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Professional Development Handbook


Contents PLC Statement of Purpose.............................................................................................................................................................3 Professional Learning Framework............................................................................................................................................... 4 Annual Internal PL (1).................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Annual Internal PL (2) - Teaching and Learning....................................................................................................................... 16 Annual Internal – Compliance (Vivien)....................................................................................................................................... 17 Pictorial Framework of Professional Learning at PLC in 2019................................................................................................ 18 PL Criteria for PL 1, 2 & 3............................................................................................................................................................... 21 Study Grant Criteria..................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Affiliations...................................................................................................................................................................................... 44

Alliance of Girls Schools

AHISA – Association of Heads of Independent Schools

APPA – The Australian Primary Principals Association

IPSHA – The Independent Primary School Heads of Australia

ACEL – The Australian Council for Educational Leaders

AISWA – The Association of Independent Schools of Western Australian

TRB – Registration Annual Fees (5 Years)................................................................................................................................. 46 Working with Children Check (3 Years).................................................................................................................................... 46


PLC Statement of Purpose Presbyterian Ladies’ College is a Uniting Church School committed to educational excellence that gives girls confidence to lead purposeful lives and make an active contribution towards the common good.

STRATEGIC PILLARS Personalisation No two girls are alike which is why we believe it is important to provide each girl with choice and flexibility to tailor her own path to success.

Leadership We believe in remaining willing to adapt and evolve; to set new standards and lead the way forward. We encourage each girl to take the lead in her own life – an active participant in her future.

Courage As the world changes, so too will the challenges facing our girls when they graduate. Instilling each girl with courage and resilience ensures they have the ability to flourish no matter what they are faced with.

Community We believe the whole community has a valuable role to play in raising empowered young women. It is important each girl is an active and engaged member of her community.

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Professional Learning Framework Rationale Presbyterian Ladies’ College is committed to the continuing professional development of its staff, and recognises and values the vital importance of teachers at the school. Professional Learning at PLC reviews, develops, and refines teaching practice, and recognises the entitlement of teachers to receive feedback and support.

The Professional Learning programme and culture at PLC aims to achieve four key goals. •

To grow and develop staff

To improve teaching standards at PLC

To improve outcomes for students

To facilitate life-long learning

To empower peer collaboration

A truly effective approach to professional learning is characterised by a shared commitment to improvement and an acceptance that teachers have a powerful role to play in each other’s development, as well as their own.

Goal-setting To engage purposefully in performance growth and development, a teacher, with the support of their line manager, must clearly articulate agreed goals-based on the AITSL (Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership) Professional Standards and the School’s Four Pillar Strategic Plan (Personalisation, Leadership, Courage, Community). All staff have a set of documented and regularly reviewed goals related to both performance and development, and ways of measuring progress towards them.

All Teaching Staff •

Compliance Training

Apple Teacher badges

Asthma Online Training

Anaphylaxis Online Training

Observational Rounds Historically Educator Impact, currently using David Hopkins Models of Practice, moving into Community of Practice in 2020. An important part of improving professional practice is collecting evidence that provides the basis for ongoing feedback, refection and further development. PLC uses peer observation, self-observation, and student feedback to support staff in better understanding their strengths and development opportunities.

PROFESSIONAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES School-Based Courses •

Visible Wellbeing

Strategic Focus Groups

Projects funded through parents @ PLC

Professional Levels These levels formally recognise a teacher’s outstanding commitment to continuous improvement, adherence to professional standards in Pedagogy and demonstrated excellence to the education of students of Presbyterian Ladies’ College. There are three levels. Professional Level 1 - Classroom Teacher Proficient (internal) Professional Level 2 - Classroom Teacher Highly Accomplished (external) Professional Level 3 - Classroom Teacher Lead - AITSL National Certification (external)

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Each level is assessed in alignment with the National Standards. Teachers applying for this recognition must address all standards satisfactorily to attain a particular PL status.

External Provider Courses •

7 Habits of Highly Effective People PD Workshop

NESLI – colloquium coaching

NBI - Neethling Brain Instrument

Suzi Finkelstein Leadership Coaching

Leadership courses

Subject-specific courses

Conferences

Postgraduate Study/ Research •

PLC offers study grants to staff members undertaking postgraduate study and research.

Graduate Diploma

Masters

PhD

ALL TEACHING STAFF Compliance Training •

Staff Week

Mandatory Reporting

Fire and Evacuation training

Policy Training • Confidentiality and Privacy Policy Confidentiality of Information Relating to Child Protection Matters Anyone who has access to information regarding a case of suspected child abuse must keep such information confidential and secure and must only disclose or discuss this information with those involved in managing the situation. You must not provide undertakings that are inconsistent with their reporting obligations in the School’s Child Protection Programme. In particular, you must not promise a student that you will not tell anyone about the student’s disclosure. Students and any other parties who become involved in the investigation (this may include other students) should be informed of the reporting process and be required to maintain confidentiality. Inappropriate disclosure will be subject to disciplinary action. Protection of Reporter’s Identity Reports made to the CPFS are confidential and the reporter’s identity is generally protected by law. It is important to note however that WA Police may be granted access to the identity of the reporter if this is needed in connection with the investigation of a serious offence against a child or young person. The request must come from a senior WA Police officer and the reporter must be informed that their identity is to be released, unless informing them of the disclosure will prejudice the investigation. Reporter Liability A person who makes a mandatory report in accordance with the Children and Community Services Act 2004 (WA) will not be held liable for the eventual outcome of any investigation. If a report is made in good faith, it does not constitute a breach of professional ethics on the part of the reporter and the reporter cannot be held legally liable in respect of the report.

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Staff Access to Child Protection Information Staff who have access to information regarding suspected or disclosed child abuse or grooming must keep such information confidential and secure and must not disclose this information unless required to do so as part of an ongoing investigation, by law, or when it is necessary to disclose the reasons for removing a child from a class or activity where the grooming behaviour occurred. This should only be done where absolutely necessary. Staff must not provide undertakings that are inconsistent with their reporting obligations under our Child Protection Programme. For example, students who disclose that they have been subject to abuse or grooming behaviours may attempt to elicit a promise that a staff member not tell anyone about the disclosure. Staff members must not make this promise. Students and any other parties who become involved in the investigation (this may include other students) should be informed of the reporting process and be requested to maintain confidentiality. Inappropriate disclosure of confidential information will be subject to disciplinary action. Staff Access to Child Protection Information Protection of Staff’s WWCC Status The School will only be informed of whether an individual passes or fails the Check. None of the information gathered for the Check, such as criminal or professional records, will be passed on to Presbyterian Ladies’ College. Protection of Personal Information How Presbyterian Ladies’ College handles the information we collect about individuals (referred to in the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) as personal information) is very important, as the people we deal with expect us to handle their personal information properly and we have a legal obligation to do so. Personal information is information, or an opinion, about an identified individual, or an individual who is reasonably identifiable: whether the information, or opinion, is true or not; and whether the information, or opinion, is recorded in a material form or not. The Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) only applies to personal information that is captured in a record. For more information about how the School handles and stores personal information in accordance with the Privacy Act, see our Privacy Programme. Information Sharing with the School Community The School takes great care to assess the relevance and appropriateness of sharing information about a child protection incident before providing any information about child abuse to the person who is subject to an allegation, the complainant, affected students and their parents/guardians and the wider School community because even the confirmation of an incident or allegation can lead to the identification of a victim. The School may consult with relevant government authorities to determine when, what and by whom such information can be disclosed. Record Keeping Obligations For the School’s record keeping obligations relating to child protection incidents, refer to Child Protection Record Keeping.

Apple Teacher Badges Apple Teacher is a free professional learning programme designed to support and celebrate educators using Apple products for teaching and learning.

Observational Rounds

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Asthma Online Training Asthma Training at PLC is conducted online through Asthma Australia. The course will be assigned to PLC staff by Culture & People. https://asthma.otrainu.com/

Anaphylaxis Online Training Anaphylaxis Training at PLC is conducted online through the Australian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy at https://etrainingwa.allergy.org.au The course involves 6 modules and will be assigned to PLC staff by Culture & People at the start of the school year.

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SCHOOL-BASED COURSES Weekly Internal PL Sessions All teaching staff Monday Afternoons •

Department Meetings

Diploma Meetings

Preparation for exam planning

Guest speakers

Staff presentations

Visible Wellbeing In 2017, PLC became a foundation school in Australia for the Visible Wellbeing Instruction Model in partnership with Professor Lea Waters. A strong relationship exists between a student functioning well and their capacity to learn. The Visible Wellbeing Instructional Model helps teachers build student wellbeing as part of their daily teacher practice in every classroom, ensuring a truly integrated approach to wellbeing in education.

Strategic Focus Groups Projects funded through parents @ PLC Professional Levels Purpose Presbyterian Ladies’ College recognises and values the vital importance of the role that classroom-based teachers undertake. The purpose of this policy is to establish a means to which ‘exceptional’ classroom-based teachers can be recognised and continue to develop professionally. It will provide the opportunity for teachers to gain salary increments and professional acknowledgement while remaining in the classroom rather than seeking administrative positions. Principles Presbyterian Ladies’ College is committed to ensuring classroom-based teachers are recognised and rewarded for their commitment to learning and professional development and therefore provide the opportunity to apply for the following levels of professional recognition. This will be achieved via the attainment of Professional Levels. These levels formally recognise a teacher’s outstanding commitment to continuous improvement, adherence to professional standards in Pedagogy and demonstrated excellence to the education of students of Presbyterian Ladies’ College. There are three levels:

Professional Level 1 - Classroom Teacher Proficient

Professional Level 2 - Classroom Teacher Highly Accomplished

Professional Level 3 - Classroom Teacher Lead

Descriptors Professional Level 1 teachers at PLC (PL1) will be able to demonstrate that they meet all seven standards described, at the Proficient Level, of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (February 2011). They are teachers who create effective teaching and learning experiences for their students. They know the unique backgrounds of their students and adjust their teaching to meet their individual needs and diverse cultural, social, and linguistic characteristics. They design and implement engaging teaching programmes that meet curriculum, assessment, and reporting requirements. They use feedback and assessment to analyse and support their students’ knowledge and understanding. PLC Proficient teachers use a range of sources, including student results, to evaluate their teaching and to adjust their programmes to better meet student needs. PLC Proficient teachers are team members; they work collaboratively with colleagues, and seek out and are responsive to advice about educational issues affecting their teaching practice. They communicate effectively with their students, colleagues, parents/carers, and community members. They behave professionally and ethically in all forums. 8 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Professional Level 2 teachers at PLC (PL2) will be able to demonstrate that they meet all seven standards described at the Highly Accomplished Level of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (February 2011). They are teachers who model a high level teaching knowledge and skills, which they use to evaluate teaching programmes, support their colleagues, and achieve better student outcomes. They have a good understanding of their students’ physical, social, cultural, and developmental characteristics, and can select from a repertoire of flexible and effective teaching strategies to meet these unique needs and backgrounds. They implement engaging teaching programmes that meet the curriculum, assessment, and reporting requirements of PLC, and use a range of sources, including assessment results, to evaluate the efficacy of their teaching and programmes. PLC Highly Accomplished teachers are supportive and innovative team members; they have a comprehensive knowledge of their subject content and contemporary research which they use to assist others in planning and evaluating teaching programmes. They plan for and seek out professional learning opportunities and initiate departmental discussions regarding the implementation of the knowledge and strategies acquired. They communicate effectively with their students, colleagues, parents/carers, and community members and conduct themselves professionally and ethically in all forums. Professional Level 3 Lead teachers at PLC (PL3) will be able to demonstrate that they meet all seven standards described, at the Lead Level, of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (February 2011). They are teachers who demonstrate an outstanding level of teaching. PLC Lead teachers take on leadership and management positions consistently strive to improve their teaching practices as well as sharing their knowledge and experience with colleagues. They create effective and innovative teaching and learning experiences for their students; they are very familiar with the unique backgrounds and learning styles of their students and adjust their teaching to be responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students. They establish inclusive learning environments that facilitate and promote learning for students with diverse cultural, social, and linguistic characteristics. They design and implement engaging teaching programmes that meet curriculum, assessment, and reporting requirements. PLC Lead teachers regularly track and analyse student assessment data in conjunction with staff/parent feedback to better support their students’ knowledge and understanding. They use a range of sources, including Educator Impact feedback, to consistently re-evaluate their own teaching and adjust their programmes to better meet student needs. PLC Lead teachers are leading team members; they are skilled in mentoring teachers and pre-service teachers, support their colleagues, and inspire others to improve their own professional practice. They are “life-long learners” who see teaching as a constant process of acquiring new knowledge and implementing new strategies to achieve better outcomes. They are actively involved within the PLC community and communicate effectively with students, colleagues, parents/carers, and community members. They behave professionally and ethically in all forums. Each level is assessed in alignment with the National Standards. Teachers applying for this recognition must address all standards satisfactorily to attain a particular PL status. PL 1 status is an internal process. PL 2 and 3 status is via an external process conducted by AISWA. Responsibilities Applicants applying for this recognition are responsible for the correct information and evidence contained within their application portfolio. Each applicant must supply all the required documentation as listed in the application packs on the due dates or in order as required. Accept and agree to take responsibility for understanding the requirements for each level applied for. When submitting an application for a PL will endeavour to provide all information that directly relates to and supports their application in a timely manner. PLC and AISWA Will communicate with the applicant regularly about their application. Will provide feedback on the outcome in writing. Will assist applicant where appropriate with advice and guidance. Will abide by the process and decisions ultimately reached. Ensure equitable application of this policy. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 9


Eligibility Professional Level 1 & Level 2 To be considered for PL1 the applicant must meet the following criteria: 1. Have completed one year on the top level of the current PLC Teachers Agreement salary scale. 2. Have a permanent position as a classroom teacher at PLC and have completed one full-time year at PLC. 3. Have successfully met the outcomes of their Growth and Development Review. Professional Level 3 To be considered for PL3 the applicant must meet the following criteria: 1. Have completed one year at PL1 or 2 status (Proficient Teacher/Highly Accomplished Teacher). 2. Have a permanent position as a classroom teacher at PLC and have completed one full-time year at PLC. 3. Have successfully met the outcomes of their Growth and Development Review. PL 3 at PLC require teachers to demonstrate achievement of standards described as Lead Teacher under the National Professional Standards for Teachers. AISWA staff will be trained assessors who have completed the National Assessor Training Programme to assess applications for Certification of Lead Teachers. Application 1. Applicants will be called at the end of Term 1 each year and will be required to be submitted by 31 August. 2. Teaching and learning leaders or other Senior Leadership Team members may nominate or refer an applicant to the PL Process. Should the staff member wish to pursue the application the staff member would follow steps 4 and 5 to apply. 3. Applicants may also at this point seek clarification or information from the following people to continue this process. This is a good opportunity to ‘test’ what others may view as the applicant’s readiness in an objective and safe manner and provide the applicant with information that may assist him/her further.

a. Teaching and Learning Leader

b. Relevant Deputy Principal or Head of Junior School

c. Head of Staff

d. A previous applicant

4. Applicants should advise the Head of Staff by e-mail of their intention to apply for PL to Human Resources by the end of Term 1. Once the intent to apply is received it will be acknowledged in writing. A preliminary interview may be conducted with the Head of Staff or Head of Junior School (or delegate) to discuss the application. 5. Applicants shall then commence developing their application which will consist of: a. A portfolio (print or electronic) that includes evidence such as examples of work and documentation that is cross-referenced and clearly demonstrates achievement of all standards and descriptors for Proficient Teachers (Australian Professional Standards for Teachers). One piece of evidence may cover a number of criteria and/or elements. i. Whilst the applicant will be given support and guidance during the gathering of evidence phase, the onus is on the applicant to provide as much information as possible to support their application, including clarification of the standard/ criteria each chosen piece of evidence demonstrates. 6. When submitting an application for PL, the applicant will endeavour to submit all information that directly relates to and supports their application in a timely manner. 7. The applicant may at any point withdraw or suspend their application but will need to advise the Head of Staff of this intention.

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EXTERNAL PROVIDER COURSES 7 Habits of Highly Effective People PD Workshop The 7 Habits work sessions are based on the content from The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, authored by Stephen Covey, which is considered one of the most impactful books ever written on personal effectiveness, leadership development and change. What differentiates The 7 Habits from other leadership offerings is its unique, proprietary content, which has global appeal, and is an inside-out approach to leadership development. The principles taught in the work session are universal, timeless, cross-cultural and have been widely accepted, as such.

NESLI – colloquium coaching GUIDING PRINCIPLES Creating the conditions in which optimal teaching and learning can flourish At the heart of the NESLI Initiative is a steadfast belief that great schools are vital to building great communities. Moreover, our belief is that exceptional teaching and learning is directly enabled by exceptional leadership. ​ Transformation We seek to work with school leaders who view the potential for schools to evolve and change as imperative. They seek change in the wider community, change inside their schools, and change within themselves. They don’t accept business as usual, and are open to the possibilities and rewards of transformation. ​ Collaboration We believe that schools should be able to tap into many channels and partners for support and development. This creates an opportunity for disparate parties to collaborate and share resources and skills to best support schools. We constantly seek partnerships to unlock the power of collaboration​. ​ Diverse voices We encourage diverse voices to be heard respectfully, and we add our own voices as catalysts to the conversation. This requires us to create a safe space - intellectually and emotionally - to authentically and courageously approach leadership development. Find out more Advocacy We strive to find innovative ways to bring values to schools. We take an open-source approach to these innovations. In this way we share and advocate for other parties who can make a difference to do likewise​. ​ Mutuality Mutuality is the spirit in which we bring people together to build trust. We always look for ways for everyone, regardless of status, to talk and listen, teach and learn, give and receive. Programmes •

Deputy principals leadership colloquium

Lead and expert teachers colloquium

Catholic schools middle leaders programme

The women’s advanced leadership programme

Women’s middle leadership programme

Staff wellbeing toolkit

International executive leaders programme

The Principals’ wellbeing forum

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NBI - Neethling Brain Instrument The NBITM was developed after extensive international research since 1980 on left/right brain functions, leading to the four-quadrant NBITM profile. Kobus Neethling under the research guidance of Professor Paul Torrance of the University of Georgia first developed the NBITM for adults before applying similar methodologies to develop a number of other whole brain instruments. The most recent development has been the introduction of the 8-dimensions, providing even more insight into thinking preferences and applications at work and at home. Thinking preferences give an indication of how an individual: •

Does business

Acts toward other people

Communicates

Learns

Teaches

Solves problems

Makes decisions

TOP LEFT (L1) Focus Essence Precise Accuracy Clinical Factual memory Concrete Mathematical/financial Factual reasoning Performance-driven Logic Objective Diagnostic Analysing (digging deeper) Quantitative Realistic Important to do it right Critical Rational

BOTTOM LEFT (L2) Organised/orderly Punctual/time-conscious Planned Structured Step-by-step approach Steadfast Sequential Thorough Security/safe-keeping Detail Traditional Drive/trask-driven Neat Reliable Result-driven

Realist Analyst

Preserver Organiser

Strategist Imagineer

Socialiser Empathiser

TOP RIGHT (R1) Holistic/big picture Flexible Risk-tasking Curious Looking for alternatives Experimentation Artistic Speculation Imaginative Strategic Simultaneous (doing many things at once) Fantasy Visualising Synthesis (link ideas) Idea-intuition Investigation Integrating ideas Unstructured Preference for change

BOTTOM RIGHT (R2) Non-verbal cues Touch Co-operation Sociable (one-on-one and in groups) Take part Accessible Approachable Expressive Empathy Teamwork People-focus Responsive Receptive Sensitive Support People awareness People perceptive Involved Playful Respectful

NBI - Neethling Brain Instrument

The NBI can help individuals and organisations to: •

Increase individual productivity

Enhance organisational performance

Strengthen customer and client relationships

Establish better job and person matching

Build and lead effective teams

Suzi Finkelstein Leadership Coaching Leadership courses Subject-specific courses Conferences

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Annual Internal PL (1) 2019 INTERNAL PL TITLE

OVERVIEW

PARTICIPANTS

Student Overview

This was an opportunity for staff to learn about the individual students that they teach who have diagnosed learning difficulties and /or identified areas of weakness. Their specific areas of difficulty were discussed with information about how this may present in the classroom and key strategies to address their needs.

All SS teachers Split into year group sessions

Writing subject specific learning goals for students with diagnosed learning difficulties

This PL was an opportunity for staff to look at the profiles of the learners and identify specific strategies that they will use to support individuals with specific needs to work towards goals set by the student and teacher collaboratively.

All teachers in English, science, maths and humanities LEC teacher worked with each department

Review of learning goals

All teachers in English, science, maths and humanities LEC teacher worked with each department

Modifying the curriculum for students on IEPs

The LEC teachers worked 1-1 with subject teachers to assist in the modification of the curriculum for students on IEPs, setting of appropriate learning goals, reviewing learning goals, and the creation of resources.

Individual teachers of students on IEPS 1-1 with LEC teacher

Looking at how we can use technology to promote higher level thinking skills, deeper learning, personalised learning, collaboration and creativity, using SAMR as a guide. Some examples provided, as well as useful visuals e.g. Padagogy Wheel

1 x presentation Total participants = all teaching staff preK-12

Supporting Students: SEQTA Programmes and Pathways

SEQTA programmes offer the opportunity to present resources, tasks and success criteria to students and parents in an engaging, organised, easilyaccessible, always-available format. The use of pathways increases the flexibility for teachers to deliver resources and other content in more personalised and targeted ways.

2 x workshops Total participants = 25

Communicating: SEQTA Correspondence and Records

This workshop introduces staff to formatting and bulk sending of emails in SEQTA correspondence for efficient and personalised communication (use of fields). Staff are also guided through the various methods of recording information about students, accessing existing records, and creating reports on different groups of information for increased and improved communication about needs of individual and groups of students.

1 x workshop Total participants = 5

Shared Learning: Introduction to Microsoft Teams for staff groups

Academic staff take a hands-on journey through Teams, exploring the features of conversation thread, file/folder creation and organisation, and embedded OneNote, with a specific view to using within Departments and other staff groups for sharing, storing and communicating.

1 x workshop Total participants = all Senior School academic staff

Learning Design: Integrating ICT General Capability

Teachers work in department groups to reflect, record, explore, wonder and plan opportunities to meaningfully integrate technology in their subject areas, looking at the why, the what and the how. ICT-related AITSL skills are examined and teachers plot themselves on the continua. Teachers consider the Ideas Maps as a way to identify and plan ICT integration across the year levels in their subject. Participants also explore various examples of learning tasks/assessments that meaningfully integrate technology, linked to SAMR and Bloom’s. In groups, teachers re-design existing tasks in order to more meaningfully integrate ICT, and share these ideas with all staff via a shared PowerPoint.

1 x workshop Total participants = all Senior School academic staff

Assessment and Feedback: Microsoft Forms

In this workshop, participants investigate how Forms can be used by students and teachers for formative assessment, peer feedback, selfevaluation, reflection, course evaluation, revision, research surveys and more. Staff will learn how to view and analyse responses to provide detailed and insightful information about student achievement and development, as well as attitudes and opportunities for growth.

1 x workshop Total participants = 5

Learning Design: Class Notebook - Advanced

Teachers who are already familiar with the basics of setting up and managing Class Notebooks have the opportunity to further explore features which aid with learning support (Immersive Reader, checklists), student engagement (embedded content, layout, design, stickers) and collaboration (setting up spaces for small groups within a class). Participants will also learn how to copy sections and pages from one OneNote to another for improved efficiency.

1 x workshop Total participants = 5

Learning Design: SAMR Model refresher

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Brightpaths Training

This workshop introduces class teachers to the Brightpaths Assessment Module. Teachers will be shown how to use the software to administer assessment tasks and make judgements using the Brighpaths guides.

3 x workshops Total participants= 15

SEESAW Training

This workshop introduces staff to SEESAW. Seesaw allows students to communicate with parents and provide them with a digital window into their classroom. Students can share learning experiences and highlights of their school day, with the intention that parents have greater clarity around the activities their child is participating in while they are at school. Teachers will also be shown how to use this tool to communicate classroom notices, with the intention of phasing out the communication pages and creating a more streamlined approach to classroom notifications.

1 x workshop Total participants = 10

NQS Audit

This workshop provides an update to staff on the changes to the elements and concepts within the NQS - setting a timeline for the review and audit of each of the seven areas within the NQS.

1 x workshop Total participants = 7

RULER Anchors

RULER is an acronym that stands for Recognising, Understanding, Labelling, Expressing and Regulating emotions. Our emotions drive our learning, decision-making, creativity, relationships, and health. The fundamental tools of RULER were introduced to staff and parents last year. This workshop looks at embedding the RULER Anchors; the first being The Charter. The Charter ties in with our Essential Agreements and Learner Profiles.

1 x workshop Total participants = 15

Setting the Scene – Evaluation Preparation

This workshop reviewed the self-study timeline and provided information on how the standards and practices self-study will be administered and how we will work together towards the 2020 IB Evaluation.

1 x workshop Total participants = 40

EALD

This workshop provides teachers with details of the strategies being put in place for incoming EALD students by the Language Department. This includes the introduction of a new EALD student enrolment form.

1 x workshop Total participants = 40

Marks Book

Working with the ILT Team, the purpose of this workshop is to develop teacher’s skills in SEQTA. During the workshop, staff completed the set-up of their Marksbook for Semester 2 Junior School reporting.

1 x workshop Total participants = 40

PL2 Process

Helen Jones explained the PL2 process, taking staff through how she can support them in the application process and the ongoing implementation of their project.

1 x workshop Total participants = 20

Sharing Best Practice Differentiated Workshop 1:

Teaching children with Down Syndrome, intellectual disability and Autism how to read.

PreK-Yr 2: Playing with STEAM – mathematics and science resources in the JS Library.

1 x workshop, 3 x professional learning teams Total participants = 40

Using Press Reader and Overdrive as well as supporting staff with familiarity of the library system and capabilities.

‘Positive primers and brain breaks’ – activities for stimulating student engagement and enhancing student relationships.

Yr 3-6: Playing with STEAM – mathematics and science resources in the JS Library.

‘Drama through a PYP Lens’ – planning for authentic links with Unit of Inquiry through key and related concepts.

‘Carol Ann Tomlinson’ – a snapshot of valuable ideas from this recent professional learning focus on differentiation.

“Instructional Framework for Mathematics’ – having a shared

Sharing Best Practice Differentiated Workshop 2:

Sharing Best Practice Differentiated Workshop 3:

1 x workshop, 3 x professional learning teams Total participants = 40

1 x workshop, 3 x professional learning teams Total participants = 40

approach to constructing maths lessons. ‘Talk for Writing’ – sharing a great professional learning experience to assist oral language and writing development. Sharing Best Practice Differentiated Workshop 4:

A transdisciplinary approach to integrating Art and IT in Year 5 with the iPad Pro.

Using Kimochi dolls to develop wellbeing and connection with the IB Learner Profile Attributes.

1 x workshop, 2 x professional learning teams Total participants = 40

People Styles understanding ourselves and others

PYP Co-ordinators presented a workshop on people styles. This allowed the staff to identify their dominant style and how this influences our habits of behaviour. In teams, people worked through a people style survey and shared with their teams their dominant style, allowing those who they work with collaboratively to understand their strengths and differences. The discussions this promotes are important for driving high team performance.

1 x workshop Total participants = 40

Professional Certificate in Positive Education (University of Melbourne)

The Professional Certificate in Education (Positive Education) provides a foundation in the science of positive psychology and its application in education settings. Many schools are now introducing positive principles to nurture the whole person with both students and staff. The Professional Certificate in Education (Positive Education) brings together the science and practice of positive psychology to promote optimal learning environments.

1 x course Total participants = 3

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Youth Mental Health First Aid Course

The Youth Mental Health First Aid Course is for adults working or living with adolescents (those aged between 12 and 18 years), however, the course can be relevant for those helping people who are a little younger or older. This course teaches people simple, practical first aid skills for helping a family member, friend, co-worker or other person who is experiencing mental health problems.

3 x courses (1 x PLC and 2 x Scotch) Total participants = 28

Gatekeeper Suicide Prevention Training

Gatekeeper Suicide Prevention training is a two-day workshop designed for professionals and para-professionals in the human services whose roles bring them into regular contact with people at risk of suicide. It aims to increase knowledge and understanding of suicidal behaviour in order to increase participant’s capacity to respond effectively to those in need.

1 x course Total participants = 11

Geelong Grammar Discovering More about Positive Education

This comprehensive three-day course will explore the applied nature of ten emerging Positive Education concepts, giving participants a deeper insight into the science of Positive Psychology that underpins the best Positive Education programmes around the world.

1 x course Total participants = 4

Mental Health Literacy Pilot Programme Training

School settings are the ideal place to address mental health literacy as most youth attend school and the average teen spends over thirty hours each week in the classroom. Schools have a vital role to play. These two initiatives support schools to better address youth mental health in an effective, inexpensive, system strengthening, and pedagogically familiar way.

1 x course Total participants = 7

Eating Disorder and Obesity Prevention Facilitator/Trainer Course

The two interventions covered in our two-day course: Body Project & Project Health, have been developed and used at Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, and Oregon Research Institute. The interventions are the outgrowth of a 16-year programme of research on the risk factors for eating disorders by Dr Stice’s research team.

1 x course Total participants = 5

The Body Project: A 4 week (one hour per week) eating disorder prevention programme which reduces appearance-ideal internalisation, body dissatisfaction, negative mood, unhealthy dieting, and eating disorder symptoms. This intervention has also been found to reduce risk for future eating disorders.  In addition, there is evidence that the Body Project intervention reduces the risk for future onset of obesity, results in improved psychosocial functioning, and reduces mental health care utilisation. Project health: A 6 week (one hour per week) intervention which promotes healthy, lasting, lifestyle changes to dietary intake and activity. Project Health produced a 66% reduction in future eating disorder onset at 2-yr follow-up.

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Annual Internal PL (2) (TEACHING AND LEARNING)

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Annual Internal – Compliance (Vivien) STAFF CODE OF CONDUCT All children have the right to be and feel safe. The welfare and best interests of the child are paramount.  Clear expectations for appropriate behaviour with children are established in our Child Safety Code of Conduct located in PolicyPlus (Complispace). PLC’s approach to Child Protection is outlined in PLC’s Child Protection Programme located in PolicyPlus (Complispace).  To successfully complete this course, staff must review the Staff Code of Conduct and complete the Quiz with 100% pass rate.

CHILD PROTECTION (8 MODULES) The eight modules of PLC’s Child Protection training are: 1. Overview 2. The Meaning of Child Abuse and Key Risk Indicators 3. The Legal and Regulatory Child Protection Framework 4. Statement of Commitment to Child Safety and Child Safety Code of Conduct 5. Responding to a Child Protection Incident Internally 6. Child Protection Reporting to External Agencies 7. Working with Children Checks 8. Staff and Student Professional Boundaries All modules must be successfully completed to pass the Award.

CHILD PROTECTION AND MANDATORY REPORTING REFRESHER All children have the right to be and feel safe. The welfare and best interests of the child are paramount.  Clear expectations for appropriate behaviour with children are established in our Child Safety Code of Conduct located in PolicyPlus (Complispace). PLC’s approach to Child Protection is outlined in PLC’s Child Protection Programme located in PolicyPlus (Complispace).  To successfully complete this course staff must review the Child Protection Presentation and the Mandatory Reporting Presentation and complete the Quiz with 100% pass rate.

PRIVACY This course covers the important information you need to know regarding Privacy. Staff must review all training content and complete the Quiz with 100% pass rate.

HUMAN RESOURCES This Course covers compliance obligations concerning Human Resources. The following Modules are included in this Course: •

Module 1: General Policies and Procedures

Module 2: Equal Employment Opportunity, Anti-Discrimination and Harassment

Module 3: Internal Grievance Resolution and Consultation Procedures

Staff must review the training content and complete the Quiz for each module with 100% pass rate.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 17


Pictorial Framework of Professional Learning at PLC 2019 PL 2: Soni Bailey, Liz Lagrange, Erin Jones, Beverly Spencer

Mentoring of new teachers by 2IC in Departments

PL 3: Matt Donaldson, Jane Brandenburg Asthma Friendly School

PL 1 & 2 (Internal) PL 3 (External)

Nurses PL

All teaching staff

Monday PL

David Hopkins Observational Rounds

To commence in Term 2

Educator Impact Pastoral

One-on-one Phone Coaching

Sarah Kelly, Gemma Freel, Lynne Jones, Sarah Kelly, Deb McPhee, Jane Brandenburg, Padminee Raja-Snijder, Lana Salfinger, Liam Sullivan, Guy Varndell

Dedicated Wellbeing Sessions

SLT & HODs

Staff Day - 1 March 2019

18 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Professional Certification CCPA Melissa Murray

UWA Chris Robinson, Toni Jeffereies, Lesley Kaye, Meinan Jin

Wollongong Jane Brandenburg

ECU Vernita Jaques

Kathleen Plastow August 2019

Masters Wollongong Jane Brandenburg

Presenting at Conferences Online Courses

PhD

2019 Growth & Development for staff

Kathleen Plastow Victoria Kelleher

Alliance Annual Networking Dinner

Internal PD Online Compliance Training

NESLI

Workshops

HR, Asthma, First Aid, Child protection, Code of Conduct, Mandatory Reporting, Anaphylaxis, Warden training, Diabetes, Epilepsy, Fire/Evacuation and Lock-down

Annette Pearce, Keryn McKinnon, Victoria Kelleher, Vivien Whitehead, Gemma Freel, Chonny James, Greg Jones, Lynne Jones, Narelle Lange, Stewart Neilson, Lesley Kaye, Ayomi Perera, Doug de Kock, Katy Howes

Conferences

Guest Speakers Bond University Leadership Development Masterclass • Victoria Kelleher • Vernita Jaques

Internal T&L SCSA Department

Dr Sue Byrne

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 19


Professional Development Policies

20 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


PL Criteria for PL 1, 2 & 3 Professional Level 1 – Proficient PROCEDURE AND APPLICATION INFORMATION Professional Level 1 teachers at PLC (PL1) will be able to demonstrate that they meet all seven standards described, at the Proficient Level, of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (February 2011). They are teachers who create effective teaching and learning experiences for their students. They know the unique backgrounds of their students and adjust their teaching to meet their individual needs and diverse cultural, social, and linguistic characteristics. They design and implement engaging teaching programmes that meet curriculum, assessment, and reporting requirements. They use feedback and assessment to analyse and support their students’ knowledge and understanding. PLC Proficient teachers use a range of sources, including student results, to evaluate their teaching and to adjust their programmes to better meet student needs. PLC Proficient teachers are team members; they work collaboratively with colleagues, and seek out and are responsive to advice about educational issues affecting their teaching practice. They communicate effectively with their students, colleagues, parents/carers, and community members. They behave professionally and ethically in all forums.

Overview and Information for Applicants This is an opportunity for PLC teachers to be recognised for their outstanding contribution as classroom-based educators.

Eligibility To be considered for PL1 the applicant must meet the following criteria: 1. Have reached band 8 of the PLC Teachers Agreement salary scale. Applicants can apply for PL1 during their first year at band 8 but will not receive any payment until January 1st the following year after they have completed one full year at band 8 of the PLC Teachers Agreement salary scale. 2. Have a permanent position as a classroom teacher at PLC and have completed one full-time year at PLC. 3. Have successfully met the outcomes of their Growth and Development Review.

Accreditation Duration A teacher, who has successfully attained PL1 status, shall hold this recognition for a period of five (5) years. After which time they reapply for recognition. A teacher must also demonstrate adherence to these standards across the tenure of PL1 status or the recognition allowance may be revoked. A teacher on Level 1 will need to produce a project to be reviewed on an annual basis for the duration of PL 1 status.

Remuneration Successful applicants will be eligible for the salary increment (4% of Band 8) from the commencement of the calendar year (January). Please note that employees who currently hold a promotional position within PLC are able to apply, however, recognition allowances will be in line with EA agreement.

Application Procedure 1. Applicants for PL1 will be required to submit an expression of interest by the end of Term 1 each year and will be required to submit their application by 31 August of the same year. 2. Teaching and learning leaders or other Senior Leadership Team members may nominate or refer an applicant PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 21


to the PL1 Process. Should the staff member wish to pursue the application the staff member would follow steps 4 and 5 to apply. 3. Applicants may also at this point seek clarification or information from the following people to continue this process. This is a good opportunity to ‘test’ what others may view as the applicant’s readiness in an objective and safe manner and provide the applicant with information that may assist him/her further. a. Teaching and Learning Leader b. Relevant Deputy Principal or Head of Junior School c. A previous applicant 4. Applicants should advise the relevant Deputy Principal by e-mail of their intention to apply for PL1 by the end of Term 1. Once the intent to apply is received it will be acknowledged in writing. A preliminary interview may be conducted with the Relevant Deputy Principal or Head of Junior School (or delegate) to discuss the application. 5. Applicants shall then commence developing their application which will consist of: a. A portfolio (print or electronic) that includes evidence such as examples of work and documentation that is cross-referenced and clearly demonstrates achievement of all standards and descriptors for Proficient Teachers (Australian Professional Standards for Teachers). One piece of evidence may cover a number of criteria and/or elements. i.

Whilst the applicant will be given support and guidance during the gathering of evidence phase, the onus is on the applicant to provide as much information as possible to support their application, including clarification of the standard/ criteria each chosen piece of evidence demonstrates.

6. When submitting an application for PL1, the applicant will endeavour to submit all information that directly relates to and supports their application in a timely manner. 7. The applicant may at any point withdraw or suspend their application but will need to advise the relevant Deputy Principal of this intention.

Interview and Assessment Attainment of PL1 status will be considered by a review panel that may consist of: Junior School - Head of Junior School and a representative staff member. Senior School – Deputy Principal, Head of Senior School. Eligibility will be based on: a. Portfolio of evidence b. Observation of teaching c. A formal interview with the panel to discuss what is being submitted in further detail.

Review Panel Responsibilities Review Panel will: a. assess the application within 30 days of receiving it; b. provide feedback on the outcome of writing; c. assist applicant where appropriate with advice and guidance; d. abide by the process and decisions ultimately reached; and e. ensure equitable application of this process. Any member of the Review Panel reserves the right to: a. observe the teacher in one or more classroom lessons; b. request additional information in support of the application; and c. meet with the referee of the applicant to validate evidence or to seek additional feedback and information.

Decision/Feedback Once the process has been completed, the applicant will receive written notification of the outcome within two (2) 22 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


weeks of the formal interview. Should the application be unsuccessful, the applicant will be provided with feedback as well as some guidance on how to fulfil any missed criteria for future applications. Should the applicant at this point wish to appeal the following process will apply:

Appeal Process 1. Applicant will: a. lodge any appeal to an application for PL1 within six (6) weeks of the date of decision and outline why you believe needs to be reconsidered. b. ensure equitable application of this process. c. accept the decision of the Appeal Panel as final. 2. The Appeal Panel will: a. assess the appeal application within 20 days of receiving it; b. provide feedback on the decision/outcome of the appeal in writing to the applicant; c. consisting of the Principal, relevant Deputy Principal, relevant Head of Department and a member of staff nominated by the applicant. d. meet with both the applicant and the review panel separately to discuss the application in greater detail and review the references and supporting documentation; e. ensure equitable application of this process.

Evidence and Assessment Information Assessment for PL1 is criterion referenced, that is, it will be a process by which a judgment will be made of an individual against the selection criteria. (Reference: Australian Professional Teaching Standards). 1. Evidence may be provided in various formats and can be submitted either by documentation (electronic or paper-based), by being observed, or from third parties as appropriate. 2. The applicant must submit at least on piece of evidence per standard and criterion. However, one piece may cover a number of standards and criteria. 3. Should the evidence provided not be deemed sufficient, the applicant will be required to provide more to substantiate the application. Guidance will be provided in these instances. Evidence must be: •

Authentic – all work examples submitted must be their own.

Valid – the evidence provided must directly support and be relevant to your application for PL1 based on the criteria below.

Reliable – the evidence provided must show a consistency across the whole application and can be used to make an informed judgment about the application against what it means to be at PL1.

Current – the evidence provided must be timely, contemporary, and again reflect and support the standards required of a PL1 status at the time of application.

Forms of Evidence This list is only a guide and other categories and evidence types may be used to demonstrate the achievement of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

Teaching and Learning Programmes •

term, semester, or full year teaching and learning programmes

lesson plans

learning resources

learning tasks and activities

evaluation of teaching and learning programmes

individual student learning plans PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 23


Classroom observations •

lesson observation

post-observation meeting notes

video clips of practice

video/ photos of classroom environment

student survey data

peer observation notes 


Reflection and feedback •

student records

student feedback and survey data

parent-teacher interview notes

parent feedback

360 degree feedback

peer feedback

professional reading log and reflection

diary of practice and reflection

performance review feedback

Student assessment and learning •

teacher records of student performance

assessment plan

assessment schedule

assessment tools/tests/strategies

student self/ peer assessment feedback

diagnostic assessments

exhibitions/ display of student work, feedback and outcomes 


Collaboration and communication •

video clip of team teaching

resources co-constructed/ shared with colleagues

common assessment tasks

team meeting notes

online blogs, wikis, discussion forums

meeting logs

emails/ letters/ correspondence

parent teacher interview notes

community partnerships and engagement notes and meeting logs

policy review and development notes and meeting logs

Professional learning •

professional learning plan

professional learning journal

action research project

participation in professional associations

professional learning workshops/ forums delivered

graduate and post graduate studies

24 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Guidelines for expected Proficient Teacher practices at PLC Standard 1: Know students and how they learn •

Design and implement teaching strategies and activities consistent with PLC’s “personalisation” pillar. • Lessons should meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities and learing styles, as well as taking into account diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Access and use student information: • Available on SEQTA • Provided by other staff member • Previous teachers / course co-ordinators • Line manager • Other teachers • Psychologists • Wellbeing Co-ordinators • LEC staff

Engage with and respond to student feedback from Educator Impact

Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it •

Apply knowledge of the content and teaching strategies of the teaching area to organize content into coherent, well-sequenced learning and teaching programmes.

Work with Line leader, colleagues, and department to develop engaging teaching activities.

Work with department to ensure curriculum, assessment & reporting guidelines are met.

Use 1Degree staff to guide the implementation of digital technology in the classroom

Seek out Professional Development or research opportunities specifically related to teaching strategies.

Standard 3: Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning •

Use knowledge from SEQTA and the LEC Department to set goals for students that are relevant & challenging.

Use effective verbal and non-verbal communication strategies • Use 1Degree staff to guide the implementation of ICT in the classroom

Appropriately encourage parents/ carers to be involved in their daughter’s learning. • Develop respectful relationships with parents • Be aware of parent details through Coneqt • Attend relevant school functions, e.g. Welcome Sundowner, Principal’s Cocktail Party, Support Your Daughter evenings if applicable.

Standard 4: Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments •

Establish and maintain orderly and workable routines to create an environment where student time is spent on learning tasks. • Manage challenging behaviour. • Establish clear expectations. • Address discipline issues promptly, fairly and respectfully.

Develop positive, mutually respectful relationship with students.

Ensure that lessons are inclusive of all students.

Develop your own “style” within the parameters of your classroom while maintaining the appropriate PLC standards.

Keep up to date with current policies regarding staff code of conduct via Complispace/SEQTA.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 25


Standard 5: Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning •

Develop and implement a variety of appropriate assessment tasks and forms.

Work with other teachers in your area/ department to moderate student work to ensure judgements are equitable.

Complete reports as per PLC reporting guidelines for your school area

Upload marks and effective comments to SEQTA in a timely manner.

Return assessment tasks within department set feedback schedule

Access and use feedback relating to students provided by: • Previous teachers / course co-ordinators • Line leader • Other teachers • Psychologists • Wellbeing Co-ordinators • LEC staff

Use SEQTA to centralise and compare Exit levels, Naplan results, and entrance data for new students

Ensure all records, marks, and comments are consistently maintained on SEQTA.

Use student assessment data to analyse and evaluate student understanding of the subject content, identifying interventions and modifying teaching practice.

Standard 6: Engage in professional learning •

Identify areas of professional concern/weakness and source and undertake professional learning programmes to address these.

Participate in PLC Monday PL programmes.

Participate in PLC Educator Impact.

Demonstrate up to date teaching practices.

Integrate PL knowledge.

Standard 7: Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community •

Meet codes of ethics and conduct established by regulatory authorities, systems and schools. • Maintain TRB and WWC status • Use Complispace/SEQTA to keep up to date with current legislation.

Establish and maintain respectful collaborative relationships with parents/ carers regarding their daughter’s learning and wellbeing.

Get involved in and maintain contact with: • The PLC staff community. • The broader PLC community – students, parents, alumni • Interschool networks • Other subject specific or teaching provider networks, e.g. Universities.

Prepare for and take advantage of parent/student/teacher interviews

26 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Professional Level 2 – Highly Accomplished PROCEDURE AND APPLICATION INFORMATION Professional Level 2 teachers at PLC (PL2) will be able to demonstrate that they meet all seven standards described at the Highly Accomplished Level of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (February 2011). They are teachers who model a high level of teaching knowledge and skills, which they use to evaluate teaching programmes, support their colleagues, and achieve better student outcomes. They have a good understanding of their students’ physical, social, cultural, and developmental characteristics, and can select from a repertoire of flexible and effective teaching strategies to meet these unique needs and backgrounds. They implement engaging teaching programmes that meet the curriculum, assessment, and reporting requirements of PLC, and use a range of sources, including assessment results, to evaluate the efficacy of their teaching and programmes. PLC Highly Accomplished teachers are supportive and innovative team members; they have a comprehensive knowledge of their subject content and contemporary research which they use to assist others in planning and evaluating teaching programmes. They plan for and seek out professional learning opportunities and initiate departmental discussions regarding the implementation of the knowledge and strategies acquired. They are actively involved within the PLC community and communicate effectively with students, colleagues, parents/ carers, and community members. They behave professionally and ethically in all forums.

Overview and Information for Applicants This is an opportunity for PLC teachers to be recognised for their outstanding contribution as classroom-based educators and will contribute to the PLC Community.

Eligibility To be considered for PL2 the applicant must meet the following criteria: 1. Have reached band 8 of the PLC Teachers Agreement salary scale. Applicants can apply for PL2 during their first year at band 8 but will not receive any payment until January 1st the following year after they have completed one full year at band 8 of the PLC Teachers Agreement salary scale. 2. Have a permanent position as a classroom teacher at PLC and have completed one full-time year at PLC. 3. Have successfully met the outcomes of their Growth and Development Review.

Accreditation Duration A teacher, who has successfully attained PL2 status, shall hold this recognition for a period of five (5) years. After which time they reapply for recognition. A teacher must also demonstrate adherence to these standards across the tenure of PL 2 status or the recognition allowance may be revoked. A teacher on Level 2 will need to produce a project to be reviewed on an annual basis for the duration of PL 2 status.

Remuneration Successful applicants will be eligible for the salary increment (7% of Band 8) from the commencement of the following calendar year (January 1st). Please note that employees who currently hold a promotional position within PLC are able to apply, however, recognition allowances will be in line with EA agreement.

Application Procedure 1. Applicants for PL2 will be required to submit an expression of interest by the end of Term 1 each year and will be required to submit their application by 31 August of the same year. 2. Teaching and learning leaders or other Senior Leadership Team members may nominate or refer an applicant to the PL2 Process. Should the staff member wish to pursue the application the staff member would follow steps 4 and 5 to apply. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 27


3. Applicants may also at this point seek clarification or information from the following people to continue this process. This is a good opportunity to ‘test’ what others may view as the applicant’s readiness in an objective and safe manner and provide the applicant with information that may assist him/her further. a. Teaching and Learning Leader b. Relevant Deputy Principal or Head of Junior School c. A previous applicant 4. Applicants should advise the relevant Deputy Principal by e-mail of their intention to apply for PL2 by the end of Term 1. Once the intent to apply is received it will be acknowledged in writing. A preliminary interview may be conducted with the relevant Deputy Principal or Head of Junior School (or delegate) to discuss the application. 5. Applicants shall then commence developing their application which will consist of: a. A portfolio (print or electronic) that includes evidence such as examples of work and documentation that is cross-referenced and clearly demonstrates achievement of all standards and descriptors for Highly Accomplished Teachers (Australian Professional Standards for Teachers). One piece of evidence may cover a number of criteria and/or elements. i.

Whilst the applicant will be given support and guidance during the gathering of evidence phase, the onus is on the applicant to provide as much information as possible to support their application, including clarification of the standard/ criteria each chosen piece of evidence demonstrates.

6. When submitting an application for PL2, the applicant will endeavour to submit all information that directly relates to and supports their application in a timely manner. 7. The applicant may at any point withdraw or suspend their application but will need to advise the relevant Deputy Principal of this intention.

Interview and Assessment Attainment of PL2 status will be considered by a review panel that may consist of: Junior School - Head of Junior School and a representative staff member. Senior School – Deputy Principal, Head of Senior School. Eligibility will be based on: a. Portfolio of evidence b. Observation of teaching c. A formal interview with the panel to discuss what is being submitted in further detail.

Review Panel Responsibilities Review Panel will: a. assess the application within 30 days of receiving it; b. provide feedback on the outcome of writing; c. assist applicant where appropriate with advice and guidance; d. abide by the process and decisions ultimately reached; and e. ensure equitable application of this process. Any member of the Review Panel reserves the right to: a. observe the teacher in one or more classroom lessons; b. request additional information in support of the application; and c. meet with the referee of the applicant to validate evidence or to seek additional feedback and information.

Decision/Feedback Once the process has been completed, the applicant will receive written notification of the outcome within two (2) weeks of the formal interview.

28 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Should the application be unsuccessful, the applicant will be provided with feedback as well as some guidance on how to fulfil any missed criteria for future applications. Should the applicant at this point wish to appeal the following process will apply;

Appeal Process 1. Applicant will: a. lodge any appeal to an application for PL2 within six (6) weeks of the date of decision and outline why you believe needs to be reconsidered. b. ensure equitable application of this process. c. accept the decision of the Appeal Panel as final. 2. The Appeal Panel will: a. assess the appeal application within 20 days of receiving it; b. provide feedback on the decision/outcome of the appeal in writing to the applicant; c. consisting of the Principal, relevant Deputy Principal, relevant Head of Department and a member of staff nominated by the applicant. d. meet with both the applicant and the review panel separately to discuss the application in greater detail and review the references and supporting documentation; e. ensure equitable application of this process.

Evidence and Assessment Information Assessment for PL2 is criterion referenced, that is, it will be a process by which a judgment will be made of an individual against the selection criteria. (Reference: Australian Professional Teaching Standards). 1. Evidence may be provided in various formats and can be submitted either by documentation (electronic or paper-based), by being observed, or from third parties as appropriate. 2. The applicant must submit at least on piece of evidence per standard and criterion. However, one piece may cover a number of standards and criteria. 3. Should the evidence provided not be deemed sufficient, the applicant will be required to provide more to substantiate the application. Guidance will be provided in these instances. Evidence must be: •

Authentic – all work examples submitted must be their own.

Valid – the evidence provided must directly support and be relevant to your application for PL1 based on the criteria below.

Reliable – the evidence provided must show a consistency across the whole application and can be used to make an informed judgment about the application against what it means to be at PL1.

Current – the evidence provided must be timely, contemporary, and again reflect and support the standards required of a PL1 status at the time of application.

Forms of Evidence This list is only a guide and other categories and evidence types may be used to demonstrate the achievement of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

Teaching and Learning Programmes •

term, semester, or full year teaching and learning programmes

lesson plans

learning resources

learning tasks and activities

evaluation of teaching and learning programmes

individual student learning plans

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 29


Classroom observations •

lesson observation

post-observation meeting notes

video clips of practice

video/ photos of classroom environment

student survey data

peer observation notes 


Reflection and feedback •

student records

student feedback and survey data

parent-teacher interview notes

parent feedback

360 degree feedback

peer feedback

professional reading log and reflection

diary of practice and reflection

performance review feedback

Student assessment and learning •

teacher records of student performance

assessment plan

assessment schedule

assessment tools/tests/strategies

student self/ peer assessment feedback

diagnostic assessments

exhibitions/ display of student work, feedback and outcomes 


Collaboration and communication •

video clip of team teaching

resources co-constructed/ shared with colleagues

common assessment tasks

team meeting notes

online blogs, wikis, discussion forums

meeting logs

emails/ letters/ correspondence

parent teacher interview notes

community partnerships and engagement notes and meeting logs

policy review and development notes and meeting logs

Professional learning •

professional learning plan

professional learning journal

action research project

participation in professional associations

professional learning workshops/ forums delivered

graduate and post graduate studies

30 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Guidelines for expected Highly Accomplished Teacher practices at PLC Standard 1: Know students and how they learn •

Design and implement teaching strategies and activities consistent with PLC’s “personalisation” pillar. • Lessons should meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities and learning styles, as well as taking into account diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Access and use student information: • Available on SEQTA • Provided by other staff member • Previous teachers / course coordinators • Line manager • Other teachers • Psychologists • Wellbeing Coordinators • LEC staff

Engage with and respond to student feedback from Educator Impact

Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it •

Apply knowledge of the content and teaching strategies of the teaching area to organize content into coherent, well-sequenced learning and teaching programmes.

Work with Line leader, colleagues, and department to develop engaging teaching activities.

Work with department to ensure curriculum, assessment & reporting guidelines are met.

Use 1Degree staff to guide the implementation of digital technology in the classroom

Seek out Professional Development or research opportunities specifically related to teaching strategies.

Standard 3: Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning •

Use knowledge from SEQTA and the LEC Department to set goals for students that are relevant & challenging.

Use effective verbal and non-verbal communication strategies • Use 1Degree staff to guide the implementation of ICT in the classroom

Appropriately encourage parents/ carers to be involved in their daughter’s learning. • Develop respectful relationships with parents • Be aware of parent details through SEQTA • Attend relevant school functions, e.g. Welcome Sundowner, Principal’s Cocktail Party, Support Your Daughter evenings if applicable.

Standard 4: Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments •

Establish and maintain orderly and workable routines to create an environment where student time is spent on learning tasks. • Manage challenging behaviour. • Establish clear expectations. • Address discipline issues promptly, fairly and respectfully.

Develop positive, mutually respectful relationship with students.

Ensure that lessons are inclusive of all students.

Develop your own “style” within the parameters of your classroom while maintaining the appropriate PLC standards.

Keep up to date with current policies regarding staff code of conduct via Complispace/SEQTA.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 31


Standard 5: Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning •

Develop and implement a variety of appropriate assessment tasks and forms.

Work with other teachers in your area/ department to moderate student work to ensure judgements are equitable.

Complete reports as per PLC reporting guidelines for your school area

Upload marks and effective comments to SEQTA in a timely manner.

Return assessment tasks within department set feedback schedule

Access and use feedback relating to students provided by: • Previous teachers / course co-ordinators • Line leader • Other teachers • Psychologists • Wellbeing Co-ordinators • LEC staff

Use SEQTA to centralise and compare Exit levels, Naplan results, and entrance data for new students

Ensure all records, marks, and comments are consistently maintained on SEQTA.

Use student assessment data to analyse and evaluate student understanding of the subject content, identifying interventions and modifying teaching practice.

Standard 6: Engage in professional learning •

Identify areas of professional concern/weakness and source and undertake professional learning programmes to address these.

Participate in PLC Monday PL programmes.

Participate in PLC Educator Impact.

Demonstrate up to date teaching practices.

Integrate PL knowledge.

Standard 7: Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community •

Meet codes of ethics and conduct established by regulatory authorities, systems and schools. • Maintain TRB and WWC status • Use Complispace/SEQTA to keep up to date with current legislation.

Establish and maintain respectful collaborative relationships with parents/ carers regarding their daughter’s learning and wellbeing.

Get involved in and maintain contact with: • The PLC staff community. • The broader PLC community – students, parents, alumni • Interschool networks • Other subject specific or teaching provider networks, e.g. Universities.

Prepare for and take advantage of parent/student/teacher interviews

32 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Professional Level 3 – Lead PROCEDURE AND APPLICATION INFORMATION Professional Level 3 Lead teachers at PLC (PL3) will be able to demonstrate that they meet all seven standards described, at the Lead Level, of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers (February 2011). They are teachers who demonstrate an outstanding level of teaching. PLC Lead teachers are inspired to lead others and consistently strive to improve their teaching practices as well as sharing their knowledge and experience with colleagues. They create effective and innovative teaching and learning experiences for their students; they are very familiar with the unique backgrounds and learning styles of their students and adjust their teaching to be responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students. They establish inclusive learning environments that facilitate and promote learning for students with diverse cultural, social, and linguistic characteristics. They design and implement engaging teaching programmes that meet curriculum, assessment, and reporting requirements. PLC Lead teachers regularly track and analyse student assessment data in conjunction with staff/parent feedback to better support their students’ knowledge and understanding. They use a range of sources, including Educator Impact feedback, to consistently re-evaluate their own teaching and adjust their programmes to better meet student needs. PLC Lead teachers are leading team members; they are skilled in mentoring teachers and pre-service teachers, support their colleagues, and inspire others to improve their own professional practice. They are “life-long learners” who see teaching as a constant process of acquiring new knowledge and implementing new strategies to achieve better outcomes. They are actively involved within the PLC and the wider community and communicate effectively with students, colleagues, parents/ carers, and community members. They behave professionally and ethically in all forums.

Overview and Information for Applicants This is an opportunity for PLC teachers to be recognised for their outstanding contribution as classroom-based educators, in addition to their contribution in the School and the wider community.

Eligibility To be considered for PL3 the applicant must meet the following criteria: 1. Have completed one year at PL2 status (Highly Accomplished Teacher). 2. Have a permanent position as a classroom teacher at PLC and have completed one full-time year at PLC. 3. Have successfully met the outcomes of their Growth and Development Review. PL 3 at PLC require teachers to demonstrate achievement of standards described as Lead Teacher under the Australian National Professional Standards for Teachers. AISWA staff will be trained assessors who have completed the National Assessor Training Programme to assess applications for National Certification of Lead Teachers.

Accreditation Duration A teacher, who has successfully attained PL3 status, shall hold this recognition for a period of five (5) years, after which time they should reapply for recognition. A teacher must also demonstrate adherence to these standards across the tenure of PL3 status or the recognition allowance may be revoked. A teacher on Level 3 will produce a project to be reviewed on an annual basis for the duration of the PL 3 status.

Remuneration Successful applicants for PL3 will be eligible for a salary increment of 12% of Band 8 from the commencement of the calendar year (January) following successful accreditation. Please note that employees who currently hold a promotional position within PLC are able to apply however, recognition allowances will be in line with EA requirements. Please contact the Director of People and Culture for further information. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK

33


Advantages of Certification National Certification is a voluntary and portable process that ensures teachers have access to a rigorous and transparent process that recognises Lead teachers. It enables the staff member to receive feedback on their practice and have their practice evaluated by nationally trained assessors who are external to PLC. It exposes the staff member to communities of practice and supports them to further develop and grow as a professional whilst improving outcomes for their students. Benefits of Certification •

feedback on evidence of practice

enhanced performance culture

shared discourse on effective practice

access to networks and communities of practice

enhanced collaboration and support from colleagues within and across schools

national recognition for effective teaching

increased profile of the profession

Certification lasts for a fixed period of five years, after which a teacher may renew their certification. The term ‘Lead teacher’ does not refer to job positions. This makes Certification under the national system portable within and across sectors, states and territories, but it does not mean that any industrial arrangement attached to Certification is automatically transferable.

Application Procedure 1. Applicants for PL3 will be called at the end of Term 1 each year. 2. Teaching and learning leaders or other Senior Leadership Team members may nominate or refer an applicant to the PL3 process. Should the staff member wish to pursue the application they would follow steps 4 and 5 to apply. 3. Applicants may also at this point seek clarification or information from the following people to continue this process. This is a good opportunity to ‘test’ what others may view as the applicant’s readiness in an objective and safe manner and provide the applicant with information that may assist him/her further. a. Teaching and Learning Leader b. Relevant Deputy Principal or Head of Junior School c. A previous applicant 4. Applicants should advise the Deputy Principal by e-mail of their intention to apply for PL3 by Term 1. Once the intent to apply is received it will be acknowledged in writing. A preliminary interview will be conducted with the Deputy Principal and or Head of Junior School (or delegate) to discuss the application. 5. Applicants shall then commence developing their application which will consist of: a. A portfolio (print or electronic) that includes evidence such as examples of work and documentation that is cross-referenced and clearly demonstrates achievement of all standards and descriptors for Lead Teachers (Australian Professional Standards for Teachers). One piece of evidence may cover a number of criteria and/or elements. i.

Whilst the applicant will be given support and guidance during the gathering of evidence phase, the onus is on the applicant to provide as much information as possible to support their application, including clarification of the standard/criteria each chosen piece of evidence demonstrates.

6. When submitting an application for PL3, the applicant will endeavour to submit all information that directly relates to and supports their application in a timely manner. 7. The applicant may at any point withdraw or suspend their application but will need to advise the Head of Staff of this intention.

34 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Decision/Feedback Once the process has been completed, the applicant will receive written notification of the outcome within two (2) weeks of the formal interview. Should the application be unsuccessful, the applicant will be provided with feedback as well as some guidance on how to fulfil any missed criteria for future applications. Should the applicant at this point wish to appeal the following process will apply:

Appeal Process 1. Applicant will: a. lodge any appeal to an application for PL3 within six (6) weeks of the date of decision and outline why you believe the decision needs to be reconsidered. b. ensure equitable application of this process c. accept the decision of the Appeal Panel as final. 2. The Appeal Panel will: a. assess the appeal application within 20 days of receiving it; b. provide feedback on the decision/outcome of the appeal in writing to the applicant; c. consisting of the Principal, Deputy Principal, relevant Head of Department and a member of staff nominated by the applicant; d. meet with both the applicant and the review panel separately to discuss the application in greater detail and review the references and supporting documentation; e. ensure equitable application of this process.

Evidence and Assessment Information Assessment for PL3 is criterion referenced, that is, it will be a process by which a judgment will be made of an individual against the selection criteria. (Reference: Australian Professional Teaching Standards). 1. Evidence may be provided in various formats and can be submitted either by documentation (electronic or paper-based), by being observed, or from third parties as appropriate. 2. The applicant must submit at least on piece of evidence per standard and criterion. However, one piece may cover a number of standards and criteria. 3. Should the evidence provided not be deemed sufficient, the applicant will be required to provide more to substantiate the application. Guidance will be provided in these instances. Evidence must be: •

Authentic – all work examples submitted must be their own.

Valid – the evidence provided must directly support and be relevant to your application for PL1 based on the criteria below.

Reliable – the evidence provided must show a consistency across the whole application and can be used to make an informed judgment about the application against what it means to be at PL1.

Current – the evidence provided must be timely, contemporary, and again reflect and support the standards required of a PL1 status at the time of application.

Forms of Evidence This list is only a guide and other categories and evidence types may be used to demonstrate the achievement of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.

Teaching and Learning Programmes •

term, semester, or full year teaching and learning programmes

lesson plans

learning resources

learning tasks and activities PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 35


evaluation of teaching and learning programmes

individual student learning plans

Classroom observations •

lesson observation

post-observation meeting notes

video clips of practice

video/ photos of classroom environment

student survey data

peer observation notes 


Reflection and feedback •

student records

student feedback and survey data

parent-teacher interview notes

parent feedback

360 degree feedback

peer feedback

professional reading log and reflection

diary of practice and reflection

performance review feedback

Student assessment and learning •

teacher records of student performance

assessment plan

assessment schedule

assessment tools/tests/strategies

student self/ peer assessment feedback

diagnostic assessments

exhibitions/ display of student work, feedback and outcomes 


Collaboration and communication •

video clip of team teaching

resources co-constructed/ shared with colleagues

common assessment tasks

team meeting notes

online blogs, wikis, discussion forums

meeting logs

emails/ letters/ correspondence

parent teacher interview notes

community partnerships and engagement notes and meeting logs

policy review and development notes and meeting logs

Professional learning •

professional learning plan

professional learning journal

action research project

participation in professional associations

36 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


professional learning workshops/ forums delivered

graduate and post graduate studies

Guidelines for expected Lead Teacher practices at PLC Standard 1: Know students and how they learn •

Lead colleagues to design and implement teaching strategies and activities consistent with PLC’s personalisation pillar.

Produce model lessons that meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities and learning styles, as well as taking into account diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Evaluate and revise school learning and teaching programmes, using expert and community knowledge and experience, to meet the needs of students.

Regularly access and use student information: • Available on SEQTA • Provided by other staff members • Previous teachers / course co-ordinators • Line manager • Other teachers • Psychologists • Wellbeing Co-ordinators • LEC staff

Lead processes to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching programmes using research and workplace knowledge about how students learn, and addressing the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities.

Initiate and lead the review of school policies to support the engagement and full participation of students with disability and ensure compliance with legislative and/or system policies.

Standard 2: Know the content and how to teach it •

Lead and support colleagues in applying knowledge of the content and teaching strategies of the teaching area to organize content into coherent, well-sequenced learning and teaching programmes.

Lead colleagues to develop learning and teaching programmes using comprehensive knowledge of curriculum, assessment and reporting requirements.

Lead and support colleagues with using 1Degree staff to guide the implementation of ICT in the classroom

Monitor and evaluate the implementation of teaching strategies within the school to improve students’ achievement using research based knowledge and student data.

Lead and support colleagues in seeking out Professional Development or research opportunities specifically related to subject content and teaching strategies.

Standard 3: Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning •

Demonstrate exemplary practice and high expectations and lead colleagues to encourage students to pursue challenging goals in all aspects of their education.

Lead colleagues in using knowledge from SEQTA and the LEC Department to set goals for students that are relevant & challenging.

Use effective verbal and non-verbal communication strategies • Lead colleagues in using 1Degree staff to guide the implementation of ICT in the classroom

Exhibit exemplary practice and lead colleagues to plan, implement and review the effectiveness of their learning and teaching programmes to develop students’ knowledge, understanding and skills. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 37


Work with colleagues to review, modify and expand their repertoire of teaching strategies to enable students to use knowledge, skills, problem solving and critical and creative thinking.

Model exemplary skills and lead colleagues in selecting, creating and evaluating resources, including ICT, for application by teachers within or beyond the school.

Demonstrate and lead by example inclusive verbal and non-verbal communication using collaborative strategies and contextual knowledge to support students’ understanding, engagement and achievement.

Conduct regular reviews of teaching and learning programmes using multiple sources of evidence including: student assessment data, curriculum documents, teaching practices and feedback from parents/carers, students and colleagues.

Initiate contextually relevant processes to establish programmes that involve parents/carers in the education of their children and broader school priorities and activities.

Standard 4: Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments •

Establish and maintain orderly and workable routines to create an environment where student time is spent on learning tasks. • Manage challenging behavior. • Establish clear expectations. • Address discipline issues promptly, fairly and respectfully.

Develop positive, mutually respectful relationship with students.

Ensure that lessons are inclusive of all students.

Develop your own “style” within the parameters of your classroom while maintaining the appropriate PLC standards.

Keep up to date with current policies regarding staff code of conduct via Complispace/SEQTA.

Demonstrate and lead by example the development of productive and inclusive learning environments across the school by reviewing inclusive strategies and exploring new approaches to engage and support all students.

Initiate strategies and lead colleagues to implement effective classroom management and promote student responsibility for learning.

Lead and implement behaviour management initiatives to assist colleagues to broaden their range of strategies.

Evaluate the effectiveness of student wellbeing policies, safe working practices, and use of ICT using current school and/or system, curriculum and legislative requirements and assist colleagues to update their practices.

Standard 5: Assess, provide feedback and report on student learning •

Develop and implement a variety of exemplary and level appropriate assessment tasks and forms.

Lead and evaluate moderation activities that ensure consistent and comparable judgements of student learning to meet curriculum and school or system requirements.

Complete reports as per PLC reporting guidelines for your school area.

Lead colleagues in consistently uploading marks to SEQTA in a timely manner.

Model exemplary practice and initiate programmes to support colleagues in applying a range of timely, effective and appropriate feedback strategies.

Return assessment tasks within department set feedback schedule.

Regularly access and use feedback relating to students provided by: • Previous teachers / course co-ordinators • Line leader • Other teachers • Psychologists • Wellbeing Co-ordinators • LEC staff

38 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Regularly use SEQTA to centralise and compare Exit levels, Naplan results, and entrance data for new students in order to monitor student performance.

Ensure all records, marks, and comments are consistently maintained on SEQTA.

Use student assessment data to analyse and evaluate student understanding of the subject content, identifying interventions and modifying teaching practice.

Evaluate school assessment policies and strategies to support colleagues with: using assessment data to diagnose learning needs, complying with curriculum, system and/or school assessment requirements and using a range of assessment strategies.

Co-ordinate student performance and programme evaluation using internal and external student assessment data to improve teaching practice.

Evaluate and revise reporting and accountability mechanisms in the school to meet the needs of students, parents/carers and colleagues.

Standard 6: Engage in professional learning •

Use comprehensive knowledge of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers to plan and lead the development of professional learning policies and programmes that address the professional learning needs of colleagues and pre-service teachers. • Source and share Professional Learning courses • Seek out up to date information regarding upcoming Professional Learning courses • Participate in PLC Monday PL programmes. • Participate in PLC EI programme with your triad. • Share knowledge acquired on PL.

Initiate collaborative relationships to expand professional learning opportunities, engage in research, and provide quality opportunities and placements for pre-service teachers.

Implement professional dialogue within the school or professional learning network(s) that is informed by feedback, analysis of current research and practice to improve the educational • Pool feedback from Educator Impact with department and triad group

Advocate, participate in and lead strategies to support high-quality professional learning opportunities for colleagues that focus on improved student learning.

Consistently demonstrate up to date teaching practices.

Actively integrate PL knowledge into new learning strategies and programmes.

Standard 7: Engage professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community •

Meet codes of ethics and conduct established by regulatory authorities, systems and schools. • Maintain TRB and WWC status. • Use Complispace/SEQTA to keep up to date with current legislation.

Model exemplary ethical behaviour and exercise informed judgements in all professional dealings with students, colleagues and the community.

Initiate, develop and implement relevant policies and processes to support colleagues’ compliance with and understanding of existing and new legislative, administrative, organisational and professional responsibilities.

Identify, initiate and build on opportunities that engage parents/carers in both the progress of their daughter’s learning and in the educational priorities of the school.

Participate actively in the PLC Community (PLC staff and broader PLC community – students, parents, alumni) • Staff Association • Staff Day activities • Student Competitions, e.g. Moot, Mock Trials, Da Vinci and World Challenge • Student performances, e.g. School Musical • Extra-Curricular activities, e.g. Tours, 50 Mile walk, charity initiatives PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 39


• Outdoor Education programmes • Special events, e.g. Valedictory Dinner, Balls/dances •

Take a leadership role in professional and community networks and support the involvement of colleagues in external learning opportunities. • Interschool networks • Teaching provider networks, e.g. Universities. • Subject specific networks, e.g. Textbook authors, leading figures (scientists, authors, sportspeople, etc.) • Professional Development providers

Thoroughly prepare for and take advantage of parent/student/teacher interviews

Study Grant Criteria POST GRADUATE STUDY GRANT Overall Objectives •

To ensure that Professional Learning opportunities are linked to the strategic direction of the School.

To provide staff with opportunities that will benefit them as professional educators, as well as benefit the School.

Professional Learning Funding Individual Self-Directed Professional Learning for Post Graduate Study The school will fund 25% per unit of study per semester. The maximum funding per unit will be $700 with a maximum of $1,400 per year.

Eligibility To be considered for Individual Self-Directed Professional Learning for Post Graduate Study Reimbursement, the applicant must meet the following criteria: The applicant to have completed a minimum of 2 years at PLC. The applicant holds a permanent position at PLC.

Guidelines for Individual Self-Directed Professional Learning for Post Graduate Study Fees 1. Funds are available to a maximum of $700 per unit or up to $1400 per person per year to permanent employees of Presbyterian Ladies’ College to attend a Post Graduate Study. 2. Process a. Complete the Post Graduate Study Application Form attached to this document on an annual basis. b. Line Manager/member of the School Leadership Team to approve the Professional Learning Experience. c. Complete/Attend Self-Directed Post Graduate Study experience. d. Submit original receipt(s). (Post Graduate Study experience to be paid for by the individual and reimbursed) e. Complete a Post Graduate Study Evaluation Form (after the unit) attached to this document by 30 August, the previous year. •

Reimbursements will be processed once all forms and receipts are received

Only original receipts are acceptable. The original receipt may be returned to the applicant upon request.

3. The Post Graduate Study allowance cannot be: •

Used for Membership fees.

Used for Textbooks, resources, or other materials.

4. Funding as follows: In any given year a School employee may receive 25% funding to a maximum of $1,400 per year. Semester unit: 25% to a maximum of $700. 40 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


Individual Self-Directed Post Graduate Study APPLICATION FORM (PRE-APPROVAL) (A maximum of $700 per unit or up to $1400 per person per year)

Name

Department

Email

Role

ACTIVITY INFORMATION Organiser Date (mm/dd/yyyy)

Location

Brief Description

Questionnaire Note: Refer to the Guidelines for Individual Self-Directed Post Graduate Study 1. Does this Post Graduate Study experience directly relate to your personal Growth and Development and/or the strategic plan of the School? YES NO

EXPENSES

TOTAL CLAIM (A maximum of $700 per unity or up to $1,400 per person, per year)

Amount

$

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 41


Acknowledgement Upon successful completion of the course/unit module I understand I will need to present originals of appropriate receipts and tax invoices and a Statement of Academic Record to the Director of People ad Culture so that reimbursement of expenses can be arranged. I agree that this will be within 3 months of successfully being advised of passing the relevant unit/s. I agree to pay back an amount of the reimbursement for the previous years fees in the following proportions if my employment is voluntarily terminated, terminated for gross misconduct or terminated for performance management issues. Termination within: •

24 months of reimbursement

refund 30%

18 months of reimbursement

refund 50%

12 months of reimbursement

refund 100%

Signature of Employee

Date

APPROVAL

Signature of Relevant Line Leader

Date

Signature of Relevant Deputy

Date

Signature of Principal

Date

Once completed, please forward to Director of People and Culture for recording and filing to be able to facilitate payment upon supporting documentation as per policy requirements.

Reimbursement People and Culture has received and checked the relevant documentation and confirms reimbursement is now due under the terms of the Study Leave policy.

Signature of Director of People and Culture

Date

25% to a maximum of $700 per unit or up to $1400 per person per calendar year. UNIT

42 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK

AMOUNT

PLC


EVALUATION REPORT Name

Evaluation 1. Was it beneficial?

YES

NO

ACTIVITY INFORMATION Title Organiser Date (mm/dd/yyyy)

Location

Presenter(s) Attach a one page programme if available Key Messages

How did you share the knowledge gained with colleagues at the School?

Which presenter(s) would you recommend?

Was it aimed at a specific group?

YES

NO

If YES, specify?

Other comments

Signature of Employee

Date

Signature of Relevant Manager

Date PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 43


Affiliations ALLIANCE OF GIRLS SCHOOLS The Alliance of Girls’ Schools Australasia is a non for profit organisation which leading voice for the advancement of girls’ education. They advocate for and support the distinctive work of girls’ schools in their provision of unparalleled opportunities for girls. They contribute to the development and promotion of education in Australasia and the empowerment of young women to reach their potential and become influential contributors to our complex and changing world. The Alliance connects educators from our 175 plus member schools across six countries. They represent over 132,000 girls, over 10,000 educators and attract over 2000 programme participants annually to local events, and regional conferences. Their members comprise girls’ schools throughout Australasia, with the current membership that spans girls’ schools in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Philippines, Hong Kong and South Africa, and includes Government, Catholic and Independent schools. The Alliance of Girls’ Schools Australasia has a close working relationship with similar organisations in North America, The National Coalition of Girls’ Schools and the United Kingdom, the Girls’ Schools Association. We are also affiliated with other like-minded not for profit organisations working in the areas of girls’ education and gender equality. PLC is a member of the Alliance of Girls’ Schools Australasia, offering networking gatherings, conferences and other such opportunities for staff. For more information: agsa.org.au

ASSOCIATION OF HEADS OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS AUSTRALIA (AHISA) General membership may be offered to the Head of a school which is a non-government school, is not run for profit and where the Head has the autonomy to determine staffing, curriculum offerings and administration of the school. The process for becoming a General member of AHISA is detailed on their website ahisa.edu.au

APPA (THE AUSTRALIAN PRIMARY PRINCIPALS ASSOCIATION) The Australian Primary Principals Association (APPA) is the national professional association for primary school principals in Australia. APPA represents affiliated state and territory Government, Catholic and Independent primary schools across the nation with over 7,000 members. It is the national voice on national issues and speaks directly to the Federal Government on matters that concern school principals and their school communities. For more information: appa.asn.au/about-us/

IPSHA The Western Australia Branch of IPSHA consists of over 50 members representing the entire breadth of independent schools, including: co-educational, single sex, denominational, non-denominational, metropolitan and regional schools. All Heads of Independent Primary Schools are invited to join and enjoy the benefits of the association for students, staff and themselves.  IPSHA Network meetings are held for teachers within member schools for Teacher Librarians, Art Teachers, Deputies, K-3 Teachers and Years 4-7 Teachers.

For Students •

Biennial Performing Arts Festival

Biennial Art Exhibition

Chess Competitions

Public Speaking Competition

Ecumenical Service

Co-educational Sport competitions and fixtures

44 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


For Staff •

Network meetings for teachers within member schools for Teacher Librarians, Art Teachers, Deputies, K-3 Teachers and 4-7 Teachers

For Heads •

Collegiality and support from others who understand your role implicitly

Regular meetings for members each term, with a focus on collegiality and engaging and relevant professional development

Social gatherings, an annual dinner and a regional conference

Mentoring

Representation at APPA and the Principal Australia Institute

For more information:ipsha.org.au/state-branch/western-australia-2/

ACEL The Australian Council for Educational Leaders (ACEL) is a not-for-profit company that actively supports the development of educational leadership capabilities across Australia through conferences and workshops, leadership programs, in-house publications, online resources, and a bookshop. Access to these leadership-focused opportunities is available for classroom teachers through to system leaders. ACEL is the largest professional association in the education sector in Australia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. It has a growing network of more than 7000 members and over 45,000 educators, with branches in each state and territory. ACEL also partners with like-minded organisations to further enhance the richness of its portfolio of programs and resources to ensure that educational leaders get access to most current research and best practice in their field. They cultivate a collaborative learning community of educational leaders by: •

Enhancing leadership capacity through delivery of high quality programs, events and publications

Elevating the standing of educational leadership by recognising excellence

Representing, supporting and advocating for the education profession

Sustaining strong state, national and international ACEL networks

For more information: acel.org.au/ACEL/

ASSOCIATION of INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA (AISWA) The Association of Independent Schools was established in 1962 as a non-profit organisation to support, represent and promote the interests of Independent Schools. AISWA is incorporated under the Industrial Relations Act. AISWA’s constituent members include over one hundred and fifty-five Independent Schools. AISWA’s services are wide ranging, supporting all facets of education from governance, leadership, teaching and support staff, to students and the wider school community. AISWA creates and delivers high quality Professional Learning (PL) so that schools can keep up with the everchanging educational landscape. These PL experiences include school-based training, seminars, hands-on workshops, conferences, network meetings, study tours, online courses, licenced/partnership training initiatives and one-on-one consultation. For more information: ais.wa.edu.au/contact-us

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK 45


Teacher Registration Board of Western Australia (TRBWA) Registration Annual Fees (5 Years) Annual TRB fee to be paid by the end of March of every year. The TRBWA is the body responsible for the registration of teachers in Western Australia and registers all teachers, from early childhood to Year 12, who teach in a Western Australian educational venue. The TRBWA is also responsible for the accreditation of initial teacher education programmes in WA. The Teacher Registration Act 2012 (Act) requires all teachers who are teaching in Western Australian schools and other educational venues to be registered with the Teacher Registration Board of Western Australia (TRBWA). Renewal of Registration occurs every five years. As part of maintaining registration status, teachers are required to continually update their professional learning activities.  The fees associated with teacher registration are collected in accordance with the Teacher Registration Act 2012. The Schedule of Fees is prescribed in the Teacher Registration (General) Regulations 2012 and is reviewed from time to time in accordance with the State Government’s general review of fees and charges.

Contacts Monday - Friday: 8.30 am to 4.30 pm Telephone: (08) 9223 9100 Email: info@trb.wa.gov.au

Working With Children Check (WWC) To be renewed every 3 years. The annual fee is $85 The Working with Children Check (WWCC) is a compulsory screening strategy in Western Australia. The WWC Check aims to protect children by: •

deterring people from applying to work with children where they have a relevant charge or conviction on their criminal record that indicates they may harm a child;

detecting new charges and convictions of those people who hold a current WWC Card and preventing them from continuing to engage in child-related work where their criminal record and behaviour indicates they may harm a child; and

protecting children by creating awareness that child safety is a whole of community responsibility.

All employees at PLC are required to have a current and up-to-date WWC at all times. In absence of a WWC, the person may not perform their designated duties. In addition, the Heads of every Subject Department will have an associated body that they liaise with. If you want to find out more, please contact them as I don’t know who they may be.

46 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT HANDBOOK


PRESBYTERIAN LADIES’ COLLEGE A COLLEGE OF THE UNITING CHURCH IN AUSTRALIA 14 MCNEIL STREET, PEPPERMINT GROVE WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6011 TEL (08) 9424 6444 | PLC.WA.EDU.AU

CRICOS Provider Code 00447B

Profile for Presbyterian Ladies' College

Professional Development Handbook 2019  

Professional Development Handbook 2019