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LABELOGRAPHY — The Major U.K. Record Labels

A First Pressing Identification Guide for CBS, Columbia, Decca, Fontana, His Master´s Voice, Parlophone and Pye — Singles, EPs and LPs 1953 - 1975

Jan Pettersson


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Labelography - The Major U.K. Record Labels

Written by: Jan Pettersson

Edited by: Ingrid Eriksson Research by: Jan Pettersson Chris Dunkley Glenn Henning

Stockholm

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About the Author Jan Pettersson was born 1965 in Uppsala, Sweden. He started collecting records in the ‘70s, but his interest for British pop music of the ‘60s first developed in the ‘90s when he moved together with his fiancé – a dedicated Beatles fan. As time went by, Jan’s record collection has grown larger and now contains almost all singles, EPs and LPs of the 20 most famous British bands of the ‘60s – among them The Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Who, Hollies, Zombies, Pretty Things, Animals and more. Jan works as a service engineer at a chemistry company.

PREMIUM PUBLISHING Sankt Göransgatan 159 Box 301 84 SE-104 25 STOCKHOLM Sweden Phone: +46 8 545 689 20 E-mail: info@premiumpublishing.com www.premiumpublishing.com Graphic Design: Jan Pettersson, Ingrid Eriksson Image Scanning: Jan Pettersson, Chris Dunkley, Glenn Henning Production Assistant: Roger Holegård Project Manager: Wille Wendt Printed by: Bulls Graphics, Sweden Paper: Gallery One Silk 100 gr. ISBN: 978-91-89136-07-6 First edition: © 2008 Premium Publishing – a div. of internal AB All rights reserved. No part of this publication maybe reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any other form or by any means, electronic, digital, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright holder.

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Contents Preface ................................................................................................................. 9 Acknowledgements........................................................................................... 11 Chapter 1. Introduction and General Information.......................................... 12

Chapter 2. The CBS Label 2.1 Introduction to the CBS label ..................................................................... 42 2.2 Introduction to the singles .......................................................................... 45 2.3 Label pages for the singles in the AAG, 200000, 2000, 7000 and 1000 series.................................................................................. 62 2.4 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................... 76 2.5 Label pages for EPs in the AGG 20000 and EP 6000 series ..................... 81 2.6 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................... 86 2.7 Label pages for the LPs in the 62000 and 69000 series ............................ 97

Chapter 3. The Decca Label 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7

Introduction to the Decca label................................................................. 106 Introduction to the singles ........................................................................ 110 Label pages for the singles in the F series ............................................... 129 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................. 144 Label pages for the EPs in the STO and DFE series ............................... 155 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................. 168 Label pages for the LPs in the LK, SKL, TXL and TXS series ................ 183

Chapter 4. EMI: General Information 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5

Introduction to the EMI company ............................................................. 206 EMI 45 rpm centre styles .......................................................................... 211 EMI matrix and stamper codes................................................................. 213 EMI EP covers........................................................................................... 214 EMI LP covers ........................................................................................... 220

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Chapter 5. The Columbia Label 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7

Introduction to the Columbia label ........................................................... 224 Introduction to the singles ........................................................................ 225 Label pages for singles in the SCM and DB series.................................. 239 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................. 258 Label pages for the EPs in the SEG and ESG series ............................... 261 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................. 272 Label pages for the LPs in the 33SX, SX and SCX series ....................... 277

Chapter 6. The HMV Label 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7

Introduction to the HMV label ................................................................... 292 Introduction to the singles ........................................................................ 293 Label pages for the singles in the 7M, 45-B and POP series .................. 308 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................. 323 Label pages for the EPs in the 7EG series ............................................... 327 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................. 336 Label pages for the LPs in the CLP. and CSD. series ............................. 340

Chapter 7. The Parlophone Label 7.1 Introduction to the Parlophone label ........................................................ 350 7.2 Introduction to the singles ........................................................................ 351 7.3 Label pages for the singles in the MSP and R series .............................. 367 7.4 Extra information about The Beatles singles ............................................ 387 7.5 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................. 400 7.6 Label pages for the EPs in the GEP series .............................................. 403 7.7 Extra information about The Beatles EPs ................................................. 412 7.8 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................. 418 7.9 Label pages for the LPs in the PMC and PCS series .............................. 421 7.10 Extra information about The Beatles LPs ................................................. 433

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Chapter 8. The Fontana Label 8.1 Introduction to the Fontana label.............................................................. 460 8.2 Introduction to the singles ........................................................................ 462 8.3 Label pages for the singles in the H., 267000 TF, TF, and 6007 000 series ........................................................................... 474 8.4 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................. 487 8.5 Label pages for the EPs in the TFE.17000 and TE.17000 series ............ 492 8.6 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................. 500 8.7 Label pages for the LPs in the TFL.5000, STFL.500, 680 000 TL, TL.5000 and STL.5000 series .............................................. 505

Chapter 9. The Pye Label 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7

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Introduction to the Pye label..................................................................... 516 Introduction to the singles ........................................................................ 518 Label pages for the singles in the 7N. series ........................................... 528 Introduction to the EPs ............................................................................. 542 Label pages for the EPs in the NEP.24000 series .................................... 550 Introduction to the LPs ............................................................................. 564 Label pages for the LPs in the NPL.18000 and NSPL.18000 series ....... 570

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Chapter 1. Introduction and General Information Why these seven record labels? The book is mainly intended as a guide for collecting the UK beat boom of the 60s. Therefore I have chosen to write about the main UK record labels during that time period – CBS, Columbia, Decca, Fontana, HMV, Parlophone and Pye – since they cover most of the great UK pop/rock bands of the 1950s-’70s. However, because of the way the book is written it should also be a useful guide for collecting any record released on these labels since the start of vinyl records in Britain (1952–1954) until 1975. How is the book organised? This book is intended to be a field guide, as essential to bring along when you are looking for original pressings of records, as books about flowers or birds are for those who are botanists or ornithologists. It is meant to be useful for checking if your favourite records, or records you are thinking of buying, have the original labels or not. Information about record company history and record sleeves is also included in the book. The book is divided into 7 main chapters, one for each label. At the beginning of each main chapter there is initially a label history followed by a chapter for each of the different formats: singles, EPs and LPs. These chapters each start with an introduction where you can read about the record number series, matrix numbers, centres, export pressings and record sleeves. A feature on the label’s main artists and notes about possible problems with the label description, may also be included. After this introduction follows the label description pages. These feature one page each for the known label versions complete with a photo/scan of an example label. The label pages all have the same basic layout, which should make it easier to understand how the label designs were changed. All pictured record labels on these pages should be from the first pressings of those particular records. The approximate timeperiod and record number interval when each label version was in use is recorded on every label page. However, this data is not complete, so there are “gaps” in between the record number intervals for the reported label, where the label version used is unknown to the author.

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The first step is to look at the record number and find that record number series in the book. The record number SKL.4847, illustrated below, corresponds to label version Decca stereo LP SKL. series label #3 (see next page). When the reference label is found, look at the description below the pictured label and compare it with your record.

»MADE IN ENGLAND BY« as left top perimeter print, OK

Dark blue label with silver print, OK

Unboxed Decca logo, OK Matrix number printed upside down above the record number, OK

Publishing date of the recording printed as: » è1967« at the bottom of the label, OK

If everything in the description of the reference label and your record is the same, it is a record pressed with the original label. If it is not the original label, you can find out when it was pressed. Start comparing the record with the following label versions in the book and do this until you have a match. When you have found the matching label version, you can see when it was made by looking at the dates printed below the reference label.

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Decca stereo LPs #3

SKL series

SKL 4814 ~ SKL 5032

Label used between summer 1966 and October 1969 Dark blue label with silver print Unboxed Decca logo Publishing year printed as: »è1967« at the bottom of the label »MADE IN ENGLAND BY« as left top perimeter print Matrix number printed upside down above the record number Decca moved the publishing year to the bottom of the label in the summer of 1966. This label version can be found with the side numbers printed either on the left or the right side of the spindle hole. Decca continued to use this label until the autumn of 1969. In October 1969 some labels were printed with the matrix number the right side up together with the unboxed Decca logo (See note at the beginning of the LP introduction).

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Copyright information The record companies printed copyright information on records that were intended for export and on a lot of domestic UK pressings. This information was usually printed in a “box” somewhere on the label. It is not possible to use this information to date the records. The most usual ones are: B.I.E.M. (Bureau International des Sociétés gérant les Droits d’Enregistrement et de Reproduction Mécanique) handles the copyrights for 52 different countries. G.E.M.A. (Gesellschaft für musikalische Aufführungs- und mechanische Vervielfältigungsrechte) was started in 1915 and handles the copyrights in Germany. N.C.B. (Nordisk Copyright Bureau) is responsible for the copyrights in the nordic countries.

(Right) A single with copyright information for N.C.B. and B.I.E.M.

How to identify singles and EPs pressed at different pressing plants When record companies had big hits their original pressing plants could not always keep up with the demand and the records had to be pressed by other companies pressing plants. It can be interesting for the record collector to know where their records were pressed. Sometimes this also makes a big price difference. Contract pressed Beatles records are considerably more rare and expensive than the Beatles records pressed by EMI. When this type of information becomes more available, this might cause price differences for the records from other major British groups.

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It is usually possible to find out where a 1960s record was pressed by looking at details in the centre of the label and the outer edge of the record. It is more difficult to recognise where the ’50s and the ’70s records were pressed, because the pressing details are not as consistent as for the ’60s records. The following pages show how to recognise the most common UK ’60s pressing plants including CBS, Decca, EMI, Fontana, Pye and “Island”pressings. There were other pressing plants, but the records from those factories are rare and difficult to recognise. Information about LP contract pressings can be found in the Parlophone chapter and covers only Beatles LPs. The edge of the records It is possible to identify the different pressing plants by looking at the edge of the vinyl. The edge can be described as “flat”, “rounded” or “knife”-edged.

“Flat” – Decca, EMI

“Rounded” – Pye

“Knife” – Philips, Oriole/CBS

Oriole/CBS pressed records Oriole had a very good pressing plant that was used by several different companies, especially EMI. The Oriole pressings are usually mistaken for Pye pressings. The reason for this was that Pye had several of their hits pressed by Oriole. (Right) Oriole pressing. The space between the centre and the rest of the label is the same as for Decca and Pye. The main difference is that the pressing ring at the centre is closer to the cut-out, the centre is usually textured and the vinyl has a knife edge. The vinyl of the early Oriole pressings is usually slightly heavier than EMI pressing vinyl.

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Decca pressings Decca did many contract pressings during the ’60s, mainly for EMI. Typical of the Decca single is the larger space between the centre and the rest of the label compared to an EMI pressing. The pressing ring of the centre is also smaller and deeper on a Decca pressing compared to an EMI pressing. The only difference I have found between Decca and Pye pressings is that the Decca vinyl edge is flat while the Pye vinyl has a slightly rounded edge. There are no differences between the centre of a Pye ’60s pressing and a Decca ’60s pressing.

(Above) Two singles pressed by Decca. Note the wide space between the centre and the rest of the label, and the pressing marking on the centre.

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(Right) Single pressed by Decca. Note the wide space between the centre and the rest of the label, and the pressing marking in the centre.

(Right) In the ’70s Decca started to make some singles with an extra pressing marking in the centre.

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“Island pressings” The earliest Island singles were pressed by Oriole, but by 1965 they were pressed by another factory. Island probably changed pressing plant when Oriole was bought by CBS in September 1964. This new pressing plant did a few contract pressings for the major labels. I have decided to call them “Island pressings”; the factory normally made records for Island, Chrysalis and B&C. Some pop records from the Philips group of labels were pressed by this factory in the 1960s. Partly, this may have come about because of the connection between Philips/Fontana and Chris Blackwell – the manager of The Spencer Davis Group – who owned Island records and leased the group to Fontana.

(Right and above) “Island pressed” singles. They can be found with either textured or smooth labels. Note the pressing markings on the centre of the singles. There are two pressing rings, one of them is very close to the cut-out. The edge of the vinyl varies between a knife edge and a flat edge.

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The covers of the EPs and LPs To make it a little easier to understand how the different record covers were constructed, I have made schematic drawings of them. For each type of cover illustrated below and on the following pages, the left drawing shows the cover before it is glued together and the right the complete cover with the record inside. White areas in the drawings indicate cardboard without lamination and the light grey areas laminated cardboard. EP covers

EP cover A One-piece flipback cover without lamination. The extension flaps are glued to the back of the cover. Used by Decca in the ’50s.

EP cover B One-piece die-cut top-opening flipback cover without lamination. The extension flaps are glued to the back of the cover. Used by EMI as generic EP sleeve in the ’50s.

EP cover C One-piece flipback cover laminated on both front and back. The extension flaps are glued to the back of the cover. Used by most of the companies from the late ’50s to the early ’60s.

EP cover D One-piece flipback cover laminated on the front and the extension flaps. The extension flaps are glued to the back of the cover. Used by most of the companies from the late ’50s to late ’60s.

EP cover E One-piece cover laminated on the front and over the spine. The extension flaps are glued to the inside of the cover. Used by CBS in the second half of the ’60s.

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Decca singles #7

F series

45-F 11159 ~ 45-F 11603

Label used between September 1959 and March 1963 Dark blue label with silver print Unboxed curved Decca logo »45-F« as the record number prefix Publishing year printed as: »RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1961« »MADE IN ENGLAND« printed below logo Round push-out centre Matrix number upside down above the record number The round push-out centres started to appear in September 1959. Decca used them concurrently with the triangular centres (see label #5 and #6) until record number 45-F 11207. Decca concurrently released singles with the short print below the Decca logo shown on this page and with the longer print shown on the next page. The publishing year was printed either on the left or the right side of the spindle hole.

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Decca singles #8

F series

45-F 11159 ~ 45-F 11603 D E C C A

S

Label used between September 1959 and March 1963 Dark blue label with silver print Unboxed curved Decca logo »45-F« as the record number prefix Publishing year printed as: »RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1960« »MADE IN ENGLAND - THE DECCA RECORD CO.LTD« printed below logo Round push-out centre Matrix number upside down above the record number This label with the longer »MADE IN ENGLAND - THE DECCA RECORD CO.LTD.« printed below the Decca logo was used concurrently with the label on the previous page. The publishing year was printed either on the left or the right side of the spindle hole.

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The SDE series of export EPs Decca exported a lot of EPs, most of which were domestic UK pressings. A few EPs had special export sleeves and domestic UK record numbers. The most well known of these is the EP with Them: “Them”, DFE 8612. There were also some EPs especially produced for export in the SDE record number series. The most interesting SDE EPs are the three Rolling Stones exports: SDE 7501, “Volume 2”, probably released in August 1964 SDE 7502, “Got Live If You Want It!”, probably released in June 1965 SDE 7503, “The Rolling Stones”, probably released in late 1965 In addition there is supposed to have existed an export version of the Rolling Stones EP ”Got Live If You Want It”, DFE 8620, with red labels. However, I think this is most likely a Rhodesian pressing. Another supposed Rolling Stones export EP – SDE 7260, “Rolling Stones” – is probably a Swedish-pressed EP. The label changes of the SDE EP series occur at the same dates as those of the main DFE record number series. The three Rolling Stones EPs have unboxed logos, and SDE 7501 has the publishing year printed as »RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1964«. SDE 7502 and SDE 7503 have the publishing year printed as »è1965«.

(Left) The back side of the cover for The Rolling Stones’ “Volume 2”, SDE 7501 export EP. The front looks exactly like the UK issue.

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D E C C A

EP

(Above) The label version used for SDE 7501. (Right) Label version used for SDE 7502 and SDE 7503.

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Parlophone stereo LPs EMI started to release stereo LPs on the Parlophone label in 1960 with PCS 3001, a recording of the show “At the Drop of a Hat” at Fortune Theatre in London, 1959. The stereo LPs received PCS record number prefixes and until early 1966 they were released in a separate record number series: the PCS 3000 series. It took about six years before stereo LPs became more common than mono LPs. Before 1966, the stereo LPs were less common than the mono versions and after 1966 mono was more rare than stereo. Parlophone ceased to release mono LPs in late 1969. The last one I have found is PMC 7087, an LP by Mrs Mills, released in November 1969. Before the spring of 1963, the stereo label had the same basic gold/black design as the mono label, although with a stereo banner printed below the Parlophone logo. After March 1963 the stereo looked like the mono labels, except for the record number prefix and the word “STEREO” printed on the right side above the Parlophone logo. The stereo LP label changes follow the label changes for the mono LPs. The record numbers for the stereo releases are included in the information in the Parlophone LP label description. (Right) Parlophone stereo LP from 1961. The label has the same design as the mono label except for the »STEREO« banner below the Parlophone logo.

Parlophone export LPs EMI exported a lot of LPs, and most of them looked identical to those produced for the domestic market. They also produced some records in two special number series especially for export. Parlophone made export LPs in the CPCS and PPCS record number series. These records were only pressed in stereo and looked like the normal UK pressings, except for the absence of the »SOLD IN UK SUBJECT TO RESALE PRICE CONDITIONS, SEE PRICE LISTS« statement.

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7.9 Label pages for the LPs in the PMC and PCS series PMC/PCS series Parlophone LPs #1

PMC 1033 ~ PMC 1118 PCS 3001 ~ PCS 3003

Page 422

Parlophone LPs #2

PMC 1124 ~ PMC 1202 PCS 3010 ~ PCS 3042

Page 423

Parlophone LPs #3

PMC 1203 ~ PMC 1220 PCS 3043 ~ PCS 3054

Page 424

Parlophone LPs #4

PMC 1221 ~ PMC 1242 PCS 3057 ~ PCS 3062

Page 425

Parlophone LPs #5

PMC 1243 ~ PMC 1248 PCS 3063 ~ PCS 3066

Page 426

Parlophone LPs #6

PMC 1249 ~ PMC 7081 PCS 3067 ~ PCS 7081

Page 427

Parlophone LPs #7

PMC/PCS 7084

~ PMC/PCS 7092 PMC/PCS 7093 ~ PCS 7130 PCS 7132 ~ PCS 7164

Page 428

~

Page 431

Parlophone LPs #8 Parlophone LPs #9

Page 429 Page 430

P A R L O P H O N E

PMC/PCS series The Beatles Apple LPs #10

PMC/PCS 7067

The Beatles Apple LPs #11

PCS 7088

~

PMC/PCS 7070

PCS 7096

Page 432

LP

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Parlophone LPs #1

PMC/PCS series

PMC 1033 ~ PMC 1118 PCS 3001 ~ PCS 3003

Label used between 1957 and autumn 1960 Black label with gold print »The Parlophone« printed at the start of the perimeter print Side numbers printed as: »Side 1« and »Side 2« This is the earliest Parlophone LP label design found during the work with this book. The label is black with gold print and the side numbers are printed as »Side 1« and »Side 2«. Parlophone started to release stereo LPs in 1960. The stereo LPs had a golden banner directly over the spindle hole with the text »STEREO«. The record number prefix was »PCS« for stereo and »PMC« for mono recordings. (See pictures and text at the start of the LP chapter.) There is possibly an earlier label design without the side numbers printed on the label, see note at the beginning of the LP chapter.

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Parlophone LPs #2

PMC/PCS series

PMC 1124 ~ PMC 1202 PCS 3010 ~ PCS 3042

P A R L O P H O N E

Label used between autumn 1960 and March 1963

LP

Black label with gold print »The Parlophone« printed at the start of the perimeter print Side numbers printed as: »1« and »2« The side numbers now appeared twice on each side and were printed as »1« and »2«. They were also enlarged to be of the same size as the record number.

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“With the Beatles”, PMC 1206 / PCS 3045 This LP was first released with incorrect song credits for ”Money”. It was credited to Jobete Music, but this was soon corrected to Belinda (Ltd.). There was also a misspelling of “You Really Got a Hold on Me” which was spelled as “You Really Gotta Hold on Me”. As with the other Beatles LPs, this record was in print for a long time and can be found with several different label versions. There were also Decca and Pye contract pressings of this LP. (Right) The first pressing of “With the Beatles”. This label has “You Really Got a Hold on Me” misspelled and the incorrect song credit for “Money”. The label version is Parlophone LP label #3.

(Left) The second pressing of “With the Beatles” with corrected spelling and song credits. The label version is Parlophone LP label #3. 444

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“Beatles for Sale”, PCS 3062 There is one version of this LP where “I’m a Loser” has been misspelled as “I’m a Losser”. This only happened on a later stereo pressing, printed sometime between September 1965 and November 1969. Even though they are not first pressings, the records with misspelled labels are about ten times as expensive as LPs with the normal versions of the label.

P A R L O P H O N E

(Above) Label with misspelled “I’m a loser”. The label version is Parlophone LP label #6.

LP

(Left) The first stereo pressing. The label has perimeter print starting with» THE PARLOPHONE« and the publishing year printed as »RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1964«. The label version is Parlophone LP label #4.

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LABELOGRAPHY

A DATING GUIDE FOR ORIGINAL U.K. VINYL RECORDS Do you collect vinyl records? Investing in original UK pressings from the ‘50s, ‘60s or ‘70s? Spending money on mint records of acts like The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Pretty Things, The Zombies or Yardbirds? Then this is indeed a book for you...

— The Major U.K. Record Labels

Usually sellers of original records claim that their records are first pressings without having any kind of proof. Finally, now you don’t have to guess anymore, you can just compare your copy with the hundreds of reference pictures of labels and covers, and find out if you have an original pressing or not. This guide even tells you during what months a record actually was pressed. And in which specific record pressing plant... It even displays company sleeve variations and during what time periods they were used. Labelography is not written about any specific artists, it’s written about the record labels which means that any artist or record on the seven labels are all covered here in one single book. This meticulously researched book also have special pages focusing on The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and The Kinks to explain some finer details you should be attentive to. The book is intended as a field guide and should be as essential to bring to a record shop or a record fair as a book about birds when you go out bird watching. It’s also an essential tool when buying or selling rare records on eBay or other internet sites. Illustrated. 592 pages.

—The Major U.K. Record Labels

To ensure a collectable record’s value it is important to have it in mint condition, but if it’s a verified first pressing it will more likely hold or increase its value over time.

LABELOGRAPHY

Labelography is a unique book - the first of its kind. With the help of this book you can find out if any UK-pressed record actually is an original pressing or not. It covers all singles, EPs and LPs from the very start of UK vinyl records until 1975 on the Parlophone, Decca, CBS, Columbia, HMV, Pye and Fontana labels.

A DATING GUIDE FOR ORIGINAL U.K. VINYL RECORDS

Jan Pettersson

A First Pressing Identification Guide for CBS, Columbia, Decca, Fontana, His Master´s Voice, Parlophone and Pye — Singles, EPs and LPs 1953 - 1975

Jan Pettersson

Labelography - The Major UK Record Labels  

A Dating Guide for Original U.K. Vinyl Records

Labelography - The Major UK Record Labels  

A Dating Guide for Original U.K. Vinyl Records

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