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December 2016

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“When you speak truth and empty your closets in life, you just might find out your dining room will fill up with people who really love you.� - Ace Lundon

Adieu Ace Lundon ISSN: 2372-2207

See Story Page 4!


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Diversity Rules Magazine December 2016

Jim Koury

Editor/Publisher Diversity Rules Magazine

Diversity Rules Magazine

PO Box 72 Oneonta, NY 13820 James R. Koury, Editor/Publisher 607.435.1587 Website www.diversityrulesmagazine.com Blog diversityrulesmagazine.com/blog E-Mail diversityrulesmagazine@gmail.com Copyright 2016 Diversity Rules Magazine All Rights Reserved Disclaimers If you have a question or comment regarding this issue or future issues of Diversity Rules Magazine, the publisher would love to hear from you! Feel free to contact Diversity Rules using the e-mail above or mailing address listed above. Content submission are always welcome too! All submissions become the property of Diversity Rules Magazine. However, originating authors reserve all rights to their creative works. Diversity Rules Magazine’s physical offices are located at 189 River Street, Oneonta, NY 13820. Diversity Rules Magazine will not knowingly publish or advertise text which is fraudulent or misleading. The publisher reserves the right to edit, limit, revise, or reject any text without cause. Diversity Rules Magazine does not assume any fnancial responsibility for typographical errors. If any errors are found, please notify Diversity Rules Magazine immediately. Materials in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

Welcome to the December issue of Diversity Rules Magazine. It is the last issue of the year and a bittersweet one at that. A couple weeks ago I discovered that a dear friend, Ace Lundon, had died on October 24th. I never personally met Ace but over the years we cultivated a friendship that blossomed into one that one would expect from two people that see each other often. Unfortunately, due to all that is going on in my life, and my preoccupaton with it all, I lost touch with Ace. I had experienced a few moments emanating from my gut, that I should reach out to him again and touch base, and reconnect. Each time I was in the middle of something and said, “I’ll call him tomorrow.” Alas, tomorrow came and Ace Lundon had gone across the veil. Not reaching out to him will be one of my life’s regrets, always. As a remembrance to Ace, I de

cided to dedicated my December issue of Diversity Rules to his memory, and is located on page 4. Ace’s memory shall live with me forever, as well as the words of widsom and lessone he taught me about myself and my place in this damn crazy world we live in. Adieu Ace Lundon, until we meet again. I know you will not be resting in peace, as you will be busily reminding the angels to think for themselves. You are now reunited with your love Patrick who was taken from you so long ago from the ravages of AIDS. I bid you peace brother and love to you always. Make sure you check out all the other great features in this month’s issue. There are a couple new columnists that I am exceited about -Belo Cipriani, and Ms. T. Helems. Enjoy your lives year.

See you next

Inside This Issue (partial listing)

A PTSD Memoir ............................................. Page 3 Remembering Ace Lundon .............................. Page 4 An Unrestful Nation ......................................... Page 6 Amazon Trail .................................................... Page 11 Trans Thought of the Day ................................. Page 13 Heterosexual Jill ................................................ Page 14 Carols for a Cure ............................................... Page 16 Workplace Diversity .......................................... Page 20 Resources and Diversions .................................. Page 22


Diversity Rules Magazine December 2016

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If You Could Read My Mind Mental Illnes Is Not Entertainment By David-Elijah Nahmod

David-Elijah Nahmod is a film critic and reporter in San Francisco. His articles appear regularly in The Bay Area Reporter and SF Weekly. You can also find him on Facebook and Twitter. David developed Post Traumatic Syndrome Disorder (PTSD) after surviving gay conversion therapy as a child and has found that many in the LGBT community suffer from severe, often untreated emotional disorders due to the extreme anti-gay traumas they endured. This column chronicles his journey. I know what its like to have my condition laughed at. Everywhere I go there’s always one or two assholes who will make snarky comments about how “sick” I am or lecture me--using the cruelest language imaginable--regarding all the “help” I need. All of these “concerned” souls usually do these things as publicly as possible in order to fully maximize the degradation they wish to subject me to. I am well aware of what my PTSD-caused by being subjected to childhood gay conversion therapy and other abuses--can do to me. The last thing I need is for some idiot to use my condition as a weapon against me--or as a “teaching tool” to “educate” me. With that in mind, I join millions of people who have expressed their disgust at talk show host Dr. Phil’s re-

cent interview with the former movie star Shelley Duvall. Duvall was riding high during the 1970s and 80s. She played major roles in numerous films by the late director Robert Altman, most notably in the Oscar winner Nashville (1975) and opposite the late icon Robin Williams in Popeye. She had a small but memorable role in Woody Allen’s Oscar winning Annie Hall (1977), and is most likely best remembered for co-starring role opposite Jack Nicholson in Stanley Kubrick’s classic chiller The Shining (1980). Duvall had a glorious second act as a producer. Her 1980s TV series, Faerie Tale Theater, which she created, produced and occasionally acted in was a huge hit for Showtime, helping to put the then second tier network on the map. A little over a dozen years ago, Shelley Duvall dropped out of sight. Rumor has it that she had moved back to her native Texas and was living a life of quiet retirement, comfortable with the money she had earned during her twenty-plus years in show business. In late 2016 Duvall resurfaced on the Dr. Phil Show. The TV psychologist interviewed Duvall about her current state of health. Many viewers were shocked by the once rail-thin Duvall’s overweight appearance--another example of how the public rushes to judgement. Duvall is now 67 years old--45 years have passed since she made her film debut. It’s absurd for people to expect Duvall to look in 2016 as she did in 1971. PTSD - Con’t on page 10


Diversity Rules Magazine - December 2016