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FLIP THIS MAGAZINE FOR OUR BEAUTY ISSUE

OCTOBER 2018

FALL FASHION FEVER BEST LOOKS FOR NIGHT, DAY & PLAY

EXCLUSIVE:

FERTILITY CLINICS UNDER FIRE

NICOLE KIDMAN

CLAIMS HER THRONE


OCTOBER 2018


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FIRST WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT

OCTOBER

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO, SEE, HEAR, AND TALK ABOUT THIS MONTH Rock-history buffs, take note: Bad Reputation, a new documentary on the legendary Joan Jett, has just hit theaters. Come for the awesome archival footage; stay for the interviews with everyone from Debbie Harry to Iggy Pop.

2. TALENT SHOW If you’re into artists like Mondrian and Kandinsky, get to the Guggenheim in NYC on October 12 for the opening of Hilma af Klint’s first major U.S. solo exhibition. A Swedish painter inspired by mysticism and the occult, Klint started making bold, colorful abstract art well before the men credited with the genre’s creation did, but she stipulated that her work not be shown until at least 20 years after her death.

3. RIOT GIRLS In this era when women aren’t afraid to get loud, author Rebecca Traister brings us Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger (Simon & Schuster), which explores the history of female fury as a political force. Out October 2, it’s a galvanizing, timely study of righteous rage.

4. DREAM HOUSE Those who have home decor on the mind should check out the first Louis Vuitton Les Petits Nomades collection, featuring ornamental objects by world-renowned visionaries in interior design and architecture. The brightly colored leather items, available in stores October 1, range from origami flowers to a geometric mirror.

5. SOUTHERN NIGHTS Keep your music-festival game going strong at Austin City Limits. Starting October 5, it boasts an impressive lineup including Janelle Monáe, Childish Gambino, and Camila Cabello. Book those tickets to Texas pronto.

6. CHAPTER AND VERSE On October 2, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Alice Walker offers up almost 70

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7. POWER CHORDS At long last, the indie rocker Cat Power presents Wanderer, her first album in six years, on October 5. Get ready for epic folk-and-blues-inflected tracks about her journey from town to town with her guitar in tow and a dreamy duet with Lana Del Rey.

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RIGHT: The Ten Largest, No. 7, Adulthood, Group IV (1907), by Hilma af Klint, from her solo exhibition at the Guggenheim. BELOW: Rebecca Traister’s book on the political power of pissed-off women.

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8. REQUIRED VIEWING Expect a powerful experience from the film adaptation of the 2017 YA novel The Hate U Give, in theaters October 19. The story of a teenage girl who witnesses the fatal police shooting of her childhood best friend, it features a standout performance from rising actress (and activist) Amandla Stenberg. Prepare to leave the theater majorly moved.

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9. COMIC RELIEF On October 4, one of NBC’s most iconic sitcom ensembles will—yet again—pick up like they never left, with this season’s return of Will & Grace. May sidesplitting Karen-isms and Jack quotes continue to get us through the day.

10. GHOST STORY Look no further for your dose of seasonal spookiness: On October 14, a stage adaptation of Tim Burton’s quirky-creepy cult classic Beetlejuice makes its world premiere at

5

The Austin City Limits music festival returns this month. RIGHT: Leather blooms by Atelier Oï from the Louis Vuitton Les Petits Nomades collection.

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1. COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES; 2. COURTESY OF SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM; 3–4: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES; 5. CHARLES REAGAN HACKLEMAN/COURTESY OF THE FESTIVAL

1. JETT FUEL

works of poetry, presented in both English and Spanish, with Taking the Arrow Out of the Heart (37 Ink). A book that meditates on these contentious times but also on life, love, hope, and gratitude, it’s just what our literary souls were aching for.

Joan Jett in Bad Reputation, a new documentary on the rocker’s life and career


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W H AT W E L O V E

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A new box set of ’80s-era tracks from the legendary David Bowie is coming. TOP LEFT: The first comprehensive biography of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. LEFT: Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper in A Star Is Born.

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12. STAR MAN It’s a good month to be a David Bowie superfan. On October 12, Parlophone Records releases the latest in its series of Bowie box sets, David Bowie: Loving the Alien (1983–1988). Complete with 11 CDs and a 15-piece vinyl collection, it contains exclusive new production, instrumentation, and remastering.

13. RISE AND SHINE Calling all Little Monsters! Lady Gaga appears in her first major lead acting role in A Star Is Born, alongside Bradley Cooper (who also makes his directorial debut). Out October 5, this remake of a classic movie about an aspiring young singer and the troubled musician who takes her under his wing features original tracks cowritten by Gaga and sees her more stripped down than ever.

14. PORTRAIT MODE

ABOVE: Afro Goddess Looking Forward (2015), by Mickalene Thomas, as seen in her solo exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts. RIGHT: Recipe powerhouse Delish presents its first cookbook.

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MARI EC L A IR E .C OM October 2018

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Washington, D.C.’s National Theatre before moving to Broadway. It’s the perfect occasion to let out your inner Lydia Deetz.

11. HER HONOR Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is inarguably among the most influential legal minds and genderequality advocates of the century (not to mention an Internet star and SNL muse). The first comprehensive biography of the pioneering icon, Jane Sherron De Hart’s Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Life (Knopf), out October 16, was 15 years in the making and written with the cooperation of Ginsburg herself.

The work of Mickalene Thomas—the artist behind the earliest individual portrait of Michelle Obama as first lady—fills the Wexner Center for the Arts, in Columbus, Ohio, in a recently opened major solo exhibition. Using rhinestones, acrylic, enamel, and collaged materials, she combines pop culture and her personal muses to create powerful pieces exploring issues of race, gender, sexuality, and beauty.

15. GOOD EATS Feeling like far too many recipes are inaccessible for the everyday foodie? This month, you’re in luck. On October 16, crazy-popular website Delish presents its first cookbook, Delish: Eat Like Every Day’s the Weekend (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Its 400 pages are packed with more than 275 fun, simple ideas, from a Reuben egg roll to unicorn bark.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: WARNER BROS. PICTURES; MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT.; COURTESY OF THE COMPANY

FIRST


OCT

contents VOLUME 25 ISSUE 10

ON THE COVER 57 BEST FALL LOOKS For night, day, and play

98 NICOLE KIDMAN Claims her throne

128 FERTILITY CLINICS UNDER FIRE

FIRST 18 WHAT WE LOVE ABOUT OCTOBER

40 BEHIND THE COVER 42 NEXT BIG THING From flying taxis to humanoid robots, the latest tech will help you hack your life

101 IDEAS 57 SHOES FIRST: BECAUSE

EVERY GREAT OUTFIT DESERVES AN EVEN BETTER PAIR OF SHOES, WE SHOWCASE THE COWBOY BOOTS, FEATHERED STILETTOS, AND GEM-ENCRUSTED MULES OF YOUR DREAMS

@WORK 88 THE BEAUTY OF BUMBLE

PHOTOGRAPH BY THOMAS WHITESIDE

Whitney Wolfe Herd has changed the way we find love, work, and friendship. And she’s just getting started. Up next? A beauty line.

DRESS $895, TOP price upon request, Coach 1941; coach.com for stores. EARRINGS $358, Erickson Beamon; ericksonbeamon shop.com. BELT $106, B-Low the Belt; revolve.com.

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OCT

contents NEWSFEED 93 WOMEN KNOWN AS

“ISIS WIVES” ARE PAYING DEARLY FOR THEIR HUSBANDS’ INVOLVEMENT IN THE TERRORIST GROUP

FASHION & FEATURES 98 EYES WIDE OPEN The star of Boy Erased and HBO hit Big Little Lies, Nicole Kidman is using her celebrity to help empower women in Hollywood and beyond

104 AFTER SIX Nighttime is the right time for tuxedoinspired dressing

112 INDIGO GIRL All-denim everything offers an easy, pared-down vibe for fall

120 FIELD DAY Soft shearling and tailored tweed meet flowy florals in the lush countryside

126 DANCE REVOLUTION Female choreographers take center stage at the American Ballet Theatre

PHOTOGRAPH BY CARLIJN JACOBS

DRESS price upon request, Givenchy; (212) 650-0180. SHOES $890, Gucci; gucci.com for stores.

October 2018

M A RIECLA IRE.CO M

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OCT

contents

128 A DREAM DESTROYED

Exclusive: Three women tell their stories of heartbreak in the wild, unregulated world of egg freezing

FLIP FOR OUR SPECIAL BEAUTY ISSUE!

IN EVERY ISSUE 30 MARIECLAIRE.COM 36 EDITOR’S NOTE 38 WHAT YOU SAID 133 SHOPPING DIRECTORY 134 THE SHRINK IS IN 135 BACKPAGE

VAN MOSSEVELDE+N

ON THE COVER: Photograph by Thomas Whiteside. Styling by J. Errico. On the front cover: Dress, Gucci; necklace, Cartier. On the inside cover: Dress, necklace, socks, boots, Chloé. JACKET $455, Iro; iroparis.com for similar styles. BRA TOP price upon request, American Vintage; americanvintage-store.com for information. JEANS price upon request, Liu Jo; liujo.com for stores.

M A RIECLA IRE.CO M

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FIRST FIRST 1

MAKE ROOM

2

DRESS UP YOUR SPACE WITH THE SEASON’S TOP DECOR PICKS, FROM ACCENT PIECES, LIKE A CHUNKY WOVEN BLANKET TO JEWELTONE UPHOLSTERY THAT WILL GIVE YOUR PLACE AN ENTIRELY NEW VIBE. marieclaire.com/ apartment-decor-ideas

BEST FACE FORWARD

RICHLY HUED NAIL POLISH, GLOWY BLUSH COMPACTS, AND LONG-WEAR LIP STAINS HAVE FALL LOOKS TURNING OVER A NEW LEAF. marieclaire.com/fall-musthave-makeup-products 1. CHINA GLAZE Nail Lacquer in You Don’t Know Jacket, from Ready to Wear FW ’18 Micro Mini Kit, $15; ulta.com. 2. LAURA MERCIER Blush Colour Infusion in Grapefruit, $30; sephora .com. 3. NARS Powermatte Lip Pigment in Wild Night, $26; sephora.com.

INSTA-BEAT OUR PHOTO-HAPPY EDITORS HASH(TAG) IT OUT

Alix Campbell chief photography director @alixbcampbell Monday morning after a long weekend

Jennifer Goldstein beauty director/ features editor @jenn_edit Casual. (@terrymatlin)

Ki Williams entertainment manager @kiwynell i call this my ariana grande filter.

STAY IN TOUCH SHARE YOUR LATEST STREET STYLE, BEAUTY PICKS, AND MORE!

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MA RI EC L A IR E .C OM October 2018

Colleen McKeegan senior editor @clmckeegan Vacation mode

CLOCKWISE FROM CENTER TOP: ALEKSANDAR NOVOSELSKI/STOCKSY; JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D; COURTESY OF THE COMPANY (2); COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS (4)

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FIRST MARIECLAIRE.COM

SQUAD GOALS AS LAW & ORDER: SVU ENTERS ITS 20TH SEASON, MARISKA HARGITAY TAKES US BEHIND THE SCENES By REBECCA PHELPS

FROM TOP: Mariska Hargitay as Detective Olivia Benson in Season 1, 1999; Hargitay directing the Season 15 episode “Criminal Stories,” guest starring Alec Baldwin, 2014

MARIE CLAIRE: Tell us about your audition. MARISKA HARGITAY: One of the things that

really drew me to the part was the fact that Olivia had this very rich backstory of being a product of rape. I had just come off filming ER and didn’t know a lot about sexual assault back then, but I knew I’d never connected to a script more; I felt the part in my soul. When I went in to read for Dick, I saw other actresses in the waiting room, and I told him, “I need you to understand, this is my role.” MC: What was filming 2005’s “911,” the Season 7 episode you won an Emmy for—in which a young sex-trafficking victim calls for help and Benson takes the call—like? MH: It challenged me in many ways, and it

was exciting to be called to do that kind of role. Most people don’t realize that the little girl actress wasn’t on set when we shot. A 45-year-old woman read her lines. Most of the episode was me, the director, and a telephone. After doing that episode, I just remember feeling so confident.

sociopath who abducts Benson.] That’s when you learn about Benson’s psychology, what she’s made of. The scenes were painful to shoot—scary, uncharted territory, and so raw—but I felt such an incredible responsibility to go there and tell that story. I wanted to show the ugliness, fear, and inhumanity, but also what survival is, what inner strength is, our resourcefulness, what we’re capable of, and what we will do to survive. I know a lot of people can’t watch those episodes, and even for me, every time I go back, I’m like, Wow. Because you have to shut off a part of yourself to tell these stories.

MC: How has your character evolved? MH: Things really started to change for my

MC: When did acting on a show about crimes against women turn into activism? MH: Instead of hearing, “Hey, I love your

character during the William Lewis story arc. [In Seasons 14 and 15, which aired in 2013 and 2014, Pablo Schreiber plays Lewis, a

show, can I get an autographed picture?” I started receiving a different kind of fan mail, which was women disclosing their stories of

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MA RI EC L A IR E .C O M October 2018

abuse. I didn’t know what to do or how to respond, so that’s when I started educating myself. I kept hearing, “I’m just so alone.” And I thought, These people are writing to me? An actor on television? Then this is something we need to start talking about, and I have this platform, so what can I do? That’s when I started the Joyful Heart Foundation [dedicated to empowering survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, and child abuse], because we need to change the way society responds. MC: Have you seen progress, both via the show and in real life, in how society portrays and addresses such crimes? MH: The culture is indeed changing. We have,

of course, lots of work to do, but I know we can fix it. It’s a pleasure to watch our writers change with the times and educate themselves on these issues; they’re really keeping up on the evolving attitudes. I think SVU makes people feel safe, like somebody gets it. I’m in a deeply unique and lucky position to be the one constant on this progressive, forward-thinking show—to have everybody come and play with me in my playground. FOR AN IN-DEPTH ORAL HISTORY OF LAW & ORDER: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT, TOLD BY ITS FEMALE CAST AND CREW, VISIT MARIECLAIRE.COM/SVU-HISTORY

FROM TOP: CHRIS HASTON/NBCU PHOTO BANK; MICHAEL PARMELEE/NBC

In 1999, creator Dick Wolf’s procedural crime franchise Law & Order debuted a spin-off centered on a squad of NYPD officers who investigate sex crimes. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, or SVU as it became known, featuring topical story lines, shone a light on violence against women—and often saw justice served. It was a runaway hit and remains one of NBC’s most watched shows, with as many as 10 million viewers tuning in weekly. Now, as the series enters its 20th season—tying with Gunsmoke and the original Law & Order for longest-running drama series in TV history—we spoke to SVU star and executive producer Mariska Hargitay about her incredible run as Olivia Benson and her work to help survivors on and off screen. This is her story. DUN DUN.


ecuie Discover it October 19

CURATED STYLE MADE SIMPLE—FOR YOU & YOURS


FIRST This issue focuses on the latest technological breakthroughs impacting every corner of our lives, from how we get dressed to the way we remember the people we love.

E D I TO R ’ S N O T E

When The Jetsons first aired on prime time in 1962, the family’s flying car was pure fantasy; in 2020, Uber will test an airborne taxi service. The 1999 Disney Channel flick Smart House featured a tricked-out home that did household chores via computer; you can now get an app-controlled dishwasher to clean plates in 10 minutes flat or a machine that folds laundry for you. When Black Mirror arrived on Netflix in 2014, viewers were unsettled by an episode in which a humanoid robot captured the personality of a woman’s departed ex-boyfriend, based on his tweets. That robot actually exists: Bina48 uses social-media posts to channel the traits of a real person. What was once TV magic has become reality. Advances in technology are stretching nearly unfathomable boundaries. For our annual Next Big Thing package (“The Future Is Now,” p. 42), we spoke with visionaries from Google, Intel, and General Electric to learn what the next big ideas are and to showcase the latest innovations that will dramatically change the way we work, play, and live. There’s an augmented-reality headset that allows colleagues in

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MA RI EC L A IR E .C O M October 2018

different zip codes to meet virtually; a smartwatch powered by your body heat; a sensor-studded bodysuit that takes your measurements, which can then be used to create perfectfitting clothes; and a microchip that eliminates the need for often-forgotten things like wallets and car keys. (Once implanted, just wave your hand to pay or drive!) The beauty world also gets futuristic (“Forward-Looking,” flip the issue, then turn to page 46) with stem cells that reverse hair loss and holographic pigments in lip gloss. If you can dream it, what may seem far-fetched is closer than we imagine. The future isn’t coming, and it’s not confined to the small screen. It’s here.

Anne Fulenwider EDITOR IN CHIEF

annefulenwider@marieclaire.com

FROM TOP: MARTIN SWEERS/TRUNK ARCHIVE; SHARON SUH

WHAT’S NEXT


Lip Boldly

Gal Gadot is wearing Super Lustrous™ Lipstick in Certainly Red.

Super Lustrous™ Lipstick Talk about impact! Super smooth, moisturizing lip color in every gorgeous shade imaginable. Find yours @Revlon.com


FIRST

WHAT YOU SAID

WHEREVER YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT MC, WE’RE LISTENING. HERE’S WHAT YOU HAD TO SAY ABOUT OUR JULY 2018 ISSUE

Moving Forward @BarbaraLeeSays: “We’ve got to get to a point where it doesn’t raise eyebrows to have someone give birth in office. Just like it shouldn’t raise eyebrows to have a woman be a senator.” —@SenDuckworth Great piece from @kaylawebley via @marieclaire!

Wellness Wishes I’ve been itching to take a solo trip for a while now, but I’ve felt too afraid. The women describing their own experiences in “Fantastic Voyages” make solo travel actually feel doable. I particularly love that there are organizations like G Adventures that provide a local taste of the town and give back to the community. Even SuperShe Island sounds up my alley. How awesome would it be to kick back with a bunch of other boss ladies!? Safe to say, this article left me inspired to book a trip ASAP. —Stacia Affelt, New York, New York

Amy Adams on the cover of our July issue

Chasing Amy

Endless Summer @nicolette.piper: What do you love about July? #SUMMER2018

@jana_meister: The struggle is REAL on this MONDAY! I need all the coffee I can get today. Happy Monday! @marieclairemag

@bethshankleanderson: Reading @marieclairemag is an event, especially with Amy Adams on the cover!

LET IT OUT! Tell us what you love, don’t love so much, or want to see more of in Marie Claire. We want to hear it all! E-mail your feedback directly to annefulenwider@marieclaire.com, or join the fray on Twitter (@marieclaire), Instagram (@marieclairemag), and Facebook (Marie Claire). Letters may be edited for space or clarity. 38

MA RI EC L A IR E .C OM October 2018

ADAMS: BRIGITTE LACOMBE

@jsick89: Seeing my goals manifest in other people’s lives motivates me. I will manifest! And work hard! And create my dreams into realities! Thanks @clmckeegan! @marieclairemag #Relaxing

I was so excited the novel Sharp Objects was coming out on TV. I was even more excited when I found out Amy Adams would be the lead. Amy has this magical way of disappearing into her roles and allowing her characters to come alive. She has a humility and grace that are hard to find in Hollywood. I hope she gets the Emmy nod. Thank you for making her your cover star. —Hannah Brown, St. Louis Park, Minnesota


Life Tested

Gal Gadot is wearing ColorStay™ Liquid Makeup in True Beige.

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FIRST “NICOLE HERSELF WAS MY MUSE. SHE’S MYSTERIOUS, PLAYFUL, ELEGANT... SHE BECOMES YOUR VISION.” —Makeup artist ANGELA LEVIN

KIDMAN WEARING A DRESS BY HAIDER ACKERMANN

BEHIND THE COVER

Nicole KIDMAN

HOMETOWN: Sydney, Australia. CURRENT HOMETOWN: Nashville. SOUTHERN COMFORT: The actress arrived in a button-down flannel top and mid-wash skinny jeans. ECO EATS: Craft service was plastic-straw-free, with Magic Markers for writing names on mason jars for drinks. GEN X: Kidman danced and sang along to the poppy lyrics of the Spice Girls’ ’90s hit “Wannabe.” LIGHT THIS WAY: “The rich-hued wardrobe selected for the shoot—filled with bold reds, golds, and browns—mixed with photographer Thomas Whiteside’s genius lighting techniques gave the shoot a warm glow,” says stylist and MC fashion director J. Errico, “almost like a play on a late-autumn sunset.” ALONG FOR THE RIDE: As the shoot wound down, the actress’s husband, country singer Keith Urban, swung by to pick her up. BEAUTY ROUTINE: “My inspiration was an undone Carole Lombard,” says hairstylist Italo Gregorio of his sexed-up waves for Kidman. He worked mousse and a drop of hair oil through damp strands, then spritzed volumizing spray on the roots for lift. Using a round brush, Gregorio blow-dried her hair in sections and added waves with a two-inch curling iron. For makeup artist Angela Levin, “Nicole herself was my muse. She’s mysterious, playful, elegant…she becomes your vision.” After hydrating and priming skin, Levin perfected Kidman’s complexion with foundation and pink cream blush. Then for definition, she blended luminous beige and gold shadows on the eyelids and swiped on dark-brown mascara. Barely there lip stain and a touch of highlighter on the actress’s cheekbones, nose, and Cupid’s bow finished the look. FOLLOW: @nicolekidman. —Sara Holzman & Taylore Glynn FOR EXCLUSIVE BEHIND-THE-SCENES FOOTAGE, GO TO MARIECLAIRE.COM/NICOLE-KIDMAN 40

MA RI EC L A IR E .C O M October 2018

PHOTOGRAPH BY THOMAS WHITESIDE

THE BOY ERASED ACTRESS WORKS THE LIMELIGHT AT HER NASHVILLE COVER SHOOT


EL AINE & TRAVIS HAVE BEEN TOGETHER FOR FIVE YEARS. HER DIAMONDS HAVE SPENT TWO BILLION YEARS BENEATH THE EARTH’S SURFACE.


FIRST

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, CONVERSATIONAL ROBOTS, AND CUSTOM-FIT FASHION ARE HERE—AND THEY’RE GOING TO MAKE LIFE MUCH EASIER. WE TALKED TO THREE EXPERTS ABOUT THE NEXT BIG THING IN TECH. OUR TAKEAWAY? TOMORROWLAND IS LOOKING SEAMLESS N E XT B I G T H I N G

THE

FUTURE IS NOW By COLLEEN MCKEEGAN Illustrations by CECILIA CARLSTEDT

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MA RI EC L A IR E .C OM October 2018


FIRST N E XT B I G T H I N G

HOME SMART HOME

EXPERIENCE A TRULY HANDS-FREE HOUSE WITH THE NEWEST WAVE OF BRAINY PRODUCTS

The Expert Says “Technology should be in service to humanity. It should support our lives, not be at the center of them. Voice-enabled products are already here. Now we’re asking, how can you use all your senses—eyes, ears, voice, touch— to create fluidity and magic at home? What society dreams and thinks about is ultimately what will get created.” —IVY ROSS, head

PILE HIGH Slated to launch late next year, the 49-inchtall FoldiMate can be fed shirts, pants, pillowcases, and the like. Less than five minutes later, its bottom compartment is filled with a perfectly folded load of clothes, making laundry day slightly less painful. $980; foldimate.com.

of design for hardware products at Google

Microsoft’s HoloLens headset uses augmented reality to allow colleagues thousands of miles apart to share a screen and collaborate, surgeons to see 3-D scans of patients’ hearts before surgery, and professionals to guide DIY-ers through home-improvement projects. From $3,000; microsoft.com.

The Meeting Owl, a speaker topped by a 360 degree camera, tackles the conundrum of video conferencing when you’re working remotely. Machinelearning tech steers the lens toward whomever is speaking, and eight microphones keep you from asking the abhorred “Sorry, can you say that again?” $799; owllabs.com.

MAP IT OUT

CRYSTAL CLEAR A countertop dishwasher fit for city dwellers in tiny spaces, the Tetra is controlled by an app, requires only a half gallon of tap water per 10-minute cycle, and heats up using graphite electrodes rather than metal coils to help you save room, water, and time. Price to be determined; myheatworks.com.

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The company behind the Roomba, iRobot, recently launched an iteration (the i7) of the self-driving vacuum that uses AI to remember your home’s layout (furniture included), and its CEO has said if consumers are on board, the company may partner with Amazon, Apple, or Google to make your house more connected than ever. $699; irobot.com.

ROSS: COURTESY OF GOOGLE; REMAINING PHOTOS: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

BIRD’S EYE


TREAT YOURSELF BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT.™

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FIRST

N E XT B I G T H I N G

AT YOUR SERVICE PERSONALIZE ALL YOUR LIFESTYLE NEEDS IN AN A.I.-ENABLED WORLD

The Expert Says “ ‘Additive manufacturing’ sounds so damn industrial, but it’s the combination of AI, materials, design, and 3-D technology. When it all comes together, you get a massively bespoke approach to designing jewelry, clothing, shoes, even braces. You’ll soon see it come much more into our lives and pervade everything we do.” —SUE SIEGEL, chief

Laced with over 300 sensors, the ZOZO suit (which costs nothing to order) uses your measurements to create clothes (which all cost less than $100) perfectly tailored to your body. zozo.com.

PERSONAL CHEMISTRY

Starting in 2020, Uber will begin testing its air-taxi service in Dallas, L

vehicles will use electric propulsion, which means zero operational emissions. Ride-sharing junkies can expect a public launch by 2023. uber.com.

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The first Bluetooth smartwatch powered by body heat, the Matrix PowerWatch X charges while you wear it via a tiny internal thermoelectric generator. The makers hope to license the technology to other wearables startups and upend how we source energy. $279; powerwatch.com.

WORD COUNT Led by Rent the Runway cofounder Jenny Fleiss, Jetblack, part of Walmart’s Store No. 8 incubator, is a concierge platform that reads texts and pictures sent by members and suggests, then delivers, items from retailers including Walmart, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Pottery Barn. The service is available to New Yorkers and plans to expand. $50 per month; jetblack.com.

SIEGEL: COURTESY OF GE; MICROCHIP: GETTY IMAGES; REMAINING PHOTOS: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

innovation officer at GE


FIRST N E XT B I G T H I N G

MR. ROBOT

IN THE FUTURE, MACHINES AND HUMANS WILL WORK HAND-IN-WIRED-HAND

“If we could mime the brain of Leonardo da Vinci, who wouldn’t want to run experiments on a mind that was able to blend science, math, physics, and arts? Our thirst for information and possibilities will not die down. We’ll have to be careful—but we already live in a world where robots and humans mix. Moving forward, the technology powering those robots will be smarter and more efficient.”

MIND CONTROL Technology that allows you to control a game using just your mind? It’s here…almost. Neurable is several years away from an official launch, but its prototype headset, which measures users’ electrical brain activity to move characters in its signature VR game, works—proving computer-brain interface tech is just beginning. neurable.com.

—AICHA EVANS, senior vice president and chief strategy officer at Intel

TECH MATE

A humanoid robot with rubber skin, motorized facial tics, and a personality based on digital files that capture the personality and emotions of the person it’s based on, Bina48 is the face of transhumanism, the idea that our intelligence can live beyond human life. hansonrobotics.com.

Unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show in January and in active development, the Ubtech Walker is like Alexa on steroids. The human-size robot does the typical virtual-assistant tasks while also acting as a security system (if it detects motion during a nightly patrol, it records its surroundings and alerts its owner) and a friend. (It plays videos, dances, and even kicks around a soccer ball.) ubtech.com.

MAKE MOVES

earthquake survivors in rubble. mit.edu.

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BRAIN POWER Founded by Facebook, Google, and Intel alum Mary Lou Jepsen, Openwater lines bandages or ski hats with temperature sensors and liquid-crystal displays that use holography to capture red and infrared light that passes through the body, resulting in an affordable, more detailed MRI. Prototypes will be available to select partners in 2019. openwater.cc.

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF INTEL; COURTESY OF THE COMPANY; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF THE RESEARCHERS; ROBYN RASKIN/COURTESY OF THE COMPANY

The Expert Says


S I M O N G J E W E L RY.CO M


SHOES $1,390, Chloé; chloe.com for similar styles.

EDITOR IN CHIEF

ANNE FULENWIDER @annefulenwider

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

KATE LANPHEAR

RIZA CRUZ @rizagcruz MANAGING EDITOR JOYCE BAUTISTA FERRARI @joycebferrari LEAH WYAR ROMITO @leahwyar EXECUTIVE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, LUXURY BEAUTY ERIN FLAHERTY @erinflahertynyc DESIGN DIRECTOR WANYI JIANG CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR, HEARST MAGAZINES ALIX CAMPBELL @alixbcampbell PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JAMES MORRIS @j_alexander_photo EXECUTIVE EDITOR

CHIEF BEAUTY DIRECTOR, HEARST MAGAZINES

F E AT U R E S KAYLA WEBLEY ADLER @kaylawebley COLLEEN MCKEEGAN @clmckeegan SENIOR INTERNATIONAL EDITOR ABIGAIL HAWORTH @abihaworth

SENIOR EDITORS

FAS H I O N JOSEPH ERRICO @j_errico ACCESSORIES DIRECTOR JULIA GALL @juliasgall FASHION EDITOR AT LARGE ZANNA ROBERTS RASSI @zannarassi FASHION FEATURES ASSOCIATE SARA HOLZMAN @saraholzman MARKET ASSISTANTS KATIE ATTARDO (ACCESSORIES) @katieattardo ADRIENNE FAUROTE (FASHION) @adriennefaurote FASHION ASSISTANTS TAYLOR AYERS @ayers_taylor BELLA KHOSHABA @bellakhoshaba FASHION DIRECTOR

B E AU T Y JENNIFER GOLDSTEIN @jenn_edit ALEXANDRA ENGLER @alex_blair_ ASSISTANT BEAUTY EDITORS TAYLORE GLYNN @tayloreglynn SAM NEIBART @sneibart BEAUTY ASSISTANT AMA KWARTENG @amakwarteng BEAUTY DIRECTOR/FEATURES EDITOR

BEAUTY EDITOR

A RT/ P H OTO/ P RO D U CT I O N SARAH STRZELEC @sarahwstrzelec DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR HANNA VARADY ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR CARL KELSCH ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR CASSANDRA TANNENBAUM @rosecassandra DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST REBECCA IOVAN ASSISTANT COPY & RESEARCH EDITOR ALYSSA HAAK @akhaak DESIGNER SUSANNA HAYWARD @susannahayward COPY & RESEARCH CHIEF

ENTERTAINMENT CONSULTANTS

NICOLE VECCHIARELLI & ANDREA OLIVERI FOR SPECIAL PROJECTS @specialprojectsmedia ENTERTAINMENT MANAGER KI WILLIAMS @kiwynell

A D M I N I ST R AT I O N JULI CHIN EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR IN CHIEF MEGAN D I TROLIO @meganditrolio BUSINESS DIRECTOR

M A R I EC L A I R E .C O M SALLY HOLMES @sallyholmes DIRECTOR, FEATURES & SPECIAL PROJECTS DANIELLE M C NALLY @danismcnally DEPUTY EDITOR JENNY HOLLANDER @jennyhollander SENIOR NEWS & CULTURE EDITOR CADY DRELL @hella_drella BEAUTY EDITOR CHLOE METZGER @chloe_metzger FASHION NEWS EDITOR MARINA LIAO @marinaa2214 SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR KRYSTYNA CHAVEZ @klchavez27 ASSISTANT EDITOR RACHEL EPSTEIN @rachelepstein_ DIGITAL DIRECTOR

H E A RST P H OTO G R A P H Y G RO U P DARRICK HARRIS, JUSTIN O’NEILL DEPUTY DIRECTORS CARY GEORGES, FIONA LENNON SENIOR EDITOR LAUREN HECHEL EDITOR LAUREN BROWN ASSOCIATE EDITORS SARAH ECKINGER, CORI JAYNE HOWARTH, LARISA KLINE, IGNACIO MURILLO ASSISTANT AMY COOPER DIRECTORS

P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S RANDI FRIEDMAN @randilfriedman SENIOR PR MANAGER GABRIEL FORD @_gabrielford

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLIC RELATIONS

EDITORIAL OFFICES: 300 W. 57TH ST., 25TH FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10019-1497; (212) 841-8400. MARIE CLAIRE IS PUBLISHED BY MARIE CLAIRE/HEARST, A NEW YORK GENERAL PARTNERSHIP WHOSE PARTNERS ARE HEARST COMMUNICATIONS, INC., AND COMARY, INC., A SUBSIDIARY OF MARIE CLAIRE ALBUM S.A. MARIE CLAIRE IS A TRADEMARK OF, AND IS USED UNDER LICENSE FROM, MARIE CLAIRE ALBUM, 10 BD. DES FRÈRES VOISIN, 92130 ISSY-LES-MOULINEAUX, FRANCE; 011-33-1-41-46-87-90. COPYRIGHT © 2018 BY MARIE CLAIRE/HEARST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN U.S.A. FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE, CHANGES OF ADDRESS, AND SUBSCRIPTION ORDERS, LOG ON TO SERVICE.MARIECLAIRE.COM, OR WRITE TO CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT, MARIE CLAIRE, P.O. BOX 6000, HARLAN, IOWA 51593.

COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER

C O N T R I B U T I N G E D I TO RS Samantha Boardman, M.D. @sambmd Christy Turlington Burns @cturlington Kimberly Cutter @kimcutter Anthony Elle @anthonyelle Audrey Gelman @audreygelman Mary Alice Haney @maryalicehaney Brooke Hauser @brookehauser Sarah Kunst @sarahkunst Alyssa Mastromonaco @alyssamastro44 Janet Mock @janetmock Courtney Diesel O’Donnell @courtdiesel Alexandra Robbins @alexndrarobbins Amy Wechsler, M.D. @dramywechsler C O M A RY, I N C. PRESIDENT Arnaud de Contades VICE PRESIDENT Elisabeth Leurquin M A R I E C L A I R E I N T E R N AT I O N A L EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF MARIE CLAIRE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Jean de Boisdeffre INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY & FINANCE DIRECTOR Félix Droissart INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Nicia Rodwell INTERNATIONAL DEPUTY COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR Elisabeth Barbier INTERNATIONAL CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER Ludovic Lecomte SYNDICATION MANAGER Thierry Lamarre INTERNATIONAL CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Sèverine Harzo INTERNATIONAL FASHION & BEAUTY DIRECTOR Sylvie Halic


D O N ’T L E T

NUM B ERS D EF I NE YOU

ESPERANZA ® MAKE EVERY SECOND INSPIRED WITH SIGNATURE MODERN DESIGN. MOVADO.COM BLOOMINGDALE’S


MACY’S PARTNERSHIP

POWER PICKS

FOR FALL

Adrienne Faurote, market editor at Marie Claire, enlisted the help of the Macy’s Fashion Office to curate your fall fashion essentials. Here, she shares her favorites from Macy’s fall It List and lets us in on a few of their ahead-of-the-trend tips.

Adrienne Faurote, Marie Claire market editor

ALFANI Striped Shawl-Collar Jacket, $89.50.

POWER GAZE My go-to beauty look has always been a natural glow with emphasis on my eyes. Playing up the eyes is a simple trick for transforming your look from desk to dinner. STILA Stay All Day Waterproof Liquid Eye Liner, $22; BENEFIT COSMETICS BADgal BANG! 36-Hour Full-Blast Volumizing Mascara, $25; TARTE Tartelette Amazonian Clay Matte Eyeshadow Palette, $39.

MENSWEAR JACKET This season the runways were all about power dressing, and the menswear jacket is a closet staple. I love how versatile the menswear jacket can be for me—I style it with a pair of jeans and dress it up with a pump or down with a sneaker.

Through fashion we are able to give a woman that boost of confidence that comes from loving the outfit she put on that morning, or the swagger that comes from carrying a new handbag, or the overall sensation of being comfortable in her own skin—arming her to conquer her world. -CASSANDRA JONES, HEAD OF MACY’S FASHION


METALLIC SHOE The ’80s are looming as a big inspiration this season as well. From a strong shoulder to a metallic pump, designers are creating a revival of the ’80s. I love to pair my heels with a sleek skinny jean to make the look feel fresh. VINCE CAMUTO Tashinta Slingback Pumps, $110. 1.STATE Ditsy Floral Print Dress, $129.

THE RED HANDBAG Another way to work the power dressing trend is to make a statement with color. The whole “power red” phenomenon is taking over. And what better way to work it into your wardrobe than with a handbag? I.N.C. Embellished Ripped Ankle Jeans, Created for Macy’s, $99.50.

EMBELLISHED DENIM I think it’s safe to say the denim trend is not going away. Designers are leaning extremely experimental with denim and this season I am loving the embellishments they’re are playing with.

FIND YOUR FALL IT LIST ON THE EDIT ON MACYS.COM/THEEDIT

FALL FLORALS Florals are definitely not just for spring anymore, and


VICE PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER/ CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER NANCY BERGER @nymaggirl ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/SALES & MARKETING

BRENT ALLEN @brentsallen

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/INTEGRATED MARKETING

ERIN LOOP PETRAUSCH @ekloop GENERAL MANAGER KATHY RIESS

I N T EG R AT E D A DV E RT I S I N G SA L E S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING SERVICES

COURTNEY ANNE GIBSON @lujalove JESSICA REED AMIT INTERNATIONAL FASHION & LUXURY DIRECTOR MARLY GRAUBARD EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INTEGRATED SALES MARGOT BECKER ACCOUNT DIRECTOR COURTNEY SANDS ACCOUNT DIRECTOR ALISSA MCCONACHIE ADVERTISING SERVICES MANAGER MELANIE SINGER DIRECT RESPONSE SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER ANGELA HRONOPOULOS GROUP ADVERTISING DIRECTOR LINDA FRISONE GAMBER, (312) 964-4969 EXECUTIVE WEST COAST DIRECTOR MARJAN DIPIAZZA, (310) 664-2891 SOUTHEAST DIRECTOR SARAH WILEY @shwiley, (404) 256-3800 SOUTHWEST DIRECTOR DAWN BAR, WISDOM MEDIA, (214) 526-3821 FRANCE ELISABETH BARBIER, MARIE CLAIRE, 011-33-1-41-46-89-82 UNITED KINGDOM DANIELLE KLEIN, HEARST INTERNATIONAL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SALES DEVEL OPMENT

011-44-20-7439-5542

HEARST ADVERTISING WORLDWIDE

ITALY

PIETRO ROMAGNINI, 011-39-02-6619-3147

PHILIPPE GIRARDOT, 011-41-22-7964626 GERMANY SILKE NOAK, 011-49-89-9250-4653 EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER SARAH DAVIS SALES ASSISTANTS NICOLE KILLEEN, SAVANNAH MILES, LINDA WILOFF SWITZERLAND

I N T EG R AT E D M A R K E T I N G S E RV I C E S

S.T.A.R. LIGHT RETINOL NIGHT OIL $99, StriVectin; strivectin.com.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF INTEGRATED MARKETING

ELIZABETH PETRELLI LINDSEY OFFICER SENIOR INTEGRATED MARKETING MANAGER RAIA SAVAGE ASSOCIATE MARKETING MANAGER BRIANA ROTELLO INTEGRATED MARKETING ASSISTANTS EMILY LYNCH, GREGORY PEPE ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR ALICE STEVENS DESIGNER INGRID FRAHM BRAND DEVEL OPMENT DIRECTOR

P RO D U CT I O N A N D A D M I N I ST R AT I O N HOWARD GRIER PRODUCTION/OPERATIONS DIRECTOR CHRIS WENGIEL OPERATIONS ACCOUNT MANAGER PETER FARRELL

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CONSUMER ENGAGEMENT

P U B L I S H E D BY H E A RST C O M M U N I CAT I O N S, I N C. PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER STEVEN R. SWARTZ CHAIRMAN WILLIAM R. HEARST III EXECUTIVE VICE CHAIRMAN FRANK A. BENNACK, JR. SECRETARY CATHERINE A. BOSTRON TREASURER CARLTON CHARLES H E A RST M AGA Z I N E S D I V I S I O N PRESIDENT TROY YOUNG PRESIDENT, MARKETING & PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

MICHAEL CLINTON @maclinton KATE LEWIS SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DEBI CHIRICHELLA CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER

DAVID CAREY @careyathearst GILBERT C. MAURER, MARK F. MILLER

HEARST MAGAZINES CHAIRMAN PUBLISHING CONSULTANTS

STEVE ROSS

Published at 300 W. 57th St., 25th Floor, New York, NY 10019; (212) 841-8314, advertising fax (212) 492-1390.

Presented by STRIVECTIN

COURTESY OF THE COMPANY

GROUP VP, BRAND DEVEL OPMENT & GL OBAL CHIEF LICENSING DIRECTOR


HAIR: TAKASHI YUSA FOR L’ORÉAL AT MAM-NYC. MAKEUP: JOSHUA RISTAINO FOR & OTHER STORIES AT TRACEYMATTINGLY.COM. MANICURE: KAYO HIGUCHI FOR CHANEL AT BRYAN BANTRY AGENCY. MODELS: BROOKLYN GRANT AT WILHELMINA; HANNAH KLEIT AT SUPREME.

IDEAS SHOES FIRST

BE SURE-FOOTED AND BUILD YOUR BEST LOOKS FROM THE BOTTOM UP WITH OUR GUIDE TO THIS SEASON’S STANDOUT FOOTWEAR OUTER DRESS $2,290, Carolina Herrera; (212) 249-6552. SLIP DRESS $325, Stella McCartney; stellamccartney.com. EARRINGS $120, Maria Black; maria-black.com. BRACELET $225, Pandora Jewelry; pandora.net. CHARTREUSE SHOES $455, PINK SHOES $498, PURPLE SHOES $525, Stuart Weitzman; stuartweitzman.com.

Fashion Editor: JULIA GALL Photograph by KATHY LO Shot on location at the Standard, High Line in New York City

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7 1. JACKET & SKIRT prices upon request, Chanel; (800) 550-0005. EARRINGS $490, Agmes; agmesnyc.com. BOOTS $1,625, Manolo Blahnik; at Neiman Marcus, (888) 888-4757. BAG $3,950, Céline; (212) 535-3703. 2. BAG $2,620, Azzedine Alaïa; barneys.com. 3. BAG $995, Boyy; boyybag.com. 4. BAG price upon request, Delvaux; at Barneys, (212) 826-8900. 5. BOOTS $1,650, Alexander McQueen; (212) 645-1797. 6. BOOTS $795, Emanuel Ungaro by Malone Souliers; malone souliers.com. 7. BOOTS $1,190, Loewe; loewe.com.

MODEL: PHOTOGRAPH BY KATHY LO; BAGS AND SHOES: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D

6

Look for something in a solid color with a super-large latch

2

Short and shapely with just a clever touch of contrast is the way to go

THE BAG

A GRAPHIC BLACK-AND-WHITE BOOTIE + A STRUCTURED OVERSIZE-BUCKLE BAG = THE SMARTEST DUO FOR FALL

1

THE BOOT

THE FORMULA

101 IDEAS


© 2018 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved

A NEW ERA OF STYLE Presenting PANDORA ReflexionsTM, a bracelet you can wear in limitless ways.

us.pandora.net


101 IDEAS BOARDROOM BUY

WESTERN UNION

COWBOY BOOTS CAN MEAN BUSINESS WHEN SUITED UP IN OFFICEAPPROPRIATE PLAID CAPE DRESS $3,390, BOOTS $1,190, Fendi; fendi.com.

Mix and match complementary menswear patterns to round out the look.

Photograph by ALLIE HOLLOWAY

MANICURE: KAYO HIGUCHI FOR CHANEL AT BRYAN BANTRY AGENCY. MODEL: CLAIRE @ PARTS MODELS.

Style Hack


101 IDEAS DRAMA CLUB

GRAND STAND

INVEST IN A SHOWSTOPPING STILETTO TO GIVE ANY LOOK A LIFT

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALLIE HOLLOWAY

SHOES $4,295, Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello; (212) 980-2970.

October 2018

MARIEC L AIRE.C OM

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101 IDEAS TOP MARKS

GROUP DYNAMIC

Style Hack A combination of subtly different shades of one color is the epitome of polished perfection.

SYNC UP YOUR ACCESSORIES IN DEEP AUTUMNAL TONES WITH GILDED ACCENTS. THE VERSATILE DAY-TO-NIGHT RESULT IS AS DOWN-TOEARTH AS IT IS REFINED

PHOTOGRAPH BY KATHY LO

COAT, GLOVES & BAG prices upon request, DRESS $2,200, BOOTS $1,590, Salvatore Ferragamo; (866) 337-7242. TOP BRACELET price upon request, Vhernier; (646) 343-9551. MIDDLE CUFF price upon request, Bulgari x Zaha Hadid; (800) BULGARI. BOTTOM BANGLE price upon request, Marco Bicego; at Saks Fifth Avenue, (212) 753-4000.

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Now, draw hair-like strokes with ease. For naturally defined brows that last.

NEW TM

TATTOO STUDIO BROW TINT PEN UP TO

24H WEAR

BEFORE Sparse brows.

AFTER Full and defined brows.

NEW Multi-prong tip

Available in 4 shades. #MNYBROWS

Maybelline.com Emily is wearing New Tattoo Studio™ Brow Tint Pen in Medium Brown. ©2018 Maybelline LLC.


101 IDEAS

STROLL PLAY

HIT THE PAVEMENT IN FALL’S PERFECT BOOTS: A PAIR WITH A STURDY HEEL, A STRONG COLOR, AND JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF SLOUCH LEFT: TOP $724, SKIRT $638, Anna Sui; annasui.com. BOOTS $755, Longchamp; longchamp.com. RIGHT: DRESS $891, Anna Sui; annasui.com. CAR SEAT STROLLERS WITH BASES $499 each, Doona; albeebaby.com.

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BEST IN CLASS


Our 1st multi-use foundation stick. Full coverage to cover, conceal & touch up. NEW

SUPER STAY UP TO

24H

MULTI-USE FOUNDATION STICK

Cream-to-powder finish. For normal to oily skin.

Maybelline.com New Super Stay Multi-Use Foundation Stick in Shade 330 Toffee. ©2018 Maybelline LLC.

Precision -tip blender


Color so saturated. Shine so irresistible. Feel the compulsion.

NEW

HYDRATING OIL-IN-LIPSTICK with 60% reflective oils

Maybelline.com/shinecompulsion Christy is wearing New Shine Compulsion in Spicy Sangria. ©2018 Maybelline LLC.


PRESENTED BY MAYBELLINE

“THE CONSISTENCY AND FEEL OF THE LIPSTICK WAS SOFT, MOISTURIZING, AND BUTTERY. VERY COMFORTABLE ON THE LIPS . . .” —LAURA, OH

“. . . THE PERFECT LIPSTICK!” —JENNIFER, WA

“ I CAN RELY ON THIS LIPSTICK WHEN I WANT LOTS OF COLOR PAYOFF AND SHINE. I KNOW IT WON’T DRY OUT MY LIPS.” —SARA, CA

“. . . THIS LIPSTICK DOES ALL THESE THINGS THAT AN ORDINARY LIPSTICK DOESN‘T DO.” —TRACY, WV

THE NEW POWER POUT You can have it all—megawatt shine, deep hydration, and saturated color that stays put. Introducing NEW Maybelline® Color Sensational Shine® Compulsion Lipstick. It’s an ultra-hydrating lipstick/gloss hybrid that means your two-tube days are over. You never have to choose—or layer—again. See what readers are saying about lipstick’s new trick!

SHINY AND BRIGHT Discover the oilin-lipstick formula that will change how you think about lipstick— perfect pigment meets brilliant shine in 10 supersaturated shades.

FEEL THE COMPULSION AT MAYBELLINE.COM The quotes derived from a survey of 361 subscribers to Cosmopolitan, ELLE, Marie Claire, O, The Oprah Magazine or Redbook between the ages of 18 to 54 interested in creamy, moisturizing, color-saturated lip color who tried Maybelline Color Sensational Shine Compulsion Lipstick.


101 IDEAS

2

Style Hack Pair with opaque tights to emphasize the contrast.

3

4 1

ACE IT

A COLOR-BLOCKED, ’80S-INSPIRED SHOE IS THE LATEST ANSWER TO “FORM MEETS FUNCTION”

1. DRESS $675, Tibi; tibi.com. TIGHTS $49, Wolford; wolfordshop.com. SHOES $1,395, Givenchy; (212) 650-0180. 2. SHOES $995, Altuzarra; altuzarra.com. 3. DRESS price upon request, SHOES $1,365, BAG $4,100, Louis Vuitton; (866) VUITTON. 4. SHOES $695, Pierre Hardy; pierrehardy.com.

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY KATHY LO

RETRO REVIVAL


101 IDEAS EXTRA CREDIT

PEARL JAM

WHITE PEARL SHOES $1,725, Jimmy Choo; (866) 524-6687. PINK SHOES $995, Marc Jacobs; marcjacobs.com. RING price upon request, Piaget; (877) 874-2438. DIAMOND BRACELET price upon request, Van Cleef & Arpels; (877) VANCLEEF. PEARL-ANDDIAMOND BRACELET price upon request, Tiffany & Co.; (800) 8433269. SUNFLOWER DIAMOND BRACELET price upon request, Harry Winston; (800) 988-4110. DOUBLEROW PEARL BRACELET $4.070, Mikimoto; mikimotoamerica.com.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY ALLIE HOLLOWAY

EXTRAVAGANT STATEMENT GEMS AREN’T JUST FOR JEWELRY: GET YOUR CLUTCHES ON THESE PEARLS AND PUT SOME SPARKLE IN YOUR STEP


PRESENTED BY TACORI

EMBRACING CHANGE Tacori’s Shine Together bracelet features the brand’s signature crescent motif

SHINE

TOGETHER WOMEN. politically charged year, it’s only natural that fashion with passion emerges as the biggest trend this season. Celebrating the strength of women supporting each other, Tacori’s Shine Together bracelet is perfectly on trend. Believing that women shine brighter together, Tacori created this silver link bracelet to symbolize the power of connection. Whether you purchase this statement piece for yourself or gift it to someone you want to #ShineOn, this special bracelet is inscribed with the “Shine Together” message and showcases the brand’s signature crescent motif. Wear it to show solidarity with your fellow women or as a grown-up spin on the friendship bracelet. MSRP: $95 for one bracelet; $175 for two

DREAM TEAM From left: Sherry Park and Michelle Chila from Tacori with Shine Together co-founders Leah Busque (left), and Jamie Viggiano (right), with Valerie Jarrett (center)


LADIES WHO LAUNCH

“WHEN WOMEN SUPPORT & CELEBRATE ONE ANOTHER’S IDEAS WE INCREASE OUR CHANCES OF SUCCESS.” –VALERIE JARRETT

HANDCRAFTED WITH HEART

SELINA TOBACCOWALA

VALERIE JARRETT

NASTIA LIUKIN

LEAH BUSQUE

JAMIE VIGGIANO

NADINE TACORIAN

As the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements clearly show, 2018 is the year of empowering women. We are finding our voices and using them, en masse, to promote change. Inspired by Valerie Jarrett, former senior advisor to President Obama and now co-chair of the United State of Women, Shine Together (shinetogether.us) is an organization dedicated to promoting shine theory: When women support and celebrate one another’s ideas we increase our chances of success. Founded on the pillars of mentorship, sisterhood, and philanthropy, Shine Together shares its “shine stories” to draw attention to everyday unsung heroes while connecting entrepreneurs, investors, and even Olympians with their future counterparts to create more opportunity and achievement for all.

ANN MIURA-KO

KICK STARTERS: Tacori’s Michelle Chila and Nadine Tacorian welcome Power Trippers to dinner at AT&T Park last year

POWER PAIRING Tacori’s exclusive partnership with Shine Together was forged after a fateful meeting with former TaskRabbit CEO Leah Busque at last year’s Marie Claire Power Trip. Shortly after the summit, Busque and Tacori collaborated to create the Shine Together bracelet; Busque and former TaskRabbit VP of marketing Jamie Viggiano then went on to start the Shine Together initiative (@ShineTogetherOfficial). Tacori’s goal is to make 2018 the year of shining on positive success. Committed to promoting positive change, Tacori will donate 30 percent of net proceeds from the sale of each Shine Together bracelet to its namesake organization and use #ShineTogether as a platform to share the brilliance and strength of women. Because sisterhood is always in style.


Chains

L a se r C u t

PAPER BACKGROUND: GETTY IMAGES; FOOTWEAR: COURTESY OF THE DESIGNERS

A-B-C-

Buckle


DETAILS

FOOTWEAR’S FAVORITE ACCENTS, AND EXTRAS

Un z ippe d

A: $1,190, Fendi; fendi.com. B: $625, Emporio Armani; armani.com for similar styles. C: $2,495, Giuseppe Zanotti; (212) 650-0455. D: $650, Miu Miu; miumiu.com for stores. E: $655, Pierre Hardy; pierrehardy.com. F: $1,245, Valentino Garavani; valentino.com for stores. G: $325, Stella Luna; stellaluna.co. H: Price upon request, Balmain; balmain .com. I: Price upon request,

Wr a ppin g

S culp t ur a l Heel Ta rtan Pl at fo r m M A RIECLA IRE.CO M

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BACK IN BLACK

OWN IT

TIGHTS $49, Falke; lordandtaylor.com. BOOTS $1,390, Versace; versace.com.

THE LITTLE BLACK SHOE IS THE NEW LBD. THIS SEASON, SHOP FOR SILHOUETTES THAT ABANDON THE ORDINARY


101 IDEAS Style Hack

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALLIE HOLLOWAY

Slip on ankle-high hosiery or cheeky fishnets to easily switch up the classic look.

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5

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8

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AT THE END OF EVERY WORKWEEK BUMBLE FOUNDER AND CEO WHITNEY WOLFE HERD

OPPOSITE PAGE: The entryway to Wolfe Herd’s pool house is decorated with pictures of friends, family, and her husband of just over a year.

likes to slow things down for her team. Often this means staying at HQ—a playful mid-century-style pad of many yellows and hexagonal motifs—to treat the now-60-person team based in Austin, Texas, to manicures in the designated Glam Room (which doubles as a nursing haven for new moms). But today she takes them to the local Alamo Drafthouse Cinema to see RBG, the recently released documentary about iconic Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The group of staffers, mostly women, fills seats around Wolfe Herd; the theater, with its menu of food and cocktails, provides a giddy sense of playing hooky rather than one of required reading. Betty Boop for President, a slyly subversive black-and-white cartoon, plays before the documentary. The two films are an appropriate combo for this gang: Bumble is nothing if not woman-centric, and its notions of womanhood intertwine strands of the cute with the noble, the ambitious with the decorous, and the feminine with the feminist. A plate of chicken tenders on her lap, Wolfe Herd visibly relaxes when the lights go down. Watching the film, she seems to give herself over to not being Whitney Wolfe Herd, tech-startup mogul. For the first time all day, she’s just a 29-year-old at the movies. Teetering between these two worlds has its price. Earlier in the day, soon after we meet, Wolfe Herd breezily says she feels dizzy. “Does that ever happen to you? I think it’s anxiety. I have so much. Yesterday, I cried for 20 minutes in my kitchen. Why is that?” Wolfe Herd says she used to try to hide her anxiety, but “if people look at me and think I’ve got it all together, why not tell the truth?” One could forgive Wolfe Herd for feeling a little anxious. She’s running a relationships platform with over 35 million users globally that is already in the U.S., Europe, Canada, Australia, Mexico, and Latin America and is launching in India this month. Bumble BFF, a feature to connect with new friends, recently crossed three million users, and Kris Jenner announced in April she was using Bumble Bizz, the app’s professional networking service, to hire an assistant. Bumble is countersuing Match Group, which owns Tinder, for $400 million. (The legal back-andforth started last February, after Match reportedly said it

was interested in acquiring Bumble, which opened its books. When Bumble turned down Match’s acquisition offer, Match sued for alleged intellectual-property infringement.) Wolfe Herd joined Imagine Entertainment’s board of directors in July, and in August, Bumble launched Bumble Fund, a venture-capital arm that invests in women-led businesses. When I meet with Wolfe Herd in June, she is also nursing her husband, Michael Herd, an executive at an oil company who recently had follow-up back surgery after surviving a near-fatal car accident in 2017, and overseeing the second-floor renovation of their house. Oh, and Bumble is getting into the beauty game. Yes, you read that correctly. Bumble has spent several months working with psychotherapists and dermatologists to make serums that simultaneously solve skin and, according to the company, emotional issues. In mid to late 2019, Bumble will launch two serums with quirky names, like Break Up With Bad, the line’s facial oil for “breakups and breakouts.” And that’s just the beginning. Empowering women is Wolfe Herd’s cornerstone, the motivator that fuels all of her ambitious plans. She says her personal goal is to eradicate misogyny—to make it illegal. When I ask if she thinks it’s truly possible to put an end to a phenomenon that has been around since time immemorial, she looks at me squarely, pauses, and says, “We can try.” It’s why she’s working with legislators to get a bill passed that would make sending unsolicited pictures of genitalia an offense similar to flashing in public. (The conversations are so preliminary that it’s too early to name specific legislators, says Bumble.) If a man who’s been rebuffed by a romantic interest hostilely sends an “eggplant pic,” Bumble’s coy reference to a “dick pic,” Wolfe Herd wants him to be held accountable. She points to a nearby stop sign. “If you run it, you get arrested. Laws attach consequence.” So much of Wolfe Herd’s impetus to cast a wide net and make as much impact as possible stems from her life experiences. “They say that the greatest companies in the world come out of someone’s personal heartbreak,” she says. Wolfe Herd famously sued Tinder, which she cofounded, for sexual harassment after being fired in 2014. Though she’s legally barred from discussing the suit, which the two parties reportedly settled for $1 million, she does say that four years ago, “it wasn’t #MeToo; it was #MeOnly.” Years before, in her first romance as a teenager in Salt Lake City, she dated someone who “told me what clothes to wear, certain friends to stay away from, how everyone was prettier than me, and then he would disappear for days. Talk to any FBI agent. They’ll tell you the easiest way to torture someone is the silent treatment. It is severe physical and mental torture,” she says. “My mom had to literally intervene. She went to his house and said, ‘Stay away from my daughter.’” Despite her desire to squash the gender-fueled behavior she dealt with as she came of age, Wolfe Herd still straddles the line between the classic and ultramodern paradigms of being a woman. “Sometimes she wants to be the October 2018

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WORK

@

PROFILE

Wolfe Herd, at home in front of a Gray Malin photograph, is spearheading Bumble Beauty, a new line of serums.

90

expectations for men and women are the same, but “there are more eyeballs on our trajectories. More criticism.” It’s why the two spend early mornings paddle—MICHAEL HERD, boarding on Lake OIL EXECUTIVE Austin, just off of AND WOLFE HERD’S Wolfe Herd’s lawn, HUSBAND or playing tennis on her court. “There aren’t many female founder-CEOs. It’s quite lonely,” says Haney. Having Wolfe Herd as a peer, a friend, has been helpful personally and professionally. “My motto is ‘totally possible.’ With Whitney, it’s ‘beyond totally possible.’ She’s like a queen bee. Her energy attracts people. She’s my brain trust,” says Haney. “Whitney is so good at taking care of people. She’s a boss-mama.” A woman pushing boundaries, even if she’s doing so under the cover of beauty and charm, can easily anger a faction of men in this country. In April, two months after the Parkland shootings, Bumble banned guns from profile pictures, and Wolfe Herd received an angry email from one man who threatened “to put his Glock and his youknow-what in my mouth,” sending a picture of each. Another critic reportedly published false rumors about her, accompanied by her picture and her cell number, on neo-Nazi site the Daily Stormer in 2017; the company received hundreds of messages from men detailing how they wanted to mutilate the female employees and writing traditional wife. She’ll work a 12-hour day and come that women existed only for their pleasure. The Austin home. I’ll say, ‘Let’s order in,’ and she’ll want to cook police camped out at Bumble’s offices for a week, and the dinner instead,” says her husband. Wolfe Herd has FBI got involved. Today, a source close to Wolfe Herd says cultivated a public persona that screams lovely; think her house in a gated community has multiple security Audrey Hepburn—if Hepburn used terms like “intersecsystems, Bumble’s new HQ has full-time security, and tional feminism.” But Herd adds, “No Harvard Business Wolfe Herd travels with a bodyguard. School tells you how to do what Whitney’s done. She All the pushback, the lawsuits, and the ugly threats do stood up against a multibillion-dollar corporation that is motivate her. Just before Wolfe Herd takes her staff to had every ability to swallow her up. You don’t leave see RBG, there is an all-hands meeting at HQ. Everyone Exxon and start Chevron. She did. It’s unbelievable: Her gathers in an open central space on long yellow velvet ambition, strength, and ability to persevere have created couches. Wolfe Herd sits just apart and is being videoed so much success.” for satellite offices—about 30 employees work outside of Yet Wolfe Herd often tempers that success with a kind Texas, in cities like New York, Paris, Mexico City, London, of prettiness and accessibility that seem to prove she and Sydney—to watch her answer anonymous questions doesn’t feel times have changed enough—something she submitted by employees. The last one: What is the future discusses regularly with her good friend Ty Haney, the of Bumble? founder and CEO of Austin-based Outdoor Voices sportsTo grow. “I fucking love this,” Wolfe Herd says of the wear. “Men are expected to be ruthless. They’re allowed to cut people down. I feel like I have this expectation to bend, challenge. “I want to take this sucker around the planet. Then, who knows, maybe we’ll work with Bezos and Musk to fold, to be nice to everyone, and if I’m not I’m labeled a and take it beyond.” B-I-T-C-H,” says Wolfe Herd. Haney says the performance

MA RI EC L A IR E .C O M October 2018

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Umm Ahmed (center) holding one of her daughters in al-Shahama detention camp, for families of those accused of having ties to the Islamic State, near Tikrit in central Iraq, 2018

WEDDED TO ISIS

NOW THAT THE ISLAMIC STATE HAS LOST ITS MILITANT GRIP ON IRAQ, WHAT WILL BECOME OF THE WOMEN BEING PUNISHED FOR THEIR HUSBANDS’ CRIMES? By SOPHIA JONES Photographs by ANDREA DICENZO Late at night, when the wind whips between the rows of sand-caked tents in a detention camp about three hours north of Baghdad, Umm Ahmed’s mind drifts to the orange tree that once stood in the courtyard of her former home in Mosul, then Iraq’s second largest city. There, in her mind, she hears her husband, Ali, cracking jokes as her children eat lunch. If only for a moment, she’s at peace. But for Umm Ahmed—who, for fear of retribution, asked to be identified only as umm, the Arabic word for mother, and Ahmed, the first name of her 14-year-old son—the memory is fleeting. Umm Ahmed is accused of being the widow of an Islamic State supporter. There has been no trial. She says Ali was a nurse given an impossible choice: pledge allegiance to ISIS or die. As head of the household, her husband of 16 years held the decision-making power; Umm Ahmed says she had no voice in the outcome. Ali chose life, vowing to serve ISIS, though his service wouldn’t last long. He died in what was likely an air strike or heavy artillery fire, along with two of her five sons, Haresh and Ayman, in early June 2017, during the United States–backed offensive to drive ISIS fighters out of Mosul. One

moment Umm Ahmed was washing her face, and the next she was frantically digging through rubble for her family. “I will never forget that moment,” she says. “How can I?” Now Umm Ahmed lives with her three surviving sons, two daughters, and nine other family members in a detention camp called al-Shahama, near Tikrit in central Iraq. She’s essentially a prisoner, as she has been since Iraqi security sent her to the camp shortly after Ali was killed. When U.S.-backed Iraqi forces declared victory over ISIS in July 2017, there was celebration the world over. But what came next was far from black-and-white: Who gets punished for alleged ISIS ties and crimes, and who goes free? Iraqi security forces, militias, and tribal leaders have detained and forcibly relocated thousands of people in an attempt, they say, to root out extremists. Among those rounded up have been Iraqi women and foreigners from Syria, Turkey, Germany, France, and the U.S., according to sources in Baghdad familiar with detainees. (The U.S. State Department would not confirm U.S. citizens are imprisoned.) As Iraq tries to rebuild, women in former ISIS-held cities are relishing October 2018

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their newfound freedom. They’re graduating from college, wearing bright colors, and reclaiming lost time. But women accused of ISIS affiliation say they’re being collectively punished for the crimes of violent men who “only brought destruction,” as Umm Ahmed puts it. For these women, being branded an ISIS wife, or even the distant cousin of an ISIS fighter, means they’re social pariahs, often denied medical attention, government identification cards, birth and marriage records necessary to cross checkpoints and access state services, and, most distressingly, the right to return home. ISIS MILITANTS STORMED MOSUL IN JUNE 2014, riding in from Syria in pickup trucks. They took control of the city with ease, seizing weapons and declaring Mosul part of their “caliphate,” what they said was a true Islamic State. After decades of war, bitter divisions, and distrust of the government, many residents welcomed the takeover as the lesser evil, finding hope in the militants’ promise: a better life, rule of law, a place where Sunni Muslims could live without fear. But the group’s brutality consumed Mosul. Women no longer had a choice in what they wore. ISIS forced them to wear black abayas and veils covering the face and eyes. Cigarettes and alcohol were banned; so were music, cell phones, and the commingling of men and women. Those who disobeyed faced whippings, hefty fines, detention, and even execution—often in public rituals designed to terrify others into submission. Families sheltered children inside, fearing they’d be recruited. Some willingly pledged allegiance. Men became fighters, mechanics, or bomb makers, while women served as “morality police,” patrolling streets for those who didn’t fall in line. But others say they were merely trying to survive, caught up in a war they did not start. Umm Ahmed says militants sent Ali’s name to checkpoints around the city so they could not easily escape. For years, ISIS did everything in its power to keep civilians, including its own fighters, from fleeing. They needed strength in numbers. A 2018 United Nations report estimates ISIS counts up to 30,000 members. But when ISIS fell in 2017, Umm Ahmed found herself a prisoner once more. Even after Ali’s death, his family name is on a long list of people accused of ties to ISIS who have been 94

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FROM TOP: Maha, center, chats with family members in their home in Mosul’s Old City, 2018; a detained woman with her children in al-Shahama, 2018; Hala, 23, whose husband was killed fighting the government, is detained in alShahama camp with her oneyear-old son.

detained or are wanted by Iraqi security forces, ensuring that Umm Ahmed is always linked to her husband’s decision to pledge allegiance to ISIS. The camp is filled with hundreds of families just like hers, most of them made up of widows and children. There, they wait indefinitely. It’s a place of crushing boredom, shut off from the outside world; cell phones have been confiscated and may only be used in the presence of camp management. Water is pumped from tanks and carried in buckets across dusty gravel to filthy, overcrowded tents. There is no privacy. Though the camp isn’t officially called a prison or detention center, it’s effectively that. Those held inside are forbidden to leave without permission from security forces and tribal leaders, and that permission is difficult to come by. “There is a family behind every [accused] man,” says 33-year-old Ikhlas, a mother of six whose husband was a taxi driver who drove families fleeing ISIS to safety in Kurdish government-controlled territory. Ikhlas insists her husband didn’t join ISIS. When militants came to Mosul, her family had nowhere else to go. “I didn’t think of anything but fleeing,” Ikhlas says. She miscarried during an air strike before deciding her family would die if they didn’t risk the journey out. One week before they left, another family tried to escape. ISIS members killed them, including their children, in the street. Ikhlas’s family walked through the night, dodging ISIS checkpoints, to reach a camp for displaced Iraqis, roughly 40 miles away. On the day they arrived, Iraqi security detained Ikhlas’s husband. She hasn’t seen him since May 2017. “All I want to know is if he’s detained somewhere and to let him know his family is OK,” she says, sobbing. “My heart would stop if I could talk to him.” Women branded “ISIS wives,” like Umm Ahmed and Ikhlas, are the most vulnerable. Many report sexual harassment and assault by members of the security forces. They say, “You have to come see me at 2 a.m. or you’re ISIS,” according to one camp facilitator who spoke on condition of anonymity. “It’s very difficult. We hide them,” he says, referring to how camp staff relocate women to other tents to try to protect them. Other women are unabashed about their families’ ties. “My husband was ISIS,” says a soft-spoken woman from Hawija, in northern Iraq. She goes by the name Umm Maimouna (or mother of Maimouna, her daughter). “I was against it, but he joined and I couldn’t convince him,” she adds. Umm Maimouna says her husband, who studied Islam, joined ISIS because the militants said they “came in the name of religion.” She didn’t know how to leave him in a culture where divorce often brings ostracization. Her husband has been missing for more than two years. She assumes he’s dead. Like many women here, Umm Maimouna has no education or work experience and thus no way to support herself. She lives in a tent with a dozen accused women and children, entirely reliant on aid from international organizations and unable to return home because tribal leaders and neighbors have banished her family. “No one likes this path,” she says.


UMM AHMED AND UMM MAIMOUNA SAY their fates were sealed by their husbands, but what about the women who traveled to Iraq and Syria in the name of ISIS? Iraq has detained approximately 1,350 foreign women accused of ISIS ties, along with hundreds of their young children, who are imprisoned with the women as they await trial. Whether the foreigners came for adventure, religion, or love, they all face the full force of the Iraqi justice system. German citizen Linda Wenzel, 17, met a man online who convinced her to join the caliphate when she was 15. She traveled to Turkey, then Syria, then Iraq, where she married a Chechen ISIS fighter. According to news reports, Wenzel says the propaganda videos she watched before leaving were “rosy,” showing “another world” in which “men and their wives and children wandered together through parks.” But reality was a nightmare. “Why, you idiot, did you come here?” Wenzel would ask herself, she recalled in an interview with German media in Baghdad. In July 2017, Iraqi forces found her in a pile of rubble in Mosul; she’s been detained since. This February, she reportedly narrowly escaped the death penalty, an Iraqi court instead sentencing her to six years in prison. In Baghdad’s counterterrorism court, a maze of hallways and courtrooms stacked high with paperwork, women have mere minutes to defend themselves. One morning in March, a dozen female detainees from Turkey and Central Asia lined up outside a courtroom. One after another, they were led to a wooden cage in the middle of the room. Bouncing babies and straining to understand the judge through a court-appointed translator, they stood accused of supporting ISIS by virtue of illegally traveling to Iraq and living under militant rule. None were accused of killing, but their sentences were the same as those given to the most violent ISIS fighters: death by hanging. The women didn’t have their own lawyers; they relied on the same aging public defender, who sat mostly in silence. There seemingly to comply with international law, he offered no compelling defense for the accused. Judge Abdul-Sattar al-Birqdar, a judiciary spokesman, maintains Iraq’s legal system is sound. Those who are innocent will be found not guilty, and sentences for the guilty will “deter others from terrorism in the future,” he says. But the swiftness of trials—and death sentences—has shocked human-rights groups like Amnesty International. “This is not justice,” muttered a Turkish former teacher in her 20s when she learned she would be put to death. Iraqis disagree about what the fate of these women should be. Those who joined willingly are largely considered traitors. “They destroyed this city, this nation,” says 24-year-old Moaj, a biology student, as she sat on a bench at Mosul University in front of the remains of a library torched by ISIS. “I hope whatever they did to people, there is twice the catastrophe for them.” But she’s torn about what should happen to women who say they were helpless. “They couldn’t leave,” she says. Some are guilty, she says, but some are not. The question is whether Iraq’s justice system can fairly differentiate between the two.

FROM TOP: Maha’s sister pulls colorful clothing from a drawer (under ISIS, women could wear only black), 2018; a detained woman and child at al-Shahama, 2018; women survey a heavily damaged market in the Old City of Mosul, 2018.

Thirty-year-old Maha, a nurse who worked at al-Jamhuri hospital in Mosul’s Old City for nearly three years under ISIS rule, has no sympathy for women linked to ISIS. “They must be punished,” she says, sitting in the courtyard of her family’s house, one of the few in the area that survived the war. At the hospital, she was forced to treat ISIS fighters and civilians, some of them young girls sexually enslaved by ISIS. “I felt really sorry for them,” Maha says. “They were innocent.” Maha’s aunt wants to see women who supported ISIS dead. “If I see them, I’ll kill them,” she says. But Maha’s father isn’t so sure. “They are innocent,” he says. “They couldn’t control their husbands.” IN MOSUL’S OLD CITY, a mess of flattened concrete and twisted wire, the prospect of rebuilding is daunting. The once bustling neighborhoods, made up of ancient mosques and homes hundreds of years old, now resemble ghost towns. But to the east, where ISIS was pushed out sooner, life has rebounded. Restaurants are busy, and markets swell with shoppers. In an amusement park, men and women line up side by side to ride merrygo-rounds and roller coasters. This spring, at least a dozen women donned graduation caps and robes and teetered in high heels through the campus of Mosul University. They had planned on graduating in four years, but life stopped when war came, so it’s taken them seven. “You achieved your dream,” read one woman’s robe. “You graduated. Love, Mom.” Clad in bright-red headscarves (the color of happiness, they said), the women hugged and snapped selfies. Gone are the “black days,” as some students call them, when women had to hide inside and cloak themselves from head to toe. “We use the burqas to mop the floors!” one student exclaims as the women around her laugh. Now they’re focused on the future: getting jobs and chasing dreams. But as Mosul continues to rebuild, women like Umm Ahmed are stuck a world away. Neighbors will not easily forget her husband’s allegiance to ISIS; nor will the government. All she can hope for is forgiveness and, along with it, the freedom to safely return to Mosul. Only then could she piece together what’s left of her shattered life. “I dream of smiling,” she says, her eyes focused on the two gold wedding rings she wears, glistening in the warm afternoon light. “But when I wake up, it’s not time to smile.”

This story was reported with the Fuller Project, a journalism nonprofit reporting on global issues impacting women.


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TRULY, MADLY, DEEPLY “I’M INCREDIBLY SENSITIVE TO THE WORLD AND TO THE WAY IN WHICH WE’RE ALL NAVIGATING TOGETHER AS PEOPLE,” KIDMAN SAYS. THIS PAGE: DRESS, $3,190, FENDI. ON LIPS: NEUTROGENA MOISTURESMOOTH COLOR STICK IN WINE BERRY. OPPOSITE PAGE: DRESS, $3,200, BELT, $375, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO; RING (WORN THROUGHOUT), KIDMAN’S OWN.

Fashion Editor:

J. ERRICO


Photographs by THOMAS WHITESIDE

SHE WENT FROM INGENUE TO SERIOUS DRAMATIC ACTRESS (AND HAS AN OSCAR AND AN EMMY TO PROVE IT). IN NEXT MONTH’S DRAMA BOY ERASED, NICOLE KIDMAN BRINGS HER SIGNATURE HUMANITY AND HEART. By BROOKE HAUSER

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Kidman and her husband, the country music star Keith Urban, like to play a little game. Say they’re talking about a guitarist: “When I say to him, ‘What kind of guitarist is that person?’ we do this,” she says, patting her head, patting her heart, and then motioning … downward. “Head, heart, or—” she cocks an eyebrow. “It’s a great way to describe different artists, right?” It is. And it also begs a question: What kind of artist is she? “Well, I always say I’m a pretty even mix, but I’m probably dominated by that,” she says, with one hand over her heart. “If you don’t come from a feeling place, you just end up with an enormous amount of technique. “I have this,” she says, tapping her head again, “but that can be overruled. It fluctuates too. I have a strong sexuality. It’s a huge part of who I am and my existence.” Anyone who has seen Kidman in HBO’s hit series Big Little Lies has witnessed all three elements at play, but offscreen her sexuality also manifests in more innocent ways, like when she sees her husband—who crashes our interview at Noshville Delicatessen in Nashville, where the couple has lived since they married in 2006. “Excuse me,” Urban says, approaching the booth. “Can I clear these dishes for you?” Kidman beams and pulls him down next to her. They eat here often enough that the burgundy-haired hostess, Linda, barely bats an eye when they enter but can’t help exhaling dreamily when they leave: “I could stare at him all day long. He’s just the most beautiful man!” As for Kidman, on this sticky day, she seems to exist in a different climate, wearing her pale-blond curls swept up at the nape of her neck and a charcoal blazer despite the heat. If the other diners have noticed a movie star eating among them, they aren’t doing anything about it, which is one reason why Kidman loves living here. It’s hardly a quiet city—on any given day, the streets are filled with tourists and Pedal Taverns powered by drunk bachelorettes—but it isn’t crawling with paparazzi, like L.A. or New York. It is crawling with country-music stars, many of whom like this particular diner. “You have Vince Gill, who comes every day,” Kidman says, forking some fruit. “He’s usually here for breakfast, so I thought I’d see him.” Kidman now considers Nashville her hometown and her two daughters with Urban, 10-year-old Sunday Rose and seven-year-old Faith Margaret, Nashvillians. (For souvenir shopping, Kidman recommends a place downtown where one daughter got her first pair of pink cowboy boots.) The family home has a recording studio for Urban. Kidman used it herself while singing on Keith’s 2017 track “Female.” “I was eating breakfast 100

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and went down in my pajamas,” she says. “Yeah, I’ll do anything for him. “I have a very sort of quiet life, I suppose,” she adds. “I try to live a soulful, artistic life.” That means “trying to raise my daughters in a really conscious, present way. Time becomes so precious as you get older,” she elaborates. It also means signing on to projects that resonate with her deeply. “I mean, I feel probably more now than I ever have. I’m incredibly sensitive to the world and to the way in which we’re all navigating together as people. Artistically, I can make statements.” Statements like “Love is love”—the message of her new film Boy Erased (out November 2), directed by Joel Edgerton and based on Garrard Conley’s 2016 memoir about being a Baptist pastor’s son (played by Lucas Hedges) who is pressured to undergo gay conversion therapy in Arkansas. Kidman plays his torn mother; Russell Crowe plays his intolerant father. “I waited a long time to be married to Nicole,” Crowe jokes. The actors have known each other since traveling in the same circles in Australia, where director Jane Campion encouraged a young Kidman to pursue acting as a career. “We didn’t talk until a jam-packed house party in Darlinghurst. She was 19, maybe,” he recalls. “I say we talked, but I actually don’t think I got more than a word or two out. She’s kind of held me spellbound ever since.” It’s a subtle kind of magic she casts in person, not so different from the spell she casts on screen, whether she’s playing a fame-hungry weathercaster in To Die For or Virginia Woolf in The Hours (a role for which she won an Academy Award). “Nicole’s acting is too seamless to describe these days, really,” Crowe says. “She is so consummate in how she inhabits characters. In the great actors, there’s always the concurrent contradictions of shyness and showmanship, and acute sensitivity and internal steel. She is brave on behalf of the truth, and that clarity is what makes her so compelling.” Brave. It’s different from being fearless. Kidman experiences fear. “Crippling fear at times,” she says. “But at the same time, I was raised by stoics.” The actress, who was born in Hawaii, grew up in Sydney, the eldest daughter of a biochemist father and a nurse-educator mother. In particular, she credits her late father, who later became a psychologist, with teaching her about stoicism at an early age. “It’s a philosophy, a way of behaving and being in the world, which I kind of don’t have,” she says wryly. “I have a little bit of it, but I have far more of, like, ‘Oh, my God, how am I going to get through this? I can’t get through this! I can’t


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get up!’ And then I think, ‘Get up!’ ” She shakes her head. “I think once you have children, your resilience is built, and your ability to go, ‘OK, I can’t wallow…and I certainly can’t get into bed for a week and never get out.’ ” Still, resilience is a quality she has been building in herself for a long time. “I’ve had artistic failures,” Kidman says. She has endured painful trials in her personal life as well, some of which she has spoken about openly, such as her fertility struggles and miscarriages during her marriage to Tom Cruise. After marrying in 1990, they divorced in 2001, and their adopted children, Isabella, now 25, and Connor, 23, opted to live with Cruise. Even today, Kidman is the subject of intense scrutiny when it comes to her relationship with her older children. “They’re adults now, married and off in their own lives,” she says. “They’re totally grown-up people.” After brunch, she’s heading to New York City to see her “Mumma,” whom she has flown in, along with some friends, from Australia. “I’m on daughter duty for the next two days,” Kidman says. “I’m going to take her to the theater to see Carey Mulligan in Girls & Boys. I’ll take her shopping—you know, things that you do.” While in the city, she also plans to visit with Naomi Watts, one of several Australians Kidman counts among her closest friends and collaborators. (Friends call them “Nic” and “Nai.”) “This concept in Australia that goes back a long way is mateship,” says Bruna Papandrea, an executive producer on Big Little Lies (along with Kidman and Reese Witherspoon) who’s also part of that group. “Friendships are like family.” And Kidman is a crucial part of that family, in both Australia, where she and Urban own an operating farm in New South Wales, and the U.S. Papandrea recalls one time in particular when Kidman was there for her. “When I really struggled to get pregnant, and I had multiple miscarriages, I remember at one of our other friends’ weddings being completely bereft and having that moment where you think it’s not going to happen,” she says. “And I remember [Nicole] taking me in her arms and just saying, ‘It’s going to be OK; you’ll make a family in the way you can,’ and how significant that was in that moment. “You have to have empathy as a human to show empathy as an actor,” Papandrea adds. On-screen, Kidman’s empathy seems to border on telepathy. There’s something almost supernatural about how she embodies her characters. As she puts it, “I get to live my life, but I get to go into other people’s lives too. They’re transient, but I absolutely live those lives.” Once in a while, she steps into a mythical being, like the queen of Atlantis, which she plays in the sci-fi fantasy Aquaman, based on the popular comic of the same name, out in December. (“My way of having a little street cred with my children.”) But she has also entered her share of tortured souls. She recently finished shooting Destroyer, a crime thriller directed by Karyn Kusama in which she plays an LAPD detective who must reckon with bad choices she has made in the past, also out in December. “That was a hell place to exist,” Kidman says. “I was completely in pain, to the point my husband was like, ‘I cannot wait for this to end.’ ” For Kusama, seeing Kidman at work was a revelation. “Nicole the movie star exists, and that is one facet of her personal makeup,” the director says. “But another facet that now is becoming the prominent expression of who Nicole is, is Nicole the artist. It’s not that she’s giving up one thing for the other, but you feel that she’s embracing her role as an artist so fully and so completely. Between takes, I would approach her, and she would still be that character in a way. I would see her mind and her heart both working to explore something. And when you see an actor working at that level, it’s thrilling.” These are the experiences that keep Kidman excited about making movies. “When I have the ability, I always choose to go back to that very basic, in-the-trenches filmmaking,” she says, eyes sparking like blue fire. And lately, she has stepped up her efforts even more to 102

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support female filmmakers and tell women’s stories with her Blossom Films production company. (With approximately 50 movies as an actor to her credit, she just signed a first-look film and TV deal with Amazon Studios, which recently greenlit a TV series adaptation of Janice Y.K. Lee’s The Expatriates.) Kidman traces her own feminism back to her childhood in the 1970s, when her mother used to make her and her younger sister, Antonia, hand out leaflets advocating for political candidates who supported women’s rights. “We’d get teased at school: ‘Oh, your mom is so radical,’ ” Kidman says. “At the time, we’d roll our eyes and be embarrassed. But my sister and I are both advocates now. It was an incredible gift to be given.” As a Goodwill Ambassador for U.N. Women, Kidman has long been a behind-the-scenes champion of women’s rights, but she is becoming louder in her activism. In her best-actress acceptance speech for Big Little Lies at this year’s Golden Globes, she broadcast her feminism to the world, touching on everything from domestic abuse to the power of female friendship. Some of these issues are baked into the first season of Big Little Lies, even though the show and the book it’s based on predate #MeToo. (A second season, with Meryl Streep joining the cast, has finished shooting.) But Kidman’s character, Celeste—who at once lusts for and lives in fear of her violent husband, played by Alexander Skarsgård—quickly became a part of the conversation about power dynamics and sexual and domestic abuse. “I think that’s just when culture and storytelling collide—probably storytelling igniting parts of it and unraveling parts of it. Domestic abuse, or any sort of abuse, and that misuse of power…it’s insidious,” says Kidman, who also received an Emmy for her role. “The day after I won, I was in San Francisco doing a fundraiser for domestic violence. It’s probably the Catholic in me, but as soon as there’s some sort of glory or you receive something, you then have got to immediately counteract it with giving back.” Last October, following multiple allegations against Harvey Weinstein, Kidman publicly showed her support for “all women…who speak out against any abuse and misuse of power, be it domestic violence or sexual harassment in the workforce.” She didn’t reference Weinstein by name and made no mention of being harassed herself by the producer, but they worked together on many films, including Cold Mountain, The Others, and, most recently, Lion. The movement has sparked debate on how we should look at art made by alleged abusers. “I look at those films that Polanski made, and they’re amazing. I’m sort of navigating through it myself with my own moral compass,” she says. “What do you do? Do you ban it? Or see it as art? Or judge it in this time looking back at that time? I have no answer.” But she does have questions. One of her favorites: “‘What do you mean?’ And ‘I don’t understand.’ And ‘Teach me,’” she says. “Those are really important things to constantly be saying. I’m willing to learn. Since I was a kid, I’ve loved learning, growing, broadening, understanding, being challenged, being dissected. And I’ve had some of the greatest teachers in the world.” The late Stanley Kubrick, who directed her in Eyes Wide Shut, was one. “He came into my life and was like, ‘OK, I’m going to make a lot of your beliefs unstable right now for the reason of making you teachable,’ which is a great place to exist in,” she says. Campion, who directed her in The Portrait of a Lady, is another. “One of the great minds,” Kidman says. “She’s got an enormous amount of wisdom.” The actress also tells a story about the late novelist Philip Roth, whose novel The Human Stain was the basis for the eponymous movie in which she starred. As they were getting to know each other, she used to ask the author one persistent question: “‘But why, Philip?’” she recalls. “And he would go, ‘Nicole, Why is the worst question.’” He later presented her with a copy of The Human Stain, which he had inscribed with the words “Why not?” “I sort of live by that now,” she says, smiling. “Why not?”


LIVE AND LEARN “PART OF THE TRAJECTORY OF SUCCESS IS FAILURE. YOU’VE GOT TO BE ALLOWED TO FALL AND GET BACK UP AND HAVE A SECOND CHANCE AND THIRD CHANCE AND A FOURTH CHANCE.” DRESS, $3,995, NECKLACE, $990, SOCKS, $150, BOOTS, $1,390, CHLOÉ. ON FACE: NEUTROGENA HEALTHY SKIN LIQUID MAKEUP BROAD SPECTRUM SPF 20. FOR STORES, SEE SHOPPING DIRECTORY. HAIR: ITALO GREGORIO AT BRYAN BANTRY AGENCY MAKEUP: ANGELA LEVIN MANICURE: TARA FINLEY FOR ESCAPE SPA NASHVILLE SET DESIGNER: ANGEL REYES AT AMAX AGENCY PRODUCTION: IRIS BAKER


JACKET REQUIRED THIS PAGE: JACKET & LEATHER BLAZER, PRICES UPON REQUEST, PANTS, $900, SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO; EARRING (SOLD AS SINGLE), $490, CHARLOTTE CHESNAIS. OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET, $3,895, PANTS, $1,045, EARRINGS (WORN THROUGHOUT), $1,130, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN; RING, $670, GUCCI. ON LIPS: CHANEL GLOSS VOLUME PLUMPING LIP GLOSS.

Fashion Editor: Imruh Asha

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AFTER SIX

Tuxedo-inspired dressing makes evening attire a less frilly affair

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CARLIJN JACOBS


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NIGHT MOVES THIS PAGE: DRESS, PRICE UPON REQUEST, CHRISTOPHER KANE; SHOES, $795, DOLCE & GABBANA. OPPOSITE PAGE: COAT, $3,500, PROENZA SCHOULER; EARRING (SOLD AS SINGLE), $365, DRIES VAN NOTEN. ON FACE: DIOR DIORSKIN NUDE AIR LUMINIZER SHIMMERING SCULPTING POWDER IN NUDE GLOW.


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DUSK TILL DAWN THIS PAGE: JACKET, TOP, PANTS, PRICES UPON REQUEST, DIOR. ON FACE: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK FACESTUDIO MASTER STROBING LIQUID ILLUMINATING HIGHLIGHTER IN GOLD. OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET, TOP, SKIRT, PRICES UPON REQUEST, SHOES, $1,999, LOUIS VUITTON. ON HAIR: PAUL MITCHELL INVISIBLEWEAR MEMORY SHAPER. FOR STORES, SEE SHOPPING DIRECTORY. HAIR: FRANCO ARGENTO AT THE WALL GROUP MAKEUP: TIZIANA RAIMONDO AT THE WALL GROUP MODEL: MARIE FOFANA AT IMG MODELS CASTING: RAMA PRODUCTION: UNIT C.M.A., SALAPROD October 2018

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DENIM RENDERED I N R O O M Y, RELAXED SILHOUET TES MAKES FOR A S A R TO R I A L S EC O N D SKIN

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Good Jeans THIS PAGE: OUTER JACKET, $275, MAJE; MIDDLE JACKET, $70, WEEKDAY; INNER JACKET, $70, TOMMY JEANS. ON LIPS: NYX LIP LINGERIE SHIMMER IN SPIRIT. OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET, $90, JEANS, $168, LEVI’S; BRA, $32, CALVIN KLEIN UNDERWEAR.


Stitch Craft TOP, $1,050, JEANS, $995, VERSACE.

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GREAT WIDE OPEN THIS PAGE: COAT, $3,010, DRESS, $945, LONGCHAMP.

Fashion Editor: Jayne Pickering

FROM RUSTIC FLORALS AND RICH TWEEDS TO SOFT SHEARLING AND AUTUMNAL KNITS, FALL’S PASTORALINSPIRED PIECES ARE FIT FOR GREENER PASTURES

Photographs by DAVID ROEMER

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DAVID ROEMER AT ATELIER MANAGEMENT/MARIE CLAIRE UK/TI-MEDIA

OPPOSITE PAGE: TOP, $790, SKIRT, $1,645, DRIES VAN NOTEN.


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IN A BRAVURA BREAK WITH THE PAST, WOMEN CHOREOGRAPHERS TAKE THE LEAD AT THE STORIED AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE

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HAIR AND MAKEUP: STACI CHILD FOR CHANEL LES BEIGES AT RAYBROWNPRO.COM

A Choreographers Michelle Dorrance (second from left), Claudia Schreier, Jessica Lang (both seated), and Lauren Lovette (in pink) with American Ballet Theatre executive director Kara Medoff Barnett (seated) and ABT students (from left) Madison Brown, Grace Curry, Tillie Glatz, Max Barker, and Miuka Kadoi, New York City, 2018. Not pictured: choreographer Stefanie Batten Bland.

lthough so many of the pioneering figures of American dance—Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Ruth St. Denis, Agnes de Mille—were women, somewhere along the way (not surprisingly) men took over. In the ballet world, where binary gender roles have prevailed onstage and off, the statistics have been especially egregious. Only 41 of the 183 choreographers who have contributed pieces to American Ballet Theatre, for example, have been female. The fabled 79-year-old New York–based company (cofounded by a woman, Lucia Chase) is now rectifying this imbalance with an ambitious undertaking called ABT Women’s Movement. To kick-start the initiative, five accomplished innovators—Michelle Dorrance, Stefanie Batten Bland, Lauren Lovette, Claudia Schreier, and Jessica Lang—have been commissioned to choreograph new work. The long-term project will be officially saluted at ABT’s gala opening night on October 17, when, for the first time, the program will feature only the creations of female dance-makers. Says New York–born Batten Bland, acclaimed for incorporating everyday materials such as cardboard and plastic bags into her provocative pieces, “ABT is going to open a wonderful conversation. The timing and authenticity around this project feel too good for it not to succeed.” Schreier, whose parents brought her to her first ABT performance as a toddler, notes “that it is important for the young people coming up behind us to see that the pool of talent isn’t as homogenous as it has been in the past.” Prolific choreographer Lang, whose new ABT creation will be her 101st piece, believes that “to get at the root of the problem, we have to rethink how we educate students in ballet conservatories.” In her initial piece for ABT, Dorrance, celebrated for radicalizing tap dance, topples both gender and genre barriers by putting a man in pointe shoes, which to her are gender-neutral percussive instruments: “We have to define what we want the future of our culture to be, because our culture will define our politics.” Kara Medoff Barnett, ABT’s executive director, fully expects that the dances generated by all five women will diverge from what their male counterparts might have produced. “In any art form, an artist’s experiences inform her choices and the stories she wants to tell,” she explains. “We are responsible as America’s national ballet company to both protect and expand the great canon of dance.” —Amy Fine Collins

Photograph by ABBEY DRUCKER


A Drea m

B Y Kayla Webley Adler

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y Cristiana Couceiro

Dest roy ed


In March, a fertility clinic in Cleveland destroyed more than 4,000 frozen eggs and embryos. This is the story of the women whose hopes of motherhood were lost that day. Among the 950 patients impacted are a trio of cancer survivors who told Marie Claire in exclusive interviews about their fight for reform in a notoriously unregulated industry INSIDE

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in Rachel Mehl’s impeccably decorated two-story home in Pittsburgh sits a steel-gray garbage bag knotted at the top to conceal an infant bouncy chair that features pastel drawings and bits of well-known nursery rhymes: “Humpty Dumpty,” “Little Boy Blue,” “Hickory Dickory Dock.” Mehl bought the chair back in 2003, when her sister-in-law was pregnant; she purchased one for her niece and an extra for the child she herself hoped to have one day. “I remember my niece sitting in her chair and loving it,” says Mehl, 40. “And I thought, My baby is going to love that too.” The chair has been with her through many life-changing events: five jobs, three boyfriends, three homes in two cities, and one cancer diagnosis. In 2016, days after her 38th birthday, Mehl learned she had an aggressive form of breast cancer, and her doctors warned that chemotherapy would likely destroy her ovaries, rendering her infertile. They gave her the option of delaying treatment—jeopardizing her survival—in order to freeze her eggs, thus preserving the chance to have a biological child in the future. For Mehl, it wasn’t even a question. “Many people know what they want to be when they grow up. Truly, my only ambition was to be a mom; it’s the only certainty I’ve ever had,” she says. “I would work jobs, but it was all just waiting until I found the guy, settled down, and had kids. I felt like that’s when my life, my dreams, would actually begin.” Mehl was referred to a fertility center run by University Hospitals (UH), an affiliate hospital of Case Western Reserve University, in Cleveland, known regionally for its fertility expertise. For three weeks, she injected herself with hormones—paid for by the Livestrong Foundation’s Fertility Program, which helps cancer patients cover fertility preservation; the remaining cost was covered by a donor-funded grant program at UH—all the while wondering what impact her decision would have. “Even though I consciously chose to delay treatment, it was constantly on my mind: Is the tumor growing inside of me? How quickly? At the end of these three weeks, is the cancer going to be everywhere?” Mehl says. “It was terrifying.” In the end, she felt the risk and fear had been worth it when she found out her doctor was able to retrieve 19 eggs. “I felt empowered,” continues Mehl, who works as an operations management consultant for small businesses. “When you are diagnosed with cancer, you lose control of

everything. Your doctors tell you what to do, and you’re just sort of on this train. Freezing my eggs felt like I was taking back control of something—I had a decision in this—and I could potentially still retain that future I wanted.” After the retrieval, Mehl went through four rounds of chemotherapy, daily bouts of radiation, and a lumpectomy. By the end of the year, she was told there was “no evidence of disease” left in her body. Her type of cancer has a high rate of recurrence, and doctors advised waiting to get pregnant for five years, so she tried to get on with her life, knowing her 38-year-old frozen eggs could be used to impregnate her well into her 40s. Or so she thought. In March 2018, four months after learning her cancer had returned, while she was undergoing chemotherapy for a second time, Mehl received a letter in the mail from UH informing her that there had been “an unexpected temperature fluctuation” in a tank where frozen eggs and embryos (fertilized eggs) were stored at the fertility center and directing her to call a dedicated phone line for more information. “I felt like the wind got knocked out of me when it set in what they were saying,” Mehl recalls. “I had just had such a string of bad luck, so even though they left room that maybe my eggs weren’t affected, I just knew.” Her gut was right. Mehl soon learned she was one of 950 patients whose genetic material was destroyed when the temperature inside the storage tank rose more than 150 degrees. In a letter dated March 26, UH wrote, “We are heartbroken to tell you that it’s unlikely any [of the more than 4,000 eggs and embryos affected] are viable,” meaning absent a medical miracle, Mehl will never be able to give birth to a biological child. “It’s hard enough not to know if I have a future, and then to try and reformulate what that might look like after a lifetime of assuming it would be having a family—I don’t even know where to begin,” Mehl says, tears brimming in her big green eyes. “When you put your trust in people and practices and institutions and they fail you, what are you left with?” At first, Mehl wasn’t mad; cancer has given her an understanding of the bad, uncontrollable parts of life. “I knew this was going to have a massive impact, and I felt for the UH employees who might lose their jobs,” she says. “I felt compassion for them.” But the more Mehl learned about October 2018

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eggs and embryos have been lost all over the what occurred at the fertility center—the country, from California to Ohio to Texas and careless way her precious genetic material in between,” says Adam Wolf, a partner at the was handled, and how the industry as a San Francisco–based law firm Peiffer Wolf Carr whole lacks government oversight and & Kane. “Individuals and couples need to regulation—her furor bubbled. “I am very, investigate seriously the fertility centers in very angry now,” she says. “I just don’t know which they put so much trust. These are not how there could be such disregard for eggs just storage centers where you store art or and embryos. It’s unfathomable.” your tricycle; it should be vitally important Mehl and two other women who lost eggs that they abide by the highest standards of in Cleveland, Danelle Yerkey, 38, and Sarah care and act in the most ethical way possible.” Deer, 31—fellow cancer survivors who met through a Facebook group for Pittsburgh women with the disease—banded together, F O R T Y Y E A R S A G O T H I S J U LY , with representation from famed civil-rights Louise Joy Brown, the first so-called test-tube attorney Gloria Allred and others, to file baby, the product of the first successful in vitro lawsuits. “Part of the beauty of being a woman fertilization (IVF), was born in England. Two is that you get to choose if you’re going to be a years later, in 1980, the first IVF clinic opened mom. That choice was taken away from me,” in the U.S., ushering in a new era of assisted says Deer, a middle school English teacher reproductive technology. The milestones kept who planned to use the eggs to get pregnant coming: In 1983, the first pregnancy using a with her husband in 2020, when she hopes to donated egg was reported; the following year, have been cancer free for five years. “Those a baby was born using a frozen embryo; 1986 eggs were our plan B, a security blanket after saw the first pregnancy using a cryopreserved cancer. To lose them, that was the last piece of egg. Between 1987 and 2015, more than eight me: my old life, the me that I knew before million babies worldwide were born with cancer, before my new reality set in.” Deer and assisted reproductive technology, more than the others are suing UH for gross negligence one million in the U.S. alone. and breach of contract, among other charges. In 2012, the American Society of Reproduc“The dreams they had to become biological tive Medicine said egg freezing had demonparents were shattered. It’s devastating; it’s strated such success that it should no longer catastrophic. I think anyone who has any be considered experimental (even though the feelings at all would want to help them, as I chance of a frozen egg becoming a baby ranges did,” Allred says. “There has to be accountabilfrom 4.5 to 12 percent). The number of women ity here. Saying you’re sorry is not enough.” freezing eggs has increased sharply in recent Mehl, Yerkey, and Deer want far more years, from 475 women in 2009 to 6,207 in than an apology: They want change, reform, 2015, according to the latest data available regulation—something to prevent other from the Society for Assisted Reproductive women from having to suffer through what Technology (SART). In that same time frame, they’ve experienced. And that’s key because the number of IVF cycles increased by nearly what happened to them likely occurs at 60 percent, from 146,244 at 441 clinics in fertility clinics far more often than the public 2009 to 231,936 at 464 clinics in 2015, is aware. In fact, the very same weekend as the according to SART. Women pay around incident in Cleveland, a fertility clinic in San $15,000 to hormonally stimulate and retrieve Francisco announced that it, too, had experitheir eggs—most often out of pocket, as most enced a tank failure, compromising thousands health insurers do not cover the procedure— of eggs and embryos and impacting more than plus an additional fee to store them, which 400 individuals and families. Further, though ranges from $300 to $1,000 a year. mass incidents are rare, lawyers interviewed One clinic capitalizing on the growing and for this story say they lucrative have represented industry is UH dozens of women Fertility Center, nationwide whose which opened genetic material in 2011 under was negligently the direction of destroyed at Dr. James fertility Goldfarb, a clinics. “This pioneer in the is not the first field. Earlier in his time. We are career, Goldaware of other farb estabincidents where lished the IVF —SARAH DEER, A CANCER SURVIVOR WHOSE EGGS WERE DESTROYED IN CLEVELAND

“Part of the beauty of being a woman is that you get to choose if you’re going to be a mom. That choice was taken away from me.”

program at Cleveland’s Mt. Sinai Medical Center that resulted in Ohio’s first IVF birth in 1983 and the world’s first IVF birth using a surrogate in 1986. A 2010 Cleveland Plain Dealer story said Goldfarb “has built a reputation for being able to build up, or turn around, fertility programs,” and Goldfarb himself touted “the most updated laboratory facilities” and state-of-the-art incubators. This March, that state-of-the-art equipment failed spectacularly. According to news reports, sometime between August and November 2017, a stuck valve caused the autofill function on a storage tank in the embryology lab at UH to malfunction, meaning it was no longer automatically filling with liquid nitrogen, which keeps eggs and embryos at the optimal temperature of –196 degrees Celsius (about –320 degrees Fahrenheit). UH contacted the tank’s manufacturer, Michigan-based Custom BioGenic Systems (CBS), about the problem. In a statement emailed to Marie Claire in response to requests for an interview, CBS says it provided instructions to UH on the maintenance needed to use the autofill function and, in the meantime, told lab workers to manually fill the malfunctioning tank by connecting it by hose to a reservoir containing liquid nitrogen. By late February of this year, the reservoir had run dry, so lab workers began pouring liquid nitrogen directly into the top of the freezer tank, even though, as CBS notes, that directly contradicts the product manual’s instructions. The last time the tank was topped off was Friday, March 2. UH told the Plain Dealer that at the time of the incident it was planning to move the materials stored in the malfunctioning freezer to a replacement tank within “a day or so”; UH has not said why it didn’t use the replacement tank, which was delivered on November 2, 2017, sooner. (CBS says the extra tank was available to UH as of August 15, 2017, but UH did not finalize arrangements for its delivery until October 27.) According to a survey prepared as part of the Ohio Department of Health investigation, on Saturday, March 3, an unnamed lab worker checked the temperature on the malfunctioning tank and noted it was appropriate at about 1:20 p.m., before he or she left for the day. The temperature inside the tank began to rise just 40 minutes later. The lab was not staffed Saturday night, so when a local alarm sounded on the tank at 5:06 p.m., alerting anyone within earshot that the temperature had risen to –156 degrees Celsius, no one heard it. The local alarm should have triggered an external remote alarm that phones lab technicians at home, but the alarm had been turned off. UH says it is investigating why the remote


alarm was deactivated. Had it been in use, a lab worker would likely have been able to get to the tank and potentially fix the problem before its contents were damaged. At 7:20 a.m. on Sunday, March 4, when the first employee set foot in the embryology lab, the local alarm was still blaring. By that point, the temperature inside the freezer had risen to –32 degrees Celsius, effectively destroying everything inside. “We understand the sorrow of those impacted by the loss of their eggs and embryos,” UH said in a statement emailed to MC. (The fertility center declined to be interviewed.) “We continue to support our patients with their clinical care, including emotional support. We do not yet fully understand why the temperature fluctuation occurred in the storage tank and will not be able to make a further determination until we have appropriate approvals from the court to conduct testing. In the interim, however, we are continuing our review to help our industry improve the care for patients.” UH says it has stopped using the malfunctioning tank and that it has purchased four new storage tanks, hired additional embryologists, nurses, and support staff, and instituted new policies and procedures for checks, preventative maintenance, and remote alarm monitoring. It is also offering affected patients refunds of storage fees paid to date ($400 per year), free storage for seven years, and a free “in vitro package tailored to their individual clinic needs” at UH or another clinic if the woman elects to go through the retrieval process again. “When we learn more, University Hospitals intends to share our learnings with other fertility clinics,” the statement concluded. “We want to help ensure the highest standards of patient care for those who seek our services.” But in court filings, UH has denied liability and said, the “plaintiffs were fully advised of the material risks, benefits, and alternatives available for the treatment, and thereafter voluntarily assumed and consented to those risks.” The consent form UH requires patients to sign includes lines reading, “I was informed and I understand that no promise or guarantee is made to me concerning a final result, outcome, or cure” and “There is no guarantee that the eggs harvested and frozen will survive, or that they will fertilize and create a baby in the future.” Lawyers representing the women will argue the forms don’t cover UH’s errors. “While there may be some language that indicates the technology is not perfect, that is not what happened here,” says Stuart Scott of Spangenberg Shibley & Liber LLP, one of the law firms representing Mehl, Yerkey, and Deer. “It

“The dreams they had to become treated more doesn’t say that one of b i o l o g i c a l p a r e n t s been securely. “If there the risks that were that many might reduce w e r e s h a t t e r e d . golden eggs in a vault, your chances I t ’ s d e v a s t a t i n g ; they’d be guarded. of having a There would be child is our i t ’ s c a t a s t r o p h i c . alarms around the negligence in clock,” she says. “That’s storing the eggs T h e r e h a s t o b e how our eggs and embryos.” have been For Danelle a c c o u n t a b i l i t y h e r e . should treated.” Now she Yerkey, one of S a y i n g y o u ’ r e s o r r y wants to ensure no the three other woman has to Pittsburgh is not enough.” feel her pain. “Our women suing UH—one of 61 —GLORIA ALLRED, CIVIL-RIGHTS ATTORNEY main goal is REPRESENTING CLEVELAND PATIENTS legislation to lawsuits filed prevent this from happening again,” she says. against the hospital as of July 13—the course correction comes too late. Four years ago, when “We want everything to be changed: the protocol, the safety measures, the regulation.” she was diagnosed with stage III breast cancer at age 34, her doctors urged her to proceed with chemotherapy right away—warning her in T H E L AW S Y E R K E Y A N D T H E O T H E R not so many words that if she didn’t, she may women desperately hope for are unlikely. The not be around to have kids one day. “And I’m federal government takes a hands-off approach like, ‘You don’t understand; not having chilto assisted reproductive technology. In 1988, dren is not an option,’ ” Yerkey says. “I took all Congress passed the Clinical Laboratory the chances—I didn’t even care if it killed Improvement Amendments, requiring all labs me—because I didn’t want that life after that perform tests on humans to be accredited cancer of being barren.” She woke up in the and to adhere to quality standards. But embryhospital after the procedure with the number ology labs were excluded and, thus, fertility 33 scrawled on her hand to represent the clinics can choose to be accredited or not. (Most number of eggs retrieved; ultimately, 24 of her do; according to the Society for Assisted eggs were deemed viable and placed in a Reproductive Technology, of the 464 surveyed storage tank at UH for safekeeping. for its 2015 report, 92 percent were accredited.) Her oncologist then proceeded with An amendment passed in 1995 prohibiting treatment, giving Yerkey a drug known to have the Department of Health and Human Serdisastrous effects on fertility. “I thought, Well, vices from funding the creation or destruction I’ll be OK because I have my eggs, so let’s save of human embryos for research purposes my life. I have 24 viable eggs; that will be my further explains why there hasn’t been more future,” she says. “They were my light at the federal involvement. “With government end of the tunnel.” funding comes government oversight. If the In March, Yerkey called UH after her mom government isn’t contributing to this work, it heard about the incident on television. She doesn’t really have a foothold to say, ‘This is collapsed on the floor of her kitchen in the how you should do it,’” says Dov Fox, professor two-bedroom townhouse she shares with and faculty director of the Center for Health three rescue pugs upon hearing the news. Law Policy and Bioethics at the University of “I screamed so loud, the neighbor probably San Diego School of Law. “The position that thought I was dying. I cried all that weekend. Congress reached then, and really hasn’t I wanted to die. And I’ve been in mourning for budged from since, is that it’s going to stay out the two months since then,” Yerkey says. “I felt of the way.” It’s “extremely rare” for the like I lost a child that day.” government to take such a hands-off approach, The fact that UH knew the storage tank was Fox adds. “In every other area of medical problematic and did not do more to safeguard research, the government plays a big part. its contents is what bothers Yerkey most. How research is conducted, what kinds of “Cancer is no one’s fault—you can’t help if you certification or training practitioners need—all get it—but this could have been prevented. of that is fair game for every other area of This was someone’s fault. This was someone’s medicine except this one.” carelessness. That makes it harder to swallow,” The main form of federal oversight comes she says. “Those eggs were worth more than from the Food and Drug Administration gold. If someone offered me a million dollars (FDA), which regulates all drugs and medical for an egg, I would say no.” And, Yerkey adds, devices used in assisted reproductive technolhad the eggs been made of gold, they may have ogy, as it does in every field of medicine; October 2018

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the agency also mandates donated eggs and sperm be tested for communicable diseases. But it does not control how clinics maintain storage tanks because they don’t fall under the FDA’s jurisdiction since they are not marketed to patients. When it comes to reproductive legislation, the U.S. is an outlier. “If you step almost anywhere else in the world, assisted reproduction is far more heavily regulated,” says Rene Almeling, a sociologist at Yale University and author of Sex Cells: The Medical Market for Eggs and Sperm. The United Kingdom, for example, has a government agency, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, dedicated to regulating the industry. There are positives to the lack of oversight. The U.S. does not restrict who can use reproductive technology to make a baby, while in France, for example, only heterosexual couples can access donor sperm, forcing lesbians and single women to go elsewhere. “Historically, when governments get involved in telling people who can reproduce, how, and with whom, it does not end well,” says Almeling, citing the eugenics movement in the U.S., which for some 70 years sought to eliminate supposed negative genetic traits through forced sterilization of poor, uneducated, and minority populations. Neither major political party is expected to push for more regulation. Democrats aren’t likely to touch fertility because of how close the issue is to the abortion debate. “Any attempt to regulate reproductive technology almost inevitably leads to difficult questions relating to abortion,” says I. Glenn Cohen, director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. “As a result, people have been shy, including those on the left who might be interested in pushing regulation in this area, because once they do so, there’s a real possibility it ends up resulting in restricting women’s reproductive rights.” Republicans similarly aren’t inclined to wade in because the whole idea of assisted reproductive technology (ART) makes them uncomfortable and regulating it is seen as tantamount to condoning it. “A significant number of conservatives find ART troubling or immoral,” Fox says. “They view the creation of life inside a lab as playing God and think if you regulate this stuff, you implicitly approve of the underlying practice that you disapprove of.” But that doesn’t entirely explain why the gov132

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ernment couldn’t impose a set of safety protocols, require annual inspections (currently, accredited clinics are inspected every other year), or codify straightforward reforms such as splitting up genetic material in two or more storage tanks so that a patient’s eggs aren’t literally in one basket. Few clinics take such additional safety measures because they add cost and complicate record keeping. “I’m aware of a handful of clinics storing material from one patient in two tanks, but this is currently not standard practice,” says Catherine Racowsky, director of the assisted reproductive technology lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Such legislative changes may come in Ohio, at least. State senator Joe Schiavoni, a Democrat, plans to introduce a bill to regulate fertility clinics that will include “reasonable changes” that won’t be overly “restrictive or burdensome” for clinics, including requiring 24-hour on-site monitoring, storing genetic material in different tanks, and mandating that clinics notify accreditation agencies if cryopreservation is compromised. “It’s just sensible,” Schiavoni says. “We have to do the best we can to prevent something like this from happening again.” The American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), an organization dedicated to the advancement of the science and practice of reproductive medicine, advocates against government intervention, promoting the industry’s ability to regulate itself. “The field is best left to professional self-regulation,” says Sean Tipton, ASRM’s chief advocacy, policy, and development officer. “When government starts codifying those kinds of practices, it typically doesn’t understand the clinical science nearly as well as professionals do. You often will codify the technology in place in a rapidly moving field. Governments are slow and unresponsive; that can create some problems.” But as Cohen cautions, ASRM has an inherent bias. “The industry has done a good job of trumpeting its self-regulation as a reason for regulators not to get involved,” he says. “Critics of ASRM think that it’s too close to the regulated community—basically, it’s made up of the regulators—and some of the decisions being made are driven by the interests of people providing the medicine, not always the patients.” ASRM issues extensive guidelines to its members and requires that clinics be accredited, but it has no mechanism to discipline those that don’t, other than revoking their memberships. Tipton says the industry does “pretty well” at regulating itself; in a statement issued days after the incidents in Cleveland and San Francisco, ASRM said, “Up until last week, the history of cryopreservation had been a steady string of improved performance and reliability.” But how would we know if that’s true? Fertility clinics are required to report their success rates—the number of cycles started, what materials were used (fresh or frozen eggs, etc.), and resulting live births—to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but not all do, and there is little consequence for those that fail

to report. (All that happens is the CDC puts them on a list of “non-reporting” clinics.) Further, the CDC does not ask clinics to disclose how often tanks malfunction or how many genetic samples have been destroyed, so there’s no way of knowing how often such incidents occur. “I suspect this happens a lot more often than we know, but because of the lack of regulation and transparency, we don’t really know,” says Naomi Cahn, professor at the George Washington University Law School and author of the book Test Tube Families: Why the Fertility Market Needs Legal Regulation. “We need mandatory reporting whenever there are mishaps like this. It’s important that when this happens, we find out more about it, because that’s the only way we’ll be able to better safeguard people and their precious reproductive material.” As clinicians in Cleveland were dealing with the temperature fluctuation in its storage tank, a remarkably similar incident was playing out nearly 2,500 miles away at Pacific Fertility Center (PFC) in San Francisco. According to a classaction lawsuit still pending at press time, on Sunday, March 4, during a routine walkthrough at PFC, an embryologist discovered a substantial loss of liquid nitrogen, likely caused by a failure of the tank’s vacuum seal, in a storage tank containing thousands of eggs and embryos. (The clinic has not released the exact number.) PFC hasn’t been able to conclude whether all of the tissue in the tank was destroyed; instead, the more than 400 individuals and families impacted have been told the only way to know if the eggs and embryos are viable is to begin the IVF process and see if they get pregnant or not. In an April 19 email, PFC told patients, “After thawing and transferring some of the embryos, we can report several early pregnancies.” For Marianne, a PFC patient who requested we omit her last name, the reports of successful pregnancies only set her up to be devastated again. “They let us be more optimistic than they should have,” says Marianne, who had her nowthree-year-old son in 2015 using an embryo stored at PFC. When she and her husband returned to PFC this April in the hopes of having a second child, they were told all three of their embryos had been destroyed. “Because my son had come out of that same batch, I felt like I could picture them,” Marianne says, her voice breaking. “We knew two of them were girls and one was a boy.” Marianne and her husband were lucky; they happened to have two frozen embryos at another clinic. They transferred one of those embryos in April, and at press time, Marianne was in her second trimester. Still, she and her husband are suing PFC, one of at least 15 lawsuits filed against the clinic. T H E I N C I D E N T S W E K N O W A B O U T in Cleveland and San Francisco may only scratch the surface of how many eggs and embryos are destroyed at fertility clinics each year. Most are likely one-off cases that take place outside of the


limelight. “My guess is that in many of these instances, clinics try to settle and avoid the PR,” says Harvard Law School’s I. Glenn Cohen. “Especially if it’s affecting a small number of people, they try to settle quietly.” The earliest known incident of this kind occurred in 1995, when three couples sued a fertility clinic in Rhode Island, accusing it of losing 15 embryos. More recent headlines include a 2006 mechanical failure in a storage tank at a Florida health center, impacting 60 men who had sperm samples frozen there, and a tank failure in 2012 in Chicago in which sperm and testicular tissue were destroyed. This June, a class-action lawsuit was filed against an Ontario-based clinic where a vacuum-pump failure and temperature rise inside a storage tank destroyed an unknown number of eggs, sperm, and embryos. One impacted patient, Qi Zhang, who is seeking $25 million in damages, told The Toronto Star she had 65 eggs stored at the clinic before the incident. Adam Wolf, of Peiffer Wolf Carr & Kane in San Francisco, says over the past four years he’s represented more than 100 people whose embryos have been lost. “In every single case we’ve had, it has come down to human error and negligence,” he says. “All were preventable errors, and all are the most momentous of losses.” In one particularly confounding case that was pending at press time, a client of Wolf’s named Natalia, who asked we not use her last name, was told the embryos she and her husband had paid $35,000 to Coastal Fertility Medical Center in Irvine, California, to produce and store had simply disappeared, according to her lawsuit. On the day she was supposed to be impregnated, when doctors at another fertility clinic thawed the straws that had been transferred from Coastal and once contained her embryos, they were empty. “It’s been two years and we’re still devastated,” Natalia says. “Those were our babies. We were promised them, we paid for them, and now we’re left with nothing.” (Coastal has denied liability and said in a statement to MC, “We have no control over embryos once they leave our laboratory.”) If there’s any silver lining to be had, it’s that the incidents in Cleveland and San Francisco may have scared the industry into taking a hard look at its practices. “It really shook a lot of people in the field; it’s every professional’s worst nightmare,” ASRM’s Sean Tipton says. “I’ve talked to embryologists who put somebody in their labs around the clock until they had the chance to review all of their procedures.” Paul Bachner, past president and spokesperson for the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the organization that accredits roughly 8,000 fertility labs nationwide, including UH and PFC, says both clinics were to be reinspected this summer. (The investigations were ongoing at press time.) CAP is also in the process of revising the standards accredited clinics are required to adhere to. Bachner said they are especially focused on storage-tank maintenance, temperature monitoring, and the frequency and type of review for alarm systems. UH has said it will no longer store a person’s genetic material all in one tank; PFC has not disclosed what changes it has made. (PFC declined to be interviewed but sent a statement from spokesperson Alden Romney: “The doctors at [PFC] are fully focused on patient care and helping our patients achieve their family building and fertility preservation goals.”) It’s impossible to say what impact such efforts will have. After all, UH and PFC were both accredited and ostensibly should already have been heeding CAP’s guidelines. “My reaction was, if they had the protocols in place, they weren’t adhering to them, and if they didn’t have them in place, they should have,” says Brigham and Women’s Catherine Racowsky, who is also CAP’s incoming president. “CAP accreditation is incredibly stringent. There are hundreds and hundreds of checkpoints you have to pass in order to become accredited. It’s all about making sure you’re adhering to every single one of those checkpoints, every single time, every single day. If you bend the rules at all, you can get yourself into very deep trouble.” None of that does anything to soothe Rachel Mehl. Shortly after she learned about the destruction of her eggs in Cleveland, she posted a letter on Facebook to the biological son or daughter she’ll never have: “You felt so real to me. So close. I’ve been preparing to be your mom since I was a little girl myself. While some dreamed of being doctors or lawyers, I dreamed of kissing boo-boos and letting you eat the cookie batter. I’m sorry I waited too long. I’m sorry I couldn’t save you.”

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Q&A

The SHRINK Is IN

IF THE 24/7 NEWS CYCLE DRIVES YOU CRAZY, YOU HAVE BAD NEWS TO TELL A FRIEND, OR YOU’RE NOT A VELCRO GIRLFRIEND, OUR RESIDENT PSYCHIATRIST HAS ADVICE FOR YOU Q: The news these days makes me feel either depressed or outraged and ultimately defeated. How do I channel those feelings into something positive? Studies show the barrage of disturbing and infuriating stories can worsen feelings of anxiety, lead to sadness, and flip you into a bad mood. Negative news stories have also been shown to exacerbate personal worries unrelated to the content of the story itself. In other words, a story about a disheartening political situation can amplify concerns about your relationship. The 24/7 news cycle is emotionally draining. It’s so easy to tumble down the rabbit hole of live updates as an event unfolds. The irony is that following a breaking event may make us feel more involved but does not

necessarily make us more informed. Most of the time, it’s noise, not news. So how do we stay on top of the issues without feeling overloaded? The key is to optimize how, when, and from where you get your news. Here are a few tips that have helped me and my patients stay sane: 1. Turn off notifications and digital alerts from news sources on all your devices. 2. Designate a time—either once or twice a day—to get your news fix from an established source, not social media. 3. Read or watch stories that intelligently present digested and reliable information about what has happened. 4. Skip commentary and media that predict what might happen. Listening to pundits and so-called experts weigh in on the future is

basically glorified gossip. Learn the facts; don’t follow opinions. 5. Avoid checking the news first thing in the morning and before bed, which might hijack your day or interfere with sleep. Once you gain control over your news consumption, not only will you be calmer and more productive, you’ll be better informed and in a position to make better decisions about what you want to do about what you’ve learned.

Q: What is a sensitive approach to delivering bad news to a friend? Resist the impulse to sugarcoat the situation or beat around the bush. As uncomfortable as it might feel for you to be direct, research suggests that recipients of bad news prefer candor and very little, if any, buffer. There is

no need to launch into a lengthy song and dance about how fabulous they are or to engage in superficial conversation about the great weather. If you are concerned about a “shoot the messenger” reaction, remind your friend how much you care about her. According to a study titled “The Power of Good Intentions: Perceived Benevolence Soothes Pain, Increases Pleasure, and Improves Taste,” perception shapes experience. Make sure your friend knows your comments come from a place of kindness and that you have her best interests at heart. It won’t make the pain of the bad news go away, but it might hurt a little less.

Q: Should I feel guilty I don’t want to spend all my time with my partner?

DR. SAMANTHA BOARDMAN IS A CLINICAL INSTRUCTOR IN PSYCHIATRY AND AN ASSISTANT ATTENDING PSYCHIATRIST AT WEILL CORNELL MEDICAL COLLEGE IN NEW YORK AND THE FOUNDER OF POSITIVEPRESCRIPTION.COM.

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STUDIO FIRMA/STOCKSY

There is a misperception that a good relationship means never being apart. A healthy relationship is not all-consuming. It’s important to spend quality time with friends. In fact, research shows that having a strong social network outside of your romantic partnership is good for your relationship. One reason friendships are so important is that they can help you weather times when conflicts arise with your partner. Having that shoulder to lean on will enhance your connection. Friends don’t just make life better, they make relationships happier.


Jane

BACKPAGE

@janefonda

FONDA

THE SUBJECT OF THE DOCUMENTARY JANE FONDA IN FIVE ACTS, PREMIERING ON HBO THIS MONTH, FINALLY FEELS LIKE SHE’S MADE IT 1. IF I WEREN’T AN ACTRESS, I’D BE: A psychologist. 2. BEST CAREER ADVICE I’VE GOTTEN: “Relax.” 3. THE QUALITY THAT GOT ME WHERE I AM TODAY: Willingness to take leaps of faith. 4. MOMENT I FELT I MADE IT: When I turned 80. 5. MOST AGONIZING CAREER DECISION I’VE EVER MADE: I tend not to agonize over things. Life’s too short. Either jump in and do it or don’t.

6. EASIEST CAREER DECISION I’VE EVER MADE: Producing 9 to 5. 7. KIND OF WORK I’D DO FOR FREE: The things I do for free are the things I don’t consider work. 8. FAVORITE PERK OF THE JOB: Having my hair and makeup done every day by two big talents, David de Leon and Jonathan Hanousek. 9. WORST PITFALL OF THE JOB: Not enough sleep. 10. CHANGE I’D LIKE TO SEE IN MY INDUSTRY: More women in decision-making jobs. 11. WHO DO YOU ADMIRE AND WHY? Natalie Portman, Cate Blanchett, and Meryl Streep because of their talent and smarts. 12. LAST THING I BINGE-WATCHED: The Good Place [NBC]. 13. BOOK THAT LEFT A LASTING IMPRESSION ON ME: The Village of Ben Suc, by Jonathan Schell. 14. MOVIE WITH THE GREATEST ENDING: Get Out. 15. ON MY BUCKET LIST: Write another book. I can feel it marinating. 16. COCKTAIL OF CHOICE: Vodka martini. 17. IF I COULD LIVE IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY, IT WOULD BE: Italy. 18. MY PERFECT DAY WOULD BEGIN: Quietly and slowly. 19. MY PERFECT DAY WOULD END: Quietly and slowly. 20. SOMETHING NICE I DID FOR MYSELF RECENTLY BECAUSE, HEY, WHY NOT: I spent all day in bed with my dog. 21. ADVICE TO A WOMAN WITH A BROKEN HEART: This too shall pass. (This is a hard concept to get when you’re young. The elders get it.)

MAX VADUKUL/AUGUST

22. THE THREE QUALITIES I THOUGHT I WANTED IN A PARTNER: Funny, smart, sexy. 23. THE THREE QUALITIES I KNOW NOW MATTER: Kindness, compassion, sexy. 24. RELATIONSHIP ADVICE TO MY YOUNGER SELF: Pay attention. 25. THE CRAZIEST THING I DID FOR LOVE: Moved to France and lived in an attic. FOR MORE JANE, GO TO MARIECLAIRE.COM/JANE-FONDA

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A NEW DAY

What beauty products are you obsessed with right now? Chances are, plenty of them are recently hatched rather than classics. This shift guided “Cults of Personality” (p. 24), which looks at indie brands that have not so quietly disrupted the industry. The one thing they have in common? Unlike so many of the mega beauty companies, run by male executives, all of the brands we profiled were founded by women who have smashed mirrored-glass ceilings. And in the grand tradition of pioneers like Estée Lauder and Helena Rubinstein, who knows what women want better than other women? Speaking of change, knowing the origin of your food is considered de rigueur for today’s well-informed eater, and the same now applies to the products on your vanity. To help you shop responsibly, we took a closer look at one of cosmetics’ most commonly used ingredients, mica, and the efforts brands are making to ensure they’re purchasing sustainable and ethically produced supplies. Finally, we explore the coolest beauty upgrades in “Forward-Looking” (p. 46), the current customization craze in fragrance (p. 40), and the switch from YouTube “contouring” to 2018’s reigning aesthetic: new skincare-makeup hybrids that give you a healthy glow while letting your natural skin shine through (p. 50). It doesn’t get more fresh and modern than that.

Executive Editorial Director, Beauty

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12 INSPIRATION BOARD Beauty sleep has gone next-level

14 VANITY FILES Global lipstick trends, stick masks, and more

18 WHAT I LOVE ABOUT ME Get to know the ladies of Salt Lake City

22 HAIR DIARIES The power of temporary hair color

24 CULTS OF PERSONALITY Female founders are taking over the beauty industry

28 CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SKIN How to (actually) boost collagen

40 FULL TRANSPARENCY Customization has hit the perfume world

44 GLIMMER OF HOPE The true story behind the mineral mica

46 FORWARD-LOOKING The latest in beauty upgrades

50 BARELY THERE Skincare is the new makeup

59

HEALTH NEWS Breast-cancer screenings get political

60

BEGINNING AT THE END The real lessons from breakups

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s,1961

E D I TO R ’ S N O T E

contents

Marie Claire (ISSN 1081-8626) is published monthly, with a combined Holiday issue, 11 times per year, by Marie Claire/Hearst, a New York general partnership whose partners are Hearst Communications, Inc., 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019 U.S.A., and Comary, Inc., c/o Marie Claire Album S.A., 10 boulevard des Frères Voisin, 92130, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. Hearst Communications, Inc.: Steven R. Swartz, President & Chief Executive Officer; William R. Hearst III, Chairman; Frank A. Bennack, Jr., Executive Vice Chairman; Catherine A. Bostron, Secretary. Hearst Magazines Division: David Carey, Chairman; Troy Young, President; John A. Rohan, Jr., Senior Vice President, Finance. © 2018 by Marie Claire/Hearst. All rights reserved. Marie Claire is a registered trademark of Marie Claire Album S.A. Periodicals postage paid at NY, NY, and additional entry post offices. Canada Post International Publications mail product (Canadian distribution) sales agreement No. 40012499. Editorial and Advertising Offices: 300 West 57th Street, New York, NY 10019-3797. Subscription Prices: United States and possessions, $19.97 for one year. Canada and all other countries, $39.97 for one year. Subscription Services: Marie Claire will, upon receipt of a complete subscription order, undertake fulfillment of that order so as to provide the first copy for delivery by the Postal Service or alternate carrier within 4–6 weeks. From time to time, we make our subscriber list available to companies that sell goods and services by mail that we believe would interest our readers. If you would rather not receive such mailings, please send your current mailing label or an exact copy to Mail Preference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. For customer service, changes of address, and subscription orders, log on to service.marieclaire.com, or write to Customer Service Department, Marie Claire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Marie Claire is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art. None will be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. Canada BN NBR 10231 0943 RT. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 707.4.12.5); Non-postal and military facilities: Send address corrections to Marie Claire, P.O. Box 6000, Harlan, IA 51593. Printed in the U.S.A.

ON COVER: DRESS, NECKLACE, SOCKS, CHLOÉ. FOR STORES, SEE SHOPPING DIRECTORY. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JASON HETHERINGTON; RONALD GRANT ARCHIVE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; PHILIP FRIEDMAN/STUDIO D; JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. FACIAL OIL: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. REMAINING STILL LIFE: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

BEAUTY

OCTOBER ISSUE


ogxbeauty.com |

ogxbeauty


BEAUTY A sleep pod at the Dreamery in NYC

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5 Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961

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I N S P I R AT I O N B O A R D

Remember when Red Bull was the jam? The pendulum has swung, friends, and the hottest new “trend” is…sleep. Everyone craves it, and in these anxiety-laden times, it’s no wonder people want to hide under the covers. Just look at the proliferation of sound-machine apps, “napercise” classes, and chic indie bedding companies. The leader of the latter is Casper, which has graduated from shipping boxed mattresses to your door to selling various sleep accoutrements, including linens, a new “nap pillow” that you can place on your desk for a stealth in-office snooze, and sessions at just-opened sleep haven the Dreamery in NYC, which welcomes the yawning masses for 45-minute siestas. Of course, sleep’s beauty benefits are well known. To wit, a slew of nighttime products now aim to optimize them: Estée Lauder’s eye cream targets skin damage done by daily blue-light exposure and circadian-rhythm disruptions; Tan-Luxe’s Sleep Oil delivers a subtle glow overnight; and ingestible aids like herbal “dusts” and melatonin in tasty Executive Editorial gummy form are becoming nightstand staples. Director, Beauty ERI N F L A HE RT Y Bouncy overnight gel masks, like Belif’s luxurious offering, lock in nutrients for hours (don’t fret, they won’t stain your 1,000-thread-count Egyptian cotton) and provide sweet, sweet cooling hydration all night long. Nap time, anyone?

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1. BELIF Aqua Bomb Sleeping Mask, $34. 2. CLARINS Hydra-Essentiel Eye Mask, $38. 3. REN & Now to Sleep Pillow Spray, $25. 4. NAILS INC. Overnight Detox Mask, $15. 5. OLE HENRIKSEN Transform Plus Goodnight Glow Rentin-Alt Sleeping Crème, $55. 6. GARNIER SkinActive Hydrating 3-in-1 Moisturizer with Aloe Juice, $12. 7. AVEENO Positively Radiant MaxGlow No-Mess Sleep Mask, $18. 8. LITTLE AURELIA Sleep Time Bath & Massage Oil, $43. 9. MOON JUICE Dream Dust, $38. 10. NEUTROGENA Night Calming Makeup Remover Cleansing Towelettes, $7. 11. ESTÉE LAUDER Advanced Night Repair Eye Supercharged Complex, $62. 12. MOONLIT SKINCARE Midnight Shift, $34. 13. DERMALOGICA Sound Sleep Cocoon Transformative Night Gel-Cream, $80. 14. SEPHORA COLLECTION Coconut Water Sleeping Mask, $4. 15. BUMBLE AND BUMBLE While You Sleep Overnight Damage Repair Masque, $49. 16. OLLY Restful Sleep Gummies, $14. 17. TAN-LUXE Sleep Oil, $49. 18. SLIP Pure Silk Sleep Mask in Blue, $50. 19. CHANEL Hydra Beauty Masque de Nuit Au Camélia, $65. 20. AMOREPACIFIC Time Response Skin Renewal Sleeping Masque, $200. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RONALD GRANT ARCHIVE/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; CASPER; CSA IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES; EYEEM/ GETTY IMAGES; SJO/GETTY IMAGES; SUCHART KUATHAN/GETTY IMAGES. CHANEL, TAN-LUXE, AND AVEENO: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES; REMAINING STILL LIFE: JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D

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SLEEP

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BEAUTY STATUS UPDATE

LADY PINK

THE INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED STREET ARTIST SHARES THE INSPIRATION FOR HER LANCÔME FRAGRANCE COLLABORATION— AND A FEW OF HER FAVORITE THINGS

EASY GLOWING

Keep summer-Friday vibes in effect well past Labor Day with this multipurpose tint that imparts a dewy veil of color and takes just a few seconds to apply. —J.G. BURT’S BEES All Aglow Lip and Cheek Stick in Peach Pond, $13.

Local Color

Women rock lipstick all over the world, but when it comes to shade and formula, they’re speaking different languages. Here, Mary Kay global beauty ambassador Luis Casco plays trend spotter. BRAZIL: “They’re concerned about looking oily in the heat, so they wear matte everything. The population is diverse, so shades range from nudes and bricks to rich violets.” RUSSIA: “Women here are battling dryness because of the cold climate, so they stick to sheer, moisturizing glosses in pinks and nudes.” CHINA: “Pops of color are big with the younger generation, but they do a blurred-out twist where they apply color to the center of the lips, then diffuse it outward with a brush or balm.” —T.G.

VANITY FILES

THE LATEST IN HAIR, MAKEUP, AND FRAGRANCE By Jennifer Goldstein and Taylore Glynn

Resting Face

There may be an exhaustion epidemic (see page 12), but that doesn’t mean we all have to look tired. Ole Henriksen’s newest serum features bakuchiol (an Ayurvedic herb derivative that’s a natural alternative to retinol) to soften lines, gentle AHAs that smooth texture, and an almost imperceptible lavender tint that illuminates sallow skin. Result: You look like an eight-hour sleeper on vacation. —J.G.

MARY KAY Matte Lipstick in Grazie Violet, Puro Mirtillo, and Orange Mio, $18 each.

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OLE HENRIKSEN Transform Plus Glow Cycle Retin-Alt Power Serum, $58.

From top: OLAY Fresh Reset, Pore Detox, and Glow Boost Clay Stick Masks, $10 each.

Having a Moment

STICK MASKS

Solids are the new sheets in the masking world. The pink-mineral complex in Olay’s (above) sloughs away dulling surface cells. (There’s also a detoxifying charcoal and glow-boosting white charcoal version.) Yes to Grapefruit’s SnapMask Stick ($16) brightens with vitamin C and lycopene. And the Innisfree Super Volcanic Stick Mask ($12) absorbs excess sebum in under a minute. Whichever you chose, the twist-up applicators keep your fingers clean—and your sink from looking like a natural disaster. —T.G.

TAG TEAM: “The lettering I did for the limited edition La Vie Est Belle bottle is derived from 1980s graffiti in New York. It’s hard to combine that edginess with Lancôme’s classiness, but it works; it’s like an elegant woman who is also fierce and strong.” GENERATION NEXT: “There are so many global female artists who inspire me: Faith47 from South Africa, Shiro from Japan, Mick La Rock from the Netherlands, Nina [Pandolfo] from Brazil.” MOST PLAYED: “On S&M, a collaboration between Metallica and the San Francisco Symphony, the orchestra is doing their classical instruments but going fast and strong with the crazy metalheads. It’s my favorite album.” MUST VISIT: “The Queens Museum has an amazing panorama of New York City, with all the buildings in miniature. It’s laid out in one room and has been there for decades. When a building comes down, like the World Trade Center, they take it down; when a building goes up, they add it. It’s beautiful.” FRESH PICK: “I grow all kinds of flowers, like roses and irises, which are actually in the La Vie Est Belle perfume. And I have so many petunias; I just love the fragrance they release at night.” —J.G.

OWEN BRUCE/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM. STILL LIFE: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

LANCÔME La Vie Est Belle Lady Pink limited edition, $94.


PRESENTED BY POND’S

HAUTE HALLOWEEN TREAT YOUR FRIENDS TO A CLASSICALLY CHIC SPOOKFEST COMPLETE WITH A SURPRISE BEAUTY ESSENTIAL FROM POND’S THEY’RE SURE TO LOVE.

NAIL THE LOOK

THEME YOUR FETE

No costume is complete unless you experiment with makeup to completely transform your look. Once you decide on your character, use bold lipsticks and colored mascara to make it all come together.

Keep your event classy by using your costume and makeup as inspiration to plan the evening. Keep the theme alive by coordinating your makeup look with the invitation and party decor. A “Mummy Mash” theme for example, lets guests use creativity in their own looks but also provides a truly #instagrammable experience. Try painting pumpkins white to further communicate the theme to your guests.

MAKE IT MEMORABLE Incorporate interactive experiences into the party. We love costume trophies—who wins the scariest, most creative, and best makeup of the year? You pick! Also fun? A witch hat ring toss and a themed cocktail cart.

GET CREATIVE WITH SWEETS A Halloween party wouldn’t be complete without a

AND TREAT YOUR

SHOP THE TREAT!

remover. Our favorite? Pond’s Cold Cream, which uses 50% moisturizer to melt away Halloween makeup while infusing your skin with the vital hydration it craves. Keep it festive by letting guests pick their treat from a cauldron or hollow pumpkin as they leave.


Trick your friends. Treat your skin. Unlike ordinary makeup removers, Pond’s Cold Cream is 50% moisturizer. It melts away your toughest Halloween makeup, while infusing skin with vital hydration leaving it clean, soft and glowing. Get the look at Ponds.us


BEAUTY

What I Love ABOUT ME

It’s hard to compete against Salt Lake City’s scenic natural beauty, but these locals hold their own INTERVIEWS BY AL EXAND R A ENG L ER PHOTOGRAPHS BY JO EL BAR H A M AN D

Denae Shanidiin “Coming into my look as a Native American woman was very empowering; it felt so meaningful.”

GUEST EDITOR:

MICHAELA DRANSFIELD

Marsroots Kelsi Carma “I’m most confident when I’m outside my comfort zone, meeting people and trying new things.”

“Growing up, I always straightened my hair. One day I decided I wasn’t going to do that anymore and cut it all off. It sparked something, and now I embrace being unique. When I go out, I don’t want anyone else to look like me.”

This bartender shares SLC’s best spots. Chill out: One of the treats of living so close to the mountains is Snowbird’s Cliff Spa (snowbird.com/spa); the 360 degree view is truly memorable. And the eucalyptus steam room leaves me glowing. Retail therapy: Decades is a vintage shopper’s dream come true. Or check out the Stockist (thestockistshop.com), a contemporary store that sells beauty products, home goods, clothing, and jewelry. Play time: If you want to check out live music from local and touring artists, stop by Diabolical Records (diabolicalrecords.com). Night out: For delicious food and cocktails, visit Current (currentfishandoyster.com) and Under Current (undercurrentbar.com), a cool, industrial-style restaurant and bar duo. Must-do: The major Halloween tradition is attending Frightmares at Lagoon (lagoonpark.com), a local amusement park that even allows BYOB!

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO BE A GUEST EDITOR, POST A PHOTO OF YOURSELF IN YOUR CITY ON INSTAGRAM USING #MCTRAVELS.

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Follow #neutrogenamakeup © J&JCI 2018

Good for you never looked this good. That’s Neu.

Kerry is wearing Healthy Skin® Liquid Makeup with SPF and anti-oxidants in Cocoa.


BEAUTY

Kate Hall “I’m a tomboy and keep things simple. Even now I feel most grounded and beautiful when I’m outside.”

Kerry Kalu “My eyebrows are the perfect combination of my mom and my dad. They’re my favorite feature.”

Jai Hamid Bashir Lexi Linford “I used to try to be ‘girly,’ but I realized that just wasn’t me. Surprisingly, I never felt more feminine than when I shaved my head.”

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“I’ve always cared a great deal about how I present myself. It’s a way to show my interior to the world.”


BEAUTY

HAIR DIARIES

DYE HARD

CAN COLORFUL HAIR DELIVER THE SAME CONFIDENCE BOOST AS A RED LIP? MAKEUP AFICIONADO KATE FOSTER GIVES HER STRANDS A TASTE OF THE RAINBOW

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JACQUI MILLER/STOCKSY.COM

M

y life can be measured in tubes, pots, and palettes: the bronzer I overdid in middle school; my first designer eye shadow in college; the bloodred lipstick I bought to feel like Siouxsie Sioux when I moved to New York City. To this day, coworkers hardly recognize me if I’m not wearing a bold lip color. So you can imagine my trepidation when my editor asked me to forgo cosmetics for a week and focus my creative energy on “making up” my hair instead. Could all the new types of temporary hair color—one-day sprays, glitter gels, vibrant clip-ins—give me the same confidence as a red lip or sharp cat eye? I was about to find out. On day one, a Friday, I hit snooze three times. The plan was to pull my shoulder-length platinum-blond hair into a low pony and dab teal glitter gel along my middle part. It couldn’t take more than five minutes, right? More like 20. When I finally arrived at the office, a very honest coworker asked, “Did a bird shit on your head?” I ended up receiving a few compliments, but they seemed to be applauding the effort and not the execution. In an afternoon meeting, my uncharacteristically bare face and overthe-top strands visibly worried colleagues. Their eyes shot from me to my boss: Did she have a mental break? Thank God for Saturday. Inspired by the cotton-candycolored wigs at Jeremy Scott’s fall show, I tinted my tips pink with a temporary spray and hit a meditation class in Brooklyn, where my style was greeted with zen acceptance. The fact that I had on zero makeup seemed to make the whole vibe even cooler; my hair felt less like a statement and more like “Oh, this old thing?” On Monday, I test-drove a purple topknot (painted with a temporary dye that came in a sponge-tipped tube). Now, I’m used to drawing attention when I take the subway to work with my boyfriend: He’s trans, and even in liberal New York, people stare, trying to figure us out. But during the morning commute, I could tell eyes were trained on the top of my head and not him. Maybe they were admiring the bold hue, but I felt a malicious curiosity in their gaze, like they couldn’t fathom a woman taking the time to create such a statement-making hairstyle without making sure her face was “done” too. I tried two more looks before the week was over: burgundy clip-in extensions woven into braids and hair “tattoos” I created by pressing a star stamp saturated with temporary dye onto the top layer of my hair. The looks were fun, but all I could think about was their wasted potential. Without a sooty eye to grunge them up, the braids made me feel like a lost cowgirl, and the stampedon stars were begging for a Barbie-pink lip. When the experiment ended, I realized the best thing about the new products I tested was their impermanence. Painting your hair is a great way to change things up—but it isn’t exactly effortless. With these looks, you need makeup so your face doesn’t get lost. Outfits must be planned in advance to minimize clashing. And there’s so much pressure to be on all the time. After all, you can’t have Rainbow Brite hair and expect to be a wallflower. Next time I want to be the life of the party, sure, I’ll reach for hot-pink hairspray. But for everywhere else? You’ll find me swiping on a hot-pink lip.


BEAUTY Chances are, your vanity has more than a few femalefounded brands on display.

T R E N D R E P O RT

CULTS OF PERSONALITY By JESSICA MATLIN

I

n 2015, you wanted what hairstylist Jen Atkin was having. She traveled the world with clients like Chrissy Teigen and Bella Hadid, hit the L.A. scene with her then-boyfriend (now husband), celebrity photographer Mike Rosenthal, and regularly appeared on Keeping Up With the Kardashians, styling clients-turnedfriends Kim, Khloe, and Kourtney. Of course, she recorded some of that on her social accounts, but her feeds also included videos of her using up the last hiss of a discontinued hairspray, posts giving the side-eye to brands that reformulated their products, and pictures of her “just living my life,” she says. “People followed me because I’m a hair enthusiast.” By 2016, when she launched her own hair line, Ouai, there were 1.5 million people who wanted to live that Jen Atkin life, and she offered them the quickest way in: products designed to be a direct extension

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of her personal brand and signature look, which she describes as “effortless—not polished whatsoever.” The products were an instant smash, one of the first examples of a trend that has only grown since: In today’s beauty world, the girl crush is big business. “Consumers are falling in love with products just as much as they are with the personalities behind them,” says Artemis Patrick, chief merchandising officer at Sephora. While there have always been compelling female founders in cosmetics (from Coco Chanel and Estée Lauder in the ’30s and ’40s to makeup artists like Laura Mercier and Trish McEvoy in the ’90s), the new beauty-preneurs have a clear advantage: “Social media,” says Atkin without skipping a beat. At a moment when everything feels annoyingly targeted and dreamt up by millennial-focused market researchers, seeing a real person— whom you’ve gotten to know while lying on the couch and scrolling

JEFFREY WESTBROOK/STUDIO D. MIRRORED TRAY AND BRISTOL WALL MIRROR: COURTESY OF RESTORATION HARDWARE, AVAILABLE AT RH.COM

TODAY’S MOST SUCCESSFUL BEAUTY BRANDS ARE BETTER KNOWN FOR THEIR FOUNDERS THAN THEIR FORMULAS. BUT THE PRODUCTS ARE PRETTY GOOD TOO


PROMOTION

MIX

the

SEE. SHARE. TRY. SHOP.

OCTOBER 2018

Empowering Female Artisans Around

THE WORLD.

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Science meets STYLE. SHOP

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BEAUTY T R E N D R E P O RT through her feed—feels sort of…refreshing. These women aren’t beauty execs: “They’re wives, mothers, friends, colleagues, and classmates,” says Patrick. “Consumers are human beings, and we connect with other human beings,” says Cassandra Grey, founder of Violet Grey, which carries female-fronted brands like makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury’s eponymous collection; Tatcha, which was inspired by founder Victoria Tsai’s love of geisha culture; and RMS Beauty, a line formulated to makeup artist Rose-Marie Swift’s exacting natural standards. “That’s why I believe in human brands.” Her best example: the Kardashians. “It’s strange to say they’re authentic, but they share their real lives through their channels,” says Grey, whose site sold out of KKW Crystal Gardenia, Kim Kardashian West’s fragrance, in less than a week. The authentic approach wasn’t lost on Marianna Hewitt and Lauren Gores Ireland, founders of the Summer Fridays skincare line. The Los Angeles–based bloggers behind Life With Me and You & Lu, respectively, have a long history of being completely candid with their readers and followers (combined audience on Instagram: 944K). “It’s not a business strategy,” says Hewitt, talking about her and Gores Ireland’s habit of DM-ing beauty tips to their fans or, in the case of Gores Ireland, sharing newmom struggles. Just seven months after its launch, the Summer Fridays brand has the kind of loyalty it takes some companies years, if ever, to develop. “Customers tell us, ‘I feel like I already know you,’” says Hewitt. “They say they would rather buy from us than a big company.” Even the once notoriously private Gwyneth Paltrow has warmed up since expanding her wellness empire, Goop, to include a beauty brand of its own. On her site, she discusses acupuncture, earthing (going barefoot to “energetically connect with Mother Earth”), and pubic hair as if she were talking about the new yogurt place down the road. And while that may not be everyone’s cup of tea, it’s definitely found an audience—and thawed Paltrow’s image a few degrees. Yes, if you want to sell, you’ve got to open up. “My brand is all about sharing,” says Nyakio Grieco, founder of Nyakio, a beauty brand based on the beauty and wellness secrets of her Kenyan grandparents. “When I meet customers, I end up talking to them about their grandparents’ beauty secrets and what was passed down to them,” says the entrepreneur. Chatting pays off: Last year, her brand was bought by beauty giant Sundial, which is now owned by even-more-mega corporation Unilever. Another triumph in “human branding,” says Grey, is Glossier. Founder Emily Weiss didn’t 26

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just build a company, she built a sort of shorthand for her personal brand of insouciant, downtown cool girl. “It’s a club people want to belong to,” notes Grey. In fact, Glossier is one of the only beauty companies that can get away with charging $60 for its logo sweatshirt. And the brands that succeed aren’t just the ones started by founders who want to be your new best friend. Take Kat Von D Beauty, which is a tremendous success because Kat Von D, a tattoo artist, isn’t trying to be the most popular girl at school. “I came into the beauty world like, ‘Hey, I don’t belong here, and I know I’m not the only one,’” she says. “I think people ad-

A decade ago, mingling at a corporate product launch probably wouldn’t have been that enticing, but now those invites are coveted— especially if they offer the opportunity to snap a pic with the HBIC. “Female entrepreneurs are the new movie stars,” says Grey. “They represent the American dream.” Unlike the celebrities of yesteryear, who often had talents—not to mention looks—women could only dream of, the women behind many of today’s topselling brands offer achievable inspiration. “A customer told me, ‘You inspire me to follow a career path I have always dreamed about,’ ” says Grieco.

THE WOMEN BEHIND TODAY’S SUCCESSFUL BRANDS AREN’T BEAUTY EXECS: “THEY’RE WIVES, MOTHERS, FRIENDS, COLLEAGUES, AND CLASSMATES.” mire when someone is ‘what you see is what you get,’ ” she continues. “They like sincerity and being real.” Von D, whose line is vegan, uses her platform to talk about animal rights, a topic many beauty brands won’t touch because it hurts their bottom lines. She also shares her political and philosophical beliefs, even if that means alienating customers. (She’s anti-Trump and sparked controversy earlier this year when she said she doesn’t plan to vaccinate her child.) “I don’t give a fuck if that’s bad for my business,” she says. By speaking directly to their audiences, women like Atkin, Weiss, and Von D are doing something radical: treating customers who buy their products like real people, not numbers on a market-research report. “Years ago, you would have to write a letter to a company if you wanted to get in touch,” says Atkin. Now product creators routinely ask their customers to tell them exactly what they want, practically guaranteeing a successful launch. When Weiss decided to make a Glossier face cleanser, she posed a question on her Into the Gloss blog: “What’s your dream face wash?” Atkin also crowdsources, asking her Instagram followers for their thoughts on scents, bottle sizes, colors, and product formulas. And when Summer Fridays debuted its Jet Lag Mask, the founders decided to invite their followers turned customers to the launch parties in New York and L.A. “We didn’t use to get invited to those types of events,” says Gores Ireland. “We use to watch them from home.”

Atkin, who regularly puts other women in the spotlight (Ouai’s recent “Live Life Your Ouai” campaign profiled driven women, from a USC undergrad to a CEO), also makes it clear she’s just one of us. Recently, when a fan tweeted, “My obsession with @jenatkinhair is getting to the point where I watch her Instagram stories over and over. How does she do it all?” she quickly replied, “I don’t! Trust me I drop balls left and right.” The Ouai founder also pays homage to the cosmetic entrepreneurs who planted the seed of this current trend decades ago: “I just read Estée: A Success Story—I think Kris [Jenner] recommended it to me—and I loved it.” Few may remember, but Lauder didn’t hustle from an ivory tower; she liked to mingle with her customers, just like Atkin does. In the 1950s, she would go into stores, massage creams into shoppers’ hands, and pat rouge onto their cheeks. She chatted with them; she listened. “Lauder found ways of breaking in,” says Atkin. The search for more ways to connect on a personal level is an obvious outgrowth of the digital age, but the current political climate may play a role too. Women are underrepresented in government (see: the current Cabinet) and frustrated with systemic sexism (see: #MeToo), so it makes sense they’re looking to support one another, even if that just means buying a face cream. Smoother skin and zero chance of ending up in “a special place in hell”—who doesn’t want that?


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Anonymous Afghanistan

When bombs started falling on Kabul, this 15 year old fled with her mother and six siblings to India. Her father stayed behind, and sends money when he can. Culturally, her mother cannot work, so their family has no other source of income. In Afghanistan she was not allowed to go to school, but in India she has the freedom to learn, although she fears that if her father found out, he would stop her. So she has chosen to remain anonymous. With an education she sees a future where she can make her own decisions. Her dream is to become a fashion designer, not a wife in an arranged marriage where she is forbidden to work. Her story is one of millions from the bottom of the world’s rich list. To read more, and see how you can take action, go to bottomhundred.org


BEAUTY

SKINCARE NEWS

CHICKEN

SOUP FOR THE

SKIN

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ot for nothing did chicken soup earn the nickname “Grandma’s penicillin.” While it’s no substitute for antibiotics, it is one of the most nourishing, hydrating, and easily digested foods to consume when you’re recovering from a bad case of the sniffles. So much so, in fact, that nearly every culture makes, and has made for time immemorial, some version of chicken soup or, at least, broth. And while the exact medicinal properties of the elixir—made by simmering water, meat, bones, vegetables, and often herbs for several hours—remain the source of much debate, we do know that bone broth is particularly rich in collagen. Yes, collagen. You’ve probably heard the word used singularly, but in fact collagen is a family of 28 (currently identified) proteins, many of which give structure to the skin, ligaments, and tendons of humans and animals. As we age, collagen degrades, causing skin to sag and wrinkle, evidence of inner wear and tear. Since bone broth has collagen, it’s easy to assume that drinking it is akin to getting a refill of that youthful bounce. And dozens of companies producing collagen supplements and bone broth have sprung up over the past few years, some built on this very premise. (A particularly successful one uses the phrase “broth, not Botox” on its website.) Could

BEN RITTER/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM

THE COLLAGEN CURE IS EVERYWHERE, BUT CAN SLURPING BONE BROTH—OR TAKING SUPPLEMENTS AND SPREADING ON CREAMS— GIVE YOU FIRMER SKIN? ALEKSANDRA CRAPANZANO INVESTIGATES


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THESE INGREDIENTS ARE THE KEYS TO COLLAGEN PRODUCTION, EXPERTS SAY

digital dependency, and cultural expectations lead us to a sedentary lifestyle and a constant feeling that we need to be more perfect. The results on skin are dramatic. Under stress, you make less collagen.” My own stress levels rose as I listened. “I call this anxiety syndrome,” he added. I let out a weak, anxious laugh. While a stress-free existence sounds wonderful, it also sounds like a dream, and an improbable one at that. I returned to Bloom. “Let’s get back to the good news,” he said, sensing my discouragement. “Laser resurfacing, intradermal injections of hyaluronic acids”—such as the cosmetic fillers Juvéderm and Restylane—“and topical application of retinol have been clinically proven to stimulate collagen production.” Plus, he added, fibroblasts are constantly making new collagen, no matter your age. Haideh Hirmand, a Manhattan plastic surgeon, also noted the impact of hyaluronic acid: “There’s some evidence that applying topical hyaluronic acid creates an environment conducive to collagen production. And there’s quite strong evidence that injecting it creates a stimulatory environment that activates collagen production.” Treatments such as microneedling with a hyaluronic-acid serum can also stimulate fibroblasts. “The results I see doing this in my practice are very impressive, particularly after several treatments.” Hirmand herself applies a topical hyaluronic-acid serum every day because it helps seal in moisture, which can optimize fibroblast activity. Treatments and products that claim to “stimulate” and “optimize” collagen production may have their benefits, but wouldn’t it be easier to smooth on a lotion that replenishes the actual collagen protein, molecule for molecule? On a recent trip through Sephora, I noticed several skin creams touting the ingredient. “Unfortunately, it doesn’t work like that,” said New York City dermatologist Dennis Gross. “Collagen does not penetrate skin. If it did, you would be able to slap on a cream and instantly have thicker skin.” That’s not to say these products don’t have benefits; they may simply contain other ingredients that nudge sluggish fibroblasts into action. Gross’s advice? “Look for ingredients like vitamin C and peptides that directly affect the fibroblast cell, connecting with its receptors and instructing it to speed up the production of collagen. Think of it as telling the cell to step on the gas.” I sensed that my quest to find collagen, and firmer skin, in something as wholesome (and effortless) as chicken soup was coming to an end, but I had one more stop: the Manhattan office of Amy Wechsler, who is not only a dermatologist but also a psychiatrist. I sighed and told her I felt defeated. Moreover, I was angry,

Stand Firm

it be, I wondered, that a bowl of soup a day keeps the dermatologist away? This sounded far too good to be true, so I decided to investigate by calling my favorite dermatologist for the lowdown. If Bradley S. Bloom, from the Laser & Skin Surgery Center of New York, weren’t so kind, I might have felt embarrassed asking if the collagen in chicken soup could replenish the dwindling supply holding my face in place. “If only it were so easy!” he told me. “The bad news is you have to make your own collagen. The chicken can’t do that for you.” Our bodies simply can’t absorb proteins like collagen whole. Instead, they are broken down during digestion. I can’t say hearing this came as a total surprise, but it’s hard to square it with the prevalence of collagen products. Walk into nearly any health store or beauty emporium and you will see tubs of powdered collagen, gummies, supplements, and tonics lining the shelves. Is it just another fad with little scientific evidence to justify opening our wallets? “Absolutely,” Dr. David L. Katz, author of the forthcoming The Truth About Food, was quick to answer. “It’s all marketing.” I asked if the protein in these products might at least be beneficial. “Unless you have an illness that makes you protein deficient, even a well-balanced vegan diet provides all the necessary protein your body needs to produce collagen,” he explained. That may be why so few academics have seen the need to study how oral collagen supplements affect human skin. Most of the studies to date have been funded by makers of collagen supplements and are not the sort of controlled, peerreviewed studies that doctors take seriously. What the research does support, according to Katz: “Stick with a plant-rich diet of vegetables, fruits, seeds, whole grains, beans, lentils, and water, when thirsty. Study after study shows that people who follow this kind of diet have the healthiest skin.” Howard Murad, a Los Angeles dermatologist and the founder of the eponymous skincare line, echoed Katz: “The best way to support your skin is to eat foods that contain the nutrients your skin needs.” “Such as nutritious, collagen-rich chicken soup?” I asked, not yet willing to throw in the towel. “Yes and no,” said Murad. “Our bodies have specialized cells called fibroblasts that help produce collagen, and they need the right building blocks, in the form of antioxidants, trace minerals, B vitamins, and amino acids, to perform. Chicken soup happens to be very rich in amino acids,” Murad offered. In fact, he designed his Youth Builder Dietary Supplement with precisely this purpose in mind. Still, he prefers to focus on minimizing collagen loss by avoiding sun exposure and reducing stress. “Modern living,

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if not exactly surprised, that companies make vaguely worded claims that may pass legal muster but lead us to believe in miracles that can’t be scientifically substantiated. “We, the consumers, deserve better!” I said, on the verge of a rant. “Yes, we absolutely do,” she answered. On a positive note, the information I’d acquired was, in fact, helpful. Less stress, a well-balanced diet, ingredients like peptides and vitamin C— these were the tried-and-true basics. It couldn’t get much more wholesome than that. “But it can,” she jumped in. “Sleep!” I gave her a skeptical look. “We make the most collagen while we sleep,” she explained. At rest, levels of the stress hormone cortisol decrease, while growth-hormone and beta-endorphin levels rise, resulting in cell regeneration. “The body is in a constant state of damage and repair. When you’re young, the repair is great; when you’re older, less so,” she continued. “But we can push for more repair by getting enough sleep; it’s indispensable to collagen production. I want people to understand this,” she added with emphatic urgency. “Sleep is a necessity, not a luxury.” Her directive was all the impetus I needed to drift off that night into a dreamy state of repair, regeneration, and rejuvenation. And what helped me fall so easily into a deep beauty sleep in the first chill of autumn air? A comforting bowl of piping-hot chicken soup. October 2018

M A RIECLA IRE.CO M

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FA L L B E A U T Y R E P O R T

POWER

MOVES

Vibrant hair color, glowing skin, bold makeup—there’s not a dull moment to be found in this season’s trends Edited by ERIN FLAHERTY & LEAH WYAR ROMITO Photographs by YULIA GORBACHENKO


Must Dew

This fall, a luminous complexion is the basis for every look—and an absolute must if you want to pull off the you-but-better makeup that’s so of the moment. Start with an easy skincare routine that you’ll actually stick to: Cleanse daily—Garnier SkinActive Micellar Cleansing Water All-in-1 ($8.99) doesn’t overdry or cause irritation— and then layer on an antioxidant boost, such as L’Oréal Paris Revitalift Derm Intense 10% Pure Vitamin C Concentrate ($29.99), to take your glow to the next level. If you need coverage, reach for an ultrasheer foundation; Giorgio Armani Beauty Face Fabric Second Skin Makeup ($49) blurs imperfections and feels like next to nothing. Finish things off with satiny nude lips. Maybelline New York Color Sensational Shine Compulsion Lipstick ($7.99) has options for every skin tone.

ON NAILS: Essie Nail Polish in Minimalistic ($9). EARRINGS Fendi. ON THE PREVIOUS PAGE: L’Oréal Paris True Match Super Blendable Makeup ($10.95). JACKET and EARRINGS Marni.


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ON HAIR: Shu Uemura Sheer Lacquer Finishing Hairspray ($39). TOP Marni. EARRING Alexander Wang.

Electric Avenue Pretty, pale hair hues have ruled for multiple seasons, but right now it’s vibrant primary shades and bold streaks that really shine. Marc Jacobs sent models down the runway with touches of neon green and other rich tones to match the clothes, and Jeremy Scott went with candy colors. Whatever you choose, remember that color-treated hair needs extra care. Try a shine enhancer like Redken Color Extend Vinegar Rinse ($24), and load up on moisturizing treatments like Garnier Fructis Smoothing Treat 1 Minute Hair Mask + Avocado Extract ($4.49) and Kérastase Resistance Sérum Extentioniste ($51), a scalp oil that helps nourish hair at the root.


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Bright Idea Bold eyes popped up all over the fall runways, from Altuzarra to Kate Spade. At Ulla Johnson, makeup artist Romy Soleimani adhered real gold leaf to models’ eyelids using Tata Harper Boosted Contouring Eye Mask ($125). A simpler but no less decadent option: this cat eye accented with aquamarine shimmer. For your own take, trace eyes with Urban Decay 24/7 Glide-On Eye Pencil in Zero ($21) and press on loose eye glitter. ON LASHES: Maybelline New York Volum’ Express the Falsies Mascara ($7.77). HEADBAND Tom Ford. EARRINGS Agmes.

Model: Juana Burga at the Lions NY. Stylist: Sandy Armeni. Makeup: Erin Parsons for Maybelline New York at Streeters. Hair: Leonardo Manetti for ionstudionyc. Manicure: Naomi Yasuda for Chanel Le Vernis.


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BEST IN SHOW

The season’s must-have accessory? Your makeup bag— stocked with these beauty essentials 1. Elcie Cosmetics Jewels Eyeshadow in Garnet, Rubellite, and Amethyst, $22 each. 2. Maybelline New York Fit Me! Matte + Poreless Foundation in Soft Tan, $7.99. 3. Chantecaille Lip Veil in Impatiens, $48. 4. Garnier SkinActive Soothing Facial Mist with Rose Water, $8.99. 5. Surratt Beauty Lid Lacquer in Shikkoku, $36. 6. Lancôme Rénergie Multi-Glow Instant Rosy Skin Tone Reviving Cream, $79. 7. Yves Saint Laurent Beauté Couture Palette in 10 Lumieres Majorelle, $60. 8. Maybelline New York Super Stay Multi-Use Foundation Stick in Buff Beige, $11.99. 9. L’Oréal Paris Paradise Enchanted Scented Blush in Bashful, $12.99. 10. L’Oréal Paris Colorista Spray 1-Day Color in Pastel Blue, $9.99. 11. Garnier Whole Blends Care Cream Hair Mask Oat Delicacy, $1.69.

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BEAUTY

FRAGRANCE NEWS

FULL TRANSPARENCY

It began with a musk. At least I thought it was a musk. How was I to know? Fragrance makers have always been masters of intrigue. They peddle glamour and sex. They develop mysterious concoctions with exotic resins and flowers, cloak them in tales of romance and luxury, and sell them in beautiful bottles that sit on our vanities and make us feel chic and rich and interesting. This musk—my musk—was no different. I’ve been wearing it off and on since high school, and people often stop me to (correctly) guess its name. That’s why my search began. I wanted a new fragrance that would make me feel special, something that amplified my persona. And I’m not the only one. “There’s a trend of people trying to find something different and seeking more individuality with their perfume,” says Pierre Aulas, a Paris-based fragrance consultant who works with companies like Thierry Mugler and Lanvin. “Over the past decade, everything in the perfume shop started to smell the same—florals, fruit, a few gourmands—and this acceleration is, in part, a response to that.” There’s also been a psychological shift in society. Women today are nothing like they were in the 1960s, when Chanel advertised its most famous scent with the slogan “Every woman alive wants Chanel No. 5.” 40

MA RI EC L A IR E .C O M October 2018

These days, we don’t want what she’s having; we expect everything to be customized, from the inseam of our jeans to the blend of our coldpressed juice. We’re more interested in the provenance of our products and more skeptical of the companies that make them, and 80 percent of consumers say it’s hard to know which brands to trust, according to a 2018 report presented by graduates of the Fashion Institute of Technology’s Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing and Management program. Combine all that with the power of search engines and smartphones and it’s hard to buy anything without doing “research.” And so, my quest for a new perfume began where all journeys do these days: online. I figured if I could find out what was in my musk, I might be able to layer it with something similar to make it my own. The brand’s website calls it a “light, sensual” blend of rose, amber, and wood, but I’ve interviewed enough perfumers to know that description is just marketing. Like almost all conventional fragrances, it contains dozens of aromatic chemicals and extracts. The “amber” isn’t from fossilized tree sap, but it could be a blend of chemicals like resinous benzyl benzoate and sweet, herbaceous coumarin. (Both are listed as ingredients.) The rose might be extracted from a flower, but there’s no

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PERFUME IS LOSING ITS AIR OF MYSTERY—AND THAT MIGHT NOT BE A BAD THING. JENNIFER GOLDSTEIN REPORTS ON THE RISE OF D.I.Y. SCENTS, CUSTOMIZABLE BLENDS, AND FRAGRANCE LAYERING


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BEAUTY FRAGRANCE NEWS

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MA RI EC L A IR E .C OM October 2018

fragrance a rose scent, because maybe rose is trendy, then people go around thinking they love rose, when in reality the scent was based on lily of the valley.” To give her customers real control, she created a layering set with three of her most popular perfumes and three singlenote modifying sprays (tuberose, patchouli, and mandarin). Shapiro says the perfumers she worked with were nervous about the idea. “True single-note scents are polarizing. Tuberose on its own is strange and almost carnal,” she says. “But customers today are more educated, and they want options. They don’t need things to be perfect and pretty to start—though maybe they’ll end up there when they concoct their own thing.” Concocting my own thing sounded like a very good idea, and plenty of companies, such as Scent Trunk and Hawthorne, have popped up to help customers do just that. I opted for Waft, which leads you through an online questionnaire, then sends you a personalized spray and two modifying roll-ons based on your answers. First, I requested a unisex scent that I could wear to work. Next, I was asked to select a few existing perfumes I liked, including one to inspire my order. I found my go-to musk in the site’s library of existing scents and chose it, along with a few others I have in rotation. As I made my selections, they popped up on the page with graphics of their fragrance accords. Only one of the scents had musk, but all three were considered very woody. After I ordered my scent, I called Waft’s founder, Valerie Boffy, who says education was part of her plan when she created the algorithm. “In the process of choosing your scent, you learn other things about fragrance,” she explains. “Once you have knowledge about what types of fragrance you like, you can start playing with scents and trying different things on different days, in the same way you dress up or dress down depending on the occasion.” When my package from Waft came, the main scent was lovely—light, green, and perfect for the office. But I still wanted a sexier option, with more of the skin-like warmth of the musk that started this whole experiment. I headed to Olfactory NYC, a boutique in Nolita where you can make semicustom fragrances. (It also offers an online service.) There, I smelled nine base scents, displayed like museum pieces, complete with descriptions and information on the perfumers who created them (again with the education!). I picked Lulu, a blend of orris, tonka bean, and musk, and let company founder J.J. Vittoria walk me through the different accords he could mix in. My instinct was to play up the musk with accord number one, for a “muskier scent,” but based on what I learned from Waft,

MULTIPLE CHOICE

NEW FRAGRANCES DESIGNED TO BE LAYERED AND CUSTOMIZED—OR, AT THE VERY LEAST, TO GIVE YOU OPTIONS

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I decided to go with a dose of woodsy number nine. The result was soft and skin-like with a deeper earthiness that made me want to sniff it again and again. As Vittoria bottled it, I asked what he thought of this shift in the way people are shopping for fragrance. I expected him to talk about the millennial mind-set or how people want more transparency in every aspect of their lives, from the food they eat to the politicians they elect. He offered a simpler explanation. “You know why you like this so much?” he said, pointing to my new perfume. “You put in time and energy. Most people walk out of here loving their fragrance because they had an experience, they learned something, and they enjoyed the process of discovery. That translates to a connection with an object, whether you realize it or not.”

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

way to know. (“Fragrance,” a catchall for components the company doesn’t want to disclose, is also listed.) As for that “wood,” I doubt it came from a forest, but it could be Iso E Super, a chemical that smells dry, airy, and ever so faintly of cedar. I first heard about the compound in 2006, when Escentric Molecules launched cult favorite Molecule 01, which boasts a formula of 65 percent Iso E Super. “We neglected all the traditional ways of selling that had been spun around scents up to that point,” explains Geza Schoen, the perfumer who created it. “We don’t pretend that we’re sexy, and the idea of having a celebrity spokesperson makes me laugh. Our scents speak for themselves.” Apparently, he’s on to something. In the last two years, more companies have been playing to this trend of transparency, informing customers about the components in their wares and hyping individual ingredients, sometimes even in their names. In 2016, Rag & Bone launched eight scents, each built around a well-known note—cypress, bergamot, etc.— and Ralph Lauren Collection launched 10 scents highlighting different aromas like sage, vetiver, and lime. When Philosophy did a new version of its popular Amazing Grace perfume in 2017, it pumped up the rose and, accordingly, named it Amazing Grace Ballet Rose. Some companies have taken things a step further, giving us the tools to tinker on our own. There are fragrance “primers,” like those from Linger and Canvas & Concrete, that make any scent last longer. Kenneth Cole launched its new scent, For Her, with a set of three customizing sprays. Maison Margiela Replica has two “filters” to layer under its other perfumes. And this summer, D.S. & Durga came out with I Don’t Know What, which its creator, David Seth Moltz, calls an “enhancer.” “Alone, it smells feathery—like an expensive down jacket—but it has this magical ability to sort of blend with anything and make it more radiant,” he says. Breaking with the fragrance industry’s tradition of secrecy, he’s happy to explain that magic: “It has my favorite aroma chemicals, and most are listed on the bottle,” he says, citing a few, such as civetone (“this crazy, crazy nice musk”) and farnesol (“a sandalwoodaroma chemical on the wood spectrum”). I sprayed I Don’t Know What over my musk and, well…I don’t know what. It turned powdery and lasted longer, but it lost some of its warmth. I also tried the musk with Maison Margiela’s Blur spray, which smells like a beautiful, full-fledged perfume on its own, but my musk got completely lost in the mix. “Marketing people made it murky,” says Bee Shapiro, the founder of fragrance and bodycare brand Ellis Brooklyn. “They can call their


BEAUTY

G LO B A L B E AUT Y

GLIMMER OF HOPE

THERE’S AN UGLY TRUTH BEHIND THE SPARKLING MICA IN OUR BEAUTY PRODUCTS, BUT BIG PLAYERS IN THE INDUSTRY ARE WORKING TO CHANGE THAT By JOCELYN C. ZUCKERMAN 44

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@TERRE DES HOMMES/MAYANK SONI

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n advertisement currently running on Dutch television features a woman emerging from a car. As she slams the door behind her, the camera zooms in to reveal a tiny handprint on the auto’s shimmery surface. “Many products contain traces of child labor,” says the voice-over. “Traces of the mineral mica, mined by children’s hands.” The spot might just as well have featured an eyeshadow compact with a wee thumbprint on the surface of its sparkly powder. The word mica, from the Latin micare—to shine, flash, or glitter—actually refers to a group of 37 crystalline minerals that have dozens of industrial applications and are used to add shimmer to everything from car paints to cosmetics. European news reports and public-awareness campaigns have educated consumers about the sometimes-shady origins of the substance, but many Americans remain unaware of the inconvenient truth about this beauty mainstay. According to a March 2018 report from the Switzerlandbased nongovernmental organization Terre des Hommes (TDH), an estimated 22,000 children work in mica mines in India, where about a quarter of the world’s supply is extracted. Claire van Bekkum, who heads the mica team for TDH, which produced those television spots, has visited the Indian states of Bihar and Jharkhand, the country’s so-called mica belt. “You arrive in some remote villages and everything is sparkling—the ground, the hair of the children,” she says. She’s watched kids flee into the forest, leaving small tools scattered on the ground next to baskets of flaked shards. While Indian law prohibits children under 18 from working in hazardous industries, 70 percent of India’s mica mines are operated illegally, by a mafia of sorts whose members have no qualms about using child labor—and don’t take kindly to inquisitive outsiders. India’s mica belt is among the poorest regions in the country and has high rates of illiteracy and unemployment. While some families have small plots of land to farm, the tired soil yields precious little, and many kids must work in the mines alongside their parents in order to make ends meet. Injuries are common, and the constant breathing in of fine particles can lead to respiratory conditions like asthma, silicosis, and tuberculosis. On top of this, the haphazardly dug mines can crumble without warning: A 2016 report by the Thomson Reuters Foundation found that seven children had been smothered to death in mica mines in the span of just two months. Though it uses only 18 percent of the mica mined globally each year, the beauty industry is leading the charge to clean things up. In 2006, the Estée Lauder Companies began working


with India’s Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA), or Save the Childhood Movement, to move thousands of impoverished kids out of dangerous workplaces and into classrooms nationwide. (In 2014, its founder, Kailash Satyarthi, shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistan’s Malala Yousafzai.) In addition to educating parents about their children’s fundamental rights to education and health care, BBA, in tandem with Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation (KSCF), will team with state governments to ensure that elementary schools and teachers are in place. The Estée Lauder Companies currently helps fund programs in 152 Indian villages, according to Anna Klein, vice president of corporate affairs for the organization, which owns brands known for their sparkly wares, including Becca, Smashbox Cosmetics, and GlamGlow. Other industry players are also beginning to confront the problem. A few years ago, the Natural Resources Stewardship Circle, a French collective of cosmetics and fragrance companies, partnered with KSCF to fund work in more Indian villages. And in 2016, a two-day summit in Delhi gathered companies and NGOs involved in the mica industry with representatives

Mica extracted in India, where an estimated 22,000 children work in the mines

could no longer guarantee its product was childlabor free. “The alarm bells went off,” says Simon Constantine, Lush’s head buyer, when he was told he could visit the mine in question only if he was accompanied by armed guards. Surely something unseemly was happening there. Soon after, Lush began replacing the natural mica in its products with a lab-made version called synthetic fluorphlogopite. The ingredient, created by extracting silicate crystals from other minerals processed at high temperatures, is also used by brands like Skin Owl, which makes an illuminating face oil.

OWEN BRUCE/THELICENSINGPROJECT.COM

WHILE SOME BRANDS PROVIDE DETAILS ABOUT WHERE THEY SOURCE THEIR INGREDIENTS, OTHERS NEED NUDGING. from the Indian government and from some of the 700 villages involved in extraction of the mineral to confront the issue. The result was the Responsible Mica Initiative (RMI), whose 40-plus members include NGOs and forwardthinking beauty brands such as Estée Lauder, L’Oréal, Clarins, Coty, Chanel, and Burt’s Bees. The RMI works with member companies to improve their supply chains so they have a better idea of what’s happening on the ground; its goal is to eradicate all forms of child labor and establish a fully legal mica industry within five years, according to its executive director, Fanny Frémont. While legalizing some of India’s hundreds of artisanal mines could be a step in the right direction, even that is complicated: A number of them are located within protected forests, and sanctioning extraction, in many, could lead to environmental catastrophe. The idea would be to consolidate the industry into a few bigger mines that would operate according to strict environmental and labor guidelines. The thorny nature of the issue may be why the British company Lush has chosen to take a different tack. For years, the brand had been buying mined mica to use in products like bath bombs, but in 2014, its main supplier admitted that it

Heather Deeth, ethical-buying manager for Lush, admits that the company “struggled to find the right path forward.” Boycotting is always the last resort, she says. “If you’re a big buyer, you should stay and influence and make a difference.” In this instance, however, because Lush says it doesn’t buy a lot of mica—and therefore holds minimal sway in the industry— disengaging seemed to make the most sense. That said, working to legalize India’s mines remains a good path forward—and beauty companies can play a role in that process. But, adds Bhuwan Ribhu, a Delhi-based activist who’s worked with Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation since 2002, consumers can do their part too. While some brands provide details about where they source their ingredients, others need nudging. “Write to them and request that they disclose the source of their mica,” says Ribhu, who has little patience for brands that feign ignorance about what goes on in the mines. After all, if they manage to procure the specific grades of mica required for their various products, they should be able to find out who is extracting it. “Ask companies to put in the public domain what they’re doing to eliminate child labor,” he says. “It’s time for them to stop hiding behind excuses.”

SHINE ON

IS YOUR MAKEUP MADE ETHICALLY? HERE’S HOW TO TELL

If the terms “mica,” “potassium aluminum silicate,” or “CI 77019” are on a product’s ingredient label, it contains naturally mined mica. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing, as long as the company is transparent about its sources. (You can usually find this information in the “About Us” or “Ingredients” sections of a company’s website or by searching online for the brand’s sustainable-sourcing policies or guidelines.) L’Oréal, for instance, gets 60 percent of its mica from mines in the U.S. and says that it has been able to verify that 99.2 percent of the mica it uses was produced without child labor. The member companies of the Responsible Mica Initiative (responsiblemica-initiative.com) are developing software tools that will enable them to trace and disclose the sources of their mica in a way that protects their proprietary formulas. Full traceability, however, is likely a few years off. Until that happens, another option is to buy from brands like Lush (lushusa.com) and Skin Owl (skinowl.com) that use the lab-made stuff (look for “synthetic mica” or “synthetic fluorphlogopite” on the label), or choose cosmetics made without the shimmer: Haut Cosmetics (hautcosmetics.ca) and Omiana (omiana.com) have good options. October 2018

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BEAUTY N E XT B I G T H I N G

FORWARD-LOOKING

WE GAZED INTO A CRYSTAL BALL (OK, FINE, WE INTERVIEWED EXPERTS) TO MAKE SOME AESTHETIC PREDICTIONS. GET READY FOR AN INSTAGRAM MAKEUP REVOLUTION, THICKER HAIR FROM GROWTH FACTORS, LESS WATER IN YOUR SKINCARE, AND MORE

MAKEUP

Contouring, liner-plumped lips, highlighter that could make a unicorn cry—the hallmarks of Instagram makeup are anything but subtle. Born from a marriage of transformative technology and artistry inspired by stage makeup, this beauty “ideal” has become digitally omnipresent. There are signs, however, that the pendulum is swinging. The harbinger? None other than Kylie Jenner, one of the look’s original proponents. In July, the beauty mogul revealed her lip filler had dissolved and she’d reverted back to her natural shape. Considering her pout—and the branded products she sells—was the driving force behind that ubiquitous over-lined lip, it was a significant moment. And the shift goes beyond just one Jenner. Makeup artist and YouTube personality Wayne Goss thinks people are finally starting to realize that what works on camera doesn’t necessarily work IRL. “Instagram makeup looks very different under photo lighting than it does in daylight,” he says. “I believe that’s why women—and men—trying to copy those looks are often disheartened with the results. They don’t see the same flawless finish.” The perfection isn’t just about good lighting; most of the photos we see on the small screen have been modified. “Filters gave people this altered 46

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MARTIN SWEERS/TRUNK ARCHIVE

The Insta Revolution


BEAUTY perception of what skin was supposed to look like, so we all just started plastering on foundation,” says Jaclyn Hill. The beauty influencer, who has five-millionplus YouTube subscribers and could be the poster girl for heavy-handed perfection, says she thinks things will start to lighten up soon. Another reason change is coming: Marquee makeup artists are using social media more. “Now that artists with the fashion background and talent, like Pat McGrath, are using the platform more, people are exposed to a different caliber of work,” says celebrity makeup artist Nick Barose. “These artists aren’t catering to the Instagram look.” So, what will be next? “Creative minimalism,” according to Anu Lingala, a trend forecaster for Kantar Consulting. “Makeup is about creative expression and freedom. The new approach is using it in a way that’s more personal and expressive—not just trying to emulate a certain archetype of beauty.” That’s all well and good, but Barose doesn’t expect the Insta aesthetic to disappear completely. “There are always going to be two kinds of people: those that want to look good in real life and those that want to look good on Instagram.” —Megan McIntyre

TOP FINISHERS Lip trends come and go, but what’s certain is there will be options. With more high-tech finishes than ever before, you can get the same color in whatever look you want. Below, some favorites, from matte as chalk to glossy as latex 1. URBAN DECAY Lo-Fi Lip Mousse in Boom, $22: Resembles eyeshadow (down to the sponge-tip applicator) and leaves behind a powdery veil of color. 2. L’ORÉAL PARIS Colour Riche Ultra Matte Lipstick in Lilac Impulse, $10: A comfort matte (read: nondrying) with a heavy pigment load that blurs the appearance of lip lines. 3. REVLON Kiss Cushion Lip Tint in Naughty Mauve, $10: The color payoff of a stain with a silky look and feel. 4. MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Metallic Foil Liquid Lipstick in Luna, $9: Looks like polished metal but has longevity thanks to a matte base formula.

SKIN

5. MAC COSMETICS Supreme Beam Grand Illusion Glossy Liquid Lipcolour in It’s Just Candy, $21: Holographic pigments suspended in a super-shiny gloss. —Ama Kwarteng

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Growth Factor

Thick hair may seem unobtainable for the 30 million women in the U.S. with thinning strands, but 3 science says otherwise. Researchers have found that stem-cell injections 2 can reverse hair loss. Derived from 1. OUAI Scalp & Body Scrub, $38. umbilical cords (patients donate 2. LIVING PROOF them after undergoing C-section Restore Dry Scalp Treatment, $32. deliveries), stem cells are pluripo3. THE ORDINARY tent, meaning that they can turn Multi-Peptide Serum 1 for Hair Density, $18. into other cells. “Theoretically, when you inject them into an area—like the scalp—where a Ingredients once reserved for specific cell type is growing, they your complexion are now can differentiate and may even treating the root cause of start to create new follicles,” says hair issues Gary Goldenberg, a dermatologist PROBIOTICS: The microbiome and assistant clinical professor at has been generating plenty of Mount Sinai School of Medicine beauty buzz lately, and we’re in New York City. He says only scratching the surface of how microorganisms affect the theoretically because the FDA has skin. Nowhere is this more apparapproved the injections only for ent than on the scalp, where an medical purposes, such as treating imbalance of bacteria can lead to dryness and flakes. To the blood diseases. (Some doctors use rescue: Ouai’s dual-purpose them off-label for cosmetic scrub (1), with a probiotic blend enhancements.) to balance bacteria and sugar to But things could change in the gently exfoliate. next few years. Histogen, a HYALURONIC ACID: With its regenerative medicine company, vitamin B3 complex, Living Proof’s treatment (2) also just got FDA approval to test its harmonizes bacteria levels on injectable Hair Stimulating the scalp. Added bonus: It Complex, which is made with creates an undetectable hyaluronic-acid shield that growth factors that trigger the provides immediate hydration scalp’s fibroblasts (a kind of skin and itch relief. cell) to become pluripotent like PEPTIDES: Multiple types of stem cells. The trials, if successful, peptides in the Ordinary’s first could eventually lead to testing and hair product (3) treat hair from FDA approval for injections of root to tip, increasing microcirculation to the scalp and actual stem cells. “This type of plumping the actual strand itself. nonsurgical hair rejuvenation and The combo approach leads to restoration really is the future,” says healthier follicles and thickerlooking lengths. —M.M. Goldenberg. —M.M.

A HEAD OF THE CURVE

Everything But Water

H2O may be the most prevalent ingredient in skincare, but there’s a new wave of anhydrous offerings that could change that. In some cases, no water means less weight when products ship—and therefore a reduced carbon footprint. This may also allow for a higher concentration of active ingredients, says Karen Behnke, founder of Juice Beauty, a line that uses antioxidant-rich juices instead of water. And those formulated with oils and butters, rather than water or juices, don’t need preservatives. “Bacteria and mold can’t grow in a completely water-free environment,” cosmetic chemist Ginger King points out. Here, at right, are a few products that are all dried up—in the best way possible. —M.M.

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1 1. SUPERGOOP Unseen Sunscreen SPF 40, $32. 2. YURIPIBU Asiatica Calming Ampoule, $38. 3. JUICE BEAUTY Green Apple Brightening Emulsion, $48.

COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

HAIR

N E XT B I G T H I N G


All the absorbency of a thick, bulky pad . Minus the thick, bulky part. †

2x the coverage‡ For a good night’s sleep

†Compared to U by Kotex® Security® Maxi Overnight pads. ‡Compared to U by Kotex® Security® Regular Ultra Thin pads. ® Registered Trademark or * Trademark of Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. © KCWW.


GOLDEN GIRL Hardcore Instagram contouring feels passé, and we’re over clogging our pores to create faux definition. When it comes to the next generation in bronzer, look to easy tinted oils with healthful properties. Urb Apothecary Bronzing Serum ($22), infused with geranium oil and lavender, is a chic, modern update. Just blend it in directly under the cheekbones for a sunkissed glow. SCA R F, $141, SASK IA DIEZ. ON CHEEK S: CL A R INS R A DIA NCE-PLUS GOLDEN GLOW BOOSTER.

By TAYLORE GLYNN Fashion Editor: ANNA FOSTER

Beauty Editor: ERIN FLAHERTY

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SMOOTH OPERATOR Beyond the wholesome look of hydrated skin, litfrom-within radiance signposts a body well cared for. Seek out nurturing hydrators with added benefits, like GlamGlow’s Glowstarter Mega Illuminating Moisturizer ($49), which contains reflective blurring particles for an instant photo-filter effect. JACK ET, $3,195, GIORGIO A R M A NI; E A RR INGS, $370, BJORG JEW ELLERY. ON FACE: K IEHL’S GLOW FOR MUL A SK IN H Y DR ATOR.

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GLEAM TEAM Our collective fitness fixation has ushered in a new “it” texture: a healthy sheen that skews sexy rather than sweaty. Makeup artists have faked the look with lip gloss for years, but we’re partial to new formulas developed specifically for an effortless dew. RMS Beauty’s Living Luminizer ($38) is made with skin-softening coconut oil for a subtle shimmer, and Tata Harper Very Highlighting ($42) is a natural illuminating powerhouse packed with calming botanicals. ON EY ES: K EV Y N AUCOIN THE EXOTIQUE DI A MOND EY E GLOSS IN COSMIC.


MIDAS TOUCH Never sacrifice color for comfort. Tinted balms are the height of quick, easy glamour, and they won’t shred your lips like drying formulas do. Ere Perez Beetroot Cheek & Lip Tint ($25) gets its vibrant stain from its namesake vegetable, and Dior Lip Glow ($34) is a classic for a reason: The nourishing balm imparts a sheer wash of color that’s sumptuous and never sticky. To glam up an understated pout with a gilded twist, tap Ilia’s rosehip-infused Illuminator in Cosmic Dancer ($34) on your Cupid’s bow. ON LIPS: BURT’S BEES TIN TED LIP BA LM IN R ED DA HLIA. H A IR: BI A NCA TUOV I FOR EVO M A K EUP: GINA K A NE FOR SUQQU AT CA R EN MODEL: XIAOMENG HUA NG AT V IVA MODEL M A NAGEMEN T CASTING A ND PRODUCTION: SER LIN ASSOCIATES LONDON

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ROYAL FLUSH The latest disrupter in pampering cosmetics is “glotion.” The love child of a CC cream and a highlighter, this type of featherweight formula offers light coverage with an extra incandescent tilt. Try Erborian’s best-selling Glow Crème ($42), which boasts a rosy hue to emphasize cheeks or provide a fullface blush. ON FACE: L’OR É A L PA R IS AGE PER FECT CELL R ENEWA L ROSY TONE CR E A M.


BEAUTY BEAUTY WORKBOOK

BARELY THERE SKINCARE IS THE NEW MAKEUP

Now the most trusted place for CAR SHOPPING. 1

2 3 Refine pores with a charcoal mask, then apply an iridescent cream for a healthy glow.

EXPERT REVIEWS TRADE-IN VALUES

6 5

1. AVON True Color Dazzle Drops, $14. 2. URB APOTHECARY Bronzing Serum, $22. 3. ÉMINENCE Balancing Masque Duo, $54. 4. L’ORÉAL PARIS True Match Lumi Glotion Natural Glow Enhancer, $15. 5. FLESH Fleshpot Eye & Cheek Gloss, $20. 6. GARNIER SkinActive Glow Boost Illuminating Moisturizer, $12. For information on where to buy, see Shopping Directory.

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JASON HETHERINGTON. STILL LIFE: COURTESY OF THE COMPANIES

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Happy Places Wellness centers popping up on both coasts offer healthier alternatives to traditional gyms, spas, and corporate parks

Woke Workout Everybody (Los Angeles, memberships starting at $25; everybodylosangeles.com) is a body-positive, full-service gym that boasts inclusivity as the main attraction, with gender-neutral locker rooms, easy access for the disabled, and membership fees based on income.

Holistic Hub Modrn Sanctuary (New York City, services starting at $35; modrnsanctuary.com) provides health experiences for the Gwyneth Paltrow in all of us: acupuncture, Reiki healing, hypnotherapy, an überluxe salt room, and derm treatments such as Botox. (Natural skincare can get you only so far.)

Mindful Workspace Primary (New York City, memberships starting at $75; liveprimary.com) offers more than just a coworking cubicle. Members have access to 30-plus weekly fitness classes, cold-pressed juices, nutritious catered lunches, and curated decor (light! plants! wood!) that may help lower stress levels.

HEALTH NEWS

THE LATEST IN FITNESS, NUTRITION, AND MORE By Alexandra Engler

A Sporteclub box dedicated to #selfcare

Screen This In HBO’s documentary Rx Early Detection (premiering October 8), Emmy-winning TV chef Sandra Lee shares her breast-cancer journey—and explains why the government should be doing more for women By Jennifer Goldstein

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: LUMINA/STOCKSY.COM; JASON ROTHENBERG; SPORTELUXE

MARIE CLAIRE: After you were diagnosed, was your instinct to start filming? SANDRA LEE: No. I was

Hit Subscribe

Looking for well-being right at your door— and desktop? Lifestyle guru and founder of website Sporteluxe Bianca Cheah now offers a subscription service called Sporteclub ($59 for a seasonal subscription; sporteluxe.com). Perks include cool, must-have wellness and beauty items delivered every three months, plus a ton of exclusive digital content that covers everything from workout plans and healthy recipes to deals on athletic gear from the likes of Nike and Sweaty Betty.

building a production company and hired Cathy [Chermol Schrijver, the documentary’s director] to help run it. I told her it was on hold because of the diagnosis, and she said, “You may want to document this, if not for other people, certainly so that you can reference what the doctors say.” She shot it on her little flip camera. We didn’t even know if we would have a documentary. MC: The footage is raw. We see you get a mammogram, we hear your boyfriend [New York governor Andrew Cuomo] whisper

to you in the operating room, we watch parts of your mastectomy surgery. Why share all that? SL: After my diagnosis, I

greater your chances of living. My other agenda is changing the laws around the United States. Some women don’t get screenings because they’re deciding to feed their children instead of paying co-pays or deductibles. Or they can’t take time off to go to the clinic. But the government can change that. In New York, the governor signed legislation to get screenings covered and keep the clinics and hospitals open later and on weekends. MC: He signed that legislation after your surgery, which is probably the best get-well gift he could have given you. But what if you don’t live in New York? SL: Reach out to your repre-

went online to see what the surgery was like or what happens to your body. Nothing showed that.

sentatives, to your senators, to your governors, and tell them about the law in New York, which, by the way, was passed without resistance from either side of the table. It’s not a political thing; it’s a mandatory health thing.

MC: If your goal was to show what treatment is really like, you succeeded. SL: That was part of it. But

MC: Would you be happy if in five years, every state passed a law like that? SL: Five years? How many

first and foremost, I want women to understand that the earlier the detection, the

women are gonna die between now and that point? Try three years.

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R E L AT I O N S H I P S

BEGINNING AT THE END

TO TRULY KNOW A PERSON, YOU MAY NEED TO BREAK UP. ILLUSTRATOR KRISTEN RADTKE, AUTHOR OF THE GRAPHIC MEMOIR IMAGINE WANTING ONLY THIS, SHARES HER ROUNDABOUT LOVE STORY

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