Page 1

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/11/11/health/main5612558.shtml?tag=stack CBS News.com

CBS Evening News

The Early Show

48 Hours Mystery

60 Minutes

Sunday Morning

Face the Nation Log in

Register

Up to the Minute Help

HEALTH VIDEO Home

U.S.

WORLD

POLITICS

TECH

HEALTH

ENTERTAINMENT

BUSINESS

Health

SPORTS

OPINION

PHOTOS

MORE

EXCLUSIVE WEBSHOW

NEW YORK, Nov. 11, 2009

Chemical In Plastic Linked to Impotence

Best-selling author Mitch Albom on his first nonfiction work since "Tuesdays with Morrie." Watch Now

China Factory Workers With High Levels of Bisphenol A, or BPA, Experienced Sexual Problems Font size

Print

E-mail

Share

2 Comments

(AP) Male factory workers in China who got very high doses of a chemical that's been widely used in hard plastic bottles had high rates of sexual problems, researchers reported Wednesday.

MOST POPULAR Heavy exposure to BPA, or bisphenol A, on the job was linked to impotence and lower sexual desire and satisfaction, according to the study, which adds to concerns about BPA's effects on most consumers.

A preliminary U.S. government report has found a chemical used to make baby bottles and other shatterproof plastic containers could be linked to a range of hormonal problems. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

The men in the study experienced BPA levels about 50 times higher than those faced by typical American men, said researcher Dr. De-Kun Li. "We don't know" whether more typical doses have similar effects, he said. People shouldn't be alarmed by the finding, said Li, a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at Kaiser Permanente's research division in Oakland, California. But he said it would be prudent to limit exposure to BPA while scientists look for any effects from lower doses.

1.

Justice Dept. Asked For News Site's Visitor Lists

2.

Obama's Afghan Plan: About 40K More Troops

3.

Report: Sosa's Skin Lighter From Cleansing

4.

Carrie Prejean Sex Tape: Video "Biggest Mistake of My Life" Says Ex-Miss California USA

5.

Should Pot Be Legal?

DISCUSSED 1.

STORIES

Chemical Linked to Preemie Liver Woes FDA Gives Controversial Chemical 2nd Look

VIEWED

The U.S. government recently announced new funding for research into BPA's effects.

Li is lead author of the latest study, published online Wednesday by the journal Human Reproduction. The work was financed by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. BPA is used in a wide variety of consumer products, including some hard plastic bottles and metal food or beverage cans. Several makers of baby bottles recently said they had stopped using the chemical. Some 90 percent of the U.S. population carries detectable levels in the urine. Scientists are concerned that BPA exposure might harm the reproductive and nervous systems, and possibly promote prostate and breast cancers. Last year, a preliminary study linked BPA to possible risks for heart disease and diabetes.

Obama's Afghan Plan: About 40K More Troops (384 recent comments)

LATEST NEWS D.C. Sniper's Family: "We Have a Letter" Sniper John Allen Muhammad Offers No Words before He's Put to Death but Family Attorney Implies he Left a Letter

The Food and Drug Administration concluded last year that trace amounts of BPA that leach out of bottles and food containers are not dangerous. But the FDA is now reviewing that stance after criticism from its scientific advisers. For the new research, Li and colleagues studied 164 factory workers in China who were exposed to high levels of BPA on the job. They were compared to 386 other men in the same town who either worked at other factories or were married to factory workers.

Piracy Makes World Powers Unlikely Allies U.S., Russia, China Share Naval Intelligence To Combat

The scientists measured BPA exposure through air sampling, and interviewed the workers about their sexual functioning.

Rampant Somali Pirates

Compared to the other workers, men with high BPA exposure were about four times as likely to report trouble achieving erections, about seven times as likely to say they had difficulty ejaculating, and about four times as likely to report low sex drive or low satisfaction with their sex lives.

Iraq PM Warns of Threat Before Jan. Vote

The effects are dramatic and "pretty clearly related to the exposure," said Linda Birnbaum, director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, who was not involved in the research.

Try to Undermine Election with

The finding fits in with animal studies and should be followed up by research in the general population, she said. Her institute said last month it will spend more money on BPA-related research, bringing the total to $30 million over two years. Steven Hentges, a BPA expert and official with the American Chemistry Council, an industry group, said the work is "probably not very relevant for consumers." For one thing, the reported 50-fold difference in exposure seems to be an underestimate because of how it was calculated, he said. In addition, he said, the workers inhaled BPA or got it on their skin. Consumers get it through diet instead, which lets the body detoxify it, Hentges said.

Al-Maliki Says Insurgents Will Violence

NEWS IN PICTURES


Li said the workers probably were exposed not only through inhalation and skin contamination but also by swallowing BPA powder that contaminated their food. He said he didn't know which route was most prominent in the Chinese factories. © MMIX, The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Share:

Digg

Facebook

Yahoo! Buzz

Twitter

Mixx

Day in Pictures A Glimpse at the Day's News as Seen Through a Camera Lens

MORE FROM HEALTH Where Germs Hide

Video

Chemical In Plastic Linked to Impotence

Medical Questions Answered

Connect with CBS News Stay connected with the CBS News using your favorite social networks and online news applications:

CVS Settles Expired Product Lawsuit AMA: Repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Study: Low-Carb Diets Make Dieters Cranky

Video

Become a fan of CBS News on Facebook

'Dirty' Calls

CBS News RSS feeds

Brain Scans Show PTSD Not Just Mental

Follow CBS News on Twitter

Bill Clinton Tackles Senate Abortion Rift

CBS News Mobile Services Email Newsletters

ADD A COMMENT

by I_am_me1953 November 11, 2009 11:12 AM EST

Well that explains why I can only get it 4 time a week when it used to be four times a night 30 years ago. And I thought it was because I am getting old. D@mm plastic bottles. Reply to this comment

by door331 November 11, 2009 8:32 AM EST

YES another reason for me to hate plastic and go off on rants when talking to people about it! seriously, there are few things produced that cant be made with alternative materials. Reply to this comment

CBSNews.com Site Map

Video Site Map

Popular on CBS sites: Fantasy Football

About CBS CBSSports.com

Advertise CHOW

User Feedback CNET

Mobile/WAP Site

Miley Cyrus

MLB

Help

Visit other CBS Interactive sites: Select Site

CNET Channel

GameSpot

Contact Us

iPhone 3G

CBS Bios Recipes

BNET

CBS College Sports

International Last.fm MaxPreps Moblogic MP3.com TV.com UrbanBaby.com UWIRE Wallstrip ZDNet

Copyright ©2009 CBS Interactive Inc. All rights reserved

Internships

GPS

Privacy policy

Shwayze

mySimon

Terms of use

NCAA

NFL

CBS Radio

CBS.com

Search.com

CBSNews.com

TechRepublic

The Insider

bpa impotence  

MOST POPULAR Scientists are concerned that BPA exposure might harm the reproductive and nervous systems, and possibly promote prostate and b...