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Branching through Presbytery of the James Volume 11, number 3 ~ November, 2012

Published by: Presbytery of the James ~ 3218 Chamberlayne Ave., Richmond, VA 23227

Richmond First celebrates 200 years By Marika Byrd and Dr. Charles A. Summers

The USA was a mere infant when John Rice Holt gathered shop keepers, merchants and dockworkers to form Richmond’s First Presbyterian Church. Over the decades, as the membership grew, First moved from its original location near the docks at Rockets Landing to five different locations, arriving at the present location in Richmond’s West End in 1950. First’s rich history in Richmond includes a primary role in the establishment of Union Theological Seminary (now Union Presbyterian Seminary) and the founding of several other congregations in Richmond over the past two centuries. Its missionaries and mission trips have reached the U. S. and into Africa, Korea, China, Belarus, and Central America. “Honoring the Past, Celebrating the Present, Transforming the Future is the theme of First’s Bicentennial year. Special events have taken place throughout 2012. Worship on January 29 focused on Celebrating the Past with guest speaker Dr. Jack Sadler, Pastor Emeritus, who served as First’s Senior Pastor from 1974—1999. This Sunday also saw the introduction of the commissioned hymn “Let All We Do and Say Give Breath,” composed by Dr. Thomas Troeger. The hymn text by Sally Ann Morris incorporates the Bicentennial theme as well as First’s mission statement, “Inspire, Nurture, and Serve To The Glory of God.” Other service music was chosen to honor the Presbyterian Scottish heritage. The beautiful Bicentennial banner, which features the three-part Christian Trinity Cross, was unveiled at this service. In March, a special reception honored those with 50 or more years as members of the congregation, and the Presbyterian Women celebrated their rich history with a program led by past moderators. A special worship service on May 13 turned to Celebrating the Present, as First welcomed guest preacher Dr. Brian Blount, President and Professor of New Testament Studies at Union Presbyterian Seminary. A highlight of the service was the magnificent Reunion Choir of over 50 singers representing First’s chancel choir members past and present who gathered for the weekend. June brought another musical event, the presentation of Franz J. Haydn’s The Creation, with orchestral accompaniment, by the combined chancel choirs of First and Second Presbyterian Richmond. As First turned its focus to Transforming the Future, in October the congregation closed out the year with a Celebration Dinner as well as the visit by guest speaker Dr. Rodger Nishioka, Benton Family Associate Professor of Christian Education at Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, GA.

Sanctuary First Presbyterian Church, Richmond.

With hearts grateful for the many blessings of the past 200 years, First looks forward to many more years of ministry. In the words of Pastor Dr. Charles A. Summers, “The Christian faith is not

about the past. It is about the future that God intends for us and for the whole creation. The best years of our ministry are in front of us. God is always able to do more than we can ask or imagine.”

Grace Covenant Honduras Mission Trip By Ron and Susan David

Exciting news from the Honduras mission of Grace Covenant Church! As we prepare for our annual mission trip to Southern Honduras (January 1-12, 2013), we are happy to report that:  Our eye surgeons were able to perform almost one hundred surgeries in January, 2012, mostly cataracts, several pterygia and one foreign body removal from the eye. Our collaboration with Centro Christiano de Servicious Humanitario de Honduras continues to be strong. We will have a third surgeon in 2013, and a fourth year med-

ical student from VCU School of Medicine who will do her senior project, tracking outcome measures. Hospital San Lorenzo is energized by the annual visits from the surgical team. They are actively fundraising to build a permanent eye clinic on the grounds of the hospital. They have already received the donation of a suite of eye examination equipment from the government of Spain.  Two Grace Covenant members traveled to Tegucigalpa in June, where, with nine others, including PC (USA) missionary, Rev. Mark Wright, we hammered out the Arti(Continued on page 6)


PRESBYTERY OF THE JAMES IN

Eighty-second Stated Meeting October 20, 2012 Chester Presbyterian Church

The Presbytery of the James held its 82nd stated meeting on Saturday October 20, 2012 at Chester Presbyterian Church. Altogether 234 people attended the meeting, including 93 teaching elders and 111 ruling elders, representing 69 congregations. We enjoyed worship in Chester church's beautiful sanctuary. The service included the reading of the Necrology, the installation of the Youth Council, liturgical dancing by students from Virginia State University, music by the Chester church choir, a message by Larry Chottiner on the raising of Lazarus, and the celebration of the Lord's Supper. We welcomed three new ministers, Elizabeth Forney, Keith Johnston, and Daniel Hrach. We met the new Executive Director of Camp Hanover, Doug Walters, and his family. We examined and approved for ordination the new Director of Admissions at Union Presbyterian Seminary, Kate Boswell. We examined and received as a candidate for ministry as a teaching elder Noell Rathbun (Ginter Park). We thanked Ruling Elder John Flournoy for his six years on the Nominating Committee.

The presbytery thanked Brennen Keene and Gloria Freye for donating their excellent legal services to help us complete the purchase the property at 3218 Chamberlayne, the site of the presbytery office. We established administrative commissions for four churches to work with congregations that have expressed their desire to withdraw from the PC(USA): Spotsylvania, Christ, St. Giles, and New Hanover. After careful consideration and debate, we approved the recommendation of the Office Park Task Force, distributing from the proceeds of the sale of the old presbytery office property in Glen Allen about $1,800,000 for a variety of good works. The presbytery approved the proposed 2013 budget with one exception. We sent the Shared Mission Support item back to committee to see if it could be increased. Thank you, Moderator Mary Baril and parliamentarian Steve Hicks, for guiding us through the sometimes tangled debates! Thank you, Chester Church, for your excellent hospitality and delicious lunch!

Rev. Gordon B. Mapes and Rev. Larry Chottiner serve Communion at 82nd Stated Meeting.

International Peacemaker Provides a Timely Voice for Syria Majd Lahham, a deeply committed Christian, teaches at one of the universities in Syria and also works with his church’s ministry to the many people within his country who have lost their homes because of the war. He had scheduled an event for students in his class. “When three did not show up, I was angry. It was required. I called them on their cell phones. There was no answer,” Majd said. Then he learned that they were on the way when a suicide bomber exploded himself and a truck of TNT and it was impossible to even recover their bodies. Majd had declined the offer of the Peacemaking Program to come to the United States and speak, but that experience changed his mind. The need for peace in Syria is urgent. Christians are only 8% of the population and most like Majd are Orthodox, belonging to the oldest Christian church, based in Antioch. Majd spoke about

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T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012

the Christian presence in Syria and how precarious their lives are. Grounding his remarks in scripture and faith, he called for initiatives that will bring peace, democracy, open elections, and freedom of religion. He answered numerous questions on a wide range of issues and engaged his hearers with new insights and perspectives. Majd spoke at Bon Air Presbyterian Church, at Union Seminary, at an event jointly hosted with St. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Cathedral, Westminster Canterbury in Richmond, and Westminster Presbyterian Church in Charlottesville. Majd Lahham is the first International Peacemaker assigned to the Presbytery of the James in recent memory. Bon Air Presbyterian Church initiated the request through POJ and provided the host family. The World Mission Purpose Group provided coordination, promotion, and speaking opportunities.

Next Meeting February 16m 2913 Union Presbyterian Seminary

Presbytery of the James United for Mission in Haiti By Mary Jane Winters

A wooden bell. A gift from Haiti. Try to ring it. Ah . . . no one hears the sound of a wooden bell—or the cry of the poor. Those from the Presbytery of the James who traveled to Haiti October 4-11, did hear the cry of the poor and more than that, they saw how God was at work in the mission initiatives of the Haitians as they respond to the vast needs in that country. “We know POJ can make a difference in the lives of our brothers and sisters in Haiti. We have the opportunity to come along side and give them a hand up - not a hand out. Their perseverance in some of the most difficult conditions imaginable is impressive and inspiring. It is time for us to act!” urged Bill Nix, from Fredericksburg Presbyterian Church, a member of the team. “We returned inspired by what is being done and committed to furthering this work by supporting a “no one hears the sound of a new mission posiWooden bell” tion in Haiti,” said Nan Johnson from the Brandermill Church. The Presbytery of the James is joining with Presbyterian World Mission to send a new mission co-worker to Haiti. Many churches and individuals have given funds to help Haiti, but a new mission worker on the ground can assist with those funds and with teams who come and by providing coordination, leadership training, and advocacy as a witness to Jesus Christ. This is an opportunity for all churches in the Presbytery of the James to unite in God’s mission in Haiti and make a difference.

The Vine is published by Presbytery of the James 3218 Chamberlayne Ave., Richmond, VA 23227. Editorial Rights Reserved. Articles without by-lines are written by the editor. The Vine is a publication mailed free to members of Presbytery of the James. Submissions, corrections, letters of request or request for additional copies should be sent to: Clifton Edwards, Editor; Presbytery of the James; 3218 Chamberlayne Ave., Richmond, VA 23227 or email cliftonedwards@pbyjames.org.


‘right people, right place at the right time’

Connette, Mercer share & train at East Gambella Bethel Synod By Albert Connette

“God has sent the right people, at the right time, them on our hearts so to the right place, with the right message!” This was we can practice the a comment made by one of the East Gambella forgiveness and humilBethel Synod leaders at the conclusion of training ity needed to bring sessions Albert Connette and Jesse Mercer of healing and unity in Olivet Church in Charlottesville led in Ethiopia reour Synod.” cently. Albert and Jesse The East Gambella Bethel Synod (EGBS) arose were welcomed to out of the Presbyterian Church’s mission to the Gambella and sent off Participants in EGBS training sessions Anuak people along the border of Ethiopia and Suwith delicious meals of dan. It is part of the large and rapidly growing Ethitraditional Anuak dishopian Evangelical Church Mekane Yesus (EEes and singing accompanied by drums. During CMY). Albert had shared in a mission partnership their stay in Gambella they also met with the Synof Shenandoah Presbytery with another EECMY od’s management committee to discuss their partSynod for many years before Olivet nership, worshipped with a congreChurch, where he serves as pastor, gation on Sunday and spent time Understanding missiology to be “the systematic began developing a mission partnervisiting with PCUSA missionary, study of all aspects of mission,” Stanley H. Skresship with EGBS. Michael Weller, who lives in Gamlet’s new book introduces this academic field in a Several Olivet members have bella. comprehensive fashion. Both theological and secuvisited EGBS for fellowship, sharWhile in the capital of Addis Ababa lar studies of mission receive attention in this treating and training since the beginning Jesse and Albert were able to share ment of the field, which also describes the developof the partnership in 2010. But rea meal with Niles and Ann Reimer, ment of missiology over the past century. Skreslet cently the Synod had experienced retired PCUSA missionaries who (D.Min.’89) is the F. S. Royster Professor of Chrissome conflict and division and so worked with the Anuak people for Jesse Mercer with young EGBS tian Missions at Union Presbyterian Seminary and Albert and Jesse had been asked to evangelist who has founded 14 many years and are now completing academic dean on the Richmond campus. teach on forgiveness, Christian unity churches in his region of Gambella. the translation of the Bible into and evangelism during their August Anuak. They also shared lunch with visit. The daily teaching sessions began and ended EECMY President, Rev. Wakseyoum, EECMY with devotions, prayers and rousing singing. Albert Director of Mission and Theology, Rev. Yonas, and Jesse’s teachings were translated simultaneousand Director of the coordinating office for the ly into Anuak and Amharic for the Synod leaders, EECMY Synods with Presbyterian connections, evangelists and pastors present from three different Rev. Teferi. They also visited several Christian ethnic-linguistic groups. Olivet and EGBS’s prayministries that work with the thousands of street ers that God would bless this time of sharing, felchildren in Addis and had lunch with a group of lowship and leadership training were anEthiopian youth who grew up on the streets with a swered. “We knew all of these scriptures”, one paryouth who has now been adopted by a family in ticipant commented, “but now God has burned the Olivet Church.

‘Comprehending Mission’ Stan Skreslet’s new book

Show Me The Money! Robert Johnson, Acting General Presbyter

I have heard, for some time, people in our Presbytery wondering why we don’t get out there and spend the $5.3 million or so in assets shown in our audit report. It made me curious too – why would we need to have that much squirreled away, when there are so many ministry needs around that money could answer. So, I asked our Presbytery’s Staff Accountant, Cindy Hollingshead to “show me the money!” She looked at me funny (it isn’t the first time) and said “What money?” That is when my education started. It is true that our audit reports show $5.3 million in unrestricted assets. However, only a small portion of that is liquid and intended for totally unrestricted spending. $1.9 million is set aside as an endowment and reserve for church development projects – for NCDs and other church development purposes. Obviously, the endowment itself is preserved, so that places $1.6 million off limits of even that total. Another $1.6 million are frozen in tangible assets – our buildings, equipment and vehicles, as well as the value of the land that we hold, including Camp Hanover. This is akin to an individual calculating their net worth, and including (as one should) one’s house, land and Beanie Baby collection in the total. None of that can be spent unless it is liquidated, so although it is an asset, it is not the same as cash on hand. Then, $1.8 million is in what in our auditors call the “POJ Building Fund.” This amount is the proceeds from the sale of our Office Building, and is soon to be dispersed in mission grants. The amounts left over are mainly our annual operating expenses – money that passes through about as quickly as it shows up. So, I got showed the money, all right: it waved to me from the many cages it is locked into! T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012

Stanely H. Skreslet

“The renaissance of mission studies in the last twenty years begs for scholarly attention and assessment,” commented Amos Yong of Regent University School of Divinity, “Stanley Skreslet is a sure guide with a command of the territory.”

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Office Park Task Force awards $ Meadows Presbyterian Church, Charlottesville

Lord Jesus Korean Church, Midlothian

Camp Hanover Purpose Group

Tumaini Vocational Training Centre Building in Nyeri, Kenya

Outreach programs using new Social Mission Center building

$40,000 pledge.

$210,000 over a three year period ($70,000; $70,000; $70,000)

Facilities maintenance and updating.

“And God is able to provide you with every blessing in abundance, so that by always having enough of everything, you may share abundantly in every good work.” 2 Corinthians 9:8

“To act justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.” Micah 6:8 Lord Jesus Church has funded one-third of its budget every year to missions. In recent years, the congregation of Lord Jesus Korean Church has committed itself to social missions known as the Social Mission for Love & Justice, which has resulted in wide recognition for service to the community and in revitalization and rapid growth of church membership.

$21,000 over a three year period ($7,000; $7,000; $7,000) “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is from God; everyone who loves is born of God, and knows God . . . If we love one another, God lives in us, and His love is perfected in us.” 1 John 4:7-12. The Marriage Enrichment Education Initiative will provide proven Marriage and Relationship skills education opportunities throughout the presbytery hosted by member churches. Additionally it will train trainers who can continue to help couples in their congregations/ communities.

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“Whoever blesses a neighbor with a loud voice, rising early in the morning, will be counted as cursing.” Proverbs 27:14 The overall objective is to focus on preserving and restoring existing facilities to keep this outdoor ministry available for Presbytery of the James to enjoy. Needs have been identified and prioritized. Needing immediate attention:

In 2007, Meadows Presbyterian Church entered into a relationship with the Riamukurwe Parish of the Presbyterian Church of East Africa to help provide shelter, clothing, security and food to almost 200 children in the Tumaini Home for Destitute Children and Huruma Children’s Home. This project is for the completion of the Vocational Training Center.

First Things First Purpose Group Marriage Enrichment Education Initiative

$379,000

Remodeling and updating of director’s house

Roof replacement for Wise Lodge

Required improvement of water system accessibility through well-water distribution.

Small Church Ministry Purpose Group

Southside Presbyterians in Ministry Purpose Group

Expand the scope of Mission opportunities for small churches.

Relocation of Madeline’s House

“And the king will answer them, Truly, I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.” Matthew 25:40

$25,000 over three year ($3,750; $6,250; $15,000) Objectives are 1) To give 15 members of small church congregations the opportunity to attend one mission trip (domestic & international) annually for the next three years. 2) To increase collaboration among small churches and 3) To expand congregations’ vision for spreading the gospel in Word and deed to the “outmost ends of the earth.” Interest sparked in mission is expressed by seventh-grader Brennan Proctor addressing the congregation following a day packing meals, “Yesterday we helped a lot of people and made a difference in the world. Can we do it again?”

T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012

$100,000 Pledged (depending upon funds raised locally)

“And the king will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.’” Matthew 25.40 (NRSV)

Madeline’s House is a 33-bed facility for domestic and sexual violence shelter, which provides a safe haven for abused women and children. The only such shelter in Southside Virginia, it serves twelve counties. Its site is being sold and a new home must be found.


Stewardship Purpose Group Assistance to congregations in stewardship “The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness there.” Psalm 24:1

$150,000 over a three year period ($75,000; $50,000; $25,000)  

Establishment of a stewardship office within the presbytery structure Provision of resources for year round stewardship to all of the congregations in the presbytery A program of planned giving that each congregation could benefit from in establishing individual congregational planned giving programs. Assistance in capital campaigns for congregations whether they are for a particular project or for needs of the congregation that require capital funds. Annual stewardship conference Collaboration with Union Presbyterian Seminary in offering continuing education events in stewardship or in providing training and seminarians in the areas of stewardship. Everything we have is a gift from God.

Tabor Presbyterian Church, Crozet Crozet Cares

Woodville Presbyterian Church, Richmond

“Now the company of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one said that any of the things which he possessed was his own, but they had everything in common. And with great power the apostles gave their testimony to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great peace was EDUCATION upon them all. There was not a needy person among them . . .”

Transportation

Acts 4:32-34

$105,000 (over a three year period) $35,000; $35,000; $35,000)

HEALTH

“Equipping God’s people for the work of ministry.” Ephesians 4:12-13. $35,000, purchase of a van and one year’s insurance premium. The overall project goal is to connect to the Church Hill Community through Evangelism, Christian Education, and Mission. Over the past five years, Woodville has experienced wonderful opportunities to nurture a limited number of youths through a Saturday Enrichment Program and an Ecumenical Camp Program. These programs allowed us to connect with many families within the Church Hill community. Transportation for these programs and others is critical to the success of all programs. Currently members of the congregation use their personal vehicles to bring children to functions of the church.

Crozet Cares is a project designed to bring the unique needs of our rapidly growing rural community under the aegis of a Tabor Presbyterian Church ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT USA initiative in the areas of health education and arts/entertainment.

Union Presbyterian Seminary

Haiti Purpose Group

Culpeper Presbyterian Church

Evangelism

New Mission Co-Worker to Haiti

Manna Ministry

$280,000 (Over a four year period) ($100,000; $80,000; $60,000; $40,000)

$125,000 (over a three year peiod) $62,250; $42,000; $20,750

“As for you, always be sober, endure suffering, do the work of an evangelist, carry out your ministry fully.” 2 Timothy 4:5

“You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” Acts 1:8

Union Presbyterian Seminary has committed itself anew to supporting the church’s ministry of evangelism. Union recognizes the evangelistic task of the church and the responsibility of the pastor to provide leadership for that task. Union is committed to train the leadership necessary for the revival of the 21st century church. The objective of this project is to create an Evangelism Program to equip pastors and educators who are passionate witnesses to Jesus Christ, and who will be vital participants in God’s revitalization of Christs’s church.

The project entails the recruitment, involvement and support of as many churches in Presbytery of the James as possible working together to become involved in and financially support the new mission co-worker(s) in Haiti for three years, and hopefully beyond. The people of Haiti, Presbytery of the James and the Presbyterian Church (USA) would all benefit from this project.

T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012

$27,000 (over a three year period) ($9,000; $9,000;, $9,000) “For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in . . .” Matthew 25:35 Manna Ministry seeks to share nourishment, compassion, and hope in Christ’s Name to all who enter. The Ministry serves a meal to anyone in need of a meal on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 11:00 a.m. –12:30 p.m. The meal is served at the Culpeper Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall. Our objective is to increase the meal service to five days a week and hire a paid coordinator to oversee the ministry.

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Disabled? Maybe. Handicapped? No. Talented, Yes! RETIRED

George Dennehy plays many instruments. Resident of Ashland, attends New Hanover. By Louis Williams

In Romania, disabled/handicapped people are viewed as cursed by God and are ostracized by the people. George Dennehy was born in Romania with no arms. His parents loved him enough to give him up for adoption so he could have a better life. At eight he learned to play the cello with his feet. At the age of 18 he began to play and sing in such places as the Ashland Strawberry Faire. As a result, George was asked to perform with an internationally recognize rock band, The Goo Goo Dolls. A Romanian film crew heard about George through a video on George Dennehy the internet. They came to the U.S. to film a local story on George and his family. Now it is time for George to return to Romania where he will get to meet his biological parents. The reporter and film crew hope to change the hearts of the Romanian people so that they will value disabled people. This is the purpose of the trip. George is accompanied by his mother, Sharon Dennehy and Marti Williams. In a very simple and non-threatening way George also shares the gospel of Jesus by explaining that God does not make mistakes and he does not see himself as a mistake.

Grace Covenant Honduras Trip (Continued from page 1)

cles of Incorporation for KHISH Proyecto Vision.  We had the opportunity to attend a meeting of the Presbytery of Honduras. With translation help and introductions from Rev. Mark, we were able to outline our approach in serving the people of Southern Honduras. The presbytery includes sixteen churches with lay pastors, all in Central and Southern Honduras. Thanks be to God for the opportunity to bear witness to His healing power!

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D. Clyde Bartges ..................................................................................................................................... 70 James Griffes ........................................................................................................................................... 60 Howard Leming ...................................................................................................................................... 60 Norman Nettleton .................................................................................................................................... 60 Russell Davis........................................................................................................................................... 55 Everett Hellmuth ..................................................................................................................................... 55 Richard Sommers .................................................................................................................................... 55 Choon Duk Suh ....................................................................................................................................... 55 Carroll Londoner ..................................................................................................................................... 50 David MacFarlane ................................................................................................................................... 50 Harold Wallof.......................................................................................................................................... 50 Kenneth Davis ......................................................................................................................................... 45 Robert Pierce ........................................................................................................................................... 45 Virginia Barksdale .................................................................................................................................. 35 William Charles ...................................................................................................................................... 35 Judith Allen ............................................................................................................................................. 30 Dixie Brachlow ....................................................................................................................................... 15 Celestine Cox .......................................................................................................................................... 15 Sue Cyre .................................................................................................................................................. 15 Tom Waltz............................................................................................................................................... 15

ACTIVE Charles Pickell, Meadows Church .......................................................................................................... 60 Nathan Dell, All Souls Church................................................................................................................ 55 Donald Langfitt, Kirk O’Cliff ................................................................................................................. 55 Robert Temple, Village Church .............................................................................................................. 50 Charles Brown, Hebron Church .............................................................................................................. 40 Terry Woodard, Aberdour/Emporia First................................................................................................ 35 Hyun Bae, Lord Jesus Korean Church .................................................................................................... 30 LoAnn Fairman, Providence Church, Gum Spring ................................................................................. 30 Jay Sanderford, Blue Ridge Church ........................................................................................................ 30 Willie Woodson, Richmond First United Church ................................................................................... 30 Albert Connette, Olivet Church .............................................................................................................. 25 Alex Evans, Richmond Second Church .................................................................................................. 25 Ken Goodrich, Sandston Church............................................................................................................. 25 Gordon Mapes, Chester Church ............................................................................................................ 25 Laura Sugg, Westminster Church, Charlottesville .................................................................................. 25 Mark Valeri, E. T. Thompson Professor of Church History, Union Presbyterian Seminary .................. 25 Ann Cherry, Member-at-Large ............................................................................................................... 20 Dwight Nave, Covenant Church ............................................................................................................. 20 Sarah Nave, Covenant Church ................................................................................................................ 20 Marion Paul White, Wesley Church ....................................................................................................... 20 Mary Kay Collins, Richmond First Church ............................................................................................ 15 Gay Lee Einstein, Member-at-Large ....................................................................................................... 15 Carla Pratt Keyes, Ginter Park Church ................................................................................................... 15 Nelson Ould, Richmond Third Church ................................................................................................... 15 Elaine Bowen, Member-at-Large ............................................................................................................ 10 Joel Morgan, Westminster Church, Richmond ....................................................................................... 10 Durk Steed, St. Christopher’s School...................................................................................................... 10 Joshua Choi, Member-at-Large ............................................................................................................... 5 Scott Crannell, Member-at-Large ........................................................................................................... 5 Kevin Germer, Christ Church ................................................................................................................. 5 Gordon Lindsey, Scottsville Church ....................................................................................................... 5 Jeffrey Lee, New Hanover Church .......................................................................................................... 5 Cheryl Sumner, Montrose Church .......................................................................................................... 5 Glenda Hollingshead, Colonial Heights Church ..................................................................................... 5 Joseph Young, Oak Grove Church .......................................................................................................... 5 T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012


Rockfish firewood project

The Wood Ministry is one of many community endeavors at Rockfish Presbyterian in Nellysford, VA. Started a number of years ago by Ray Koon, men and women gather at the church on Tuesday mornings to split and deliver wood that has been donated to us from sources throughout Nelson County. Sam Alexander, current “leader”, coordinates pickups and deliveries. With the help of a split-

ter, a few chain saws, and a lot of questionable backs, Rockfish delivers free firewood to folks who depend on their stoves and fire places for heat during the winter. Sam’s motto is, “No pine, only hard wood for our neighbors.” This ministry has been a great opportunity for Rockfish Presbyterian to serve the folks of Nelson County. (center) Julia Jet, fire wood recipient.

Necrology* ABERDOUR AMELIA BLUE RIDGE BON AIR BURKEVILLE CAMPBELL MEMORIAL CHARLOTTESVILLE FIRST COLONIAL HEIGHTS GINTER PARK FREDERICKSBURG LAKESIDE LAWRENCEVILLE LOUISA MADISON

James (Jimmy) Thompson Hazel Clarke, Margaret Bultje, Harvey Llewellyn Carol Joyce Chapman, Susanne Humphlett Raileanu

PETERSBURG SECOND

RICHMOND FIRST

William Willis Berry

RIVER ROAD

Karen Lee Kennedy, Barbara Ann Holmes Stoudt

SCOTTSVILLE SOUTH HILL

Warren Gardner, Byron Haner

SOUTH PLAINS

Jack Bell, S. Miller Eason, Howard Ostergren

ST. ANDREWS

William J. Kinnamon, Jr. ST. GILES

Robert Lee Hill, David R. S. Peters, Richard H. Yearwood, Jr.

TUCKAHOE

Robert Earl Temple

VILLAGE

James D. Scharf Claire Louise Schmdt Jaenke, Edward Drank Peterson

Edward Roger Call

OVERBROOK

Daniel Benjamin Ice

Donald W. Beard, Walter Lee Harding, Donald Miller, Rodney W. Smith, Jr.

MONTROSE

ORANGE

PROVIDENCE FORGE

RICHMOND SECOND

James Perkins Agnew, II, Annie Lee Parsons

Esther Putnam White

OAK GROVE

William Willis Berry

Louise P. Armstrong

MITCHELLS

NEW COVENANT

RICHMOND FIRST

WESTMINSTER CHRLOTTESVILLE WESTMINSTER RICHMOND WYLLIESBURG

Robert Wright Bedinger, Sr., Homer K. Buerlein Glad N. Applegate, Edmund Blalock Gibson, Richard P. James, Benjamin Rice Lacy, IV, Dr. J. Gary Maynard, Jr., Richard W. Wiltshire Walter (Jimmy) Oslin Ann Fitzgerald Janet Riddle Helena Dunkle, Bonnie Shelton, Patricia Taylor C. Aubrey Featherston, Jr., Donald O. Phelps, Robert D. Wendell, John J. Wickstead, Jr. Eileen Honkala, Mary Shumate Betty Clement, Mary Anne Fisher John Guerrant, Joseph Payne Barbara Rice Jean Baxley Vaughan

Teaching Elders

Martha Staton

Donald G. Dawe Julius S. Garbett William Samuel Morris Robert W. Ratchford Leslie Cransford Robinson George B. Telford, Jr. Robert C. Vaughan, Jr.

Martha Missouri Jeffrey Owens Leroy Crowder, Andrew “Skinny” Redmon, Jeanne Taylor Harry Morgan Bluford Roy L. Christian, Kathleen T. Maitland

*Ruling and Teaching Elders, September 2011-September 2012

T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012

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Camp Hanover Celebrates 55 years of Ministry

Doug Walters, new Executive Director, Founding director John Ensign and Retiring Director, Bob Pryor.

Labor Day weekend 2012 at Camp Hanover was a time for celebration. Sixty-plus children and adults laughed, played, sang together and worshiped in the woods in Camp Hanover style, “telling the story” during the fifth annual Family Camp. Over 200 folks from the “Camp Hanover Family” travelled from across Virginia and beyond to mark the anniversary of 55 years of outdoor ministry taking place at the Camp. The day was also one of honoring the passion and work of Bob Pryor, retiring after 22 years of service as the Camp’s director. Those in attendance were treated to stirring words and colorful stories about the history of Camp and the vision of ministry for this special place at its inception from founding Director John Ensign, and had a chance to meet the new incoming Executive Director, Doug Walters and his family.

Old friends and new friends the 5th annual Family Camp over Labor Day weekend.

Transformations: Kirkwood IV Updated A handful of talented volunteers and staff members have transformed Kirkwood IV, an ag-

Kirkwood IV with new siding and windows becomes a meeting space.

New Executive Director Takes the Reins Camp Hanover’s new Executive Director, Doug Walters, and his family were introduced to the Presbytery of the James at the 82 Stated meeting of the Presbytery that took place at Chester Presbyterian Church on Saturday, October 21. Doug began serving as the Executive Director on October 1, after he and his family got settled into the newly renovated Executive Director’s residence located on the Camp Hanover property near the entrance. Doug shares that he and his wife Lynn, and their three children – eight year-old David, 6 year-old Joshua, and 2 year-old Kate – are grateful for the warm welcome they have received from the camp staff, members of the Camp Hanover Purpose Group, Presbytery staff and other members of the Presbytery of the James. The adventures that come with living on-site – hiking the trails, feeding the chickens, fishing the lake, having campfires in the woods on cool nights – have been

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the high points of the family’s Camp Hanover experience so far. Doug is passionate about Presbyterian camp ministry and brings with him a wealth of experience and creativity, having served for over a decade in a variety of leadership roles at various PC (USA) summer camps and retreat centers. These sites include Johnsonburg Presbyterian Center in northern New Jersey, Chesapeake Center in northeast Maryland, Dogwood Acres in the Florida panhandle, and most recently Ferncliff Camp & Conference Center in Little Rock, Arkansas. Doug has also served multiple terms on the Board of the Presbyterian Church Camp and Conference Association. At the Presbytery Meeting, Doug shared that he is doing a lot of “listening and learning” in these early days in his new role, visiting with past campers and their parents, purpose group members and pastors, hearing the stories of what makes Camp Hanover…Camp Hanover. Doug has been inspired to hear people speak of the rich spirit of tradition and strong values that are so integral to this vibrant ministry.

T HE V INE , N OVEMBER , 2012

ing screen pavilion, into a comfortable, indoor meeting space now available for year-round usage by guests visiting Camp Hanover. Spearheading the effort to revitalize Kirkwood IV gave Camp Hanover Maintenance Assistant, Jim Marston, an opportunity to showcase his talents for carpentry. Along the way, Jim was able to creatively repurpose discarded cabinetry and lumber scavenged from the recent renovations to the Executive Director’s residence for new use in the updated building. The newly insulated building now features new LP gas heat to keep you warm and toasty on blustery winter days. New ceiling fans and removable windows keep the air moving when temperatures rise in the summer months. Thanks to the donation of materials, the costs to update the building were kept low, and allowed for the additional lighting to brighten up the space, and the construction of a small kitchen area with sink, microwave and refrigerator.

Jim Marston showcasing his handiwork in the Kirkwood IV kitchen.

Doug shared at the Presbytery meeting, that while it was too early in the learning process to outline his goals for Camp Hanover with any semblance of specificity, his hope was that together with the churches of the Presbytery, we might look for new avenues, opportunities and intersections where Camp Hanover could support the mission work taking place at the local level, and enhance the impact and experience of the people each local congregation is ministering to.

The Vine  

Quarterly newsletter of Presbytery of the James

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