY LODGE

7:00 PM 8:15 PM 9:30 PM

8:00 PM 9:15 PM 11:00 PM

$25 $75 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $85 $50

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE PORT CLINTON DOCK MAGEE MARSH WA EAST

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:45 AM 8:00 AM

10:00 AM 12:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 6:00 PM 11:00 AM

THURSDAY, MAY 8 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: BIRDING WITH TOM STEPHENS AND SCOTT WHITTLE BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: NW BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: PHOTOGRAPHY TECHNIQUES GUIDED BUS TRIP PT. PELEE BOAT TRIP (SELF-GUIDED) (TO REGISTER, CALL JET EXPRESS) FUNDRAISING BIRD WALK WITH KAUFMAN'S AND BIRDS & BLOOMS STAFF

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2014 SCHEDULE


34 BIGGEST WEEK INWITH AMERICAN BIRDING 2014 FUNDRAISING BIRD WALK KAUFMAN'S AND BIRDS & BLOOMS STAFF

$50

MAGEE MARSH WA EAST

8:00 AM

11:00 AM

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2014 SCHEDULE ACTIVITY

FEE

LOCATION

START

END

FREE FREE FREE $25 FREE $10 $10 FREE $12

MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

10:00 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

THURSDAY, MAY 8 cont'd MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: BASICS OF IDENTIFYING SPARROWS - KENN KAUFMAN WORKSHOP: GARDENING FOR BIRDS & BUTTERFLIES - BIRDS & BLOOMS BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: WHAT'S IN A NAME? BREAKING DOWN BIRDING'S IDENTITY BARRIERS

EVENING SOCIAL HOSTED BY BIRDS & BLOOMS 5 - 7 pm / Maumee Bay Lodge & Conference Center Free food, drinks, and music - for festival registrants only, please! SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING

$10

BSBO

8:15 PM

9:15 PM

$25 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 FREE FREE FREE $25 FREE $10 $25 $10 FREE $12

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR BSBO OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 2:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

10:00 AM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

$10 $10

BSBO MAUMEE BAY LODGE

8:15 PM 9:30 PM

9:15 PM 11:00 PM

FREE $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE $12

MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA MAGEE MARSH WA EAST BSBO BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

5:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

5:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 11:30 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

FRIDAY, MAY 9 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: BIRDING BY EAR GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: SOUTH BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: TOLEDO METROPARKS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: SANDUSKY BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: BEGINNING BIRDER GUIDED BUS TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: IDENTIFYING WARBLERS EASY - AUTHORS OF THE WARBLER GUIDE

WORKSHOP: BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY BASICS - KEVIN LOUGHLIN WORKSHOP: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 101 - STEPHEN INGRAHAM - ZEISS BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: A CONSERVATION BIG YEAR - LAURA ERICKSON EVENING SOCIAL - HOSTED BY ZEISS 5 - 7 pm / Maumee Bay Lodge & Conference Center Free food, drinks, and music - for festival registrants only, please! SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING NIGHT HIKE

SATURDAY, MAY 10 (INTERNATIONAL MIGRATORY BIRD DAY) TOM BARTLETT'S BIG SIT BUS #1: PRIVATE MARSH GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OHIO YOUNG BIRDERS CLUB GUIDED FIELD TRIP SONGBIRD BANDING AND MIGRATION PROGRAM OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: WHEN THE BIRD LOOKS BACK - KENN KAUFMAN

EVENING SOCIAL / CELEBRATING THE DUCK STAMP / AN EVENING WITH ADAM AND MADISON GRIMM / FATHER AND DAUGHTER / WINNING DUCK STAMP AND JUNIOR DUCK STAMP ARTISTS / 5 - 7 PM / MAUMEE BAY LODGE / FREE REFRESHMENTS FOR BIGGEST WEEK REGISTRANTS ONLY. MUST SHOW BIGGEST WEEK NAME BADGE TO PARTICIPATE


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

35

2014

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2014 SCHEDULE ACTIVITY

FEE

LOCATION

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END

$75 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $50 $50 FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE $10 $12 $12

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA EAST MAGEE MARSH WA EAST MAGEE MARSH WA PEARSON METROPARK BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 3:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM

12:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 8:00 PM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM 8:00 PM

SUNDAY, MAY 11 BUS #1: BIRDING WITH TOM STEPHENS AND SCOTT WHITTLE BUS #2: PRIVATE LANDS OF LITTLE PORTAGE AREA GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: SOUTH BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: CATAWBA/MARBLEHEAD GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS# 7: PT. MOUILLEE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: PHOTOGRAPHY TECHNIQUES GUIDED BUS TRIP WALK WITH KAUFMANS' AND AMERICAN BIRD CONSERVANCY WALK WITH NEIL HAYWARD MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK FAMILY BIRD WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE WORKSHOP: RAPTOR IDENTIFICATION - ERIK BRUHNKE KEYNOTE PROGRAM: SAVING THE GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER KEYNOTE: AN ACCIDENTAL BIG YEAR - NEIL HAYWARD

EVENING SOCIAL HOSTED BY HOSTED BY AMERICAN BIRD CONSERVANCY & BLACK SWAMP BIRD OBSERVATORY 5 - 7 pm at Maumee Bay Lodge & Conference Center Free food, drinks, and music - for festival registrants only, please!

SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING NIGHT HIKE

$10 $10

BSBO MAUMEE BAY LODGE

8:15 PM 9:30 PM

9:15 PM 11:00 PM

$25 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 FREE FREE FREE $25 FREE $10

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR

6:00 AM 8:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM

10:00 AM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM

$25 $10 FREE $12

BSBO OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

2:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

4:00 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

MONDAY, MAY 12 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: FIELD SKETCHING GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: PRIVATE MARSH GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: NW BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS $6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: TOLEDO METROPARKS GUIDED BIRD WALK BUS # 8: BEGINNING BIRDER GUIDED BUS TRIP BIRDING BY CANOE MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: A NEW SYSTEM FOR IDENTIFYING & LEARNING VOCALIZATIONS - AUTHORS OF THE WARBLER GUIDE WORKSHOP: BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY BASICS - KEVIN LOUGHLIN WORKSHOP: HISTORY OF BIRD FEEDING IN AMERICA - PAUL BAICICH BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE:DISCOVERING THE JOCOTOCO - ROBERT RIDGLEY

EVENING SOCIAL / 5 - 7 PM / MAUMEE BAY LODGE / FREE REFRESHMENTS FOR BIGGEST WEEK REGISTRANTS ONLY. MUST SHOW BIGGEST WEEK NAME BADGE TO PARTICIPATE SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING

$10

BSBO

8:15 PM

9:15 PM

$25 $25 $45 $45 $45 $45

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM

10:00 AM 10:00 AM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM

TUESDAY, MAY 13 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP


36

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2014 SCHEDULE ACTIVITY

FEE

LOCATION

START

END

$45 $45 $60 FREE FREE FREE $25 $25 FREE $10 $10 FREE $12

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MARBLEHEAD DOCK MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:45 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

3:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 10:00 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

TUESDAY, MAY 13 cont'd BUS #7: PT. MOUILLEE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: SANDUSKY BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP KELLEYS ISLAND GUIDED BIRDING TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: PRINCIPLES AND PITFALLS OF BIRD ID - KENN KAUFMAN WORKSHOP: eBird - ZACHARY DEBRUINE BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: THE WARBLER GUIDE - TOM STEPHENS AND SCOTT WHITTLE

EVENING SOCIAL / 5 - 7 PM / MAUMEE BAY LODGE / FREE REFRESHMENTS FOR BIGGEST WEEK REGISTRANTS ONLY. MUST SHOW BIGGEST WEEK NAME BADGE TO PARTICIPATE SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING NIGHT HIKE

$10 $10

BSBO MAUMEE BAY LODGE

8:15 PM 9:30 PM

9:15 PM 11:00 PM

$25 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 FREE FREE FREE $25 FREE $10 $10 FREE $12

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

10:00 AM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM 3:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: PRIVATE LANDS OF LITTLE PORTAGE AREA GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: CATAWBA/MARBLEHEAD GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS # 8: BEGINNING BIRDER GUIDED BUS TRIP BIRDING BY CANOE MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: GULL IDENTIFICATION 101 - ERIK BRUHNKE WORKSHOP: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 101 - STEPHEN INGRAHAM - ZEISS BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: SNOWY OWLS: STUDYING AND APPRECIATING ONE OF THE WORLD'S MOST MAGNIFICENT BIRDS - NORMAN SMITH

EVENING SOCIAL / 5 - 7 PM / MAUMEE BAY LODGE / FREE REFRESHMENTS FOR BIGGEST WEEK REGISTRANTS ONLY. MUST SHOW BIGGEST WEEK NAME BADGE TO PARTICIPATE BIRD TATTOO CONTEST SKYDANCING: WOODCOCKS ON THE WING

FREE $10

MAUMEE BAY LODGE BSBO

6:00 PM 8:15 PM

7:00 PM 9:15 PM

$25 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 $45 FREE FREE FREE $25 FREE $10 $10 FREE FREE $12

MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA BSBO MAGEE MARSH WA MAUMEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR PEARSON METROPARK MAUMEE BAY LODGE MAUMEE BAY LODGE

6:00 AM 8:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:30 PM 2:00 PM 10:00 AM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

10:00 AM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 4:00 PM 12:30 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 1:30 PM 3:00 PM 12:00 PM 8:00 PM 5:00 PM

THURSDAY, MAY 15 BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #2: FIELD SKETCHING GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: SOUTH BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: NW BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK OPTICS ALLEY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1: LEADER'S CHOICE GUIDED BUS TRIP

TRAVEL TALK: TBA WORKSHOP: IDENTIFYING SHOREBIRDS - KENN KAUFMAN WORKSHOP: SPRING MIGRATION IN NW OHIO - MARK SHIELDCASTLE BIRDING 101: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO GET STARTED IN BIRDING

BIRDER'S MARKETPLACE KEYNOTE: BIRDING FOR LIFE - KENN KAUFMAN


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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37

Fun Places to Visit Toledo Museum of Art

The Toledo Museum of Art features one of the finest and most diverse collections of artwork in the country, including treasures ranging from ancient Egypt to contemporary art – glass, sculpture, European and American painting, African and Asian art, graphic arts and decorative arts. Other highlights include the Sculpture Garden outside and the architecturally renowned Glass Pavilion, located across Monroe Street. Coinciding with the Biggest Week in American Birding, the museum will showcase, “In Fine Feather,” an exhibition that highlights the intersection of natural science and art in the pursuit of describing and identifying birds, from a medieval treatise on falco falcony to John James Audubon’s “Birds of America,” to the modern field guide. The exhi exhibition features works by noted bird artists and illustrators, in including Audubon, Alexander Wilson, John Gould and Roger Troy Peterson. Admission is free. 2445 Monroe St., Toledo 419-255-8000 or 800-644-6862, toledomuseum.org

Toledo Zoo

The Toledo Zoo is recognized as one of the world’s most complete zoos, and one of the region’s top family destinations. It boasts over 6,000 mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds and invertebrates representing over 750 species, and innovative exhibits. Each year, nearly 1 million people visit the zoo to experience the wonders of the natural world, stroll the scenic grounds and explore the historic WPAera buildings. Zoo highlights include the Arctic Encounter, the Africa! exhibit, Nature’s Neighborhood children’s area and more. Join the zoo in 2014 for a year-long celebration of flight, including cool experiences that bring you closer to everything that flies, including flying reptiles in the Reptile House and the new Penguin Beach, set to open May 23. 2 Hippo Way, Toledo 419-385-4040, www.toledozoo.org

multi-sensory experience that’s as fun as it is educational. Defy gravity as you ride the High Wire Cycle 20 feet above the atrium; or visit the Learning Worlds designed to focus on a specific science genre – Energy Factory, Mind Zone, Water Works, Little Kidspace, and more. A number of special exhibits and events are planned throughout the year, including “Titanic, The Artifact Exhibition,” which runs through June 15. One Discovery Way, Toledo 419-244-2674, www.imaginationstationtoledo.org

Toledo Botanical Garden

Originally consisting of 20 acres donated by George P. Crosby to the City of Toledo, Toledo Botanical Garden now encompasses more than 60 acres of beauty, tranquility and opportunities for exploration and reflection. It is currently a public/private partnership between Metroparks and the non-profit Toledo Botanical Garden Board, Inc. in collaboration with the City of Toledo. A living museum for plants, Toledo Botanical Garden’s notable gardens include shade, perennial, English border, aquatic, herb, rose, dahlia and grass, among others. Special events include the Spring Plant Sale (May 9-11), Crosby Festival of the Arts (June 28-29), summertime jazz concerts, Peter Navarre Day (Sept. 7) and Heralding the Holidays (Dec. 5-7). 5403 Elmer Dr. Toledo 419-536-5566, www.toledogarden.org

Tony Packo’s Café

Tony Packo’s is famous for its Hungarian-style hot dogs, for its hot dog buns signed by movie stars, other celebrities and U .S. Presidents and for its frequent mention by Toledo’s Jamie Farr on the TV series M*A*S*H*. In addition to the flagship eatery, Packo’s has a location across from Fifth Third Field in downtown Toledo, home of the Toledo Mud Hens. 1902 Front St., Toledo

Imagination Station

The Imagination Station – Toledo’s hands-on science museum – promises to immerse visitors of every age in a

Tony Packo’s Cafe

The Sundance Drive-In. 800-366-4218, www.tonypackos.com

The Butterfly House

Hundreds of live butter butterflies from North America, Cen Central America and Asia can be seen in a beautiful in indoor garden set setting. Open May through August, Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday noon-5 p.m.; September, Thursday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday noon-5 p.m., and weekends noon-5 p.m. in October. 11455 Obee Rd., Whitehouse 419-877-2733, www.butterfly-house.com

Sundance Kid Drive-In

Spend an evening under the stars at the Sundance Kid Drive-in, located across from Pearson Park. First-run films are offered on two screens April through October. The `50’s-style drivein has all the nostalgia and the best in FM stereo sound. A concession stand and the Butch Cassidy Canteen, an outside concession wagon are available. 4500 Navarre, Oregon 419-691-9668, www.greateasterntheatres.com

Green spaces

• Metroparks of the Toledo Area preserves many of Lucas County’s most unique natural areas, from the Oak Openings to the Lake Erie coastal zone. Locally, Pearson Metropark, located at 761 Lallendorf Rd., Oregon, is one of the last remaining stands of the Great Black Swamp, a notorious forest that once blanketed much of Northwest Ohio. The thick woods and location close to Lake Erie make Pearson a favorite stopover for a wide variety of migrating birds. Open 7 a.m. until dark every day; extended hours for winter recreation. Metroparks of the Toledo Area 419-407-9700, www.metroparkstoledo.com Continued on page 38


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Fun Places to Visit

Fun at Maumee Bay State Park. Continued from page 37

• Maumee Bay State Park, located at Cedar Point and North Curtice roads along the Oregon-Jerusalem Township border, offers a two-mile elevated boardwalk plus an observation tower amidst swamplands, marsh, scenic meadows and woods that are teeming with wildlife and birds. The park features lakeshore and inland beaches, a marina and a conference center and resort hotel that also has a golf course and rental cabins. 419-836-1466, www.maumeebaystateparklodge.org • The Wood County Park District oversees several park facilities in the county, including Cedar Creeks Preserve, a 42-acre tract located east of Walbridge where Woodville Road (SR 51) crosses Walbridge Road. The park includes hiking trails, a footbridge, picnic tables, restrooms and an information kiosk. 419-353-1897, woodcountyparkdistrict.org • The Sandusky County Park District operates 10 facilities, including the 93-acre Wolf Creek Park, 160-acre Blue Huron Reserve, the Mull Covered Bridge, the 310-acre Creek Ben Farm and others. White Star Park, located south of Gibsonburg on SR 300, has a quarry up to 40 feet deep that is used by scuba divers throughout the region as well as for non-power boating and fishing; a beach with changing rooms and a concession stand, and a campground located across from the park’s main entrance that has electric and water hookups and primitive campsites on a reservation basis. In addition, the park offers picnic tables, grills, well water, restrooms, volleyball courts, horseshoe pits, playfield, nature trails, mountain bike trails,

shelters, day camp area and more. 419-334-4495, 1-888-200-5577, www.lovemyparks.com • East Harbor State Park, 1169 N. Buck Rd off SR 269 in Marblehead, on the shores of Lake Erie. The park has unlimited opportunities for outdoor recreation. Boating, fishing, swimming, picnicking and camping are popular while nature enthusiasts will enjoy the abundance of waterfowl, shorebirds and other species of wildlife found in the park’s scenic wetlands. 419-734-4424, 1-866-664-6727, www.eastharborstatepark.org • Marblehead Lighthouse State Park, 110 Lighthouse Dr., Marblehead. One of Lake Erie’s best known and most-photographed landmarks, the lighthouse is one of Ohio’s newest state parks. The grounds surrounding the lighthouse offer excellent picnicking and views of Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, Kelleys and South Bass Islands and Cedar Point. The park is open year-round. The Keeper’s House, the oldest surviving home in Ottawa County, offers visitors the chance to experience the history of lighthouse keepers. The 1822 home was the residence of the first three keepers of the oldest continually operated lighthouse on the Great Lakes. Throughout the year, nearly 1 million people visit the park and 20,000 will climb the 77 steps to the top. Known as the most photographed site in the state of Ohio, it is also the favorite subject of countless artists. Tours of the on-site keeper’s house museum are conducted in the afternoons Monday through Friday from the day after Memorial Day until the Friday before Labor Day. In addition to the regular season, an annual lighthouse festival is held the second Saturday in October.

419-734-4424 ext. 2, dnr.state.oh.us/parks

Schedel Arboretum

The Schedel Arboretum was home to Joseph and Marie Schedel for more than 50 years before opening to the public in 1991. The arboretum has more than 17 scenic acres that border along the Portage River just outside of Elmore. See gar gardens of nearly 20,000 annuals, roses, perennials, irises and lilies, including a Japanese garden complete with Torii, waterfall, pools, lanterns, bridges and a pagoda. A number of special exhibits and events are planned throughout the year, including exhibits in the Trellis Gallery, which has become a showcase for local artists. Group tours of the grounds and mansion are available by appointment. Regular hours are May-October, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday 12-4 p.m. Closed Mondays. 19255 W. Portage River South Rd., Elmore 419-862-3182, schedel-gardens.org

Religious sites

Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto The grotto at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Genoa is constructed of “tufa,” fossilized vegetation found in the “blue hole” at Castilia, O. A ground-level statue of a praying Saint Bernadette Souberious looks up admiringly at Our Lady. The grounds include a small altar, an adjoining bell tower of tufa, arches and outdoor Stations of the Cross in hand-carved Italian bronze. 204 S. Main St., Genoa, 419-855-8501 Our Lady of Toledo Shrine Our Lady of Toledo Shrine is a place of prayer, quiet reflection and healing. All faiths are welcome. The garden and well are open during daylight hours. 655 S. Coy Rd., Oregon, 419-697-7742 Holy Rosary Cathedral Visitors will be moved by the beau Continued on page 39

The Marblehead Lighthouse.

Holy Rosary Cathedral


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Fun Places to Visit change). Open daily rain or shine. 267 S. Lightner Rd., Port Clinton 800-521-2660, www.africansafariwildlifepark.com

Cedar Point

African Safari Park Continued from page 38

ty of the cathedral’s Old World style, and by the visual strength of its symbol as the primary church of Roman Catholic Diocese of Toledo. The cathedral is Spanish Plateresque in design – the only one of its kind in North America. Thousands have been inspired by the graceful beauty of its piers and arches; by the richly decorated nave ceiling with scenes from the Old Testament, the half-domed apse embellished by frescoes in the Keim process, and by one of its most striking gems, the Rose Window, which sparkles and radiates in the changing light of the eastern sun. 2535 Collingwood Blvd., Toledo 419-244-9575, rosarycathedral.org Sorrowful Mother Shrine The Sorrowful Mother Shrine features 120 acres of wooded splendor, plus 40 points of interest including grottos, the Sorrowful Mother Chapel, Pieta Outdoor Chapel, plus the Stations of the Cross. Founded in 1850, the original shrine is the oldest place of pilgrimage dedicated to Mary in the Midwest. Cafeteria, picnic area and gift shop available. Handicap accessible. There is no cost, however freewill offerings are accepted. 4106 SR 269, Bellevue 419-483-3435, www.sorrowfulmothershrine.org

African Safari Park

Come for a day of fun, education and entertainment at African Safari drive-through safari, home of more than 400 of the world’s most beautiful and exotic animals. Safari fun also includes camel and pony rides, entertaining and educational animal shows, pig races, a gift shop, picnic facilities, a snack bar and café and grill. Open through Nov. 3 (subject to

The ideal location for a getaway, with more than 150 rides, shows, and attractions, Cedar Point will offer new and exciting experiences for the family when it opens for the 2014 season May 10. Two new rides and general midway improvements will greet visitors, including the new Pipe Scream thrill ride, which will rock and roll riders on over 302 feet of track, flying 43 feet above the midway at 43 mph, twisting and spinning on what’s being called “the best of a roller coaster and a flat ride in one.” Open May 10 through Sept. 1 daily, then weekends (Fri. evenings, Sat. & Sun.) through Nov. 2. 1 Cedar Point Dr., Sandusky 419.627.2350, cedarpoint.com

Castaway Bay

The Caribbean meets Sandusky at Cedar Point’s Castaway Bay. Upon entering this lush indoor waterpark resort, the tropical theme will give guests the feeling they have just landed on an island paradise. Castaway Bay features 237 hotel rooms and suites including familyoriented units, a 38,000-square-foot indoor waterpark with water activities for all ages, a day spa, fitness center, arcade, a craft and child activity center, restaurants, retail shops and adjacent marina. 2001 Cleveland Rd. (US 6), Sandusky 419-627-2500, castawaybay.com

Soak City

Splish splash till your heart’s content at Soak City, an 18-acre waterpark next to Cedar Point. In addition to Splash Zone, a huge bucket and multi-story play area, visitors will enjoy Breakers Bay, a half-million gallon wave pool; body slides; tube slides and inner tube rivers. Choo-Choo Lagoon and Tadpole Town offer big fun for little ones. For

2014

adults, there’s Bubbles Swim-Up Bar a special area with a hot tub. Soak City guests can also enjoy the sandy Cedar Point Beach on Lake Erie. Open May 24 through Sept. 1 1 Cedar Point Dr., (off US 6) Sandusky 419-627-2350, www.cedarpoint.com

Challenge Park

Located between Cedar Point and Soak City, Challenge Park activity complex features the RipCord Skycoaster, two high-speed go-kart tracks, Challenge Golf and Skyscraper, a thrilling ride that spins riders in a circular motion 16 stories above the ground at speeds of 55 mph.

Admission to Cedar Point or Soak City not required. Each attraction has a separate fee. Open May 10 through Sept. 1 daily, then weekends (Fri. evenings, Sat. & Sun.) through Nov. 2. 1 Cedar Point Dr., (off US 6), Sandusky 419-627-2350, www.cedarpoint.com

Ghostly Manor

This multi-attraction family entertainment center was featured on The Travel Channel’s “Best Places I’ve Ever Been” and Forbes’ “Top 10 Haunted Attractions.” Experience a scary haunted house, Ohio’s fastest virtual roller coaster, interactive 3D blacklight miniature golf, an ice skating rink, bounce houses for those under 12 and an indoor play area. Special events include A Lake Erie Mud Run in July, a Lake Eerie Fearfest in October and a Winter Wonderland Walkthru in December. Open year-round. Call for hours. 3319 Milan Rd. (US 250), Sandusky 419-626-4467, ghostlymanor.com

Glacial Grooves

The world’s largest accessible glacial grooves, these scars in the limestone bedrock were carved 18,000 years ago by the ice sheet that covered part of North America. Open yearround during daylight hours. Division Street, Kelleys Island ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/places/nw08

Glacial grooves at Kelley’s Island Great Wolf Lodge.

39

Continued on page 40


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Fun Places to Visit Continued from page 39

Great Wolf Lodge

Great Wolf Lodge is an all-suites, full-service, indoor waterpark resort featuring a Northwoods atmosphere and family-friendly amenities including a 41,000-square-foot indoor entertainment area featuring a grand-scale waterpark, spacious outdoor pool, arcade, fitness room, kids’ arts and crafts center, restaurants, gift shop and performing Great Clock Tower. 4600 Milan Rd. (US 250), Sandusky 800-641-WOLF (9653), www.greatwolf.com/sandusky/waterpark

Kalahari Resort

Kalahari Waterpark Resort features body boarding, a water coaster, a lazy river, individual and group racing slides and wave, basketball and toddler pools. Catch some rays at Kalahari’s outdoor pool complex from Memorial Day through Labor Day (weather permitting). The resort also offers cabanas, spa treatments, five unique shops, indoor glow golf, arcade games, food and spirits and a pottery painting shop. Call for day pass information. 7000 Kalahari Dr. (off US 250), Sandusky 877-KALAHARI(525.2427), www.KalahariResorts.com/oh

Monsoon Lagoon

Monsoon Lagoon waterpark and family entertainment complex features aquatic adventures including six waterslides, a lazy river, an adult pool with swim-up Tiki bar, and Adventure Island Tree House with 17 levels. Miniature golf, bumper boats, grand prix cars and a gaming arcade round out a day of family fun. Open Memorial Day through Labor Day weekends. Routes 2 & 269 (1530 S. Danbury Rd), Port Clinton 419-732-6671, monsoonlagoonwaterpark.com

Seneca Caverns

Go caving at “The Caviest Cave” where you can walk natural stone steps and pathways through “the earth crack” and past the Ole Mist’ry River. Go pannning for gemstones at Seneca Mining Company. O p e n Saturdays and Sundays 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in

May; Memorial Day through Labor Day daily 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and September through mid-October weekends 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The last tour departs one hour before close. 15248 E. Twp. Rd. 178 (off SR 269 S), Bellevue 419-483-6711 senecacavernsohio.com

Brandville School

The Historic Brandville School, built in 1882, has been refurbished and now houses the Oregon-Jerusalem Historical Society. memo Local history memorabilia, artifacts and collec a Civil War collection, including the refurbished 19th paint century oil painting of the 1864 Volunteer Light Artillery Group, are featured. The museum complex is open 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursdays (excluding holidays). Call to arrange tours for groups of four or more. No charge; donations accepted. 1133 Grasser St., Oregon 419-693-7052, www.ojhs.org

Elmore Depot

The Elmore Historical Society purchased 1860s Elmore Depot in 1981, along with 2.5 acres of land. The society undertook an extensive renovation, and the building now houses memorabilia from Elmore’s past. The Society also owns and maintains an 1840s log house. In 1983, society members dismantled, relocated and rebuilt the Heckman log house, adding an elaborate flagstone fireplace and porch, and furnishing it with artifacts from its era. Ory (Depot) Park, Elmore 419-260-1282, elmorehs.tripod.com

Woodville Museum

Woodville Historical Museum, operated by the Woodville Historical Society, features materials and artifacts documenting the rich history of the small village located on the banks of the Portage River about 20 miles east of Toledo. The museum is open Wed. and Fri. 2-4 p.m. Other times by appointment. 107 E. Main St., Woodville 419-849-2349

Veterans Museum

The Northcoast Veterans Museum

Civil War re-enactments at the Hayes Presidential Center. is a tribute to those who have served in the uniformed service of the United States, especially those who have lost their lives in combat or training. The dramatic and colorful military displays include weapons, uniforms, pictures, memorabilia, military accessories, tents and first aid from the Civil War to present. Williams Park, 411 North Main St., Gibsonburg 419-332-5912

Hayes Presidential Center

Original White House gates lead the way to the nation’s first presidential center and museum, – a tribute to 19th U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes. The facility is built on 25 acres of the President’s beloved “Spiegel Grove” estate and includes his 31room Victorian mansion, museum, library and burial site. The exhibit galleries house nearly 1,800 artifacts on permanent display, including exhibits devoted to President Hayes’s military service, his political roles and details of his personal life. From May 1, 2014 through Jan. 4, 2015, the center will present “Privy to History: Civil War Prison Life Unearthed,” an exhibit sponsored by the Sidney Frohman Foundation and Friends & Descendants of Johnson’s Island Civil War Prison. 800-998-PRES (7737). rbhayes.org

Marblehead

Ferguson Gallery & Studio Visitors to the gallery of internationally recognized glass artist Cary Ferguson can enjoy glass-blowing and cutting demonstrations. Four showrooms are filled with jewelry, accessories, nautical decor, antiques and works of local artists. ADA accessible. Call for hours. 5890 E. Harbor Rd. (SR 163), Marblehead 419-734-0600, fergusongallery.com Continued on page 41


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Fun Places to Visit

Available year-round, weather permitting. Late boats on weekends. There is a nominal parking fee. 510 W. Main St. (SR 163), Marblehead 419-798-9763, www.kelleysislandferry.com

Lakeside Chautauqua

Lakeside, the Chautauqua on Lake Erie, is a family destination that has pioneered the act of nurturing mind, body, and spirit for more than 135 years. Lakeside offers spiritual, educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities. Groups welcome year-round. ADA accessible. 236 Walnut Ave., Lakeside 866-952-5374, www.lakesideohio.com Perry’s Monument. (Courtesy of The Beacon) Continued from page 40

Johnson’s Island Confederate Officers Prison Cemetery The historic cemetery is the final resting place of more than 200 of the 9,000 Confederate soldiers once imprisoned here. Open year-round, daily dawn-dusk. Gaydos Drive, Marblehead www.johnsonsisland.org Keeper’s House The oldest surviving home in Ottawa County offers visitors the chance to experience the history of lighthouse keepers. The 1822 home was the residence of the first three keepers of the oldest continually operated lighthouse on the Great Lakes. 9999 E. Bayshore Road, Marblehead 419-798-9339, www.thekeepershouse.org Kelleys Island Ferry Boat The only daily passenger and automobile transportation to Kelleys Island from Marblehead, departing every half-hour during peak times.

Lake Erie Islands

Put-in-Bay/South Bass Island For nearly 150 years, the Victorianera village of Put-in-Bay on South Bass Island has been attracting visitors who come to enjoy family fun activities, outdoor recreation and a large variety of special events. Many start out with a narrated tour on the Island Tour Train. For those wishing to go at their own pace, there are golf carts, scooters and bicycles to rent. There’s plenty to keep kids entertained including a butterfly house, miniature golf, gem mining, cave tours, arcades, a carousel and go-kart racing. 419-285-2832, visitputinbay.com Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial The nation’s third-tallest memorial structure, the 352-foot tall column commemorates Oliver Hazard Perry’s victory over the British during the War of 1812, and the lasting peace between the U.S., England and Canada since that time. The visitor’s center features displays, a video theater, ranger talks and interpretive programs offered free of charge and a gift shop. 93 Delaware Ave., Put-in-Bay 419-285-2184, nps.gov/pevi

Miller Boat Line. (Courtesy of The Bea con)

Kelleys Island The largest American freshwater island on Lake Erie, Kelleys Island offers 600 acres of state park land, 17 miles of coastline, miles of trails for exploring and hiking, a fossil-filled quarry, wetlands, wildflowers and an expansive sandy beach, which are admired by nature-lovers and outdoor enthusiasts alike, especially during spring birding and fall monarch butterfly migrations. Located in the western basin of Lake Erie, the island’s scenery can be discovered by foot, bike, golf cart, or kayak. The downtown district is known for its shopping and entertainment, and its many historic homes and buildings have earned it a spot on the National Register of Historic Places. Glacial Grooves National Natural Landmark and Inscription Rock are two free attractions with historical significance. 419-746-2360, www.kelleysislandchamber.com

Port Clinton

Jet Express The Jet-Express offers high-speed passenger ferry service from Port Clinton to downtown Kelleys Island and Put-in-Bay. Ride in the comfortable passenger cabin or on the open-air sundeck. Late-night service, evening discounts, family-friendly-child rates and group tour rates available. See a complete schedule at www.jet-express.com. 3 N. Monroe St., Port Clinton 800-245-1538

Heineman’s Winery Founded in 1888, Ohio’s oldest family-owned winery offers tours, a tasting room and wine garden with light snacks. Tours include a visit to Crystal Cave, the world’s largest recorded geode, located directly below the winery. Hours vary; call or see website for details. 978 Catawba Ave., Put-in-Bay 419-285-2811 www.heinemanswinery.com

Lakeside Chautauqua

The Jet Express


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Red-bellied Woodpecker. (Photo by Maggi Dandar/MDandarPhotography.com)

Pearson Metropark still thrives By J. Patrick Eaken and Tammy Walro Press Staff Writers The under story in Oregon’s Pearson Metropark, with its good cover and food supply, is a boon for birds. The thick woods and proximity to Lake Erie make Pearson a favorite stopover spot for a wide variety of migrating warblers, or songbirds. In May – around Mothers Day – there is no better place in North America to see these birds than the Western Lake Erie region. Other species to look for are woodpeckers, oriole, red-eyed vireo, ovenbird, scarlet tanager, redstart, woodthrush, hermit thrush and Acadian flycatcher. Occasionally, visitors will see predatory birds, such as screech and great horned owls and sharp-shinned hawks. A “Window on Wildlife” at the Packer-Hammersmith Center in the center of the park provides a quiet retreat where you can observe birds and other animals in their natural environment. Educational programs led by Metroparks naturalists are another way to learn more about the natural history of the park. The 300-acre addition to Pearson north of Starr Avenue offers a unique perspective on the benefits of wetland habitats. Visitors will notice how the land holds water part of the year. They will also notice that water on the land is a magnate for birds. Already, waterloving birds from killdeer to red-wing blackbirds, great egrets to great blue herons and a wide variety of warblers have discovered the site. A zone in Pearson North is a wet

Birders at Pearson Metropark’’s “Window on Wildlife” at the Packer-Hammersmith Center. (Photo courtesy of Toledo Area Metroparks)

prairie. It includes shrubs such as pawpaw and bladdernut and grasses such as sedges and switch grass. Jaeger said in the spring the paw-paw produces deep burgundy flowers and in fall fruit that looks like mangos. The bladdernut produces little green sacs that drop to the vernal pools and float away like small boats before finding purchase elsewhere and germinating. Milkweed has been planted to attract monarch butterflies. When mature, this area should attract migrating birds like thrushes and warblers. Visitors are also likely to see sandpipers, red tail hawks, eagles, green herons and the Great Blue Heron. Canada geese should not find

these wetlands attractive, John Jaeger, retired director for natural resources at the Metroparks of the Toledo Area, The site promises opportunities for nature watching, including the appearance of a wide variety of birds more typical of Lake Erie marshes. The springtime woodland will offer important foraging areas for neo-tropical migrating birds such as warblers and thrushes. The oasis of trees and water and meadow provided by the area will be a natural stop-over for birds, and meadows with wildflowers will provide important nectaring sources for butterflies and insects. The Metroparks is required to keep track of migratory birds and water fowl at Pearson North. Jaeger walks through a three-hour bird survey every 10 days. Jaeger is contracted to perform the survey for the Columbus-based Ohio Wetlands Foundation. Pearson North has 10 different bird stations, and Jaeger spends 10 minutes at each station. After 29 days touring the park, he said he’s seen “some amazing birds that have stopped off here since the opening.” In 2010, he heard a whip-poor-will one evening walking around the park — a sound not heard in Northwest Ohio today like it was decades ago. Another day, he picked up a pie-billed greed. “That’s pretty amazing because they are usually found now at places in western Lucas County, like Oak Openings,” Jaeger said. “The whip-poor-will was unusual and probably migrating through,” Jaeger continued. “We had a stopover flight of Dunlin’s which nest up around the Arctic Circle. There was a lack of warblers, as the sample was done in the open wetland, and warblers prefer the woods and shrub and scrub areas. There was a group of Great Egrets attracted to the area along Seaman Road west of Wynn Road. The abundance of tadpoles, toads and frogs provided ample food for them.” Jaeger said he has observed 24,086 birds in the 300-acre expansion area, with 15,462, or 64 percent, on the northeast side. The remaining 8,642, or 34 percent, were found on the southwest side. He observed 97 different species with an average daily diversity of 22 species. On May 29, 2009, he observed a high of 37 species, and on March 19 he observed a low of six species. He counted 6,846 birds, the most on a single day, on October 10, 2009, and the low of 71 birds was on May 5. On an average bird day, he counted 831 birds (24,086 divided by 29 days). More importantly, he says, is finding unique species, such as the return of the whip-poor-will or the Dunlins. About 34 Dunlins were hanging around the Johlin Cabin one day, he said, and they were not bothered by the historic house or a strong wind.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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2014

BLACK SWAMP OBSERVATORY AND AMERICAN BIRD CONSERVANCY SPEAK OUT AGAINST WIND TURBINES IN CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD STOPOVER HABITAT

THE ISSUE Over the objections of many environmental organizations and wildlife agencies, massive wind turbines are being installed RIGHT NOW in the globally important bird habitat in northwest Ohio near the cities of Oregon, Port Clinton, and Oak Harbor. Here is a brief summary of two of the projects we are currently dealing with. 1) Camp Perry Air National Guard (THIS PROJECT WAS SUCCESSFULLY HALTED BY OUR EFFORTS!) Camp Perry hired a consulting firm to conduct an Environmental Assessment (there was no Environmental Impact Statement, which is more comprehensive than an EA). In their comments on the EA, state and federal wildlife agencies collectively pointed out more than 50 erroneous and misleading statements. We know, because we requested all documents relevant to the project under the Freedom of Information Act. (The wildlife agencies have been objecting to this site since 2007!) After the agencies sent official comments about the flawed EA, Camp Perry refused to listen and responded by filing a "Finding of No Significant Impact." In their official response to Camp Perry's FONSI, wildlife agencies again objected. Camp Perry countered by ignoring the wildlife agencies AGAIN, and requested that the agencies submit a letter of concurrence. In other words, "We think you should ignore all of the objections that tax-payers have been paying you to register for more than six years and just sign off on this project anyway." In spite of these objections, Camp Perry officials planned to move forward with the project, at a site that is within 10 miles of 60 Bald Eagle nests, including an active nest less than 1/4 mile away!

After Black swamp Bird Observatory and American Bird Conservancy filed a letter of intent to sue, the Air National Guard’s national office withdrew the Finding of No Significant Impact, essentially taking the project off the table. 2) Lake Erie Business Park This a privately owned industrial park where one industrial-scale turbine has already been erected and another is on the ground ready to be installed. Their website shows a total of six planned for the site. Here, they claim that the project is privately funded and therefore not subject to ANY wildlife review. That's right; they have plans to install a total of six (6) massive turbines in an area of globally significant bird habitat and the project has had no wildlife review whatsoever. When the Ohio Division of Wildlife representative called to inquire about this project, the owner of the business park hung up on her, and in a later interview, referred to her as an “environmental knucklehead.” These two projects reflect the complete and utter failure of the nation's current voluntary wind energy guidelines to protect birds—even in the areas where they pose the highest risk. WHY IS THIS A PROBLEM? The Lake Erie Marsh Region is recognized as globally important for migratory birds and is home to a large number of breeding Bald Eagles. Huge numbers of migratory songbirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl stop here to feed and rest every spring and fall during their long-distance migrations. HOW CAN THIS HAPPEN? There are currently NO regulations regarding proper siting of single wind turbines—even those that are 300 feet and taller! All guidelines are voluntary.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

BLACK SWAMP OBSERVATORY AND AMERICAN BIRD CONSERVANCY SPEAK OUT AGAINST WIND TURBINES IN CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD STOPOVER HABITAT

What YOU can do to protect birds: 1) Write letters to these elected officials and ask them to support regulating ALL wind energy in Ohio! (If you’re registered for the Biggest Week, you will find a Responsible Wind Energy post card in your registration bag to fill out and mail in!)

Senator Sherrod Brown 200 North High St. Room 614 Columbus, OH 43215 Phone: 614-469-2083 Fax: 614-469-2171 Email electronic form: http://www.brown.senate.gov/contact

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur One Maritime Plaza - Sixth Floor Toledo, OH 43604 (800) 964-4699 - Tel: (419) 259-7500 Email electronic form: http://www.kaptur.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content

Senator Randy Gardner Senate Building 1 Capitol Square, 2nd Floor Columbus, OH 43215 Phone: 614- 466-8060 Email electronic form: http://www.ohiosenate.gov/gardner/contact

Senator Rob Portman 37 West Broad Street, Room 300 Columbus, OH 43215 Phone: 614-469-6774 Toll-Free: 1-800-205-6446 (OHIO) Email electronic form: https://www.portman.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contact-form

Representative Chris Redfern, District 89 77 S. High St, 10th Floor Columbus, OH 43215 Phone (614) 644-6011 Electronic Email form: http://www.ohiohouse.gov/chris-redfern/contact

For more information, visit: www.bsbo.org/CONSERVATION/ ResponsibleWindEnergy www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/ collisions/wind_policy

Keep wind turbines out of critical migratory bird stopover habitat!

LOCATION MATTERS!

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Photo by Vishnevskiy Vasily, Shutterstock

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KEEP CATS INDOORS Better for cats. Better for birds. Better for people. The Challenge: Scientists estimate that every year in the United States, free-roaming domestic cats kill from 1.4 to 3.7 billion birds and 6.9 to 20.7 billion mammals. (For perspective, consider that 1.4 billion is equivalent to the entire human population of China.) Life for outdoor cats is risky and on average results in considerably shorter lives. Outdoor cats can be hit by cars; attacked by dogs, coyotes, or other wildlife; contract fatal diseases, such as rabies and feline distemper; and be lost, stolen, or poisoned. Feral and other free-roaming cats also pose a health risk to humans from the spread of diseases such as rabies and toxoplasmosis. Cats, the top carrier of rabies among domestic animals, pose a disproportionately larger risk of exposure to people than wildlife. Toxoplasmosis, which can infect any warm-blooded species, is deposited into the environment through cat feces and can lead to conditions such as memory loss, blindness, and death.

Studies show that outdoor cat colonies, sustained through the practice of “Trap, Neuter, Release,� are also bad for birds and do not reduce feral cat populations. They are also inhumane for the cats, which lead short, harsh lives. Birds Impacted: Common songbirds, such as the Northern Cardinal, Blue Jay, and House Wren, are victims of cat predation, as well as long-distance migrants such as the Indigo Bunting and Yellow Warbler. Rare and endangered species, such as the Piping Plover, Florida Scrub-Jay, and California Least Tern, are also affected, along with birds that nest or feed on the ground, such as the California Quail. The Solution: Please, keep cats indoors. There are a number of ways to help cats adjust to an indoor lifestyle, and American Bird Conservancy provides a wealth of resources that can help. Many veterinarians and animal welfare organizations support keeping cats indoors for their own safety, as well as to prevent them from killing wildlife.

For more information: www.abcbirds.org/cats


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2014

Sawmill’s Birding Stay Our 1.5 mile trail in a Forested Riparian Corridor

• • • •

Lake Erie Beaches Great Lodge Rooms 3 Restaurants and Bars Wine Tour

Visit us and top Birding in America

Sawmill’s 235 acres joins Sheldon Marsh’s Nature Preserve 465 acres along the Lake Erie shore. Visit sister birding spot Old Woman Creek National Estuarine. 3 estuaries, forest, marshes and barrier reef for great birding.

Easy to travel on Ohio interstate Rt. 2, the same roadway east going or coming from Black Swamp Bird Observatory.

400 Sawmill Creek Dr., Huron/Sandusky, OH 44839

800-729-6455 • sawmillcreek.com

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Quick Meals Too • Hamburgers • Hot Dogs • Chili Dogs

Tell Us You’re a “Birder”

& Receive 10% OFF Your Entire Order! Just a few miles from Maumee Bay State Park

DG’S

DG’S

DG’s Soft Serve & Fast Foods 10609 Jerusalem Rd. Curtice, OH 43412 419-836-7254


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

We don't go everywhere. We don't want to go everywhere. We are a small company offering 8- 10 tours a year, each one escorted by the owners, each one offering personalized attention before, during, and after the trip. Our expert bilingual guides are local to the area we are visiting. And, because we choose to keep our company small, we can offer quality tours for a lower price. You don't travel through us, you travel with us!

�ANKA

-

Visit our website to learn how we are able to offer trips to the SAME sites, using many of the SAME lodges as the big tour companies for LOWER per-day cost!

937-862-4505

www.cheepersbirding.com

937-97 4-0 802

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

THE BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING VOLUNTEERS

Without the support of hundreds of volunteers, the Biggest Week would not be possible. This year, we offer special thanks to two volunteers who have taken on the monumental tasks of coordinating all of the speakers and arranging all of the field trips. ROB RIPMA Field Trip Coordinator Rob Ripma, a life-long Indiana resident, is owner and creator of www. NuttyBirder.com, “the place to go to find birds”. He is also a partner in Sabrewing Nature Tours leading birding and photography trips in the US and Central and South America. Rob currently the Secretary of the Board for Ohio’s Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO). Prior to joining the BSBO board, he served on the executive board of the Indiana Audubon Society for three years as Treasurer and Vice President. He is co-founder of the IndiRob Ripma ana Young Birders Club and speaks at a variety of organizations and schools about birds and birding to share his knowledge and experiences in the field. Rob loves working with new and experienced birders of all ages and believes that teaching people about birds will not only increase interest in birding but also help them better

understand why we must work to protect birds and their habitats. Most recently, he has become the primary bird blogger for Birds & Blooms Magazine. Rob has travelled and birded extensively all around the US and has taken pelagic trips into the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. When he’s not birding or travelling, Rob works part-time at Wild Birds Unlimited. Rob graduated from Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business in 2008 with a degree in Marketing and lives with his wife Stephanie in Carmel, Indiana.

KATIE ANDERSEN Presentation / Workshop Coordinator Katie Andersen went on her first birding hike at one week old and has been interested in birds ever since. A graduate of Gannon University with a B.S. in Biology, she studied Neotropical ornithology in Costa Rica and has worked on several research projects in Pennsylvania, including a study of the nesting habits of Black Terns. Katie works full time at Wild Birds Unlimited where she serves as the Store Naturalist, answering questions about bird biology, behavior, and identifying customers’ mystery birds. She also works part time Katie Anderson for Kaufman Field Guides, where she has developed a greater understanding for just how many fuzzy insects exist on this planet (a lot).

E Nature Tours

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info@WildsideNatureTours. com Phone

888.875.9453


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

51

Sawmill’s Birding Stay Our 1.5 mile trail in a Forested Riparian Corridor

• • • •

Lake Erie Beaches Great Lodge Rooms 3 Restaurants and Bars Wine Tour

Visit us and top Birding in America

Sawmill’s 235 acres joins Sheldon Marsh’s Nature Preserve 465 acres along the Lake Erie shore. Visit sister birding spot Old Woman Creek National Estuarine. 3 estuaries, forest, marshes and barrier reef for great birding.

Easy to travel on Ohio interstate Rt. 2, the same roadway east going or coming from Black Swamp Bird Observatory.

400 Sawmill Creek Dr., Huron/Sandusky, OH 44839

800-729-6455 • sawmillcreek.com

~ BED & BREAKFASTS ~ Catawba – Marblehead ~Come as a guest, leave as a friend

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

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dŚĞƌĞĂƌĞƚŚƌĞĞ,Žƚ^ƉŽƚƐĂƐƐŽĐŝĂƚĞĚǁŝƚŚƚŚĞďĞĂĐŚ͗ DĂŐĞĞDĂƌƐŚtŝůĚůŝĨĞƌĞĂͲͲĞĂĐŚĂƐƚ dŚĞƉĂƌŬŝŶŐĂƌĞĂĨŽƌƚŚŝƐďĞĂĐŚŝƐĂƚƚŚĞĞŶĚŽĨƚŚĞĂƵƐĞǁĂLJǁŚĞƌĞƚŚĞƌŽĂĚƚƵƌŶƐůĞĨƚƚŽǁĂƌĚƚŚĞŽĂƌĚǁĂůŬ͘ DĂŐĞĞDĂƌƐŚtŝůĚůŝĨĞƌĞĂͲͲĞĂĐŚtĞƐƚ dŚŝƐŝƐƚŚĞďĞĂĐŚŽĨƚŚĞĨŽƌŵĞƌƌĂŶĞƌĞĞŬ^ƚĂƚĞWĂƌŬ͘ KƚƚĂǁĂEtZͲͲƌĂŶĞƌĞĞŬƐƚƵĂƌLJdƌĂŝů dŚŝƐƉĂƌƚŶĞƌƐŚŝƉƚƌĂŝůǁĂƐŽƉĞŶĞĚŝŶϮϬϭϮĂŶĚŽĨĨĞƌƐĂĚĚŝƚŝŽŶĂůǁĂƌďůĞƌŚĂďŝƚĂƚĂƐǁĞůůĂƐĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĂĐĐĞƐƐƚŽ ƚŚĞƌĂŶĞƌĞĞŬƐƚƵĂƌLJ͘DŽƐƚŽĨƚŚĞƚƌĂŝůŝƐŝŶKƚƚĂǁĂEĂƚŝŽŶĂůtŝůĚůŝĨĞZĞĨƵŐĞ͘  zŽƵĐĂŶŚĞůƉŵĂŬĞƚŚĞĚĂƚĂŝŶĞŝƌĚŵŽƐƚŚĞůƉĨƵůŝĨLJŽƵĐĂŶĂǀŽŝĚƚŚƌĞĞƚLJƉĞƐŽĨĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚƐ͗ x EŽƚƌŝƉůŝƐƚƐ͘ĞŝƌĚƉƌŽƚŽĐŽůƐĂƌĞŶŽƚƐĞƚƵƉƚŽĂĐĐĞƉƚĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚƐƚŚĂƚƌĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂ͞ĚĂLJ͟Žƌ͞ƚƌŝƉ͟ĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚŽĨ ĂůůƚŚĞďŝƌĚƐLJŽƵŚĂǀĞƐĞĞŶŽŶĂŐŝǀĞŶĚĂLJ͘zŽƵƌƐŝŐŚƚŝŶŐƐĨƌŽŵĂŶĞŶƚŝƌĞĚĂLJŽĨďŝƌĚŝŶŐƐŚŽƵůĚďĞďƌŽŬĞŶƵƉ ŝŶƚŽĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚƐƌĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚŝŶŐƚŚĞůŽĐĂƚŝŽŶƐLJŽƵǀŝƐŝƚĞĚ͘dŚĞŽŶůLJĞdžĐĞƉƚŝŽŶŝƐǁŚĞŶLJŽƵŚĂǀĞƐƉĞŶƚƚŚĞĞŶƚŝƌĞ ƚŝŵĞĂƚĂƐŝŶŐůĞĚŝƐĐƌĞƚĞůŽĐĂƚŝŽŶ;ŝŐ^ŝƚ͕ǁĂůŬĂůŽŶŐƚŚĞŽĂƌĚǁĂůŬĂůůĚĂLJͿ͘ x EŽĐŽƵŶƚLJǁŝĚĞŽƌŵƵůƚŝͲĐŽƵŶƚLJĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚƐ͘ĞŝƌĚƌĞǀŝĞǁĞƌƐǁŝůůŶŽƚďĞĂďůĞƚŽǀĂůŝĚĂƚĞƐƵĐŚĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚƐĂƐ ƉĂƌƚŽĨƚŚĞƌĞƐĞĂƌĐŚĚĂƚĂďĂƐĞǁŚŝĐŚŝƐďƵŝůƚĨƌŽŵĚĂƚĂƐƵďŵŝƚƚĞĚƚŽĞŝƌĚ͘ x EŽŵƵůƚŝͲƉĂƌƚLJůŝƐƚŝŶŐƐ͘/ĨLJŽƵƐƉůŝƚƵƉ͕ĂŶĚďŝƌĚƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞůLJ;ĞĨĨŽƌƚŝƐŶŽůŽŶŐĞƌĐŽŽƌĚŝŶĂƚĞĚͿ͕ƚŚĂƚŝƐĂ ƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞĞĨĨŽƌƚĂŶĚƐŽĚŽŶŽƚĂĚĚƐŝŐŚƚŝŶŐƐŝŶƚŽŽŶĞĐŽŶŐůŽŵĞƌĂƚĞĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚ͘/ĨLJŽƵďŝƌĚůŽŽƐĞůLJƚŽŐĞƚŚĞƌŝŶ ŽŶĞĐŽŽƌĚŝŶĂƚĞĚĞĨĨŽƌƚƚŚĂƚŝƚƐƚŝůůŽŶĞĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚ͘,ĂǀĞŽŶĞĞŝƌĚĞƌƐƵďŵŝƚƚŚĞůŝƐƚĨŽƌĂŐƌŽƵƉĂŶĚƚŚĞŶ ƐŚĂƌĞŝƚǁŝƚŚLJŽƵĂŶĚŽƚŚĞƌƐŝŶƚŚĞŐƌŽƵƉ͘zŽƵĐĂŶƚŚĞŶĂĚũƵƐƚLJŽƵƌĐŽƉLJŽĨƚŚĞĐŚĞĐŬůŝƐƚůŝƐƚƚŽƌĞĨůĞĐƚǁŚĂƚ LJŽƵLJŽƵƌƐĞůĨŽďƐĞƌǀĞĚ͘


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

53

Tips for reporting bird sightings at Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge to eBird Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge spans two counties. The northern part of the refuge is in Lucas County and the southern part is in Ottawa County. Lucas County Ottawa NWR (Lucas Co.) Ottawa NWR--Auto Tour (Lucas Co.) Ottawa NWR--Crane Creek Estuary Trail Ottawa NWR--Crane Creek Estuary (Lucas Co.) Ottawa NWR--Veler Rd. (OH-2 @ Veler Rd.)

Ottawa County Ottawa NWR (Ottawa Co.) Ottawa NWR--Visitor Center and Boardwalk Ottawa NWR--Entrance Pool Ottawa NWR--Show Pool Ottawa NWR--Walking Trail Pools Ottawa NWR--Walking Trail Woodland Ottawa NWR--Auto Tour (Ottawa Co.) Ottawa NWR--Crane Creek Estuary (Ottawa Co.) Ottawa NWR--Adam Grimm Prairie (OH-2 @ Krause Rd.) Ottawa NWR--Boss Unit (OH-2 @ Benton-Carroll Rd.) Ottawa NWR--Stange Rd. @ Krause Rd. and Observation Tower Ottawa-Lucas Co. Rd. (Ottawa Co.) Ottawa NWR--Kontz Unit (OH-2 @ Bodi Rd.) Magee Marsh Wildlife Area--Black Swamp Bird Observatory & Trails

Reporting Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Auto Tour Bird Checklists on eBird If you wish to report your bird sightings to eBird from the Auto Tour at Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, there are two eBird Hot Spots to receive your reports: Ottawa NWR—Auto Tour (Ottawa Co.) Ottawa NWR—Auto Tour (Lucas Co.) The south portion of the Auto Tour is in Ottawa County, the north portion is in Lucas Co. You are on the county line when the Auto Tour turns right (east) on Ottawa-Lucas Rd. Please keep two checklists of birds you see, one for each portion of the Auto Tour. The section in Ottawa County is about 2.4 miles; the section in Lucas County is 3 miles. eBird limits a “traveling” count to five miles or less and sorts your bird sightings by county, thus two “hot spots” to report your sightings. Sometimes the route of the Auto Tour varies, so you might want to set your odometer to record the actual miles you cover for each section. eBird web site: http://ebird.org/ Ohio eBird Hot Spot web site: http://ohioebirdhotspots.wikispaces.com


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

HELP CELEBRATE 20 YEARS OF TOM BARTLETT’S BIG SIT FOR BLACK SWAMP NATURE EDUCATION! It’s a fundraiser that has become a 20 year tradition! At 5:00 AM on May 10, 2014, Mr. Tom Bartlett will take a seat at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area. Tom will stay in that spot for the next 12 hours and tally every bird he sees and hears from a 15 foot circle. He has been doing this annual BIG SIT for 20 years. Why, you ask? Because Tom cares about the future of birds and bird conservation! Tom conducts the BIG SIT and collects donations and pledges to help raise funds to support Black Swamp Bird Observatory’s education programs. Show Your Support for Tom and for nature education Tom makes his own pledge of $1.00 per species, and he challenges YOU to do the same, or more! The BIG SIT has raised more than $50,000 throughout its history, and this year we need your help to break our single year record. Last year, the count raised more than $11,000 and with your generous support we can beat that total! And 100% of the proceeds will help educate young people about the joy of birds and the importance of being good stewards of natural resources! Contributions Are Tax-Deductible BSBO is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, so your donations are tax-deductible. Please fill out the form on this flyer and return it by May 5th, 2014. Everyone who contributes will receive a thank you letter from Tom, and a list of all the bird species tallied during the BIG SIT. What We Will Do With Your Contribution All proceeds from the BIG SIT benefit BSBO’s youth education programs. Because of your past BIG SIT contributions, these programs are able to reach thousands of students each year. Our strong focus on youth education is highlighted by our Wetland Investigation Network (WIN) program, which offers students grades K-12 a day-long exploration of the entire marsh ecosystem. Our highly acclaimed Ohio Young Birders Club, for ages 12-18, encourages, educates, and empowers our future conservation leaders, and is serving as a model program for many other state-wide youth birding clubs.

Make your contribution by calling 419-898-4070, visit us online at www.bsbo.org, or tear off, fill out, and mail in the form, below to BSBO  13551 West State Route 2  Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 Thank you for supporting BSBO and nature education!

 DONATION AMOUNT: __________________ OR CHECK BIG SIT PLEDGE PER BIRD:

$3.00

$2.00

$1.00

$ .75

$ .50

NAME: ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

ZIP:

PHONE: CREDIT CARD NO: SEC CODE:

EXP. DATE: SIGNATURE:

$ .25


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

contactus@canopytower.com

www.canopytower.com

2014

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Why drinking bird-friendly coffee matters is on the bag! By buying certified coffee you can become part of a truly sustainable chain from seedling to cup. Be part of the solution to a better life for all and enjoy the best coffee you’ve ever tasted.

Most of the coffee sold in America today is literally killing the songbirds we love – and destroying a sustainable method of farming that supports rural communities in Latin America and keeps farm workers and their children away from toxic chemicals. Care about bird conservation? Then don’t drink or buy coffee without this logo on the bag. Tanagers, thrushes, orioles, warblers, oven-birds and many other songbirds nesting in North America find sanctuary in the rustic canopy, tropical forest-like environments of family coffee farms that carry the The Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center (SMBC) Birds Friendly® certification. Sun grown coffee – genetically modified and heavily dependent on chemical fertilization, pesticides and herbicides – adds to the destruction of critical bird habitat in Latin America – it literally kills birds we love and is harmful to farm workers and their families. ‘Birds & Beans the good coffee’™ is part of the solution. We want to help add thousands of hectares of shade grown, organic coffee habitat to the family farms already producing a truly sustainable and environmentally responsible crop. SMBC has developed strict scientific certification standards for coffee farming which is organic, shade grown, sustainable and environmentally friendly. The SMBC certification is the best assurance coffee drinkers can have that the coffee they are drinking is helping preserve habitat needed by migrant birds. Many of our most loved birds depend on environments such

Home-grown coffee-plant. (Photo courtesy of Kenn and Kim Kaufman) as those provided by ‘Rustic Canopy’ coffee farming for sustaining their populations – perhaps even for their survival. The development of GM coffee that can be grown in full sun with heavy chemicals, the growth of ‘factory’ agriculture in the coffee lands and the destruction of tropical forest make it increasingly difficult for many species to maintain viable population levels. Organic, shade grown coffee farms – family farms – are the best protection we can provide. However, the SMBC ‘Bird Friendly’® certification has not yet become the consumer ‘gold standard’ for sustainable coffee. Birds & Beans® coffee fills the void and promotes the certification. The only way you can be certain that the coffee in your cup is Bird Friendly® is if the Smithsonian’s seal

Eagle’s Nest Sweet Retreat

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Ice Cream • Full Menu 419-690-8940 “Something for Every Taste”

419-690-8940 419-690-8940

Common People, Uncommon Challenges 50 stories of inspiration

Minutes from Year Round Maumee Bay

About the Birds & Beans® Company The Birds & Beans® story began in Toronto in 1998 when Madeleine and David Pritchard opened their Café and Roastery – serving only ‘Bird Friendly’® coffee. Ten years later Scott Weidensaul (Pulitzer prize finalist author and naturalist, ‘Living on the Wind’, ‘Of a Feather’) and Bill Wilson took up the cause to shift coffee drinking behavior of bird lovers in New England, New York and eventually across the US. Birds & Beans ‘Bird Friendly’® independent certification means that Birds & Beans® coffee is 100 percentorganic and shade-grown, ensuring the conservation of migratory bird habitat in Latin America. The Birds & Beans partnership has grown to include three ‘ Voices for the Birds’ — authors, naturalists, educators and conservationists. Kenn Kaufman (‘Kingbird Highway’, Kaufman Field Guide series) and Bridget Stutchbury (‘Silence of Songbirds’, Professor and Director of The Stutchbury Lab at York University, Toronto) have joined Scott Weidensaul in getting the word out about The Good Coffee. Kenn, Bridget and Scott toured New England, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey from 2009 through 2011 for ‘The Birds & Beans Talks’™, a series of free lectures about the birds we know and love and how our lives and theirs are inexorably connected. The talks are continuing. Three family owned artisan roaster partners form the Birds & Beans collective. They are experts in delivering environmentally sound great tasting coffee. They select, roast and package the best tasting ‘Bird Friendly’® coffee in the world.

Re about the heroes Read living in the homes next to you. liv In these 50 short stories, Press columnist John Szozda tells the stories of common people who have met uncommon challenges with vision, courage, passion and determination.

PRESS The

by John Szozda

16 S. Stadium Rd. Oregon, Ohio 43616

Diane Masserant, Owner

www.eaglesnestsweetretreat.com Open 7 days year round

Metro Suburban Maumee Bay

For your copy cop of John Szozda’s book, send $15 to The Press, Box 169-J Millbury, OH 43447 or call 419-836-2221.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

WWW.BIRDSANDBEANS.COM

2014

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Birding as easy as a walk in the (Metro) park By Scott Carpenter Metroparks Public Relations Chasing birds around the globe is a passion for avid birders, but you don’t have to rack up frequent flyer miles to find new feathered friends. A birding adventure can be as easy as a walk in the park. Northwest Ohio has an abundance of birds and plenty of places to see them. The 10 Metroparks of the Toledo Area offer more than 150 miles of trails to explore; panoramic riverside views; and warm, dry Windows on Wildlife where you can search for birds any day of the year, 7 a.m. to dark. There is no admission fee to enter, and free or lowcost programs are available year round if you want to learn more. Wherever you are in Lucas County, you’re probably no more than a few minutes from a Metropark. The regional park system preserves 11,500 acres of natural area where locals and visitors alike can observe an ever-changing array of birds. Near The Lake Pearson, in Oregon, is closest to the Lake Erie shore. Preserving one of the last pieces of the Great Black Swamp, the park offers a variety of birding experiences. The original, 300-acre park, with an entrance on Lallendorf Road at State Route 2 (Navarre Avenue), is a swamp woods with well-warn paths and charming Depression era stone shelters. A Window on Wildlife overlooks feeding stations where you are likely to see a variety of birds, especially warblers during migration. Other species to look and listen for are woodpeckers, oriole, red-eyed vireo, ovenbird, scarlet tanager, redstart, woodthrush, hermit thrush and flycatchers. Until only a few years ago, Pearson North, a 300 acre addition with an entrance on Seaman Road, was a farm field with a small woodlot. Today, it is a wetland in the process of being restored. Gone are the ceramic tiles that once drained the “swamp,” replaced with a meandering stream that diverts runoff water onto the land, creating a giant bird bath. From an observation deck adjacent to a late-1800s Black Swamp Cabin, visitors can view a variety of water-loving birds. It is common to see killdeer, great egrets and great blue herons, adding a whole new dimension to birding in the popular park. In The City Swan Creek Preserve, in South Toledo with entrances on State Route 2 (Airport Highway) and Glendale Avenue, is an oasis in the city. Just

Birders at Oak Openings Preserve, the largest of the Metroparks. Located in Swanton, Ohio, the preserve is a popular destination for beginning and avid birders. (Metroparks Photo) steps from a busy highway, a visitor can disappear into a mature woods, hop on a trail through a meadow or down to the floodplain of the park’s namesake stream, Swan Creek, a major tributary to the Maumee River. In addition to a wide assortment of birds, including migrating warblers, the preserve is known for having an impressive display of wildflowers in early spring. Wildlife you may encounter include raccoons, mink, muskrat and (just before dark) screech owls. A Window on Wildlife at the Yager Center (Airport Hwy entrance) overlooks a very active bird feeding station. On The River Side Cut Metropark, in Maumee, is best known as a destination for fishermen during the spring walleye run. That’s when tens of thousands fish swim upriver to drop their eggs in the protective cobblestone below the rapids. Here is also where you will find wading birds fishing the rapids or the occasional bald eagle overhead. Upland areas away from the river are good places to scout for songbirds. Side Cut, which includes a chain of Maumee River islands, is listed as an Important Bird Area by the National Audubon Society. Upriver, Farnsworth and Bend View, in Waterville, and Providence, near Grand Rapids, are three Metroparks along the Maumee that are connected by an 8-mile Towpath Trail. The trail corridor is an excellent place to view migrating warblers. You might see or hear a noisy king fisher, or even witness an osprey or bald eagle fishing the river. Tree swallows are often seen at Providence, where they nest in natural cavities or birdhouses. In The ‘Oaks’ More than 250 species of birds are listed on the Oak Openings Preserve checklist. The park, and the larger Oak Openings Region of which it is a part, is

a premier birding destination in the region. Listed as an Audubon Important Bird Area, “The Oaks” attracts novice and advanced birders alike. Lark sparrows, a state-listed endangered species, nest on the dunes and the tiny, federally-endangered Karner blue butterfly flits about in the prairies. Oak Openings is a rare collection of habitats, from sand barrens to grassy wetlands, and the home of more rare and endangered plant species than anywhere else in Ohio. From the tiniest warblers to largest birds of prey, Oak Openings is a birder or botanist’s paradise. As the largest Metropark, with more 3,700 acres and trails from just a half-mile to more than 15 miles, there is also plenty of room to roam. Camping is available, too. Wildwood Preserve in West Toledo and Secor Metropark in Berkey are also within the Oak Openings region. All three Metroparks have very active Windows on Wildlife for easily viewing birds in all seasons. Learn More Metroparks of the Toledo Area has more than five dozen programs every month about the nature, history and culture of the Toledo region. In May, many of those programs – naturally! – focus on the songbirds that are migrating through the area. Each Thursday morning in May, you can have Coffee With The Birds from 8 to 9:30 a.m. in the Window on Wildlife at Wildwood Preserve, 5100 W. Central Avenue, Toledo. Come to the Metz Visitors Center to look for migrating warblers with a park naturalist while sipping shade-grown coffee provided by Wild Birds Unlimited. Ongoing programs for adults include Bird Study and Birders of a Feather. For a complete list of parks and programs, visit MetroparksToledo.com Scott Carpenter is an outdoor writer and director of public relations for Metroparks of the Toledo Area.


Black Swamp 3 2/19/13 2:20 PM Page 1

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

worldwide birding

since 1976

2014

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SCCVB Sandusky County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Alive with History

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center

712 North St., Fremont, OH www.sanduskycounty.org 800-255-8070

Subscribe to VENTflash for news about our tours and special discounts.

Sandusky County

North Coast Inland Trail

Have You Seen Sandusky County Lately?

 Victor Emanuel Nature Tours 

BLACK-CAPPED VIREO © GREG LASLEY ◆ CST2014998-50

VICTOR EMANUEL NATURE TOURS

VENTBIRD

info@ventbird.com | 800.328.VENT | 512.328.5221 | ventbird.com

During your 2014 travel season stop and explore all the historic destinations of Sandusky County. Mad River Railroad Museum

Plus enjoy: • The Parks and North Coast Inland Trail • Historical museums • Dining at our local restaurants • Shop at our downtown speciality stores • Sample a variety of homemade wines at Chateau Tebeau Winery

Historic Sandusky County Jail & Dungeon

Come bird with us! Two birding trails in Point Place (Toledo) in wooded trails along Maumee Bay Cullen Park - A mile-long causeway trail that begins at the northeast corner of the park. Birders will nd shorebirds on both sides of the trail, as well as warblers and other perching birds in the trees along the path. Located at 4500 N. Summit, Toledo, OH 43611, just past the big lighthouse. Pinkley Path - A wooded path loop just south of Cullen Park. The path is a short walk south of Cullen Park along the water past the lighthouse. Parking is also available along Summit Street at the path entrance. This 1.25 mile long path includes an active eagle’s nest and views of Maumee Bay. Located at 4133 N. Summit, Toledo, OH 43611 • Prime birding spots during migration for both warblers and waterfowl • Photos of American Avocets and Redstart taken last year at Cullen Park • Active eagle and oriole nests • Plenty of local dining and lodging Free parking at Cullen Park and along Summit Street. Access to Point Place from northbound I-75, exit 209.

www.cullenpark.org info@cullenpark.org


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2014

Ohio’s Wildlife Viewing Opportunities, So What’s in a Name? Wildlife conservation in Ohio is a huge undertaking and has been successful because of the diverse group of partners all working to protect and manage critical wildlife habitats. But what implications does this have for those who just want to catch a glimpse of those rare and elusive birds? Plenty, because these organizations are independent, missions and management strategies can differ. Rules for visitors to follow also vary from one agency to the next. To add to the confusion, many of these organizations share boundaries, so distinguishing between them can be difficult. Here is a quick primer on the organizations that manage wildlife viewing areas in northwest Ohio. USFWS - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the federal agency that oversees wildlife conservation on behalf of the American people, including the regulation, protection and management of federally endangered species and migratory birds. The USFWS also administers the Federal Duck Stamp program, one of the most successful conservation programs in history. The agency manages more than 560 National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) throughout the country totaling nearly 150 million acres of land and water. Ottawa NWR located in Oak Harbor, Ohio, manages nearly 10,000 acres and has 15-miles of hiking trails, a 7.5 mile Wildlife Drive, and an 11,000 square foot Visitor Center. The refuge offers numerous environmental education and interpretative guided programs, including bus trips for birdwatchers and other outdoor enthusiasts to Cedar Point NWR and other refuge attractions. West Sister Island NWR is closed to the public to protect nesting heron and egret colonies. Contact the refuge at 419-898-0014 or visit the website for additional information http://www.fws.gov/refuge/ottawa/ ODNR- The Ohio Department of Natural Resources is the state organization that oversees the 11 agencies that manage Ohio’s natural resources, including forests, wildlife, natural areas and state parks. The 11 agencies under the ODNR are referred to as Divisions, such as ODNR Division of Parks or ODNR Division of Wildlife. For more information about any of the ODNR agencies or their properties, visit: ohiodnr.gov Division of Wildlife- The ODNR Division of Wildlife is the state agency that oversees wildlife conservation in Ohio. The Division manages or cooperates in managing more than 750,000 acres of wildlife lands throughout the state, plus more than 2,250,000 acres of water. Local wildlife areas include Magee Marsh, Metzger Marsh, Toussaint, Pickerel Creek, Mallard Club Marsh and Old Woman Creek. The Division of Wildlife receives no taxpayer dollars. Instead, the agency is funded primarily by hunters and anglers through the purchase of licenses, permits and federal excise taxes on hunting and fishing equipment. Because of this dedicated funding, only wildlife conservation activities are allowed on wildlife areas and they have very few amenities compared to other viewing areas. Financial support is also received through the Ohio Wildlife Diversity Fund including: donations, specialty license plates, tax check-offs and the Wildlife Legacy Stamp. At Magee Marsh, areas posted “Controlled Access” are off limits without proper permits. Other wildlife areas are posted with “Wildlife Area, Public Hunting and Fishing” signs and are open to the public for wildlife viewing; however, trails are limited or non-existent. No camping, swimming or soliciting is permitted on any wildlife area, and dogs are only allowed at designated dog training areas during the spring. Division of Parks- The ODNR Division of Parks is the state agency that oversees the management of Ohio’s state parks. The goal of the Division of Parks is to provide fun, safe, clean and friendly places where visitors can gather and enjoy Ohio’s outdoors. The Division of Parks manages 74 state parks in 59 counties with more than 174,000 acres of land and water resources. Facilities may include resort lodges, golf courses, campsites, cottages, nature centers, swimming beaches and pools, boat ramps and docks, picnic areas and trails. The Maumee Bay State Park and Resort offers 1,336 acres of recreational facilities and unique natural environment created by the convergence of the land and Lake Erie. The park balances recreational facilities with the natural world to gives visitors a diverse experience in a coastal environment. Catawba State Park is a small 10-acre park on the west side of Catawba Island offering access to Lake Erie, a picnic area and small swim beach. East Harbor State Park offers areas for boating, fishing, swimming, picnicking and camping.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Division of Forestry- The ODNR Division of Forestry is the state agency that oversees Ohio’s forest lands. The agency’s goal is to promote and manage for the sustainable use and protection of Ohio’s private and public forests. Ohio has 21 state forests containing nearly 200,000 acres spanning 21 counties. State Forests have both forest management and wildlife habitat management programs. Generally more primitive than state parks, Ohio’s forests invite outdoor enthusiasts from bird watchers to all-terrain vehicle riders. The Maumee State Forest has 2 miles of marked hiking trails and 66 miles of unmarked fire lanes available for hiking as well as 8 miles of bridle trails and 7 miles of trails designated for APV riding. Camping and building of fires is prohibited. The area is open to visitors between the hours of 6 a.m. and 11 p.m. daily. Division of Natural Areas- The ODNR Division of Natural Areas is the state agency that protects natural areas with ecological or geological significance. Many of these areas include remnants of Ohio's natural heritage. Some areas are very fragile and a permit is required for access. State nature preserves are not parks. Instead, they are sanctuaries for rare plants and animals. For this reason, only minimum impact activities such as bird watching, hiking, nature study and photography are allowed, but not picnicking, camping or fires. Preserves are open daily from dawn to dusk. Visitors are restricted to designated trails. Nature preserves in northwest Ohio include: Sheldon Marsh, North Pond, Augusta Anne Olsen and Irwin Prairie. Metro Parks- County metroparks are area parks that are managed by the local county government. Because of the local control, the management of the individual parks varies greatly. Some metro parks focus purely on recreational use while other parks include wildlife conservation. Amenities and visitor rules vary from park to park and county to county. Examples of local metroparks include: Pearson, Sidecut, Oak Openings, Secor, Edison Woods, East Sandusky Bay and Blue Heron Reserve. Contact the county’s park district for more information about individual parks. NGO- Non-government organizations are private groups focused on conservation efforts. These can be local, state or even national organizations. Rarely do these organizations manage properties; rather, they provide essential funding, research, expertise and volunteers to government agencies. Because of their structure, NGOs are play a crucial role in conservation efforts which would otherwise be impossible. As you can see, wildlife conservation in Ohio has many faces and goes by many names; however, one thing is certain: this diversity of support is the reason wildlife conservation in Ohio has been a success. These different groups can be confusing; however, by focusing on logos and keying in on words like wildlife area, refuge, forest, natural area or park and county, state or national, visitors will have a better understanding of what organization manages the property, the management strategy and the rules.

Both Open April 2014 Marblehead Lite Bed & Breakfast Scenic location on Lake Erie, steps away from Historic Lighthouse Reservations: 419-798-4200 605 East Main St. Marblehead, Ohio 43440

Beacon Point Resort 4198 W. Lakeshore Dr. and State Route 2 Port Clinton, Ohio 43452 Phone (419) 341-3000

To all of our birding customers... We are here to serve you in one convenient location! 419-836-5027

Golf Driving Range A short drive to practice for the long drive Clubs Available

• Sandwiches • Salad • Breakfast

• Snacks • Pop • Beer • Ice • ATM • Ohio Lottery

(419) 836-4049 Open 24 hours/7 days

• Pizza • Burgers • Hotdogs • Sandwiches Lake Erie Yellow PIZZA & KITCHEN Perch Sandwich or Basket 419-836-7151 Daily Lunch Specials

Joe’s

Located on the Corner of St. Rt. 2 & North Curtice (Approx. 2½ miles south of Maumee Bay State Park)


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2014

Introducing the First Annual Bird Ohio Day On March 20, 2014, a Bird Ohio Day resolution drafted by Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO) and sponsored by Senator Randy Gardner was approved by the Ohio State Senate. The resolution designates May 10 as Bird Ohio Day to recognize the importance of bird and bird habitat stewardship. “Bird watching has become one of the most popular and economically significant forms of outdoor recreation in Ohio and throughout the United States,” the resolution states. “Birding tourism contributes significantly to economic development in Northwest Ohio. Thousands of birdwatchers from across the country and around the world visit Northwest Ohio and the southwest shore of Lake Erie each spring to witness the spectacle of bird migration and to participate in the Biggest Week in American Birding Festival organized by the Black Swamp Bird Observatory of Oak Harbor.” Research by Bowling Green State University and BSBO’s own indepen-

dent study includes estimates that visiting birdwatchers spend more than $30 million in northern Ohio each spring. Senator Randy Gardner stated, “I am pleased to sponsor the Senate resolution recognizing May 10th as Bird Ohio Day. Birding is an important part of Ohio’s strong and diverse travel and tourism economy, in addition to bringing great enjoyment to thousands of Ohioans and visitors to Ohio from all over the world.” According to the resolution, conservation and protection of bird habitats, has both aesthetic and economic benefit, including increased real estate values along nature preserves and land protected by conservation easements. BSBO Executive Director Kimberly Kaufman has high hopes for the resolution. “The passage of the Bird Ohio Day resolution is a milestone for birding, habitat conservation, and economic development. This resolution and the celebration of each year will do much

to raise awareness of the importance of birding to the economy and the value of conserving the habitat that this economic engine is built upon.” said Kaufman. Kaufman also offered thanks to Senator Gardner for his tremendous support. “We are incredibly honored that Senator Gardner was willing to sponsor the resolution, and we offer our sincere appreciation to him and to his wonderful and supportive staff for helping to make our vision for Bird Ohio Day a reality,” Other agencies and organizations that BSBO recognized in the resolution include Destination Toledo, Lake Erie Shores and Islands, Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center, Metroparks of the Toledo Area, Erie Metroparks, Cleveland Metroparks, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Columbus Audubon Society, Ohio Ornithological Society, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Ohio park districts and zoos and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Attention Birders: When you’re in the area, look for businesses with this logo in their window...

THIS BUSINESS SUPPORTS BIRD CONSERVATION AS A PROUD MEMBER OF THE

Black Swamp

BIRDS & BUSINESS Alliance www.bsbobird.org

These businesses support habitat conservation with a membership in the Black Swamp Birds and Business Alliance. For a full list of Birds and Business Alliance members, and to learn how your business can be part of our Alliance, visit www.bsbo.org and www.bwiab.com


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

START YOUR PROJECT RIGHT! The Rudolph/Libbe Companies offer a comprehensive array of facility-related services that streamline the entire design and construction process, from site selection to equipment installation and beyond. For projects of all sizes, our single-source approach provides unmatched client convenience, faster project completion, and lower overall project cost. For more information, visit us on the web:

Proud To Support the Black Swamp Bird Observatory!

www.rlcos.com

The Rudolph/Libbe Companies

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Your copy of the...

Lake Erie Birding Trail Guidebook available at Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 West State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449

Westeren Lake Erie Marshes Loop — an example of one of many maps available in the Lake Erie Birding Trail Guidebook

2014

Lake Erie’s best birding sites

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife and Ohio Sea Grant at Ohio State University have released the Lake Erie Birding Trail Guidebook, a 232-page compilation of 88 popular and less well-known birding locations all along Ohio’s Lake Erie coast, from Ashtabula to Toledo. In addition to locations of parks and other birding spots, the book lists commonly sighted species and noteworthy rarities, park amenities, and online resources for visitors. “Lake Erie and its environs are the premier birding destination in Ohio, and in the entire Great Lakes region,” says Jim McCormac of ODNR. “Nearly 400 species have been found along the Ohio shoreline, and migration periods see enormous numbers of songbirds and waterbirds. Many Lake Erie birders are from out-of-state or elsewhere in Ohio, and the Lake Erie Birding Trail helps visitors navigate the best hotspots.” Birding along the Lake Erie coast contributes $30 million to the local economy every year, and Ohio’s 1.6 million self-identified birders alone spend over three quarters of a billion dollars annually on their pursuits. The Lake Erie Birding Trail Guidebook not only makes it easier for them to spot both common and rare birds when visiting parks and preserves in northern Ohio, but it also gives birders the opportunity to point out their economic contribution to local businesses with a set of “birder calling cards” that link owners to more information. “Every visitor to Lake Erie will consider this book an incredible resource and a must-have for their libraries,” says Jeff Reutter, director of Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Lab. “We were very pleased to partner with ODNR Division of Wildlife, with funding from Wildlife, the Ohio Department of Transportation, and Ohio Sea Grant, to develop this guide.” The book itself is a companion

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piece to the ODNR Division of Wildlife and Ohio Sea Grant website lakeerieohiobirding.info, which showcases birding sites across the Ohio Lake Erie coastline to residents and visitors alike. “Connecting birders to birding and other tourism amenities in local Ohio communities will not only help attract more visitors to Ohio, but will also help us provide exceptional experiences to our guests,” says Melinda Huntley, executive director of the Ohio Travel Association. The guide is available online through Ohio Sea Grant for $13 per book and wholesale at $175 per case of 14, plus shipping and handling costs. To order, visit: ohioseagrant.osu.edu/publications or contact the Ohio Sea Grant office at 614-292-8971 with questions. More information about birding in northern Ohio and a list of recent sightings is available at lakeerieohiobirding. info.

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Bayview Experience the beauty of the birds

Northern California Birding per your request all year.

Belize March 1, 2015 Wisconsin May 11th, 2015 Nome, Alaska June 1 and June 6, 2015 Barrow, Alaska June 12th, 2015 New Mexico August 10th, 2015

Bed & Breakfast and Tea Cottage Welcome to Oregon Ohio Quiet • Country • Elegance Bayview B & B is an historic home situated on 20 acres and located adjacent to Maumee Bay State Park. On the shores of Lake Erie. Come and enjoy a blend of fine furnishings, antiques and whimsical treasures. Stroll the park like grounds, visit our unique perennial gardens or watch the clouds go by in the reflection of the pond. Pamper yourself in one of our six private rooms featuring fine linens, televisions and private baths. •Smoke-Free Environment •Park like setting on 20 Acres •Fresh Baked Goods & Beverages •No Children or Pets Please •Gift Certificates

Go to www.yellowbilledtours.com for details or Q & A.

Yellowbilled Tours For details and registration visit www.yellowbilledtours.com 925-353-0266

Hosts Dee and Jim Davies 7250 Cedar Point Road, Oregon, Oh 43618 419-836-1444 • bayviewbandb.com

Come visit our booth at the Biggest Week Optics Alley. – BSBO Headquarters –

EAGLE OPTICS® OPTIC OUTFITTERS

www.EAGLEOPTICS.com | 800.289.1132 | Follow Us www.EAGLEOPTICS.com

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2014

Voted BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT -12th Year in a Row-

Buy Any Lunch or Dinner Entree and Get Second of Equal or Lesser Value for

HALF OFF

Dining Guide Hours Monday-Thursday 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday & Saturday 11 11a.m.-11 a.m. - 10p.m. p.m. Sundays Closed

Pizza, Grinders, Salads and more!

697-1799

(419) 2325 Woodville Road Oregon, OH 43616 Dine In or Carryout

Watch Eagles, Ducks & Geese From our own peninsula!

Sonny Berry’s famous

BAYSHORE Supper Club

Good Food? Just Ask Anyone! 1842 Woodville Rd., 419-693-0862

2072 Woodville Rd. Oregon, OH 419.693.6695 Sun.-Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10

Not valid with any other offer.

The Water's Edge Restaurant at

BreakfasUtLVODIt%JOOer Open at 5:15 a.m. May 35-16 - 12

419.836.1466 ext. 24

The Closest Restaurant to Maumee Bay State Park

Farm Raised American Catfish

Featuring Our Famous Lake Erie Perch & Whole Pickerel Dinners Also Serving Steaks, Shrimp Dinners, Breakfast, Noon Lunches, Complete Bar Service

5307 Bayshore Rd. 419-698-8106

Open: 8 am-10 pm Mon. - Sat.

• Prime Rib • Steaks • Lake Erie Perch • Seafood • Salads 6067 Bayshore Road 419-697-1000

Steaks • Prime Rib • Seafood • Italian OPEN Everyday at 11am Kid’s 506 S. Lallendorf • Oregon Menu 419-690-1555

Welcome Birders! • Happy Hour 11am-1pm, 4pm-6pm, $1 can beer • Sat. & Sun. Breakfast 8am-11:30am

Birders Box Lunches Sandwich, Salad, Chips, $8.25 And Dessert

Bono Tavern 842 Main St., Bono 419-836-8786

Join us for Lunch Mon. - Fri. 11am - 3pm Dinner Fridays 5-9pm

Open 24 Hours Now at Flying J Plaza

26415 Warns Rd. at I-280. Exit 1

20% OFF

One coupon per guest check per visit. Coupon has no cash value. No change returned. Taxes & gratuity not included. Beverages not included. Valid at participating Denny's. Selection and prices may vary. Use only original coupon - no photocopied or internet printed coupons. No substitutions. BSB

Entire Guest Check with Purchase of two beverages. Orders to-go taken at 419-837-2033

Sunday Breakfast 9am-1pm Check out our website for menu details www.blackforestcafe.net

419-593-0092

3624 Seaman Road, Oregon, Ohio


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Find us at www.facebook.com/KaufmanFieldGuides or at www.kaufmanfieldguides.com

2014

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Small group and custom-made birding adventures worldwide From our offices in the United States, Peru, South Africa and Namibia, we bring you small group birding tours throughout our spectacular planet.

© Mike Nelson

We pride ourselves in our solid record of top trip birdlists (but we don’t ignore other wildlife), while also ensuring truly enjoyable tours (as we stipulate that any Birding Ecotours guide must have excellent people AND birding skills).

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© Mike Nelson

We donate 10 % of our profits to local communities and bird conservation projects.

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Please do email us about a host of destinations from Australia to Bhutan to Spain, south to Madagascar and across to Brazil and the USA.


2014 Biggest Week in American Birding Visitor's Guide