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Crossword Quiz Answers. (2018). Type of wooden shoe - Crossword Quiz Answers. [online] Available at: http://crosswordquizanswers.com/type-of-wooden-shoe/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Craftsy. (2018). magic4kids | Craftsy. [online] Available at: https://www.craftsy.com/profile/magic4kids [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Knitpicks.com. (2018). Felted Clogs Made Easy! - Knitting Patterns and Crochet Patterns from KnitPicks.com. [online] Available at: https://www.knitpicks.com/patterns/Felted_Clogs_Made_Easy!__D11763220.ht ml [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Moheda.co.uk. (2018). Traditional handmade leather Wooden clogs Moheda Sweden. [online] Available at: https://moheda.co.uk/en/wooden-clogsstandard/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Kooijman Wooden Shoe Workshop. (2018). Kooijman Wooden Shoe Workshop - Craftmanship. [online] Available at: http://www.woodenshoes.nl/en/craftmanship [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Kooijman Wooden Shoe Workshop. (2018). Kooijman Wooden Shoe Workshop - Clog museum. [online] Available at: http://www.woodenshoes.nl/en/museum [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Kooijman Wooden Shoe Workshop. (2018). Kooijman Wooden Shoe Workshop - Clog museum. [online] Available at: http://www.woodenshoes.nl/en/museum [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. ethnology @ snomnh. (2018). Object: Wooden Shoes. [online] Available at: https://ethnology.wordpress.com/2010/01/09/e_1966_7_6/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Grossman, M., Laxman, S. and Bailey, B. (2018). What is Suede? The World of Leather; Faux vs. Genuine - Contrado Blog. [online] Contrado Blog. Available at: https://www.contrado.co.uk/blog/what-is-suede/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Bradfordonavonmuseum.co.uk. (2018). The Museum Collection: Cobblers and Cordwainers | Bradford on Avon Museum. [online] Available at: http://www.bradfordonavonmuseum.co.uk/archives/2534 [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Bell (2018). Picking From Among the Different Clog Types - The Shoes for Every Occ…. [online] Slideshare.net. Available at: https://www.slideshare.net/maguba/picking-from-among-the-different-clogtypes-the-shoes-for-every-occasion?qid=ee0fb167-ef29-47a2-b83f684c65543197&v=&b=&from_search=3 [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Treforowenclogmaker.co.uk. (2018). 2. Standard Clogs - treforowenclogs. [online]


Available at: http://www.treforowenclogmaker.co.uk/clog-pictures/-standardclogs [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Sunder, K. (2018). Klompen around. [online] Tribuneindia News Service. Available at: https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/spectrum/travel/klompenaround/331886.html [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Atlas Obscura. (2018). The Clog Museum. [online] Available at: https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/the-clog-museum-zaandam-netherlands [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. AESU (2018). Planning a Trip to Holland? Learn about the Dutch Klompen, or Clogs - AESU. [online] AESU. Available at: https://www.aesu.com/blog/planningtrip-holland-learn-dutch-klompen-clogs/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Cult. (2018). Wooden Shoes & Clogs: the Flip Flops of the Middle Ages. [online] Available at: https://cult.is/wooden-shoes-clogs-the-flip-flops-of-the-middleages-2/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. Tribunesandtriumphs.org. (2018). Roman Shoes. [online] Available at: http://www.tribunesandtriumphs.org/roman-clothing/roman-shoes.htm [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. The Dutch clog store. (2018). The unique appearance of yellow wooden shoes. [online] Available at: https://www.dehollandseklompenwinkel.nl/en/blogs/klompenblog/theunique-appearance-of-yellow-wooden-shoes/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018]. The Dutch clog store. (2018). Clogs from Holland. [online] Available at: https://www.dehollandseklompenwinkel.nl/en/blogs/klompenblog/clogsfrom-holland/ [Accessed 9 Sep. 2018].


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ORIGIN Clogs are a type of footwear that is known worldwide, however their appearance and the material that they are made from may vary from culture to culture. Traditionally used in agriculture, some types of clogs are specifically worn for various styles of dancing, which demonstrates the diversity of the shoe. Carved wooden clogs originated in the early 1300s in Europe, and while originally they were worn by peasants and the lower classes, clogs became a fashionable choice of footwear by the 14th Century. Clogs are derived from “calceus” shoes, which were wooden soled shoes from the Roman Empire. Calceus shoes had a leather strap that wrapped around the top of the foot, and so the design of the clog developed due to the high demand for an enclosed shoe that offered protection from the elements. The oldest surviving European wooden shoes that resemble the clogs that are still worn today have been found in the Netherlands, and date from 1230 and 1280. Traditionally, clogs were hand crafted from a single square block of wood, which was wet down, then axed and smoothed into shape. Craftsmen specialising in the making of clogs were commonly known as bodgers, and they preferred to use wood such as balsa, beech and sycamore as these types of woods do not split easily. The clogs were then painted, and the styles and designs varied across Europe depending on the local fashion. There are three types of clog styles: whole feet or wooden upper, which is typically associated with Holland, wooden soled and overshoes. Whole feet clogs were traditionally worn as protective clothing in agriculture, industrial facilities and mining, and while they are still worn in these industries today, they are also worn by nurses and chefs for both protection and comfort. Clogs make a characteristic clicking sound when worn, which inspired clog dancing in Victorian Britain. By the 18th Century, clog dancing had made its way to America, and the traditional clog inspired the design of the modern tap shoe that we know today. Modern clog designs often mix the traditional clog style with more modern materials, such as leather and cloth. In the 70s and 80s, Swedish clogs became a fashionable accessory for both men and women. When worn without socks, clogs were considered to be somewhat of an avant-garde fashion statement for the fashion forward man. In the 80s and 90s, clogs and sandals with a platformed heel were incredibly fashionable for women. The large mid section of the heel, which typically ranged between 6 and 8 inches, was typically made of cork, while the rubber sole was often a pale sand-like colour. Platformed clogs have also featured on the high-fashion circuit; Dutch designers Viktor & Rolf included heeled clogs in their 2007/08 Winter Collection. Clogs returned to women’s fashion again in 2010 thanks to top designers such as Chanel and Louis Vuitton including them in their Spring/Summer Collection. While clogs are fundamentally a practical type of shoe, clogs remain a truly iconic style of footwear thanks to their unique shape, with variations of the design remaining true to the traditional look of the past.


ORIGIN Clogs are a type of footwear that is known worldwide, however their appearance and the material that they are made from may vary from culture to culture. Traditionally used in agriculture, some types of clogs are specifically worn for various styles of dancing, which demonstrates the diversity of the shoe. Carved wooden clogs originated in the early 1300s in Europe, and while originally they were worn by peasants and the lower classes, clogs became a fashionable choice of footwear by the 14th Century. Clogs are derived from “calceus” shoes, which were wooden soled shoes from the Roman Empire. Calceus shoes had a leather strap that wrapped around the top of the foot, and so the design of the clog developed due to the high demand for an enclosed shoe that offered protection from the elements. The oldest surviving European wooden shoes that resemble the clogs that are still worn today have been found in the Netherlands, and date from 1230 and 1280. Traditionally, clogs were hand crafted from a single square block of wood, which was wet down, then axed and smoothed into shape. Craftsmen specialising in the making of clogs were commonly known as bodgers, and they preferred to use wood such as balsa, beech and sycamore as these types of woods do not split easily. The clogs were then painted, and the styles and designs varied across Europe depending on the local fashion. There are three types of clog styles: whole feet or wooden upper, which is typically associated with Holland, wooden soled and overshoes. Whole feet clogs were traditionally worn as protective clothing in agriculture, industrial facilities and mining, and while they are still worn in these industries today, they are also worn by nurses and chefs for both protection and comfort. Clogs make a characteristic clicking sound when worn, which inspired clog dancing in Victorian Britain. By the 18th Century, clog dancing had made its way to America, and the traditional clog inspired the design of the modern tap shoe that we know today. Modern clog designs often mix the traditional clog style with more modern materials, such as leather and cloth. In the 70s and 80s, Swedish clogs became a fashionable accessory for both men and women. When worn without socks, clogs were considered to be somewhat of an avant-garde fashion statement for the fashion forward man. In the 80s and 90s, clogs and sandals with a platformed heel were incredibly fashionable for women. The large mid section of the heel, which typically ranged between 6 and 8 inches, was typically made of cork, while the rubber sole was often a pale sand-like colour. Platformed clogs have also featured on the high-fashion circuit; Dutch designers Viktor & Rolf included heeled clogs in their 2007/08 Winter Collection. Clogs returned to women’s fashion again in 2010 thanks to top designers such as Chanel and Louis Vuitton including them in their Spring/Summer Collection. While clogs are fundamentally a practical type of shoe, clogs remain a truly iconic style of footwear thanks to their unique shape, with variations of the design remaining true to the traditional look of the past.


Wooden clogs are heavy work shoes that were typically worn by French and Dutch peasants up through the beginning of the twentieth century. Known in French as sabots, and in Dutch as klompen, these sturdy shoes protected the feet of agricultural workers from mud and wet and from injury by the sharp tools used in the field. French clogs were often made from a combination of wood and leather. However, the classic Dutch clog is entirely wooden. Wooden clogs are naturally highly water resistant, and therefore they were especially useful in the marshy fields of the Netherlands. Farm workers also wore specially decorated wooden clogs to church and on holidays. In World War I, entrenched soldiers wore wood and leather clogs called sabotines. Up through this time, clogs were typically made by hand. Later, industrialization made leather and rubber shoes more readily available, and wooden clogs became less wide-spread. However wooden clogs are still worn by Dutch farm workers, and also by Dutch fishermen and steel factory workers. Clogs made a resurgence in the 1960s across Europe and North America, not as a work shoe but as fashion. They are still popular in the 1990s. These modern clogs are usually a leather shoe attached to a wood sole. Clogs made entirely from rubber are also popular as gardening shoes.

Raw Materials Wooden clogs are usually made from one of three kinds of wood: European willow, yellow poplar, or tulip poplar. These woods are all hard and water resistant. After the lumber is cut, it is not treated in any way, but made into shoes as soon after felling as is practical. No other material is necessary to make wooden clogs, though some shoes are varnished or decorated with paint.

The Manufacturing Process Wooden clogs were traditionally made entirely by hand, either by their wearers or by specialized artisans. The shoes were roughly carved on the outside, then clamped into a bench that held them vertically, toe down. Then the artisan scooped them out with a long-handled tool. Less than a hundred years ago, a wooden clog factory might consist of dozens of workers making shoes in this same manner, by hand. The introduction of automated machines sped up the process, though machines still required attentive operators.

Making the blanks •

1 The willow or poplar trees are felled and sawn into logs. The logs are debarked, then fed into a saw, which cuts them into rough rectangular blocks. Each block, called a blank, will be formed into one shoe. The size of the block varies depending on what size shoe is to be made


out of it. For a men's size 8 shoe, the block might be 14.5 x 5.25 x 5.25 in (37 x 13.3 x 13.3 cm).

Shaping •

2 Two blanks are placed into a machine called a shaper (also known as a copier or duplicator). This shapes the outside of the shoes. Next to the blanks is a vinyl shoe, which is used as a pattern. Each shoe size has its own vinyl pattern, and the machine operator locks the appropriate pattern into

the shaper. A pointer is set to ride along the pattern shoe. Attached to the pointer are two electrically powered cutting tools. These are set to the right and left shoe blanks. The machine operator turns the power on, and carefully traces the outline of the pattern shoe with the tracer. The cutting tools follow the motion of the tracer, and carve out the out-line of the shoe. The two blanks rotate in opposite directions, allowing a left and a right shoe to be carved simultaneously.

Carving the interior •

3 Next, the carved blanks are placed in another machine called a dual action borer. This machine has a three-pronged cutting implement. The center prong is a tracer, and this goes inside another vinyl pattern shoe. The right and left prongs are set to the right and left shoe blanks. Their cutting ends are sharp-edged scoops similar to ice cream scoops or melon ballers. The operator holds a long metal rod attached to the tracer prong, and pushes this along the inside of the pattern shoe. The cutters follow the tracer's movement, and scoop out the wood blocks. This machine carves out the interior of the shoes to its approximate finished dimensions, leaving an extra 0.25 in (0.64 cm) of material all around.

Refining •

4 The shoes are placed in a similar machine called a refiner, which is in this case entirely automatic. Two cutters follow a pointer on a vinyl pattern and scoop out the inside of the shoes, trimming away the excess 0.25 in (0.64 cm) of material left by the previous step. The fine action of this machine leaves the interior of the shoes extremely smooth, and they need very little finishing after this point.

Drying •

5 The shoes are left to air-dry for four to six weeks. They may be simply placed in a dry storeroom, or they may set in a low temperature


furnace, which circulates warm dry air around them. As they cure, moisture is drawn out of the wood, and the shoes harden.

Finishing •

6 After the shoes are completely dry, workers sand them lightly inside and out. At this point the shoes are completely finished and ready to wear. If the shoes are to be decorated, they are painted or varnished after sanding.

Where to Learn More Books Rowland, Della. A World of Shoes. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1989. Once sanded, the wooden clogs are decorated and then varnished.

Yue, Charlotte. Shoes: Their History in Words and Pictures. New York: Houghton-Mifflin, 1997.

Periodicals Chargot, Patricia. "Clompin' Around." Detroit Free Press (March 23, 1998). Kuniholm, Erin. "Going Dutch: Wearing Clogs Is the Next Best Thing to Going Barefoot." Women's Sports and Fitness (October 1997): 82-84. — Angela Woodward Clogs are, at their simplest, shoes made partially from or completely out of wood. Although they’re often associated with the Netherlands, other countries also have their own versions of the clog, from Britain to Sweden (träksor), to Japan (get a, a cross between clogs and flip flops). Clogs have evolved from a practical work shoe to a fashion staple, but how did this happen? This post will take a look at the rich history of clogs and how they have evolved.

When were they worn?


Traditionally clogs were worn as protection by people working in agriculture, since they were good for walking on muddy ground. They were also favoured by fishermen and labourers, and a person’s profession dictated the shape of clog they would wear. Fishermen, for example, wore clogs with pointed toes to help pull their nets in. In Britain, clogs first became popular during the Industrial Revolution, when factory workers needed cheap footwear that was easy to produce. In the steel industry, a worker could get through four pairs of clogs every day and many factories employed someone to make replacements (or at the very least re-sole any worn-out shoes). However, clogs fell out of favour in Britain in the 1930s, when massproduced shoes and boots became more affordable.

How are clogs made?

The process undertaken to make clogs requires great craftsmanship: • A tree trunk is sliced with a pull saw • The slice is split and shaped with a small axe • The outside of the clog is smoothed with a knife • Any wood on the inside of each clog is scooped out • The clogs are left to dry for approximately three weeks The Last Clog Maker in England talks through this process step-by-step. Historically, it would take around 3-4 hours to make one pair of clogs. Once they had worn out they would be used to fuel the fireplace.

What are clogs made from? In the past, clogs were made by hand, with every town in the Netherlands having their own clog maker. Materials used were based primarily on how available it was to use and whether it suited the purpose.


Wood became the ideal material for clog-making: it lasts for a long time, doesn’t hold moisture, and insulates feet from the ground. However, clogs could not (and cannot) be made from any old wood — it must be easy to work with, resist splitting, and avoid leaving any splinters in the skin. It also needs to be wet when cut due to the curved edge style of the clog. Popular types of wood used for clog making include alder, poplar, and willow. Nowadays, clogs are made by machine instead. They’re still worn in rural parts of the Netherlands and the EU has certified Dutch clogs (klompen) as safety shoes as they can withstand heavy or sharp objects and acid spills.

Contemporary Clogs CLOGS IN FASHION As mentioned above, clogs were once mostly considered to be a practical work shoe, but this is no longer the case; they are now championed for being versatile and stylish. Vogue magazine, impressed by the practicality offered by the clog, described it as “easiest switch-up for just a hint of bohemia in your everyday look.” What’s more, they pointed to a photograph of the everfashionable supermodel Kate Moss styling clogs. Nowadays clogs are more likely to be made in the British or Swedish style, with a wooden sole and an upper made of material like leather or suede (as opposed to the all-wooden Dutch version). Some designs are simple, others — particularly those made for women — are adorned with straps, studs, and buckles. The height of the heel varies, though it’s always solid. • Haflinger - Torben Grizzly Graphit PRACTICAL CLOGS From its agricultural, rustic origins, the clog has transformed itself into an icon of contemporary bohemian style. Perhaps most appropriately,


however, is that it remains a staple of many industries; its ease and versatility, as well as the protection it offers, makes it valuable for an array of professions. It’s essential for professional clogs to be super-comfortable and very durable; the industries in which they are worn tend to be ones that require their wearers to be stood for great lengths of time. The main industries in which they are found are catering, medical and leisure, though it’s not uncommon to find them elsewhere. Clogs are a staple especially within the kitchen and in health care. Their breathability makes them ideal for chefs in the heat of the kitchen. What’s more, their waterproofing stops them from hindering workers through spillages. Finally, toughened rubber protects against falling utensils. Similarly, health care professionals from doctors to nurses turn to clogs in order to avoid slips when at work, whilst remaining comfortable throughout long shifts. The kind of clogs nurses wear need to be anti-static and waterproof, which maintaining support throughout the day.


Clogs are carved wooden shoes that were traditionally worn by both male and female peasantry throughout Europe since the shoes originated in the early 1300s. Wooden clog shoes were designed as a practical covering for the foot that provided protection and comfort against harsh elements. Throughout history they were traditionally worn by the peasant classes, but by the twentieth century they evolved into fashionable footwear.

Places of Origin Wooden clogs originated in Holland, eventually spreading to France, England and Scandinavia. The clog shoe became the most common work shoe in Europe throughout the Industrial Revolution era. Clog shoes were derived from "calceus" shoes, wooden-soled shoes that existed during the Roman empire. Calceus shoes had wooden soles and leather straps that wrapped over the top of the foot. The design of the wooden clog evolved from the demand for an enclosed shoe that would protect the feet from the wet and cold elements.

Shoes of Peasants Both male and female members of the peasant classes wore clogs throughout history for warmth and protection. The strong support offered by clogs made them an ideal choice of shoes for miners, farmers and construction workers. Wooden clog shoes were considered more utilitarian than fashionable, being worn for their comfort for working in fields and for labor-intensive jobs and activities. They protected the feet in extreme climates. Throughout the early history of wooden clogs, members of nobility would not wear wooden clogs because they were associated with the garments worn by peasants.

How Clogs Were Made Craftsman who specialized in the making of clogs were referred to as "bodgers." Balsa, alder, willow, beech and sycamore woods were favored by these craftsmen for creating clogs because these woods did not split easily. Traditional clogs were made from a square block of wood. The wood was wet down, axed and smoothed into shape. The shoes were stacked to allow for thorough drying. They were then painted, usually with a variety of patterns. Many villages had their own patterns and designs for clogs, and the styles of shoe varied throughout different areas of Europe.


Evolution of the Clog Clogs make a characteristic clicking sound when walking, and it was this unique rhythm that inspired clog dancing during the Victorian era in England. Clog dancing eventually made its way to the United States during the eighteenth century, and wooden clog shoes inspired the creation of modern tap dance shoes. Throughout the late twentieth century in Europe and the United States, clogs became very fashionable. Modern clogs borrow the styles of traditional clogs with wooden soles, with new materials such as leather and cloth used for the structure of the shoes. Clogs, those wooden shoes you can often find tiny versions of on key rings or as ornaments in gift shops. They are a typical symbol for the Netherlands, but are they Dutch, and how did they come about?

What are clogs? Firstly, let’s get any confusion out of the way. Clogs are footwear, which are in whole or part made from wood. Whilst we might think of clogs as those wooden shoes that cover your whole foot, many other types of wooden shoes fall under the same category, for example, the Japanese Geta or the Cantabrian albarcas from Spain. We are going to focus on the Dutch version - the one that practically covers your whole foot.

When were clogs discovered? It is not clear when clogs first took shape; however, the first clogs found in the Netherlands date back to 1230 AD, and were found in Nieuwendijk, Amsterdam. These clogs were made from alder wood. Originally, clogs were made out of one piece of wood and proved handy for protecting your feet against the dirt and ground. They took their inspiration from “calceus” shoes, which were worn in the days of the Roman Empire. These shoes had a wooden sole, leather straps on top and resembled sandals. The clog changed its form to adapt to the harsher weather in the Netherlands. The craftsmen who made these clogs were called “bodgers”; “bodging” being a traditional woodturning craft. Alder, balsa, willow, beech and sycamore were the preferred wood types of these craftsmen, as they did not split easily.


Who wore clogs? Clogs were worn by both men and women and became the ideal choice for those working in the mines, on the farms and in construction, as they provided support, warmth and protection without needing to be reinforced. The clog is even certified as a safety shoe by the European Union! Villages had their own “bodger” and this resulted in different styles of clog and decoration for every village. When shoemaking became industrialised, the manufacture of wooden shoes experienced a decline. This picked up briefly in the World Wars when materials for shoes became scarce and wooden shoes were the perfect alternative. Today, wooden clogs are still worn in farming regions; however, many tend to wear modern shoes. Clogs didn’t stop being useful when they were worn out or rotten. When this was the case, they were used to fuel the fireplace.

What are clogs? We get to know the different styles of shoe fashion from a different period or another country. Wooden shoes also known simply as ‘clogs’ were originally handmade from wood coming from the trees of alder, sycamore, poplar or willow plant. This classic footwear was once made with wooden sole and leather strap till it came to be made of wood alone and was worn to protect the feet. It was originally used as ‘working shoes’ of farmers and miners and have come a long way to becoming a fashionable item on the fashion runway. Variations of the clogs were mainly overshoes with wooden uppers and wooden soles with wooden soled clogs as the most typical among the three.

History of clogs Though no one knows for sure the true origin of wooden shoes, they were believed to have started during the Middle Ages in Old Europe with the oldest found at Amsterdam dating as far back as 1230. Back at those times, clogs or ‘klompen’ as they were called by the Dutch, were originally made of alder and was a common necessity among farmers and miners and those doing heavy labor to protect their whole feet. This footwear was greatly favored by the working class as it fit the Dutch climate aside from the protection and comfort it offered. t was also a customary practice then for men to present a pair of carved wooden shoes to their fiancées. Soon these wooden shoes became part of the traditional Dutch costume for ‘Klompendanskunst’ or ‘Clog Dancing’. In some European countries, they also have their own traditional version of clogs like ‘sabot’ in France, ‘klumpe’ in Lithuania, ‘zoccolo (calzatura)’ in Italy, ‘tamanco’ in Portugal among others. These varieties of customary wooden shoes were also used in Asian countries like the ‘geta’ from Japan, ‘paduka’ from India, ‘namaksin’ from Korea and ‘bakya’ in the Philippines to name a few.


From a soldier’s gear to a decorative footwear By the advent of World War I, clogs became part of the combat gear among soldiers as they passed through the vast European terrains. However, the Industrial Age and mass production caused by the invention of machines soon favored leather and synthetic made shoes over clogs. They were soon soon no longer widely worn and by World War II there were primarily used for traditional decorative use.

The evolution of clogs as a fashion accessory Fast forward, clogs resurfaced by the 1960’s as a stylish accessory worn without socks by men. It was the Swedish styled clogs that became popular to both sexes which were made in different materials and colors retaining only the wooden sole. By the 80’s and 90’s it became a mainstay in fashion as new materials and accessories were incorporated to make them more comfortable and practical than the ‘old wooden shoe’. Clogs began to incorporate materials such as leather, rubber, fur, wool, or rhinestones with different designs ranging from platform styled clogs that reaches 6 to 8 cm high to open-toe or closed back versions with straps or strings. Every now and then, clogs were also seen on fashion runways as accessories for designers such as Chanel and Louis Vuitton propelling it into the world of fashion. https://www.metmuseum.org/search-results#!/search?q=clogs

TYPES https://www.metmuseum.org/search-results#!/search?q=clogs https://artsandculture.google.com/search?q=clogs

Crossword Answers:type of clogs RANK

ANSWER

CLUE

SABOT

Type of clog

UNSTOP

Clear of clogs

SOLES

Wood parts of clogs

DRANO

Brand of clog remover

DECAGON

Angular figure ruined second half of clog dance

STEELTOE

Component of some clogs

KNOW ALL

Clever clogs is King of Berlin since 1989? (4-3)

CLOSES

Clogs

CRAMPS

Clogs

DIRTIES

Clogs

OVERSUPPLIES

Clogs


OCCLUDES

Clogs

SNAGS

Clogs

RETARDS

Clogs

IMPEDANCES

Clogs

TIES

Clogs

RESTRICTS

Clogs

SEALES

Clogs

BLOCKAGES

Clogs

HOBBLES

Clogs

CONFUSES

Clogs

1. 1. Picking From Among the Different Clog Types - The Shoes for Every Occasion 2. 2. Introducti on CLOGS ARE FOOTWEAR THAT ARE MADE PARTLY OR COMPLETELY OF WOOD. THEY ARE WORN BY BOTH MEN AND WOMEN. CLOGS ARE AVAILABLE IN NUMEROUS DESIGNS AND COLORS. 3. 3. Popular Colors BLACK CLOGS FOR WOMEN ARE THE BEST-SELLING CLOGS IN THE WORLD. THEY ARE USUALLY MADE OF LEATHER UPPERS AND ARE AVAILABLE FOR MEN TOO. OTHER POPULAR COLORS ARE WHITE AND BROWN. 4. 4. Clogs for Different Occasions CLOGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR EACH AND EVERY OCCASION. THEY DIFFER MOSTLY IN STYLE AND THE MATERIALS USED. THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS DESCRIBE THE 5 COMMON TYPES OF WOMEN’S CLOGS. 5. 5. THESE CLOGS FALL BETWEEN PROFESSIONAL AND CASUAL CLOGS. THEY ARE CHUNKY AS THEY USUALLY HAVE HIGH HEELS. THEY OFTEN INCLUDE EMBELLISHMENTS SUCH AS DECORATIVE JEWELS. Dressy Clogs 6. 6. Casual Clogs CASUAL CLOGS ARE ONE OF THE MOST COMMONLY AVAILABLE CLOGS. THEY HAVE RAISED BUT SHORT HEELS, AND CAN BE WORN INDOORS. CASUAL CLOGS HAVE UPPERS MADE OF INEXPENSIVE MATERIALS SUCH AS NYLON AND COTTON 7. 7. Professional ClogsBLACK CLOGS FOR WOMEN USUALLY FALL IN THIS CATEGORY. THEY ARE WORK SHOES FOR PROFESSIONALS LIKE CHEFS AND NURSES. THEY HAVE LOW HEELS AND ARE MORE COMFORTABLE THAN OTHER CLOGS. THEY ARE MADE OF LEATHER OR SYNTHETIC UPPERS. 8. 8. Rubber Clogs RUBBER CLOGS ARE EITHER MADE COMPLETELY OF RUBBER OR HAVE A WOODEN BASE. THEY ARE MADE TO BE WORN AROUND THE HOUSE AND FOR THINGS LIKE GARDENING. THEY ARE EASY TO WASH AND ARE VERY COMFORTABLE TO WEAR. 9. 9. Wooden Clogs THESE CLOGS ARE COMPLETELY MADE OF WOOD. THEY CAN EITHER BE CASUAL OR FORMAL IN THEIR DESIGNS. WOODEN CLOGS MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE HIGH HEELS.


https://www.slideshare.net/maguba/picking-from-among-the-different-clog-types-the-shoesfor-every-occasion (VIDEO LINK) http://www.fashionising.com/trends/b--clogs-4532.html

(WOMEN CLOGS)

WHY WALK ON CLOGS??

Why walk on wooden shoes? Have you ever wondered why someone would intentionally want to walk around in shoes that could give you a splinter? Nowadays wooden clogs are largely sold in the Netherlands as tourist souvenirs, only a few farmers will walk them regularly A clog is a type of footwear made in part or completely from wood. Clogs are used worldwide and although the form may vary by culture, within a culture the form often remained unchanged for centuries.

Early History The Dutch have been wearing wooden shoes, or clogs, or “Klompen� since medieval times. Originally, they were made with a wooden sole and a leather top or strap tacked to the wood. Eventually, the shoes began to be made entirely from wood to protect the whole foot. Originally, alder, willow and poplar woods were used. The first guild of clog makers dates back to around 1570 in Holland. Wooden shoe wearers claim the shoes are warm in winter, cool in summer and provide support for good posture. The wood also absorbs perspiration so that the foot can breathe.


Workers Footwear In Holland, wooden shoes are worn by farmers, fishermen, factory workers, artisans and others to protect their feet. Nails, fishing hooks and sharp implements that might pierce a regular boot will not go through a wooden shoe. On boats and docks and in muddy fields, wooden shoes also keep feet dry. For every profession the wooden shoe would be shaped differently. Fishermen had a sharp point on the nose, so the clogs could help sort out the fishing nets. If your work was to dig out peat, the bottom of the clog was a large square. This way your weight was better spread offer the soggy soil. The square was also the perfect size for digging out the peat blocks.

Design The working clogs where just blank, nothing special about them. For wear around house, church, weddings etcetera clogs were painted or carved. A regular painting would be yellow with some red and black on the top. Wooden clogs were poor man shoes. To make them look like the fancy leather shoes with laces the design on top often featured the laces and the lace holes. Each clog maker had is own design, it was his signature. Wooden shoes, as icons of Dutch culture, appear in customs such as the practice of young Dutch men presenting their fiancĂŠes with a pair of carved wooden shoes. Making clogs Every town or suburb used to have his own clog maker in The Netherlands. It would take 3-4 hours to make one pair of wooden shoes by hand. First with a pull saw you had to slice the tree trunk. Then the slice needed to be split and given the rough shape with a special small axe. With a sharp knife the clog maker would smooth the shape of the clog on the outside before scooping out the wood from the inside. Clog makers always work with wet wood as they have to make a lot of curves (dry wood would splinter). Drying of the carved clogs takes about 3 weeks and is done by the wind. Nowadays there are only 12 clog makers left in the whole of The Netherlands. Machines


are used to speed up to process. Clogs are still worn by a few people when working in the gardens or on farms.

Wooden Shoes & Clogs: the Flip Flops of the Middle Ages MAY 1, 2015 0 SHARES 0 COMMENTS

Clogs, or wooden shoes are one of those items that are a true symbol of Dutch culture. And they indeed make for fun souvenirs if you come and visit us, were it only for the fact that windmills are a bit harder to take back home. But did you know that the wooden shoe is really just an advanced middle aged flip flop?!

Wooden flip flops The history of the Dutch Clogs – in Holland known as klompen – goes back to the Middle Ages. In that time period many people wore sandals made out of a material truly abundant in the swampy area that is currently Holland: wood! The abundance of wood becomes very apparent once you know that the name Holland actually derives from Holt, meaning wood, Land.


So making sandals out of wood was pretty straightforward. A piece of wood, shaped in the form of a foot with a leather strap on the top made for some mean middle age flip flops.

Wooden shoes…or wooden flip flops Some clever mind then came up with the brilliant idea to create a more convenient and solid shoe. Extra wood was added under the sandals, an embankment at the heel was created and also the instep got a wooden enclosement. Basically it meant the entire foot got enclosed in wood to make the shoes sturdier, keep your feet warm in winter and cool in summer, but also to reduce the amount of contact with the muddy streets of those days. Initially this wooden ‘advanced flip flop’ was constructed out of several pieces of wood that got engineered together to form the wooden shoes.


Old wooden shoes assembled out of five individual pieces of wood

Rise to popularity of the Wooden Shoe The new type of wooden shoe became very popular in the fifteenth century not only in Holland but basically all over Europe. Among the peasantry, wooden shoes provided a cheap kind of footwear because of the durability and protection they offered their wearers. Wooden clogs provided a hard casing around the foot that did not break when trampled by farm animals or hit by heavy tools. In walking through wet or muddy areas, wooden clogs provided a waterproof form of foot


protection. In urban areas, wooden shoes protected feet from direct contact with street rubbish and waste. It was not before long that another revolutionary improvement to the wooden shoe was made. The wooden shoe makers started experimenting with the fabrication of a wooden shoe made out of one piece of wood. These were the first clogs or wooden shoes as we know them still today. The clog came in all shapes and sizes, usually with a pointed front form but later in the more familiar round shape.

Pointy wooden shoes


During weekdays most people would wear unpainted clogs. But for weekend church outings people would step it up one notch and most often wear black painted clogs with all sorts of motifs. There were also clogs with sharp metal points mounted under the sole with which one could walk on ice without slipping.

wooden shoes with cleats to walk the ice

Clog making as a skill Making a wooden shoe was a craft in itself. Clog makers were seen as highly skilled people enjoying a great reputation. Making wooden shoes was almost an artform and most of the ‘artists’ were members of the so-called clogs guild.


Wooden shoes are usually made of willow or popular (the tree) wood.

Contemporary Clogs: 3 Million pair a year Approximately 3 million pairs of Dutch clogs are produced each year. They are sold throughout the Netherlands. A large part of the market is for the tourist industry were clogs sell like hot cakes. Most of these clogs are painted yellow which is most often contributed to the colour of cheese.

Yellow wooden shoes in a Dutch tourist shop


They also make for a good addition to a traditional Dutch outfit during celebrations or other dress up occasions

Clogs have found their way in a whole lot other diverse uses. From boats, flower pots, wall decorations, playgrounds to comfy indoor house slippers.


comfy indoor slippers


wooden shoe boat cruising the Amsterdam canals


the wooden shoe flower pot


a wooden shoe playground


Colorful wall decoration

CE approved Safety Shoes However, the clog is still used as the preferred sturdy footwear on the Dutch countryside among farmers and gardeners. One of the reasons being that a solid wooden shoe has great protective features for the feet. The traditional all-wooden Dutch clogs have been officially accredited as safety shoes with the CE mark and can withstand almost any penetration including sharp objects and concentrated acids. They are actually safer than


steelcapped protective shoes in some circumstances, as the wood cracks rather than dents in extreme accidents, allowing easy removal of the clog and not continued pressure on the toes by the (edge of the) steel nose Regular clog wearer also swear it is the most comfortable footwear available, it just takes some time for your feet to get used to them.

Biggest Clog in the world Logically we, the Dutch, also had to create the biggest clog in the world. It can be found in a town named Enter in the Dutch province of Overijssel. The world’s biggest clog measures a whopping 4.03 meter long, 1.71 meter wide and 1.69 meter high. Since the 26th of June 1991 the clog got its official title as the world’s biggest by the Guinness Book of Records. The town of Enter has, apart from the biggest clog, also the second biggest clog and a clog museum.


Biggest Wooden shoe in the world made out of one piece of wood in Enter (Overrijssel)

Some Wooden Shoe Fun Facts The word ‘sabotage’ has a direct relation to the clog. The French word for clog is ‘sabot’ and employees who got fired because their boss had replaced them with a machine would throw their clogs in the machine to disrupt it. • The biggest wooden shoe factory in the world – Klompenfabriek Nijhuis BV is located in Beltrum, Holland. •


The International Wooden Shoe Museum is located in Eelde, Netherlands • There are two towns in Holland that are called De Klomp (the clog) • Crocs, the plastic/foam made colourful sandal shoes were derived as a modern version of the clog. • In 2011, the Ghanan King Nana Okrukata V received a pair of Dutch clogs from the Dutch Akwadaa foundation. He liked them so much that he immediately ordered 10.000 pairs for his policitcal party, the New Patriotic Party (NPP). •

WHY DO NURSES WEAR CLOGS?? Support The main reason that clogs are a popular choice of footwear for nurses and have been since the 1800’s is quite simply the level of support they offer over a long period of time. Good support will improve posture and help prevent and relieve pain in the foot, ankle, knee and lower back. Any nurse will tell you that it is not uncommon to stand continuously for a 12-hour shift. At this point you have to appreciate the fact that the pair of shoes that are comfortable for a short period of time are unlikely to be the pair that is comfortable for a prolonged period of time. For a short period of time, the more cushioned a pair of shoes is, the more comfortable they are likely to feel, akin to lying on a very soft bed. This unfortunately is very misleading, because there is no correlation between initial comfort and the support provided. As soft shoes are in good all-over contact with the skin, it is very hard to tell if they are providing the necessary support, whereas, if a firmer pair of shoes were to feel comfortable initially (which they must!) they are far more likely to be comfortable over a longer period of time because it is easier to feel where the support is being provided, and that you feel you need. You would have made a more informed decision. This is not to say that any firm pair of shoes that feels comfortable initially will be good for 12 hours, and this is where you have to have a certain amount of trust in the research that brands put in to their footwear. In general, clogs offer superior support over shoes and trainers, and the major clog brands have been studying the anatomy of the feet for generations. They have specifically developed their work ranges, using both consumer feedback as well as medical facts.

Safety The most obvious thing about clogs is that they have no laces. This prevents tripping over one’s own feet or indeed getting caught on equipment. The lack of laces and any upper fastening also minimises pain from concentrated pressure on the foot. The smooth uncomplicated uppers make for easy cleaning. Infection control is an important factor in any healthcare environment. Clogs have closed toes. This prevents injury from falling objects and from sharp instruments, which in the case of used syringes and blades could pose risk beyond injury.


Work clogs have not been designed primarily for fashion. They are usually designed with a large and stable sole unit for maximum contact with the ground. This is also commonly combined with an anti-slip resistant sole material or sole-inserts to maximise slip resistance. Many other safety technologies are installed in modern clogs, such as composite safety toe caps, and antistatic technology. Antistatic technology will earth the charge that can build up in one’s body, reducing the risk of sparks or interference with electrical equipment.

Wellbeing This is the product of wearing footwear that is both supportive and safe. If you are wearing a pair of clogs that is giving you the correct support, you will not be focusing on aches and pains, which in turn will improve your focus on tasks. Experiencing less pain and achieving greater output will reduce levels of stress. Knowing that you are safe at work is reassuring for any one. Safety features such as antistatic technology is proven to reduce stress by removing electrical charge from the body (we all carry more charge in the modern world due to less contact with the earth). Less slips, falls and injuries will reduce time off work, or working with injury. Removing all of these issues will result in making a person more positive. Nurses spend their working lives looking after the health of others and as a result often neglect their own health. Take stock. This can begin by simply paying attention to your feet and buying good footwear. If you are currently looking to buy a pair of clogs yourself, you will hopefully find the information above useful. Please combine this information with what you know about your own feet, as no one knows your feet better than you! If you are to conduct your own market research amongst friends, be sure to ask a good number of people, because everyone’s feet are different and we will all have different experiences!

CRAFTING OF THE WOODEN SHOES http://www.lundehund.nl/klompenmaken/ch9_e.html

PRINTS shoe rack: Their beauty & craftsmanship have made klompens an endearing Dutch icon. Nearly three million pairs of klompens are manufactured every year Photos by the writer

Like windmills, cheese and tulips, brightly painted, kitschy clogs called klompen, which stand tall in front of shops and people carry as souvenirs on key chains, have always reminded one of this low-lying country. Their beauty and craftsmanship have made these an endearing Dutch icon.The oldest clog that has ever been found in the Netherlands has been dated by universities to around 1250 AD. So the history of the Dutch clog goes back a millennium.


Of course, common people don’t wear these anymore. But still in the rural areas, it’s a wardrobe staple for farmers for practical reasons — the country is built on reclaimed, marshy land, and you need footwear with a grip to walk on the fields. According to the guide, wooden shoes are also used by gardeners, farmers, blacksmiths, fishermen, and road workers, who have to work in wet or difficult terrain. “These are used by Dutch workers in industry, farming or fishing. These shoes are perfect for wet environment as these absorb perspiration and keep the feet comfortable in warm or cold weather,” he adds. Why klompen? The wooden shoe was inexpensive, protective, dry, and healthy for the foot. In the rural areas of the Netherlands where peat was collected for fuel, special peat clogs with a flat sole, were worn which were adapted to the boggy ground. These kept you safe from hard hooves, and if one broke, it could be replaced in a minute! Stuffed often with straw, these kept you pleasantly warm in squelching mud. It was also adaptable — there were special versions to wear on ice, in the garden. Farmers in the Netherlands still wear clogs, as the footwear has passed every modern safety test set by the European Union, faring better than even steel-reinforced work shoes. To get a window into this ancient craft, here’s an account of a visit to the Koijjman Clog Musuem at ZaanseSchans outside Amsterdam, where an entire village with ancient windmills has been meticulously re-created. Jaap and Ineke Kooijman out of their passion for all things Dutch started this museum to preserve this unique Dutch heritage of crafting shoes out for wood. Until the Middle Ages, most people walked barefoot. Shoes were out of reach for most people; it was the preserve of the aristocratic! The first wooden shoes consisted of a wooden bottom and a leather top that was hammered on to the wooden base. The wood that was chosen to craft clogs was usually poplar, willow, or ash. However, the farmers and labourers required more protection. The clog makers then decided to make the entire shoe out of wood to protect the wearer’s entire foot. In the middle ages, the wooden sandal developed into the “pattern”or “platijnen”. The “pattern” served as overshoe in which a thin slipper was worn. The equipment for carving a shoe is still very basic and simple. A block of wood and three special scooped chisels/drills are used to hollow out the foot opening. Making the footwear by hand is a trade that is fast dying out.


The tourist clog that can be bought in many a Dutch souvenir shop differs vastly in fit to “real” klompen still worn today on farms, docks etc as proper working shoes. People who work in klompen have appointments with the makers who custom fits the inside of the clog so that it fits the wearer perfectly, unlike the tourist “one size fits all” version. Each Dutch region or village used to have its own clog makers with their own recognisable shape of clogs. From ‘horse clogs,’ which the horses wore so that they could make their way across the bog, to extra-strong clogs for stoneworkers and dyke workers. In severe winters, the soles of the clogs were fitted with iron studs to give them more grip on the ice. Pointy-toed Fisherman’s clogs used to help hook fishing nets onto boats. One could find church clogs dating to 1675, from Hindeloopen. These wooden shoes are about 300 years old, decorated with Biblical images. Clogs also became artistic expressions. Dutch artist Van Buuren has been working on his clog project for decades. Some of his unusual creations are on permanent display in the museum. One can also find collection of wooden shoes from around the whole world. Japanese wooden clogs, and Finnish clogs with a reversed swastika denoting prosperity! The Dutch have a sense of humour and this is also reflected in their klompen… from mimicking leather shoes to the rather unsteady looking high-heeled clog and clogs re-interpreted as beer holders, plant holders, musical instruments, and even as bird houses. [4:23 PM, 9/9/2018] Prerna: Aside from creating the famous clog shapes, clog manufacturers tend to paint clogs in a traditional yellow colour. The paint will make the clogs last longer. On the front of the shoe a red pattern is painted, which used to signal where a person was from, much like an emblem. Villages used to each have their own patterns. Why choose yellow wooden shoes? As stated in the introduction to this blog entry have to be not always blank wooden shoes or clogs that have a darker color, on the contrary. When the spring and especially the summer arrives choose people anyhow also to omit them for the dark clothing during the gray winter months? The brightly colored dresses for women diving back while the men bring their distinctive pants out of the closet upstairs. By fun, combining colorful clothes with yellow wooden shoes is ensured in any case that there is a lovely, summery outfit that many people will undoubtedly appreciate.


Clogs from the Netherlands were originally painted in yellow, often with a painted pattern. Formerly bore the Dutch farmer or worker yellow lacquered specimens when he went to work. On Sunday, these were swapped for black clogs, while their women exchanged natural clogs for specimens with a cheerful motif. Are you looking for traditional clogs, then you are good to the Dutch Clog Shop. We have the most beautiful Dutch clogs selected for you. These are available in yellow painted or varnished ones, but also in many other colors and prints. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/the-clog-museum-zaandamnetherlands (CLOG MESEUM) WORN BY MANY Klompen, or wooden shoes, are a well-known Dutch tradition, much like tulips and windmills. Exactly when the first wooden shoes were created and by who is a mystery, and will more than likely remain so forever. The oldest wooden shoe ever found was discovered in Amsterdam in 1979 and dates all the way back to 1230 AD. The first actual guild of clog craftsman in Holland was founded around 1570. Prior to the 16th century, most people wore no shoes at all. Shoes were expensive and worn only by the rich to protect their feet and prove that they could afford such a luxury. Hence came about Klompen, a shoe made of wood that was a cheaper, safer alternative to handstitched leather shoes. The early versions of wooden shoes featured wooden soles and leather tops, however eventually the entire shoe was made of wood to better protect feet, as many people who wore them were fisherman, farmers, and factory workers. Wood shoes offered a barrier from dangers such as fishing hooks, nails, and other sharp objects tradesman came in contact with on a daily basis. Klompen are a symbol of Holland that Dutch people are slowly moving away from. Farmers, gardeners, tradesmen, and fishermen in the countryside make up the majority of Dutch people who still wear the traditional wooden clogs nowadays. Most people that purchase wooden shoes today are tourists. Travelers who visit Holland want to take home something ‘typically Dutch,’ and with today’s airline regulations, Klompen is easier to transport than cheese and tulips. There are doctors that claim that the typical wooden shoe is healthier for people to wear than shoes worn today. One reason is that the clogs act as an air conditioner for your feet! The wood absorbs perspiration, which keeps feet nice and dry (great for local Dutch farmers who walk around in mud all day!). Klompen are even safer than steel-toed boots in most settings. They crack instead of dent when struck by an object which protects the foot and allows easy foot removal from the damaged clog. Watch out for splinters though! Interesting Facts about Klompen: 1. While most wooden shoes are now made by machines in factories, it used to take 3 hours to make one pair of shoes by hand! 2. As a custom, young Dutch men used to present their fiancées with new wooden shoes as an engagement gift. 3. Klompendanskunst, or Dutch clogging, features a lighter wooden shoe made especially for this type of dance, which involves dancers creating a rhythm by tapping their toes and heels on a wooden floor. The soles for this special type of shoe are made of ash wood, and often taps are attached to both toe and heel to create a more prominent sound.


4. Every year in June, The American Baseball Foundation of the Hague sponsors an American-style baseball game where both teams play in clogs!

WOODEN SHOES Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Pattens (wooden overshoes) and Pantoffles

By the 14th century poulaines (long toes shoes) were protected by wooden overshoes called pattens. These safeguarded the delicate materials preventing mud and water from destroying the materials they were made from.


In Spain during the Spanish Renaissance the pantoffle, a cross between the wooden soled clog and the patten overshoe, became popular. The wedged mule footwear consisted of a wooden sole with a soft leather or fabric upper. Pantoffles were popular and worn by the women of the court usually in platform style. The pantoffle crossed over into mainstream fashion more readily than the traditional wooden clog which remained very much footwear of the peasantry.

The early settlers to Brisbane (circa 1824) were known to embark from their ship wearing fashionable small patten overshoes to protect their shoes. ‘


A brief history of Clogs

Clogs or wooden shoes have a long social history which has association with shoes of the peasantry. Cheap, durable and made from available wood, clogs were commonplace from Scandinavia to France and Northern England. The all wooden shoe was made from a single block of wood and were called different names in different countries e.g. Klomp (Netherlands), Klompen (German) and Sabots (France).


George Beau Brummell (1778-1840) was an outspoken critic of clogs and according to a biographer publicly condemned them. In private the bella figure occasionally wore a pair of clogs.

The design of Swedish clogs differs from the shoe type traditionally seen elsewhere. It consists of a backless shoe with a wooden sole. This design is closest to the older patten style and ironically remains the most popular design of modern clogs.


The traditional wooden clog is still worn on ceremonial occasions and at traditional dancing events but sadly the number of craftsmen able to make clogs has significantly reduced.

HOLLAND COLORS

When you consider Dutch culture, you can’t help but think about dikes, windmills, wooden shoes and tulips. They seem cliché, but these classic icons intertwine with the region’s geography and history. Much of the country is below sea level, reclaimed with great effort over many generations from the North Sea. That’s why the Dutch people like to say, “God made the world, but we made Holland.” This land is so small and flat that the Dutch claim if you stand on a chair, you can see all across their country. (To test this theory during one visit, I borrowed a chair from a


farmer, and you really can see for miles!) This polder land — flat land reclaimed from the sea — is the source of several Dutch icons, beginning with wooden shoes that allowed farmers to walk across soggy fields. (They’re also easy to find should they come off in high water, because they float.) The Dutch employed hundreds of miles of dams and mighty barriers, or dikes, to protect their farms and communities from flooding. To pump out all that water, they used one of their leading natural resources: the wind. Windmills drained salt marshes and the Zuiderzee (the shallow bay in the northwest) one section at a time. What had once been fishing villages on little islands — like Schokland — are now high and dry mounds rising above fertile farmland. Featured Video Artifacts of Injustice (2:38) Most Read Life Stories • • • • •

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The Dutch have been using windmills for centuries. Over a thousand survive, and many still work. Get a map and rent a bike (or take a bike tour), and you’ll find mills just outside the capital city of Amsterdam. You can visit a windmill for a few euros, and sometimes even get a peek at the clever engine inside that powered this land’s creation. Once, while climbing into a working windmill during a strong wind, I felt the wonder and excitement industrious people must have felt a thousand years ago when the technology to


harness wind and water power with mills helped Europe come out of the Dark Ages. Keeping this country dry is a constant battle. And with climate change and rising sea levels now a reality, the work is that much harder and more expensive. Famous for both their frugality and their foresight, the Dutch are investing billions of euros as climate change makes its costly impact felt on sea-level communities here and around the globe. It’s pretty easy to tell where the sea level was around here. If you scoop up a handful of dirt in polder country, it may come with some seashells. At first the salty seabed soil is barren, but with a mix of rain, sunshine, and clever crop rotation, it eventually becomes extremely fertile. Like magic, the Dutch have turned tidal flats into fields of flowers — another thing the country is famous for. If you visit between mid-March and midMay, a trip to Keukenhof is essential. This 80-acre park is the greatest bulb-flower garden on earth — with more than seven million blooming bulbs and 800 tulip varieties. It’s just half an hour south of Amsterdam and well connected by public transport — but come early to avoid the crowds. I’m not one who’s really into flowers, but when you arrive at Keukenhof and see all the gorgeous, colorful blooms, you appreciate just a little bit of what tulip mania is all about. While Keukenhof is open only in the spring, any time of year you can see the Aalsmeer flower auction — the world’s biggest flowertrading center — located not far from Amsterdam’s airport. I always visit the cavernous building at its 7 a.m. opening to catch this beehive at its busiest. To get the


flowers out as fresh as possible, everything happens fast, including the bidding. A “Dutch auction” means that prices start high and tick down; buyers push a button when the auction clock — projected on huge screens — hits a price they’re willing to pay. Trainloads of flowers roll through the hall, while outside, a Keystone-Cops commotion of delivery cars makes sure all the flowers get to their locations that same day — anywhere in Europe. Trolling the fragrant catwalk, it’s fun to peer down on the operations. Up along the ceiling, suspended orange trams zip loads of flowers to the distribution center across the street, far more quickly and efficiently than trucks. Workers scramble to get each buyer’s purchase assembled and shipped out. Every day from this building, millions of flowers are sent — including Holland’s iconic tulips — destined to make someone’s day. It’s just a story, and an American story at that, the imaginary creation of an American author who never set foot on Dutch soil. Still, the picture is real. That fictitious little boy up there on the dike really does live in the hearts of generations of children who have imagined him up there, shivering through the night. Through him, we have learned just a tiny bit of the story of Holland’s courageous stand against the sea. It’s true that most of Holland’s windmills have been replaced by modern electrical pumps, but the landscape of modern Holland is sprinkled with 950 remaining windmills, many of which are working mills. Though you will surely be inspired by the dramatic landscapes of the Kinderdijk or Zaanse Schans, you don’t have to go far from our Dutch Untour homebase to see windmills. There are two right in Leiden. Step inside De Valk, Leiden’s museum in a windmill, and you’ll begin to understand why the Dutch speak so reverently of their mills. Not only does tulip season last a mere couple of months, but most of Holland’s flowering bulbs are grown for what’s beneath the ground, their blossoms clipped in mid-bloom to better nourish the bulb below. To be sure, a field of tulips in spring might give you a whole new perspective on the color red, but you don’t have to visit in the spring to see that flowers are a part of everyday life in Holland. The wooden shoes of Holland are bearers of age old tradition. The wooden shoes here have been crafted by artisans who have learnt this art from their forefathers. Modern technology has brought different kinds of shoes into the market yet the wooden shoes, also known as clogs, and has kept its fort. There are many designs that have faded out and are seen only in the museum but the farmer yellow wooden shoe is still very popular in Holland. This is very


meticulously manufactured at Cloggieshop and is one of the most popular shoes on sale in this shop. This shoe which gives complete protection to the feet is painted bright yellow and can attract any passer-by. Along with the paint some native prints of Holland is also seen on the shoe. These are mostly line drawing to form some geometric shapes. The black and red lines stand on the yellow background. These shoes can be a pride possession of anyone. Farmers and industrial workers find these shoes useful as it keeps their feet warm in winter and cool in summer. This shoe is called farmer shoe as it is most suited for the farmers of the swampy land of Holland.

History of the Windmills Located in one of the world’s oldest industrial areas in a neighborhood of Zaandam not far fromAmsterdam, there are only 17 windmills that remain from the 1000 that had been built during the 18th and 19th centuries. Originally, these windmills were created to help keep the settler’s feet dry but over time, the windmills were turned into industrial machines which pumped out barley, rice, paper, wood, cooking oil, mustard, tobacco, hemp and even paint! The Zaanse Schans was originally built as a fortification during the fight against the Spanish for Dutch Independence during the Eighty Year’s War. Between 1961 and 1974, many of the historic houses and windmills were relocated here and today is one of the major tourist destinations in the Netherlands. The museums and windmills depict early Dutch life, a time long gone. With its picturesque windmills and traditional houses, its no wonder why this is a popular tourist hot spot.

MORE ABOUT CLOG Bradford on Avon Museum, Wiltshire . Cordwainers made boots, shoes and other articles from leather and are named after the Spanish city of Córdoba, which was famed for its leather workers. Generally they just referred to themselves as boot and shoe makers. Cobblers were people who repaired footwear. .. Click on the thumbnail picture for a bigger view.

A pair of clogs that were used by a pupil of Christ Church School in the 1940s for working on the school’s allotment garden at Sladesbrook. They have leather uppers and wooden soles, with a band of wrought iron, like a horse shoe, around the edges.


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At a time before roads were surfaced, they would easily become muddy. Pattens -overshoes that were raised on a wooden or iron frame- were used to keep shoes clean. This is the wrought iron base of a patten found in Bearfield, Bradford; the three studs (one at the front, two at the back) were rivets that fastened the wooden sole. The wearer’s shoe would be held in place by a leather strap. .

An advertisement from a booklet celebrating the coronation of King George V in 1911. Mark Uncles (1851-1916) took over the business of George Gore on the corner of Market Street and Silver Street in about 1888. In 1934 his son Rowland moved to bigger premises at 33 Market Street. Uncles & Son later bought the shop of A.C. Dodge in Silver Street as well as others in Corsham and Bath. The business was sold in 1975, but continued to trade under the same name until it closed in 1987. A number of items from the shop came to the Museum. .

A bill from John Collett, for making and repairs to the shoes of the family of John Harding jr of Holt over the years 1860 to 1863. Accounts with traders were usually settled on a quarterly or annual basis. .


PICTURES MOOD BOARD

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I wanted to show nature and the different texture of nature in my mood boars, as the shoes was made up of wood also the prints of the Dutch clog was related to flower and bright colors.


Pictures of clogs


Wooden clogs are heavy work shoes that were typically worn by French and Dutch peasants up through the beginning of the twentieth century. Known in French as sabots, and in Dutch as klompen, these sturdy shoes protected the feet of agricultural workers from mud and wet and from injury by the sharp tools used in the field. French clogs were often made from a combination of wood and leather. However, the classic Dutch clog is entirely wooden. Wooden clogs are naturally highly water resistant, and therefore they were especially useful in the marshy fields of the Netherlands. Farm workers also wore specially decorated wooden clogs to church and on holidays. In World War I, entrenched soldiers wore wood and leather clogs called sabotines. Up through this time, clogs were typically made by hand. Later, industrialization made leather and rubber shoes more readily available, and wooden clogs became less wide-spread. However wooden clogs are still worn by Dutch farm workers, and also by Dutch fishermen and steel factory workers. Clogs made a resurgence in the 1960s across Europe and North America, not as a work shoe but as fashion. They are still popular in the 1990s. These modern clogs are usually a leather shoe attached to a wood sole. Clogs made entirely from rubber are also popular as gardening shoes.

Raw Materials Wooden clogs are usually made from one of three kinds of wood: European willow, yellow poplar, or tulip poplar. These woods are all hard and water resistant. After the lumber is cut, it is not treated in any way, but made into shoes as soon after felling as is practical. No other material is necessary to make wooden clogs, though some shoes are varnished or decorated with paint.

The Manufacturing Process Wooden clogs were traditionally made entirely by hand, either by their wearers or by specialized artisans. The shoes were roughly carved on the outside, then clamped into a bench that held them vertically, toe down. Then the artisan scooped them out with a long-handled tool. Less than a hundred years ago, a wooden clog factory might consist of dozens of workers making shoes in this same manner, by hand. The introduction of automated machines sped up the process, though machines still required attentive operators.

Making the blanks •

1 The willow or poplar trees are felled and sawn into logs. The logs are debarked, then fed into a saw, which cuts them into rough rectangular blocks. Each block, called a blank, will be formed into one shoe. The size of the block varies depending on what size shoe is to be made


out of it. For a men's size 8 shoe, the block might be 14.5 x 5.25 x 5.25 in (37 x 13.3 x 13.3 cm).

Shaping •

2 Two blanks are placed into a machine called a shaper (also known as a copier or duplicator). This shapes the outside of the shoes. Next to the blanks is a vinyl shoe, which is used as a pattern. Each shoe size has its own vinyl pattern, and the machine operator locks the appropriate pattern into

the shaper. A pointer is set to ride along the pattern shoe. Attached to the pointer are two electrically powered cutting tools. These are set to the right and left shoe blanks. The machine operator turns the power on, and carefully traces the outline of the pattern shoe with the tracer. The cutting tools follow the motion of the tracer, and carve out the out-line of the shoe. The two blanks rotate in opposite directions, allowing a left and a right shoe to be carved simultaneously.

Carving the interior •

3 Next, the carved blanks are placed in another machine called a dual action borer. This machine has a three-pronged cutting implement. The center prong is a tracer, and this goes inside another vinyl pattern shoe. The right and left prongs are set to the right and left shoe blanks. Their cutting ends are sharp-edged scoops similar to ice cream scoops or melon ballers. The operator holds a long metal rod attached to the tracer prong, and pushes this along the inside of the pattern shoe. The cutters follow the tracer's movement, and scoop out the wood blocks. This machine carves out the interior of the shoes to its approximate finished dimensions, leaving an extra 0.25 in (0.64 cm) of material all around.

Refining •

4 The shoes are placed in a similar machine called a refiner, which is in this case entirely automatic. Two cutters follow a pointer on a vinyl pattern and scoop out the inside of the shoes, trimming away the excess 0.25 in (0.64 cm) of material left by the previous step. The fine action of this machine leaves the interior of the shoes extremely smooth, and they need very little finishing after this point.

Drying •

5 The shoes are left to air-dry for four to six weeks. They may be simply placed in a dry storeroom, or they may set in a low temperature


furnace, which circulates warm dry air around them. As they cure, moisture is drawn out of the wood, and the shoes harden.

Finishing •

6 After the shoes are completely dry, workers sand them lightly inside and out. At this point the shoes are completely finished and ready to wear. If the shoes are to be decorated, they are painted or varnished after sanding.

Where to Learn More Books Rowland, Della. A World of Shoes. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 1989. Once sanded, the wooden clogs are decorated and then varnished.

Yue, Charlotte. Shoes: Their History in Words and Pictures. New York: Houghton-Mifflin, 1997.

Periodicals Chargot, Patricia. "Clompin' Around." Detroit Free Press (March 23, 1998). Kuniholm, Erin. "Going Dutch: Wearing Clogs Is the Next Best Thing to Going Barefoot." Women's Sports and Fitness (October 1997): 82-84. — Angela Woodward Clogs are, at their simplest, shoes made partially from or completely out of wood. Although they’re often associated with the Netherlands, other countries also have their own versions of the clog, from Britain to Sweden (träksor), to Japan (get a, a cross between clogs and flip flops). Clogs have evolved from a practical work shoe to a fashion staple, but how did this happen? This post will take a look at the rich history of clogs and how they have evolved.

When were they worn?


Traditionally clogs were worn as protection by people working in agriculture, since they were good for walking on muddy ground. They were also favoured by fishermen and labourers, and a person’s profession dictated the shape of clog they would wear. Fishermen, for example, wore clogs with pointed toes to help pull their nets in. In Britain, clogs first became popular during the Industrial Revolution, when factory workers needed cheap footwear that was easy to produce. In the steel industry, a worker could get through four pairs of clogs every day and many factories employed someone to make replacements (or at the very least re-sole any worn-out shoes). However, clogs fell out of favour in Britain in the 1930s, when massproduced shoes and boots became more affordable.

How are clogs made?

The process undertaken to make clogs requires great craftsmanship: • A tree trunk is sliced with a pull saw • The slice is split and shaped with a small axe • The outside of the clog is smoothed with a knife • Any wood on the inside of each clog is scooped out • The clogs are left to dry for approximately three weeks The Last Clog Maker in England talks through this process step-by-step. Historically, it would take around 3-4 hours to make one pair of clogs. Once they had worn out they would be used to fuel the fireplace.

What are clogs made from? In the past, clogs were made by hand, with every town in the Netherlands having their own clog maker. Materials used were based primarily on how available it was to use and whether it suited the purpose.


Wood became the ideal material for clog-making: it lasts for a long time, doesn’t hold moisture, and insulates feet from the ground. However, clogs could not (and cannot) be made from any old wood — it must be easy to work with, resist splitting, and avoid leaving any splinters in the skin. It also needs to be wet when cut due to the curved edge style of the clog. Popular types of wood used for clog making include alder, poplar, and willow. Nowadays, clogs are made by machine instead. They’re still worn in rural parts of the Netherlands and the EU has certified Dutch clogs (klompen) as safety shoes as they can withstand heavy or sharp objects and acid spills.

Contemporary Clogs CLOGS IN FASHION As mentioned above, clogs were once mostly considered to be a practical work shoe, but this is no longer the case; they are now championed for being versatile and stylish. Vogue magazine, impressed by the practicality offered by the clog, described it as “easiest switch-up for just a hint of bohemia in your everyday look.” What’s more, they pointed to a photograph of the everfashionable supermodel Kate Moss styling clogs. Nowadays clogs are more likely to be made in the British or Swedish style, with a wooden sole and an upper made of material like leather or suede (as opposed to the all-wooden Dutch version). Some designs are simple, others — particularly those made for women — are adorned with straps, studs, and buckles. The height of the heel varies, though it’s always solid. • Haflinger - Torben Grizzly Graphit PRACTICAL CLOGS From its agricultural, rustic origins, the clog has transformed itself into an icon of contemporary bohemian style. Perhaps most appropriately,


however, is that it remains a staple of many industries; its ease and versatility, as well as the protection it offers, makes it valuable for an array of professions. It’s essential for professional clogs to be super-comfortable and very durable; the industries in which they are worn tend to be ones that require their wearers to be stood for great lengths of time. The main industries in which they are found are catering, medical and leisure, though it’s not uncommon to find them elsewhere. Clogs are a staple especially within the kitchen and in health care. Their breathability makes them ideal for chefs in the heat of the kitchen. What’s more, their waterproofing stops them from hindering workers through spillages. Finally, toughened rubber protects against falling utensils. Similarly, health care professionals from doctors to nurses turn to clogs in order to avoid slips when at work, whilst remaining comfortable throughout long shifts. The kind of clogs nurses wear need to be anti-static and waterproof, which maintaining support throughout the day.


Clogs are carved wooden shoes that were traditionally worn by both male and female peasantry throughout Europe since the shoes originated in the early 1300s. Wooden clog shoes were designed as a practical covering for the foot that provided protection and comfort against harsh elements. Throughout history they were traditionally worn by the peasant classes, but by the twentieth century they evolved into fashionable footwear.

Places of Origin Wooden clogs originated in Holland, eventually spreading to France, England and Scandinavia. The clog shoe became the most common work shoe in Europe throughout the Industrial Revolution era. Clog shoes were derived from "calceus" shoes, wooden-soled shoes that existed during the Roman empire. Calceus shoes had wooden soles and leather straps that wrapped over the top of the foot. The design of the wooden clog evolved from the demand for an enclosed shoe that would protect the feet from the wet and cold elements.

Shoes of Peasants Both male and female members of the peasant classes wore clogs throughout history for warmth and protection. The strong support offered by clogs made them an ideal choice of shoes for miners, farmers and construction workers. Wooden clog shoes were considered more utilitarian than fashionable, being worn for their comfort for working in fields and for labor-intensive jobs and activities. They protected the feet in extreme climates. Throughout the early history of wooden clogs, members of nobility would not wear wooden clogs because they were associated with the garments worn by peasants.

How Clogs Were Made Craftsman who specialized in the making of clogs were referred to as "bodgers." Balsa, alder, willow, beech and sycamore woods were favored by these craftsmen for creating clogs because these woods did not split easily. Traditional clogs were made from a square block of wood. The wood was wet down, axed and smoothed into shape. The shoes were stacked to allow for thorough drying. They were then painted, usually with a variety of patterns. Many villages had their own patterns and designs for clogs, and the styles of shoe varied throughout different areas of Europe.


Evolution of the Clog Clogs make a characteristic clicking sound when walking, and it was this unique rhythm that inspired clog dancing during the Victorian era in England. Clog dancing eventually made its way to the United States during the eighteenth century, and wooden clog shoes inspired the creation of modern tap dance shoes. Throughout the late twentieth century in Europe and the United States, clogs became very fashionable. Modern clogs borrow the styles of traditional clogs with wooden soles, with new materials such as leather and cloth used for the structure of the shoes. Clogs, those wooden shoes you can often find tiny versions of on key rings or as ornaments in gift shops. They are a typical symbol for the Netherlands, but are they Dutch, and how did they come about?

What are clogs? Firstly, let’s get any confusion out of the way. Clogs are footwear, which are in whole or part made from wood. Whilst we might think of clogs as those wooden shoes that cover your whole foot, many other types of wooden shoes fall under the same category, for example, the Japanese Geta or the Cantabrian albarcas from Spain. We are going to focus on the Dutch version - the one that practically covers your whole foot.

When were clogs discovered? It is not clear when clogs first took shape; however, the first clogs found in the Netherlands date back to 1230 AD, and were found in Nieuwendijk, Amsterdam. These clogs were made from alder wood. Originally, clogs were made out of one piece of wood and proved handy for protecting your feet against the dirt and ground. They took their inspiration from “calceus” shoes, which were worn in the days of the Roman Empire. These shoes had a wooden sole, leather straps on top and resembled sandals. The clog changed its form to adapt to the harsher weather in the Netherlands. The craftsmen who made these clogs were called “bodgers”; “bodging” being a traditional woodturning craft. Alder, balsa, willow, beech and sycamore were the preferred wood types of these craftsmen, as they did not split easily.


Who wore clogs? Clogs were worn by both men and women and became the ideal choice for those working in the mines, on the farms and in construction, as they provided support, warmth and protection without needing to be reinforced. The clog is even certified as a safety shoe by the European Union! Villages had their own “bodger” and this resulted in different styles of clog and decoration for every village. When shoemaking became industrialised, the manufacture of wooden shoes experienced a decline. This picked up briefly in the World Wars when materials for shoes became scarce and wooden shoes were the perfect alternative. Today, wooden clogs are still worn in farming regions; however, many tend to wear modern shoes. Clogs didn’t stop being useful when they were worn out or rotten. When this was the case, they were used to fuel the fireplace.

What are clogs? We get to know the different styles of shoe fashion from a different period or another country. Wooden shoes also known simply as ‘clogs’ were originally handmade from wood coming from the trees of alder, sycamore, poplar or willow plant. This classic footwear was once made with wooden sole and leather strap till it came to be made of wood alone and was worn to protect the feet. It was originally used as ‘working shoes’ of farmers and miners and have come a long way to becoming a fashionable item on the fashion runway. Variations of the clogs were mainly overshoes with wooden uppers and wooden soles with wooden soled clogs as the most typical among the three.

History of clogs Though no one knows for sure the true origin of wooden shoes, they were believed to have started during the Middle Ages in Old Europe with the oldest found at Amsterdam dating as far back as 1230. Back at those times, clogs or ‘klompen’ as they were called by the Dutch, were originally made of alder and was a common necessity among farmers and miners and those doing heavy labor to protect their whole feet. This footwear was greatly favored by the working class as it fit the Dutch climate aside from the protection and comfort it offered. t was also a customary practice then for men to present a pair of carved wooden shoes to their fiancées. Soon these wooden shoes became part of the traditional Dutch costume for ‘Klompendanskunst’ or ‘Clog Dancing’. In some European countries, they also have their own traditional version of clogs like ‘sabot’ in France, ‘klumpe’ in Lithuania, ‘zoccolo (calzatura)’ in Italy, ‘tamanco’ in Portugal among others. These varieties of customary wooden shoes were also used in Asian countries like the ‘geta’ from Japan, ‘paduka’ from India, ‘namaksin’ from Korea and ‘bakya’ in the Philippines to name a few.


From a soldier’s gear to a decorative footwear By the advent of World War I, clogs became part of the combat gear among soldiers as they passed through the vast European terrains. However, the Industrial Age and mass production caused by the invention of machines soon favored leather and synthetic made shoes over clogs. They were soon soon no longer widely worn and by World War II there were primarily used for traditional decorative use.

The evolution of clogs as a fashion accessory Fast forward, clogs resurfaced by the 1960’s as a stylish accessory worn without socks by men. It was the Swedish styled clogs that became popular to both sexes which were made in different materials and colors retaining only the wooden sole. By the 80’s and 90’s it became a mainstay in fashion as new materials and accessories were incorporated to make them more comfortable and practical than the ‘old wooden shoe’. Clogs began to incorporate materials such as leather, rubber, fur, wool, or rhinestones with different designs ranging from platform styled clogs that reaches 6 to 8 cm high to open-toe or closed back versions with straps or strings. Every now and then, clogs were also seen on fashion runways as accessories for designers such as Chanel and Louis Vuitton propelling it into the world of fashion. https://www.metmuseum.org/search-results#!/search?q=clogs

TYPES https://www.metmuseum.org/search-results#!/search?q=clogs https://artsandculture.google.com/search?q=clogs

Crossword Answers:type of clogs RANK

ANSWER

CLUE

SABOT

Type of clog

UNSTOP

Clear of clogs

SOLES

Wood parts of clogs

DRANO

Brand of clog remover

DECAGON

Angular figure ruined second half of clog dance

STEELTOE

Component of some clogs

KNOW ALL

Clever clogs is King of Berlin since 1989? (4-3)

CLOSES

Clogs

CRAMPS

Clogs

DIRTIES

Clogs

OVERSUPPLIES

Clogs


OCCLUDES

Clogs

SNAGS

Clogs

RETARDS

Clogs

IMPEDANCES

Clogs

TIES

Clogs

RESTRICTS

Clogs

SEALES

Clogs

BLOCKAGES

Clogs

HOBBLES

Clogs

CONFUSES

Clogs

1. 1. Picking From Among the Different Clog Types - The Shoes for Every Occasion 2. 2. Introducti on CLOGS ARE FOOTWEAR THAT ARE MADE PARTLY OR COMPLETELY OF WOOD. THEY ARE WORN BY BOTH MEN AND WOMEN. CLOGS ARE AVAILABLE IN NUMEROUS DESIGNS AND COLORS. 3. 3. Popular Colors BLACK CLOGS FOR WOMEN ARE THE BEST-SELLING CLOGS IN THE WORLD. THEY ARE USUALLY MADE OF LEATHER UPPERS AND ARE AVAILABLE FOR MEN TOO. OTHER POPULAR COLORS ARE WHITE AND BROWN. 4. 4. Clogs for Different Occasions CLOGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR EACH AND EVERY OCCASION. THEY DIFFER MOSTLY IN STYLE AND THE MATERIALS USED. THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS DESCRIBE THE 5 COMMON TYPES OF WOMEN’S CLOGS. 5. 5. THESE CLOGS FALL BETWEEN PROFESSIONAL AND CASUAL CLOGS. THEY ARE CHUNKY AS THEY USUALLY HAVE HIGH HEELS. THEY OFTEN INCLUDE EMBELLISHMENTS SUCH AS DECORATIVE JEWELS. Dressy Clogs 6. 6. Casual Clogs CASUAL CLOGS ARE ONE OF THE MOST COMMONLY AVAILABLE CLOGS. THEY HAVE RAISED BUT SHORT HEELS, AND CAN BE WORN INDOORS. CASUAL CLOGS HAVE UPPERS MADE OF INEXPENSIVE MATERIALS SUCH AS NYLON AND COTTON 7. 7. Professional ClogsBLACK CLOGS FOR WOMEN USUALLY FALL IN THIS CATEGORY. THEY ARE WORK SHOES FOR PROFESSIONALS LIKE CHEFS AND NURSES. THEY HAVE LOW HEELS AND ARE MORE COMFORTABLE THAN OTHER CLOGS. THEY ARE MADE OF LEATHER OR SYNTHETIC UPPERS. 8. 8. Rubber Clogs RUBBER CLOGS ARE EITHER MADE COMPLETELY OF RUBBER OR HAVE A WOODEN BASE. THEY ARE MADE TO BE WORN AROUND THE HOUSE AND FOR THINGS LIKE GARDENING. THEY ARE EASY TO WASH AND ARE VERY COMFORTABLE TO WEAR. 9. 9. Wooden Clogs THESE CLOGS ARE COMPLETELY MADE OF WOOD. THEY CAN EITHER BE CASUAL OR FORMAL IN THEIR DESIGNS. WOODEN CLOGS MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE HIGH HEELS.


https://www.slideshare.net/maguba/picking-from-among-the-different-clog-types-the-shoesfor-every-occasion (VIDEO LINK) http://www.fashionising.com/trends/b--clogs-4532.html

(WOMEN CLOGS)

WHY WALK ON CLOGS??

Why walk on wooden shoes? Have you ever wondered why someone would intentionally want to walk around in shoes that could give you a splinter? Nowadays wooden clogs are largely sold in the Netherlands as tourist souvenirs, only a few farmers will walk them regularly A clog is a type of footwear made in part or completely from wood. Clogs are used worldwide and although the form may vary by culture, within a culture the form often remained unchanged for centuries.

Early History The Dutch have been wearing wooden shoes, or clogs, or “Klompen� since medieval times. Originally, they were made with a wooden sole and a leather top or strap tacked to the wood. Eventually, the shoes began to be made entirely from wood to protect the whole foot. Originally, alder, willow and poplar woods were used. The first guild of clog makers dates back to around 1570 in Holland. Wooden shoe wearers claim the shoes are warm in winter, cool in summer and provide support for good posture. The wood also absorbs perspiration so that the foot can breathe.


Workers Footwear In Holland, wooden shoes are worn by farmers, fishermen, factory workers, artisans and others to protect their feet. Nails, fishing hooks and sharp implements that might pierce a regular boot will not go through a wooden shoe. On boats and docks and in muddy fields, wooden shoes also keep feet dry. For every profession the wooden shoe would be shaped differently. Fishermen had a sharp point on the nose, so the clogs could help sort out the fishing nets. If your work was to dig out peat, the bottom of the clog was a large square. This way your weight was better spread offer the soggy soil. The square was also the perfect size for digging out the peat blocks.

Design The working clogs where just blank, nothing special about them. For wear around house, church, weddings etcetera clogs were painted or carved. A regular painting would be yellow with some red and black on the top. Wooden clogs were poor man shoes. To make them look like the fancy leather shoes with laces the design on top often featured the laces and the lace holes. Each clog maker had is own design, it was his signature. Wooden shoes, as icons of Dutch culture, appear in customs such as the practice of young Dutch men presenting their fiancĂŠes with a pair of carved wooden shoes. Making clogs Every town or suburb used to have his own clog maker in The Netherlands. It would take 3-4 hours to make one pair of wooden shoes by hand. First with a pull saw you had to slice the tree trunk. Then the slice needed to be split and given the rough shape with a special small axe. With a sharp knife the clog maker would smooth the shape of the clog on the outside before scooping out the wood from the inside. Clog makers always work with wet wood as they have to make a lot of curves (dry wood would splinter). Drying of the carved clogs takes about 3 weeks and is done by the wind. Nowadays there are only 12 clog makers left in the whole of The Netherlands. Machines


are used to speed up to process. Clogs are still worn by a few people when working in the gardens or on farms.

Wooden Shoes & Clogs: the Flip Flops of the Middle Ages MAY 1, 2015 0 SHARES 0 COMMENTS

Clogs, or wooden shoes are one of those items that are a true symbol of Dutch culture. And they indeed make for fun souvenirs if you come and visit us, were it only for the fact that windmills are a bit harder to take back home. But did you know that the wooden shoe is really just an advanced middle aged flip flop?!

Wooden flip flops The history of the Dutch Clogs – in Holland known as klompen – goes back to the Middle Ages. In that time period many people wore sandals made out of a material truly abundant in the swampy area that is currently Holland: wood! The abundance of wood becomes very apparent once you know that the name Holland actually derives from Holt, meaning wood, Land.


So making sandals out of wood was pretty straightforward. A piece of wood, shaped in the form of a foot with a leather strap on the top made for some mean middle age flip flops.

Wooden shoes…or wooden flip flops Some clever mind then came up with the brilliant idea to create a more convenient and solid shoe. Extra wood was added under the sandals, an embankment at the heel was created and also the instep got a wooden enclosement. Basically it meant the entire foot got enclosed in wood to make the shoes sturdier, keep your feet warm in winter and cool in summer, but also to reduce the amount of contact with the muddy streets of those days. Initially this wooden ‘advanced flip flop’ was constructed out of several pieces of wood that got engineered together to form the wooden shoes.


Old wooden shoes assembled out of five individual pieces of wood

Rise to popularity of the Wooden Shoe The new type of wooden shoe became very popular in the fifteenth century not only in Holland but basically all over Europe. Among the peasantry, wooden shoes provided a cheap kind of footwear because of the durability and protection they offered their wearers. Wooden clogs provided a hard casing around the foot that did not break when trampled by farm animals or hit by heavy tools. In walking through wet or muddy areas, wooden clogs provided a waterproof form of foot


protection. In urban areas, wooden shoes protected feet from direct contact with street rubbish and waste. It was not before long that another revolutionary improvement to the wooden shoe was made. The wooden shoe makers started experimenting with the fabrication of a wooden shoe made out of one piece of wood. These were the first clogs or wooden shoes as we know them still today. The clog came in all shapes and sizes, usually with a pointed front form but later in the more familiar round shape.

Pointy wooden shoes


During weekdays most people would wear unpainted clogs. But for weekend church outings people would step it up one notch and most often wear black painted clogs with all sorts of motifs. There were also clogs with sharp metal points mounted under the sole with which one could walk on ice without slipping.

wooden shoes with cleats to walk the ice

Clog making as a skill Making a wooden shoe was a craft in itself. Clog makers were seen as highly skilled people enjoying a great reputation. Making wooden shoes was almost an artform and most of the ‘artists’ were members of the so-called clogs guild.


Wooden shoes are usually made of willow or popular (the tree) wood.

Contemporary Clogs: 3 Million pair a year Approximately 3 million pairs of Dutch clogs are produced each year. They are sold throughout the Netherlands. A large part of the market is for the tourist industry were clogs sell like hot cakes. Most of these clogs are painted yellow which is most often contributed to the colour of cheese.

Yellow wooden shoes in a Dutch tourist shop


They also make for a good addition to a traditional Dutch outfit during celebrations or other dress up occasions

Clogs have found their way in a whole lot other diverse uses. From boats, flower pots, wall decorations, playgrounds to comfy indoor house slippers.


comfy indoor slippers


wooden shoe boat cruising the Amsterdam canals


the wooden shoe flower pot


a wooden shoe playground


Colorful wall decoration

CE approved Safety Shoes However, the clog is still used as the preferred sturdy footwear on the Dutch countryside among farmers and gardeners. One of the reasons being that a solid wooden shoe has great protective features for the feet. The traditional all-wooden Dutch clogs have been officially accredited as safety shoes with the CE mark and can withstand almost any penetration including sharp objects and concentrated acids. They are actually safer than


steelcapped protective shoes in some circumstances, as the wood cracks rather than dents in extreme accidents, allowing easy removal of the clog and not continued pressure on the toes by the (edge of the) steel nose Regular clog wearer also swear it is the most comfortable footwear available, it just takes some time for your feet to get used to them.

Biggest Clog in the world Logically we, the Dutch, also had to create the biggest clog in the world. It can be found in a town named Enter in the Dutch province of Overijssel. The world’s biggest clog measures a whopping 4.03 meter long, 1.71 meter wide and 1.69 meter high. Since the 26th of June 1991 the clog got its official title as the world’s biggest by the Guinness Book of Records. The town of Enter has, apart from the biggest clog, also the second biggest clog and a clog museum.


Biggest Wooden shoe in the world made out of one piece of wood in Enter (Overrijssel)

Some Wooden Shoe Fun Facts The word ‘sabotage’ has a direct relation to the clog. The French word for clog is ‘sabot’ and employees who got fired because their boss had replaced them with a machine would throw their clogs in the machine to disrupt it. • The biggest wooden shoe factory in the world – Klompenfabriek Nijhuis BV is located in Beltrum, Holland. •


The International Wooden Shoe Museum is located in Eelde, Netherlands • There are two towns in Holland that are called De Klomp (the clog) • Crocs, the plastic/foam made colourful sandal shoes were derived as a modern version of the clog. • In 2011, the Ghanan King Nana Okrukata V received a pair of Dutch clogs from the Dutch Akwadaa foundation. He liked them so much that he immediately ordered 10.000 pairs for his policitcal party, the New Patriotic Party (NPP). •

WHY DO NURSES WEAR CLOGS?? Support The main reason that clogs are a popular choice of footwear for nurses and have been since the 1800’s is quite simply the level of support they offer over a long period of time. Good support will improve posture and help prevent and relieve pain in the foot, ankle, knee and lower back. Any nurse will tell you that it is not uncommon to stand continuously for a 12-hour shift. At this point you have to appreciate the fact that the pair of shoes that are comfortable for a short period of time are unlikely to be the pair that is comfortable for a prolonged period of time. For a short period of time, the more cushioned a pair of shoes is, the more comfortable they are likely to feel, akin to lying on a very soft bed. This unfortunately is very misleading, because there is no correlation between initial comfort and the support provided. As soft shoes are in good all-over contact with the skin, it is very hard to tell if they are providing the necessary support, whereas, if a firmer pair of shoes were to feel comfortable initially (which they must!) they are far more likely to be comfortable over a longer period of time because it is easier to feel where the support is being provided, and that you feel you need. You would have made a more informed decision. This is not to say that any firm pair of shoes that feels comfortable initially will be good for 12 hours, and this is where you have to have a certain amount of trust in the research that brands put in to their footwear. In general, clogs offer superior support over shoes and trainers, and the major clog brands have been studying the anatomy of the feet for generations. They have specifically developed their work ranges, using both consumer feedback as well as medical facts.

Safety The most obvious thing about clogs is that they have no laces. This prevents tripping over one’s own feet or indeed getting caught on equipment. The lack of laces and any upper fastening also minimises pain from concentrated pressure on the foot. The smooth uncomplicated uppers make for easy cleaning. Infection control is an important factor in any healthcare environment. Clogs have closed toes. This prevents injury from falling objects and from sharp instruments, which in the case of used syringes and blades could pose risk beyond injury.


Work clogs have not been designed primarily for fashion. They are usually designed with a large and stable sole unit for maximum contact with the ground. This is also commonly combined with an anti-slip resistant sole material or sole-inserts to maximise slip resistance. Many other safety technologies are installed in modern clogs, such as composite safety toe caps, and antistatic technology. Antistatic technology will earth the charge that can build up in one’s body, reducing the risk of sparks or interference with electrical equipment.

Wellbeing This is the product of wearing footwear that is both supportive and safe. If you are wearing a pair of clogs that is giving you the correct support, you will not be focusing on aches and pains, which in turn will improve your focus on tasks. Experiencing less pain and achieving greater output will reduce levels of stress. Knowing that you are safe at work is reassuring for any one. Safety features such as antistatic technology is proven to reduce stress by removing electrical charge from the body (we all carry more charge in the modern world due to less contact with the earth). Less slips, falls and injuries will reduce time off work, or working with injury. Removing all of these issues will result in making a person more positive. Nurses spend their working lives looking after the health of others and as a result often neglect their own health. Take stock. This can begin by simply paying attention to your feet and buying good footwear. If you are currently looking to buy a pair of clogs yourself, you will hopefully find the information above useful. Please combine this information with what you know about your own feet, as no one knows your feet better than you! If you are to conduct your own market research amongst friends, be sure to ask a good number of people, because everyone’s feet are different and we will all have different experiences!

CRAFTING OF THE WOODEN SHOES http://www.lundehund.nl/klompenmaken/ch9_e.html

PRINTS shoe rack: Their beauty & craftsmanship have made klompens an endearing Dutch icon. Nearly three million pairs of klompens are manufactured every year Photos by the writer

Like windmills, cheese and tulips, brightly painted, kitschy clogs called klompen, which stand tall in front of shops and people carry as souvenirs on key chains, have always reminded one of this low-lying country. Their beauty and craftsmanship have made these an endearing Dutch icon.The oldest clog that has ever been found in the Netherlands has been dated by universities to around 1250 AD. So the history of the Dutch clog goes back a millennium.


Of course, common people don’t wear these anymore. But still in the rural areas, it’s a wardrobe staple for farmers for practical reasons — the country is built on reclaimed, marshy land, and you need footwear with a grip to walk on the fields. According to the guide, wooden shoes are also used by gardeners, farmers, blacksmiths, fishermen, and road workers, who have to work in wet or difficult terrain. “These are used by Dutch workers in industry, farming or fishing. These shoes are perfect for wet environment as these absorb perspiration and keep the feet comfortable in warm or cold weather,” he adds. Why klompen? The wooden shoe was inexpensive, protective, dry, and healthy for the foot. In the rural areas of the Netherlands where peat was collected for fuel, special peat clogs with a flat sole, were worn which were adapted to the boggy ground. These kept you safe from hard hooves, and if one broke, it could be replaced in a minute! Stuffed often with straw, these kept you pleasantly warm in squelching mud. It was also adaptable — there were special versions to wear on ice, in the garden. Farmers in the Netherlands still wear clogs, as the footwear has passed every modern safety test set by the European Union, faring better than even steel-reinforced work shoes. To get a window into this ancient craft, here’s an account of a visit to the Koijjman Clog Musuem at ZaanseSchans outside Amsterdam, where an entire village with ancient windmills has been meticulously re-created. Jaap and Ineke Kooijman out of their passion for all things Dutch started this museum to preserve this unique Dutch heritage of crafting shoes out for wood. Until the Middle Ages, most people walked barefoot. Shoes were out of reach for most people; it was the preserve of the aristocratic! The first wooden shoes consisted of a wooden bottom and a leather top that was hammered on to the wooden base. The wood that was chosen to craft clogs was usually poplar, willow, or ash. However, the farmers and labourers required more protection. The clog makers then decided to make the entire shoe out of wood to protect the wearer’s entire foot. In the middle ages, the wooden sandal developed into the “pattern”or “platijnen”. The “pattern” served as overshoe in which a thin slipper was worn. The equipment for carving a shoe is still very basic and simple. A block of wood and three special scooped chisels/drills are used to hollow out the foot opening. Making the footwear by hand is a trade that is fast dying out.


The tourist clog that can be bought in many a Dutch souvenir shop differs vastly in fit to “real” klompen still worn today on farms, docks etc as proper working shoes. People who work in klompen have appointments with the makers who custom fits the inside of the clog so that it fits the wearer perfectly, unlike the tourist “one size fits all” version. Each Dutch region or village used to have its own clog makers with their own recognisable shape of clogs. From ‘horse clogs,’ which the horses wore so that they could make their way across the bog, to extra-strong clogs for stoneworkers and dyke workers. In severe winters, the soles of the clogs were fitted with iron studs to give them more grip on the ice. Pointy-toed Fisherman’s clogs used to help hook fishing nets onto boats. One could find church clogs dating to 1675, from Hindeloopen. These wooden shoes are about 300 years old, decorated with Biblical images. Clogs also became artistic expressions. Dutch artist Van Buuren has been working on his clog project for decades. Some of his unusual creations are on permanent display in the museum. One can also find collection of wooden shoes from around the whole world. Japanese wooden clogs, and Finnish clogs with a reversed swastika denoting prosperity! The Dutch have a sense of humour and this is also reflected in their klompen… from mimicking leather shoes to the rather unsteady looking high-heeled clog and clogs re-interpreted as beer holders, plant holders, musical instruments, and even as bird houses. [4:23 PM, 9/9/2018] Prerna: Aside from creating the famous clog shapes, clog manufacturers tend to paint clogs in a traditional yellow colour. The paint will make the clogs last longer. On the front of the shoe a red pattern is painted, which used to signal where a person was from, much like an emblem. Villages used to each have their own patterns. Why choose yellow wooden shoes? As stated in the introduction to this blog entry have to be not always blank wooden shoes or clogs that have a darker color, on the contrary. When the spring and especially the summer arrives choose people anyhow also to omit them for the dark clothing during the gray winter months? The brightly colored dresses for women diving back while the men bring their distinctive pants out of the closet upstairs. By fun, combining colorful clothes with yellow wooden shoes is ensured in any case that there is a lovely, summery outfit that many people will undoubtedly appreciate.


Clogs from the Netherlands were originally painted in yellow, often with a painted pattern. Formerly bore the Dutch farmer or worker yellow lacquered specimens when he went to work. On Sunday, these were swapped for black clogs, while their women exchanged natural clogs for specimens with a cheerful motif. Are you looking for traditional clogs, then you are good to the Dutch Clog Shop. We have the most beautiful Dutch clogs selected for you. These are available in yellow painted or varnished ones, but also in many other colors and prints. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/the-clog-museum-zaandamnetherlands (CLOG MESEUM) WORN BY MANY Klompen, or wooden shoes, are a well-known Dutch tradition, much like tulips and windmills. Exactly when the first wooden shoes were created and by who is a mystery, and will more than likely remain so forever. The oldest wooden shoe ever found was discovered in Amsterdam in 1979 and dates all the way back to 1230 AD. The first actual guild of clog craftsman in Holland was founded around 1570. Prior to the 16th century, most people wore no shoes at all. Shoes were expensive and worn only by the rich to protect their feet and prove that they could afford such a luxury. Hence came about Klompen, a shoe made of wood that was a cheaper, safer alternative to handstitched leather shoes. The early versions of wooden shoes featured wooden soles and leather tops, however eventually the entire shoe was made of wood to better protect feet, as many people who wore them were fisherman, farmers, and factory workers. Wood shoes offered a barrier from dangers such as fishing hooks, nails, and other sharp objects tradesman came in contact with on a daily basis. Klompen are a symbol of Holland that Dutch people are slowly moving away from. Farmers, gardeners, tradesmen, and fishermen in the countryside make up the majority of Dutch people who still wear the traditional wooden clogs nowadays. Most people that purchase wooden shoes today are tourists. Travelers who visit Holland want to take home something ‘typically Dutch,’ and with today’s airline regulations, Klompen is easier to transport than cheese and tulips. There are doctors that claim that the typical wooden shoe is healthier for people to wear than shoes worn today. One reason is that the clogs act as an air conditioner for your feet! The wood absorbs perspiration, which keeps feet nice and dry (great for local Dutch farmers who walk around in mud all day!). Klompen are even safer than steel-toed boots in most settings. They crack instead of dent when struck by an object which protects the foot and allows easy foot removal from the damaged clog. Watch out for splinters though! Interesting Facts about Klompen: 1. While most wooden shoes are now made by machines in factories, it used to take 3 hours to make one pair of shoes by hand! 2. As a custom, young Dutch men used to present their fiancées with new wooden shoes as an engagement gift. 3. Klompendanskunst, or Dutch clogging, features a lighter wooden shoe made especially for this type of dance, which involves dancers creating a rhythm by tapping their toes and heels on a wooden floor. The soles for this special type of shoe are made of ash wood, and often taps are attached to both toe and heel to create a more prominent sound.


4. Every year in June, The American Baseball Foundation of the Hague sponsors an American-style baseball game where both teams play in clogs!

WOODEN SHOES Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Pattens (wooden overshoes) and Pantoffles

By the 14th century poulaines (long toes shoes) were protected by wooden overshoes called pattens. These safeguarded the delicate materials preventing mud and water from destroying the materials they were made from.


In Spain during the Spanish Renaissance the pantoffle, a cross between the wooden soled clog and the patten overshoe, became popular. The wedged mule footwear consisted of a wooden sole with a soft leather or fabric upper. Pantoffles were popular and worn by the women of the court usually in platform style. The pantoffle crossed over into mainstream fashion more readily than the traditional wooden clog which remained very much footwear of the peasantry.

The early settlers to Brisbane (circa 1824) were known to embark from their ship wearing fashionable small patten overshoes to protect their shoes. ‘


A brief history of Clogs

Clogs or wooden shoes have a long social history which has association with shoes of the peasantry. Cheap, durable and made from available wood, clogs were commonplace from Scandinavia to France and Northern England. The all wooden shoe was made from a single block of wood and were called different names in different countries e.g. Klomp (Netherlands), Klompen (German) and Sabots (France).


George Beau Brummell (1778-1840) was an outspoken critic of clogs and according to a biographer publicly condemned them. In private the bella figure occasionally wore a pair of clogs.

The design of Swedish clogs differs from the shoe type traditionally seen elsewhere. It consists of a backless shoe with a wooden sole. This design is closest to the older patten style and ironically remains the most popular design of modern clogs.


The traditional wooden clog is still worn on ceremonial occasions and at traditional dancing events but sadly the number of craftsmen able to make clogs has significantly reduced.

HOLLAND COLORS

When you consider Dutch culture, you can’t help but think about dikes, windmills, wooden shoes and tulips. They seem cliché, but these classic icons intertwine with the region’s geography and history. Much of the country is below sea level, reclaimed with great effort over many generations from the North Sea. That’s why the Dutch people like to say, “God made the world, but we made Holland.” This land is so small and flat that the Dutch claim if you stand on a chair, you can see all across their country. (To test this theory during one visit, I borrowed a chair from a


farmer, and you really can see for miles!) This polder land — flat land reclaimed from the sea — is the source of several Dutch icons, beginning with wooden shoes that allowed farmers to walk across soggy fields. (They’re also easy to find should they come off in high water, because they float.) The Dutch employed hundreds of miles of dams and mighty barriers, or dikes, to protect their farms and communities from flooding. To pump out all that water, they used one of their leading natural resources: the wind. Windmills drained salt marshes and the Zuiderzee (the shallow bay in the northwest) one section at a time. What had once been fishing villages on little islands — like Schokland — are now high and dry mounds rising above fertile farmland. Featured Video Artifacts of Injustice (2:38) Most Read Life Stories • • • • •

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The Dutch have been using windmills for centuries. Over a thousand survive, and many still work. Get a map and rent a bike (or take a bike tour), and you’ll find mills just outside the capital city of Amsterdam. You can visit a windmill for a few euros, and sometimes even get a peek at the clever engine inside that powered this land’s creation. Once, while climbing into a working windmill during a strong wind, I felt the wonder and excitement industrious people must have felt a thousand years ago when the technology to


harness wind and water power with mills helped Europe come out of the Dark Ages. Keeping this country dry is a constant battle. And with climate change and rising sea levels now a reality, the work is that much harder and more expensive. Famous for both their frugality and their foresight, the Dutch are investing billions of euros as climate change makes its costly impact felt on sea-level communities here and around the globe. It’s pretty easy to tell where the sea level was around here. If you scoop up a handful of dirt in polder country, it may come with some seashells. At first the salty seabed soil is barren, but with a mix of rain, sunshine, and clever crop rotation, it eventually becomes extremely fertile. Like magic, the Dutch have turned tidal flats into fields of flowers — another thing the country is famous for. If you visit between mid-March and midMay, a trip to Keukenhof is essential. This 80-acre park is the greatest bulb-flower garden on earth — with more than seven million blooming bulbs and 800 tulip varieties. It’s just half an hour south of Amsterdam and well connected by public transport — but come early to avoid the crowds. I’m not one who’s really into flowers, but when you arrive at Keukenhof and see all the gorgeous, colorful blooms, you appreciate just a little bit of what tulip mania is all about. While Keukenhof is open only in the spring, any time of year you can see the Aalsmeer flower auction — the world’s biggest flowertrading center — located not far from Amsterdam’s airport. I always visit the cavernous building at its 7 a.m. opening to catch this beehive at its busiest. To get the


flowers out as fresh as possible, everything happens fast, including the bidding. A “Dutch auction” means that prices start high and tick down; buyers push a button when the auction clock — projected on huge screens — hits a price they’re willing to pay. Trainloads of flowers roll through the hall, while outside, a Keystone-Cops commotion of delivery cars makes sure all the flowers get to their locations that same day — anywhere in Europe. Trolling the fragrant catwalk, it’s fun to peer down on the operations. Up along the ceiling, suspended orange trams zip loads of flowers to the distribution center across the street, far more quickly and efficiently than trucks. Workers scramble to get each buyer’s purchase assembled and shipped out. Every day from this building, millions of flowers are sent — including Holland’s iconic tulips — destined to make someone’s day. It’s just a story, and an American story at that, the imaginary creation of an American author who never set foot on Dutch soil. Still, the picture is real. That fictitious little boy up there on the dike really does live in the hearts of generations of children who have imagined him up there, shivering through the night. Through him, we have learned just a tiny bit of the story of Holland’s courageous stand against the sea. It’s true that most of Holland’s windmills have been replaced by modern electrical pumps, but the landscape of modern Holland is sprinkled with 950 remaining windmills, many of which are working mills. Though you will surely be inspired by the dramatic landscapes of the Kinderdijk or Zaanse Schans, you don’t have to go far from our Dutch Untour homebase to see windmills. There are two right in Leiden. Step inside De Valk, Leiden’s museum in a windmill, and you’ll begin to understand why the Dutch speak so reverently of their mills. Not only does tulip season last a mere couple of months, but most of Holland’s flowering bulbs are grown for what’s beneath the ground, their blossoms clipped in mid-bloom to better nourish the bulb below. To be sure, a field of tulips in spring might give you a whole new perspective on the color red, but you don’t have to visit in the spring to see that flowers are a part of everyday life in Holland. The wooden shoes of Holland are bearers of age old tradition. The wooden shoes here have been crafted by artisans who have learnt this art from their forefathers. Modern technology has brought different kinds of shoes into the market yet the wooden shoes, also known as clogs, and has kept its fort. There are many designs that have faded out and are seen only in the museum but the farmer yellow wooden shoe is still very popular in Holland. This is very


meticulously manufactured at Cloggieshop and is one of the most popular shoes on sale in this shop. This shoe which gives complete protection to the feet is painted bright yellow and can attract any passer-by. Along with the paint some native prints of Holland is also seen on the shoe. These are mostly line drawing to form some geometric shapes. The black and red lines stand on the yellow background. These shoes can be a pride possession of anyone. Farmers and industrial workers find these shoes useful as it keeps their feet warm in winter and cool in summer. This shoe is called farmer shoe as it is most suited for the farmers of the swampy land of Holland.

History of the Windmills Located in one of the world’s oldest industrial areas in a neighborhood of Zaandam not far fromAmsterdam, there are only 17 windmills that remain from the 1000 that had been built during the 18th and 19th centuries. Originally, these windmills were created to help keep the settler’s feet dry but over time, the windmills were turned into industrial machines which pumped out barley, rice, paper, wood, cooking oil, mustard, tobacco, hemp and even paint! The Zaanse Schans was originally built as a fortification during the fight against the Spanish for Dutch Independence during the Eighty Year’s War. Between 1961 and 1974, many of the historic houses and windmills were relocated here and today is one of the major tourist destinations in the Netherlands. The museums and windmills depict early Dutch life, a time long gone. With its picturesque windmills and traditional houses, its no wonder why this is a popular tourist hot spot.

MORE ABOUT CLOG Bradford on Avon Museum, Wiltshire . Cordwainers made boots, shoes and other articles from leather and are named after the Spanish city of Córdoba, which was famed for its leather workers. Generally they just referred to themselves as boot and shoe makers. Cobblers were people who repaired footwear. .. Click on the thumbnail picture for a bigger view.

A pair of clogs that were used by a pupil of Christ Church School in the 1940s for working on the school’s allotment garden at Sladesbrook. They have leather uppers and wooden soles, with a band of wrought iron, like a horse shoe, around the edges.


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At a time before roads were surfaced, they would easily become muddy. Pattens -overshoes that were raised on a wooden or iron frame- were used to keep shoes clean. This is the wrought iron base of a patten found in Bearfield, Bradford; the three studs (one at the front, two at the back) were rivets that fastened the wooden sole. The wearer’s shoe would be held in place by a leather strap. .

An advertisement from a booklet celebrating the coronation of King George V in 1911. Mark Uncles (1851-1916) took over the business of George Gore on the corner of Market Street and Silver Street in about 1888. In 1934 his son Rowland moved to bigger premises at 33 Market Street. Uncles & Son later bought the shop of A.C. Dodge in Silver Street as well as others in Corsham and Bath. The business was sold in 1975, but continued to trade under the same name until it closed in 1987. A number of items from the shop came to the Museum. .

A bill from John Collett, for making and repairs to the shoes of the family of John Harding jr of Holt over the years 1860 to 1863. Accounts with traders were usually settled on a quarterly or annual basis. .


PICTURES MOOD BOARD

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I wanted to show nature and the different texture of nature in my mood boars, as the shoes was made up of wood also the prints of the Dutch clog was related to flower and bright colors.


Pictures of clogs


Referencing and Annexure  
Referencing and Annexure  
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