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3 ~ NOVEMBER,

2011 PUBLISHED BY: PRESBYTERY OF THE J AMES~ 3 2 1 8 C HAMBERLAYNE A VE., RICHMOND, V A 2 3 2 2 7

Lord Jesus Korean Church

Race relations/community service award In July, 2011, Lord Jesus Korean tional award, presented the award Church received the coveted Elinor and gave a congratulatory message Curry Award from the Union Presbyto the congregation. terian Seminary. “We believe that this award The Elinor Curry Award recogdoes not only mean a lot to the Konizes ministries of outreach and sorean community, but also to other cial concern that address the call of ethnic congregations in the presbythe church to “do justice, love mercy, tery. By being awarded for outreach and walk humbly and social concerns with God” and in so for the community, doing change the “do justice, love mercy, we hope that we can congregation. challenge them to and walk humbly Every year the reach out with the with God.” Seminary presents heart of Christ tothis award to a conward the neighbors gregation after carewho are still being fully reviewing the applications from isolated, yet in urgent need.” said 11,000 Presbyterian Churches from Dr. Hyun Chan Bae. across the country. The Elinor Curry Award for Lord Jesus Korean Church reOutreach and Social Concern given ceived this award for the first time as by Union Presbyterian Seminary a Korean congregation in the denomwas named after alumna Elinor Curination. ry (1905-1995). She was a RichDr. Kenneth J. McFayden, the mond, Va. pioneer in race relations committee chairperson of congregaand community service. Selection

Intercultural Music Festival

includes having a high level of congregational support, being a model for meeting the needs of the church’s neighborhood, stimulating an ongoing ministry by and for those it is designed to reach, and being a program that focuses on the underlying cause of injustice or need and addressing the call of the church to “do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with God.”

CARITAS

Youth Ministry thrives in small town church By Rev. Gordon Lindsey

Scottsville Presbyterian Church is a small church (35 members). Its congregation has no children or teens. Yet it has a thriving youth ministry. For some eight years, the church has been welcoming young men from the Discovery School of Virginia to its Sunday services. A close tie has

Discovery School of Virginia at Scottsville

developed between church members and the boys. The Discovery School of Virginia is located in the countryside south of

Scottsville. It serves teenage boys and girls who are experiencing emotional, behavioral, and learning problems. Many of its students experience failure in traditional school settings, often directly related to unresolved emotional and family issues. They are usually emotionally immature, impulsive, angry, and oppositional. Some come abusing drugs or alcohol. The school addresses the academic problems by first addressing the emotional and relationship problems that lie underneath. Students are placed in small groups that live outdoors year round in rustic campsites that the students design, construct, and maintain. In this group setting, as problems arise in behavior or in expressing emotions, the adult leaders

work with individual students to form supportive relationships within the group. In these relationships, the students learn to develop more mature ways of relating to others, ways that can carry over into family and school relationships. Only when that maturity begins to emerge do students enter into the school’s academic programs. As part of its educational program, the school also exposes the young men to the community beyond the school. This is where Scottsville Presbyterian comes in. It has become a host church for the Tecumseh and Chinook Groups, two of the school’s five groups. The church welcomes the groups to its Sunday service, two to three times a month. (The school does not let a group attend if there (Continued on page 5)

Monroe Park Mission

The Renew Crew

Applachian Service Project


P R E S B Y T E RY I N R E V I E W S EVENTY - N INETH S TATED M EETING ~ O CTOBER 15, 2011 ~ F AIRFIELD P RESBYTERIAN C HURCH

The Presbytery of the James held its 79th Stated Meeting on Saturday, October 15, 2011, at Fairfield Church, Mechanicsville, VA. The meeting went very well, the building was more than accommodating, and the hospitality was outstanding and gracious. Many thanks for all of the efforts of the pastors and members of Fairfield Church for their hospitality. We welcomed the following ministers into the presbytery: Rev. David Forney, Pastor, First Church, Charlottesville, from Middle Tennessee Presbytery Rev. Paul Hopwood, Honorably Retired Pastor from Albany Presbytery. Rev. Kelle Brown, Executive Director, Daughters of Zelophehad, from Seattle Presbytery We approved for ordination the following: Candidate Inho Kang, POJ, as Designated Associate Pastor, Lord Jesus Korean Church. Candidate Peter Atkinson, Presbytery of Eastern Virginia, as Pastor, Gordonsville Presbyterian Church.

Unique to this meeting was that it was held in the Family Center and Commissioners were able to sit around tables during the entire meeting, which provided a new way of fellowship and a place for one’s papers! In addition, the following actions were taken by the presbytery: 1. Approval of the June, 2011, Presbytery minutes 2. The Balancing of Commissioners to Presbytery for 2012. (Beginning in 2013, the Presbytery will have determined its formula for Commissioner representation) 3. A number of people were elected to various teams and committees of the presbytery.

4. Granted permission to serve communion as appropriate at 2012 Camp Hanover sponsored/hosted events Changed to Minister at Large status the following ministers: Rev. David Wood, 6/9/2011 Rev. Shane Roberson, 5/1/2011 Rev. Tony Lin, 8/15/2011 Validated the position of Associate Director for Preaching Resources at Luther Seminary, St. Paul, MN. Elected the following persons as Commissioners to the 219th General Assembly in 2012: a. Shady Clark, TE, Eastminster b. John Daniel, TE, Crestwood c. James Goodloe, TE, Validated, Mattoax & Pine Grove d. H. Davis Yeuell, TE, Honorably Retired e. B. Ayars Lore, RE, Providence Forge f. Zella Spiers, RE, Concord g. Jon Sweigart, RE, Hartwood h. Elsa Falls, RE, Second, Richmond Elected the following persons to serve as Alternate Commissioners to the 219th General Assembly in June 2012: a. Chris Mooney, TE, First, Richmond b. Sylvester Bullock, TE, Greenwood c. Zolton Phillips, TE, Trinity d. Nancy Summerlin, TE, BrettReed Memorial e. Bill Brownfield, RE, Three Chopt f. Diane Easley, RE, Cove g. Gene Rosen, RE, Fairfield h. Phyllis Smith, RE, Bon Air Approved a new Funding Policy for congregations concerning Statement of Intent

Road for $450,000 and instructed the Trustees to sign necessary documents to settle the purchase. The Presbytery rejoiced with the Tappahannock members present at the meeting over this special moment in their ministry. Established an Administrative Commission with the powers of G-3.0301a to complete the work necessary to dissolve the Third Presbyterian Church, Petersburg: Dan Hale, TE, Moderator Wilhemena Hailes, RE, (Westminster, Petersburg) Ron Bullis , TE, (Hopewell) Bob Barton, RE, (Crestwood) Sarah Nave, TE, (Covenant) Bob Lawrence, RE, (Colonial Heights) Elected a Task Group to propose to the Trustees and then to the presbytery the use of funds realized from the sale of the Presbytery Office Park: O. T. Crowther, RE, Salisbury, Moderator Rob Burns, TE, Crestwood Bob Ratchford, TE, River Road Jewell-Ann Parton, TE, Tabor Peter Ro, RE, Lord Jesus Madelene Green, RE, Pryor Memorial Janet Thornton, RE, Milford Elected Ruling Elder Mary Baril, First Church, Richmond, as Moderator for 2012 Respectfully submitted,

H. Carson Rhyne, Jr. H. Carson Rhyne, Jr.

Lyndsey McCall

Youth Ministries Coordinator We are delighted to have Lyndsey McCall on staff as our new Youth Ministries Coordinator. The Youth Ministry Coordinator position is the combination of direction for the Youth Council and YOCO events as well as, working with the Youth Ministry Purpose Group on their programming including the Confirmation Retreat and ACTS. Lyndsey was recently graduated from Union Presbyterian Seminary ) with her Master's of Divinity. Before seminary she attended St. Andrews Presbyterian College where she received her Bachelors in Applied Ministries. Lyndsey spent 12 years as a youth and an adult leader in her home Presbytery's Youth Council of Coastal Carolina. Lyndsey is from a small country church and knows what it is like to be one of the only young person in the church making Presbytery events extremely important to her faith life. Lyndsey looks fondly on her experience of working on the youth council and felt it had helped guide her calling into ministry. Lyndsey currently works for the Presbytery part-time but also serves Forest Hill Presbyterian Church and Greenwood United Methodist Church's After School Director. For any questions concerning youth ministry please contact her at lyndseym@pbyjames.org

2012 FUTURE MEETINGS OF THE PRESBYTERY Saturday, February18, 2012 , Grace Covenant Church, Richmond Tuesday, June 19, 2012, Salisbury Church, Midlothian

Approved the purchase of property for Tappahannock Church: 10 acres of land at the corner of Route 360 and Henley Ford

Saturday, October 20, 2012 , Chester Church, Chester

Published by Presbytery of the James, 3218 Chamberlayne Ave., Richmond, VA 23227. Editorial Rights Reserved. Articles without by-lines are written by the editor. The Vine is a publication mailed free to members of Presbytery of the James congregations. Submissions, corrections, letters or requests for additional copies should be sent to: Clifton Edwards, Editor; Presbytery of the James; 3218 Chamberlayne Avenue., Richmond, VA 23227 or email: cliftonedwards@pbyjames.org

2—November, 2011--Vine


Hunger Purpose Group Update By Starke Cauthorn, Chair Hunger Purpose Group

Five-cents-a-meal receipts from Presbytery of the James Churches through August, 2011 amount to $46,122.03 (through August 2010, $45,985.l76). In January the Hunger Purpose Group filed a grant request with the Synod of the Mid-Atlantic for funds to continue expansion of the Haiti Fish Farm Project in Bohoc, Haiti (the request included seven pages of documentation and photos). A grant of $2,500 was received. In August, 2011, the Hunger Purpose Group filed a grant with Presbyterian Hunger Program for a grant of $2500. (5 pages of documentation). The grant is pending. The Hunger Purpose Group currently consists of 10 members representing the population centers of the presbytery. Four serve from the Charlottesville area, three from Richmond and four from the Fredericksburg area. Members of the committee do hunger presentations in churches in their respective areas when requested by the churches there. In addition, members travel to sponsored international projects to observe and work. This past June two members visited a nutritional project in Reynosa Mexico for a week, a

project which has been receiving $3,000 per annum from the Hunger Purpose Group. In November, 2010, two members traveled to Matthew 28, Bohoc, Haiti for a week to work/observe orphanage work and fish farm expansion. This program receives $3,600 quarterly. In addition to regularly scheduled quarterly meetings the group meets when crises arise, usually a brief meeting by conference call. In early August with the famine escalating in Horn of Africa, the group met on line and approved a one time $3,000 grant for Church World Service. In 2011, the group has funded 21 projects, distributing a total of $33,200. At the October 10 meeting an additional $20,000 in grants was reviewed. The goal of the Hunger Purpose Group is to maintain a 50/50 balance between national and international grants. The bulk of domestic grants go to 12 regional food banks within the geographic bounds of the presbytery. A complete list of revenues and expenditures are published in a brochure available in the spring of each year. One new dimension to hunger awareness within the presbytery which has come about this year, has been that of providing matching funds to groups within the presbytery who want to do their own hunger project. Two groups, the Pres-

bytery Youth Council and the Small Church Purpose Group both did Stop Hunger Now fund raising and food packaging campaigns. The Hunger Purpose Group provided up to $1,000 in matching funds to each group. Both groups were successful by raising $1,000 on their own. Four groups within the presbytery have requested such funding for 2012. We are pleased to see more people being brought on board to international hunger awareness through this grass-roots, engaging approach toward alleviating hunger. The Hunger Purpose Group submits no 2012 funding requests from the presbytery. All committee members are volunteers, contributing their time and travel. For some, international travel costs have been substantial, but done gladly to help the many of our world in need.

Teaching Elders Years of Service ~ 5 year anniversaries Years John O. Barksdale, HR ............................................................................... 60 John H. Thompson, HR............................................................................... 60 Paul J. Achtemeier, HR ............................................................................... 55 James A. Payne, HR .................................................................................... 55 Phillip O. Miller, HR................................................................................... 50 William Arnold, HR .................................................................................... 45 Richard A. Brand, HR ................................................................................. 45 Edson Pederson, Temporary Pastor, Bethany Church ................................ 45 Richard Haines, HR .................................................................................... 40 Hunter R. Hill, HR ...................................................................................... 40 Paul Hopwood, HR ..................................................................................... 40 Robert K. Neale, HR ................................................................................... 30 Judith A. Sutherland, HR ............................................................................ 30 H. Denny Burnette, Pastor, Louisa Christian Church ................................. 35 Nick Morgan, Executive Director, Virginia ................................................ 35 John W. Turner ........................................................................................... 35 John W. Daniel, Pastor, Crestwood ............................................................ 35 Dan Hale, Pastor, Petersburg Second ......................................................... 35 Mary H. Johns, Interim, Southminster ........................................................ 35 Richard Mahlmann, Pastor, Lakeside Church............................................. 35 Charles A. Summers, Pastor, Richmond First ............................................. 35 Mary Jane Winter, Interim, Rockfish Church Johnathan Barton, General Minister, Virginia Council of Churches .......... 30 David B. Howell, Associate Director for Preaching Resources, Luther Seminary ............................................................................. 30

Years Cindy Kissel-Ito, Affiliate Assistant Professor of Christian Education, Union Presbyterian Seminary ........................................................ 30 Allen H. Fisher, Jr., Pastor, The Fredericksburg Church ............................. 30 Keith Hill, Pastor, St. Giles Church ............................................................ 30 Franklin Reding, Pastor, Providence Powhatan ........................................... 30 Stephen Starzer, Pastor, Fairfield Church ................................................... 30 Robert Azzarito, Campus Minister, University of Mary Washington ........ 25 Jeff Butler, Stated Supply, Woodlawn Church ........................................... 25 Paul H. Galbreath, Professor of Preaching and Worshp Union Presbyterian Seminary ........................................................ 20 Jae-Hie Lee Kim, HR .................................................................................... 20 Felecia Douglass, Pastor, New Covenant Church ....................................... 20 Mary McCutchen, Member at Large ............................................................ 15 Fakhri Yacoub, Pastor, Arabic Christian Church ........................................ 15 Samuel Adams, Assistant Professor of Old Testatment, Union Presbyterian Seminary ......................................................... 10 Ulysses Payne, Member at Large ................................................................. 10 Ed Kross, Associate Pastor, Three Chopt Church ........................................ 10 Yung-Suk Kim, Assistant Professor, School of Technology ....................... 5 Christopher Thomas, Member at Large ........................................................ 5 Tommy Nichols, Pastor, Beulah Church ...................................................... 5 Shawn Jason Smith, Pastor, Hartwood Church ............................................. 5 Patrick Dennis, Associate Professor, The Fredericksburg Church ............... 5 Jane Govan, Stated Supply, Cove Church ................................................... 5 (Only 5 year anniversaries are reported here) Vine—November, 2011—3


Lakeside Area Ministers Board

LAMB’s Basket By Teddy Martin

The mission of the Lamb’s Basket is to provide food for needy families in Henrico County, Virginia. It began as a food closet at Christ Lutheran Church in 1996. Needs in the area increased significantly, so the pastors of the Lakeside Area Ministers Board got together and created LAMB’s Basket. Becoming incorporated, Lamb’s Basket officially opened in June 2002 as an IRS approved 501-C-3 non-profit organization. LB works closely with Central Virginia Food Bank and receives referrals from Henrico County Department of Social Services as well as local churches and civic organizations. Nearly forty churches donate money, food, and volunteers to staff the pantry. Even the Board of Directors and Pantry Manager are volunteers. This year we anticipate distribution of nearly 500,000 lbs of food to over 25,000 local residents. This volume

continues to increase as the economy worsens. Lamb’s Basket depends on dona-

tions of food from retailers such as Central Virginia Food Bank, Tyson’s, Food Lion, Trader Joe’s, COSTCO, Sam’s Clubs, Martin’s Supermarkets and Panera’s Bread, as well as individuals and churches. Fund raisers are held periodically to aid in obtaining products that are not generally received by donations and to cover routine operating costs. Several thousand pounds of food goes quickly when the daily count of clients is nearly100. Each family receives about 30 lbs of canned and dry goods, deli items, fresh fruits and vegetables (when available), meat, breads, and dessert. Personal hygiene items, baby supplies, birthday cakes, and pet foods are provided as they are available. Lamb’s Basket is in need of additional donations, supporters, and volunteers in order to continue its mission of feeding hungry people in Henrico County. Can you help?

In the Face of Reality

Former Delegate Frank D. Hargrose, Sr. (right) and local preservationist Dr. Robert Bluford, Jr. (left) were presented with the Patrick Henry Leadership Award for preservation of Hanover’s rich history and heritage on September 15, 2011, at the Society’s annual Member/Guest Social at a Hanover historic home. The event was held on the lawn of Cool Water. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the Society each year.

Leading Through the Water

This study of the work of the late Harvard theologian Gordon Kaufman interprets his career from his first published book, Relativism, Knowledge, and Faith (1960) through his last, Jesus and Creativity (2006). James characterizes Kaufman's mature position as a sophisticated reconstruction of divine activity, one which makes use of recent scientific theory and its naturalistic assumptions but which remains rooted in classical theological tradition. After developing a critical analysis of the limitations and possibilities of Kaufman's "radical naturalism," James offers a constructive reinterpretation of the meaning The Co of human flourishing, which, of Gor nstructive Th don D. e he argues, opens the prospect Kaufm ology an of a more consistently naturalistic as well as theocentric theology. "In this fine book James gives a sympathetic albeit critical analysis of Kaufman's constructive theology. James has thereby paid Kaufman the highest compliment any theologian can hope to receive, namely, to have his work taken with utter seriousness by a first-rate mind. This study is a model of intellectual clarity and incisive argument." Rev. Thomas A. James is a validated minister in -Paul E. Capetz Presbytery of the James, Professor of Historical Theology teaching at Union Presbyterian

4—Vine—November, 2011

Bluford receives Patrick Henry Leadership Award

The ritual of baptism has often been reduced to a symbolic 'rite of passage' into a local congregation. Paul Galbreath, reaching into memory and history, has called us as readers into the recovery of the sacred and the transformational as inherent ingredients in this formative event. We all recover in these pages a sense of our full conversion as followers of The Way. --Daniel G. Bagby, Theodore F. Adams Emeritus Professor of Pastoral Care Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond In this deep and refreshing work, Galbreath taps the wellspring of ancient Christian tradition, distills clear analysis of our contemporary setting, and draws on a great reservoir of personal and pastoral experience--all to show that Christian life is baptismal life. The church and world are thirsty for such wisdom. --David Gambrell, Associate for Worship, Office of Theology and Worship, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) With vivid stories and provocative questions, Paul Galbreath leads us on a journey through Rev. Paul Galbreath is a the waters of baptism. Focusing validated minister in on how this ancient practice shapes Christian disciples for Presbytery of the James today. --Martha Moore-Keish, Associate Professor of Theteaching at Union ology, Columbia Theological Seminary Presbyterian Seminary.


Youth Ministry Thrives

NECROLOGY

(Continued from page 1)

are unresolved group problems that must be dealt with back at camp.) The church invites one of the boys each Sunday to ring its steeple bell, which marks the start of worship. The church also invites the young men to any church picnics. And last Christmas the church adopted a boy and ran a drive to provide clothing he needed. Church members have hired the boys to do some construction projects on their homesteads or

2010-2011 RULING ELDERS BLUE RIDGE BON AIR BRETT-REED CAMPBELL MEMORIAL CHARLOTTESVILLE FIRST CHESTER CONCORD CRESTWOOD CULPEPER EMPORIA FIRST FAIRFIELD FREDERICKSBURG GINTER PARK

Discovery School of Virginia student gathering.

farms. This enables the boys to earn cash that pays for group canoe trips on the James River or hiking trips into the Blue Ridge Mountains. Although it may seem at first counter-intuitive for teenage boys and senior adults to mix, a close bond has developed between the two. Church members look eagerly on Sundays for the boys to enter the sanctuary. “When they enter, they bring such energy and youth to our services,” says Elder Jim Hogan. According to the school’s director, the church’s outreach has had a significant impact on the young men as well. One indication of that is that twice the church’s pastor, Gordon Lindsey, has been invited to participate in the school’s graduation ceremony for boys completing their high-school education. He was invited at the graduating students’ specific request. One of those graduating two years ago was leaving the school to attend college. He told Lindsey that he had grown up in the church of another denomination, but he planned to seek out a Presbyterian church once he was on campus. Another boy transferred from the Discovery School to a nearby military academy. When the academy’s choir sang at Scottsville Presbyterian, a church member overheard the boy showing his fellow choir members around the church and describing it as “my church.” Surprisingly the church’s preaching has had a special impact on the boys. The school’s director says he sometimes hears the boys discussing a sermon a couple of days later. “I’m not sure any of my own church members are doing that,” says Lindsey. Once Lindsey preached a sermon on the prodigal son (to whom he gave the name Matt the Brat). A day later the group’s adult leader called him to say the boys could not stop talking about the sermon all the drive back to camp. Then that evening, one of the boys searched for a Bible and read the story to the group again. “Our outreach is a way of sowing seeds,” says Lindsey. “What fruit it will bear, only God knows. But these young men are dear to our hearts at Scottsville Presbyterian.”

HAWKINS MEMORIAL KING’S CHAPEL LAKESIDE LAWRENCEVILLE LAUREL MADISON MITCHELLS NEW COVENANT NEW HANOVER OGDEN OVERBROOK

David Mark Bailey, Betty Jean Minton Marvin Bowling, Herbert Chermside Charles Willard Brabrand, Sr. Claudia Louise Burnett Williamson Robert Joseph Brunfeldt, Amherst Howard Lamb, Edward L. Nalle Justin “Jack” Burkey, Mary “Jay” Owend Davis, Lloyd George Spence, Sr. Edith J. Marcuson Jack L. Ferrell, Welford “Pete” L. Harris Madeline Douty, Ruth Hoffman, Joseph Todd Madeline Hutcheson, James Rainey Hattie Underdown Davis Charles F. Kindred, III Miller Eason, Ethel Fields, Charles Mohr, Robert Ostergren, Billy Presson Thomas Neville Karl Osterud June Kinsey Perks, Kenneth Ray Reichel, Robert Earl Temple Mamie H. Stone Rebecca Wailes Rumpler Harvey Carpenter, Melissa Johnson William Fabry, Paul Jacobi, Leon Johnston, Rose Scudder Eugenia McDaniel, William Overbey Esther Wallace John Krebbs, Gwen Rennie, Dorothy O’Geary Snead

PETERSBURG THIRD

Bessie Meade Drake, Rose Parrish,

PETERSBURG SECOND

John W. Holt, Jr., Cecil H. Winston

PRYOR MEMORIAL RICHMOND FIRST RICHMOND SECOND RIVER ROAD ROCKFISH SALISBURY

Edward Royall Sheffield George F. Albright, Charles C. Chewning, Carmen P. LeCompte, Howard A. Sirles, Jr,. John H. Woodfin, Sr. Helen T. Bowler, Georgia L. Helmick Joyce S. Mitchell, Robert Edward Nance Kendall France, Richard “Dick” Humphrey, John Sims Richard H. Poff, Samuel Joseph Ward

SWIFT CREEK

Earl W. Noble

THREE CHOPT

Ernest Wayne Garrett

TUCKAHOE WOODVILLE

William Carter Childress, Stephen F. Hart, Jr., Susan Warinner Hogg, Morton H. Lancaster, Chester Earl Starkey Albert Young

TEACHING ELDERS AMOS HOOD ARTHUR STEVENS WILLIAM S. SMITH RUSSELL SPRY WILLIAMS

Vine—November, 2011—5


New Campus Ministry

VCU Presbyterian Fellowship Rev. Gail Monsma

Exciting new things are happening on the campus of VCU in downtown Richmond. This Fall, the Presbytery of the James and Second Presbyterian Church have joined together to launch VCU Presbyterian Fellowship, a new campus ministry and student group. Campus Ministry is one of the most important investments we can make in the future of the church, and our hope is to provide a place for students at our Presbytery’s largest university to explore and grow in their faith, through fellowship, mission and worship. We’ve got exciting things planned for the fall, from service opportunities to retreats. With over 32,000 students, including around 23,000 undergraduates, VCU is a rapidly growing and changing campus, and its students spark a unique vibrancy and activity in downtown Richmond. Yet despite it’s size, VCU has been a campus without a PC(USA) presence. This is where the idea of VCU Presbyterian Fellowship originated. Last spring, a group of students and Second Presbyterian members involved in the VCU community began a conversation asking, “ What would a Presbyterian campus ministry at VCU look like?” We set out with modest goals: ♦ to represent the Presbyterian Church at VCU, but also to reach out beyond the Presbyterian

Students gather in the Sanctuary.

Church to any student in need of a faith community.

Amelia hosts Zuni banquet . . . Forty residents came to be a part of this event . . . By Rev. C. Jeremy Cannada

The Amelia Presbyterian Church hosted residents of Zuni Campus of the Presbyterian Homes & Family Services for their annual Zuni Banquet. Each year for the past several years, members of the congregation take part in an annual fundraiser whose sole purpose is to donate all funds to this home so the residents can continue to enjoy and improve their quality of life. As a part of the congregation’s efforts, a late-summer dinner is always held. This year, it was held on September 11 in the church fellowship hall. Approximately forty residents came to be a part of this dinner. After supper, Amelia-area minister, Rev. Dan Walker, helped lead the residents and congregation members in songs that brought out the great voices from within everyone present. The church musician, Sandra Wade, and the youth performed a costumed rendition of “Old MacDonald” for the residents, which also was delightfully entertaining. At the end of the banquet, Ernie Staggers presented the Zuni residents with a check for $1900 to be used in whatever way the residents needed to ameliorate their campus. The Presbyterian Women’s Co-Moderator, Stella Llewellyn, also presented a check to the home totaling $500. This was a blessing for the Zuni home, but it felt even more tremendous for the Amelia congregation who loves 6 —Vine— November, 2011

♦ ♦

to partner with churches besides Second Presbyterian Church.

to bring a group of students to the Montreat College Conference

to offer an alternative, contemplative worship service geared toward college students, utilizing student leadership For the past two months, a group of 14 undergraduate students from VCU has as well as J Sergeant Reynolds Community College have participated in our weekly meeting. They come from both Presbyterian and non-Presbyterian backgrounds and meet each Tuesday evening at 7:30pm at Second Presbyterian Church for meals and bible study. On their own initiative, these students have worked to become a recognized and sponsored VCU student organization, and VCU Presbyterian Fellowship has begun the process of joining the VCU Interfaith Campus Ministry Association. We are a growing endeavor! If you are or know of students at VCU or at nearby J. Sergeant Reynolds community college, please be in contact with us! Similarly, if you have a heart for college students and would like to help, please be in contact with us as well; we are looking for more people from a variety of churches within the POJ to sit on an advisory board and help out. If we are to make this a successful endeavor, we need interested people from across the presbytery! To reach us, email Howard Dudley, at howard.dudley@upsem.edu or Gail Monsma at gmonsma@2presrichmond.org Come see what we are doing! ♦

hosting these residents each year. There is even

some talk of our going down to their early-Spring “Day in the Country,” where the Zuni residents show the public around. Zuni is particularly famous for their excellent peanuts, and these can be ordered at zunipeanuts.org. The residents are able to work in the peanut production and shipping, which gives them sustainable living and a sense of value and accomplishment—something the Amelia Church is reminded we all so often take for granted. The Zuni residents are an inspiring ministry of God among us. Additional pictures of the event can be found through the church’s FACEBOOK page. .www.facebook.com/AmeliaPCUSA.

to reach students not just a VCU but also at nearby J Sergeant Reynolds Community College. to have a weekly fellowship meeting


Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church

Honduras medical mission trip slated for January By Susan Pillsbury David, MD

Back in early 2005, a call from a friend was life changing. Seems his church in Pennsylvania was poised to send a “medical mission” to Honduras and was just missing one ingredient: medical personnel. Trinity Presbyterian Church in Berwyn had the missional spirit, and even the funding, but had been unable to find any doctors or nurses to go along. Little did I know when I said, “Why not?” that life would never be the same. The trip to Honduras was arranged through a retired stockbroker in Lancaster who had seen the tremendous need in the southern part of that third - poorest - in- the -Western Hemisphere nation, the size of Virginia, with a population that is comparable to our Commonwealth. In five days, we were transported on life -threatening highways (there are few paved roads in the country, but one stretches from the capital city of Tegucigalpa south to the Pacific coast) and unpaved mountain roads that had been recently washed out by torrential rains. We visited four rural hamlets and one big-city slum. We saw poverty on a scale we never believed could exist only a two-and-a-half hour flight from Miami. We had some memorable “snapshot” moments, but mostly the incredible experience of feeling totally culture-shocked. And so, we did what American doctors do, and thanked our lucky stars that our usual world was not “like that.” But we were transformed. The following year, when the same opportunity presented itself, we signed on again, believing (hope against hope?) that we could feel more competent this time. Same group organizer, five more different clinics in five more cinderblock oneroom Presbyterian churches in the stretch south from Teguc toward San Lorenzo. Then one of our translators made a casual comment at dinner. She said she didn’t believe shortterm mission groups (and she had worked with many) accomplished anything. Our reaction was to become defensive. Surely we were doing some good. She agreed that we might feel good about ourselves for being there, and that we would certainly get affirmation from friends at home as we regaled them with tales of deprivation and hopelessness, but that the people of Honduras wouldn’t

even remember us once their twenty tablets of Tylenol were gone. For the record, they lined up in the hot sun for three hours and went through the motions of a cursory physical exam, to be given twenty Tylenol, then walked home a couple of hours. What had we accomplished? Another joyless and handout, remembered perhaps with more resentment than gratitude. We were challenged.

Beatriz is the owner of a roadside restaurant who never ceases to amaze us with the quality of her cooking, enjoyed with conversations occasionally interrupted by a semi flying by on the highway only feet from where we are seated beneath slowly-turning ceiling fans in the open air. Immanuel Episcopal Church in Old Church has sent their Rector and half a dozen members (including my husband), along

See Video of recent mission trip to Honduras at www.youtube.com/watch?v=plH8TB31Zn0

We planned the 2007 mission trip ourselves. It didn’t look that difficult. We made one crucial change, after discussing our shared experiences: we decided to choose two communities and to concentrate our efforts on them. For the past five years, we have visited Moropocay and Puerto Grande, and tried to learn how God wants to use us as we come to know a few thousand people, seeing the same faces, hearing the same names, again and again. We also are learning the joy of being able to say that we are working WITH good friends in rural Honduras. Dr. Adolfo Moreno is a family physician whose “day job” is running a clinic for the very poor in Tegucigalpa, funded by the Presbytery of Tampa Bay. He has accompanied us, without fail, on every clinic day for the past seven years. He probably understands more English than he could ever say (and he never tries to speak English), but manages to give us a tutorial in tropical medicine every time. He faithfully keeps our (now) thousands of medical records, and adds to them when he holds quarterly clinics in these same two villages, funded by the Presbyterian church in Berwyn, in Port Jefferson, and on Monument Avenue. His family has been growing up before our eyes. We met his daughter Stephanie when she was fifteen, son Jorge when he was thirteen, Alejandra as a gawky ten year old, “Rosanita” before she was born. Now Stephanie is a university student studying architecture, Jorge studying biomechanical engineering, Alejandra a very savvy highschool future businesswoman, Rosanita an engaging kindergartener.

with generous funding and oodles of baby blankets. Our colleague from Centro Cristiano de Servicios Humanitario de Honduras, Melvin Tejada, is a Mennonite. Richard (AKA the Rev. Dr. Richard Graugh) is our “spiritual advisor” from the First Presbyterian Church of Port Jefferson, NY. Ken, one of his parishioners, is a soft-spoken man in his late sixties who was one of the very first crop of Peace Corps volunteers in South America in the 1960s. Len is a Professor of Dentistry from the University of Pennsylvania. He is Jewish, as is Renee, the newborn nursery head nurse from Congregation Or Ami

in Richmond. Her congregants collect sunglasses for all the Hondurans who have cataract surgery through our Project Vision Honduras/San Lorenzo. There are 46 people who can see now, thanks to the skills of Dr. Jim Wheatley from North Carolina and Dr. Carlos Martinez from California. These same gifted surgeons have committed to doing 100 surgeries in January 2012, along with Dr. Angelo Murcia, the Honduran ophthalmology resident who shared his countrywoman’s misgivings about the wisdom and the usefulness of American mission groups. He confided at the end of a week with Project Vision that HIS life had been changed. When his residency is completed in December, he will take a position in Melvin’s eye clinic for the poor. What an ecumenical group! I thank God for the wonderful support that I have been given by Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church and my fellow members who have accompanied me. Thank you, everyone. We look forward to coming years with NEW friends. If you are interested in taking part in our January mission trip, or in supporting our efforts, please see our website (www.KHISH.org) and the youtube video.

Hondurans gather for medical services.

Honduran team.

Vine—November, 2011—7


8 —Vine—November, 2011

The Vine  

Quarterly Publication by Presbytery of the James

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