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table of contents “She doesn’t just let life happen; she’s actively participating in it,” says Orji, far left, of Sykes. From left: Tse wrap, pants, $595; Sarah Chloe earrings, $148; Stuart Weitzman sandals, $415. Suistudio blazer, $499, pants, $200; Mary MacGill earrings, $155; M. Gemi flats, $228.

comedy

19 #look

45 #feel

78 #live p. 98

WILLIAMS + HIRAK AWA

YVONNE ORJI AND HER IDOL, WANDA SYKES


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table of contents

p. 36 OUTFIT IDEAS SO GOOD THEY IMPRESS THE GUYS OF QUEER EYE

Michael Michael Kors jacket, $350, pants, $225. Aerie tank top, $18. Jonathan Simkhai x Eye M by Ileana Makri earrings, $325. Stuart Weitzman pumps, $375. See Glamour Shopper for more information.

&

#think

in every issue

BRIAN HIGBEE

109

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GLAMOUR (Incorporating Self and Mademoiselle)

Fun Facts About This Issue

SAMANTHA BARRY Editor-in-Chief

“When I showed Patti Safian a picture of Mandy Moore dressed up like a Rajneeshee, from the cult depicted in Netflix’s Wild Wild Country, of which her mom was a disciple for 13 years [page 109], she said: ‘That’s hilarious, and it couldn’t be further from what sannyasins were about. They’d never wear heels or carry a leather handbag.’  ”

“On the Queer Eye shoot [page 36], Tan France regaled his castmates Bobby Berk and Karamo Brown with stories about when he was a flight attendant. The job didn’t last long—he was let go after three months for talking back to a passenger who’d said some very rude things to him.”

Creative Director NATHALIE KIRSHEH Executive Editor WENDY NAUGLE Digital Director LAUREL PINSON Executive Beauty Director YING CHU Entertainment and Special Projects Director ALISON WARD FRANK Managing Editor ERIN HOBDAY Executive Producer LAUREN LUMSDEN

FASHION Fashion Market Director SHILPA PRABHAKAR NADELLA Accessories Director ELISSA VELLUTO Fashion Market Editor AMY HOU Digital Fashion Editor ANA COLÓN Associate Accessories Editor IRENE HWANG Fashion Assistants ADRIANNA CICINELLI, HALIE LESAVAGE Bookings Assistant KELSEY LAFFERTY Credits Editor CHRISTINA DRAPER

FEATURES Digital Deputy Editor PERRIE SAMOTIN Features Director JUSTINE HARMAN News and Culture Director CHRISTINA COLEMAN Senior Political Reporter CELESTE KATZ Senior Editors SARA GAYNES LEVY, MATTIE KAHN Assistant Editor JESSICA MILITARE Editorial Assistants TESS KORNFELD, SAMANTHA LEACH

ENTERTAINMENT Senior Editor ANNA MOESLEIN West Coast Editor JESSICA RADLOFF Entertainment Editor CAITLIN BRODY Entertainment Writer CHRIS ROSA

BEAUTY

“I arrived at a New York Fashion Week show in Penn Plaza Pavilion for our backstage-beauty story [page 45] crazy early. The upside? It was in the same building as the Westminster Dog Show. The primping level was pretty much the same. I daresay the hair was better.”

Senior Digital Beauty Editor LINDSAY SCHALLON Beauty Writer RACHEL NUSSBAUM Beauty Assistant BLAKE NEWBY

ART Art Director SARAH OLIN Digital Art Director AIMEE SY

PHOTO Photo Director ASHLEY CURRY TALIENTO Deputy Photo Editor KATHRYNE HALL Senior Photo Research Editor MICHELLE ROSE SULCOV Associate Photo Editor MORRIGAN MAZA

“Our on-set tailor, Cierra Treloar, was so inspired by the eighties vibe of the GLOW shoot [page 58] that she made homemade scrunchies for the talent and crew.”

DIGITAL & VIDEO Social Media Director MADELINE HALLER Engineering Manager MEG ADAMS Senior Social Media Manager SMRITI SINHA Associate Social Media Manager SARAH MORSE Digital Producer MAGGIE BURCH Associate Director, Audience Development ALIX HENICK Digital Analytics Manager MELISSA HANEY Producers, Video MARLA GOLLER, AZADEH VALANEJAD Digital Administrative Assistant KHALIHA HAWKINS

“Danielle Levitt, who photographed ‘The Women Giving Late-Night New Life’ [page 92], asked the writers for advice for a friend who’s an aspiring comedy writer. Their answer: Tweet jokes!”

OPERATIONS

Production Director KEVIN ROFF Copy Chief TALLEY SUE HOHLFELD Research Director PATRICIA J. SINGER Production Manager ALEXANDRA KUSHEL Deputy Research Director SYLVIA ESPINOZA Senior Copy Editor DAMIAN FALLON Production Associate SARAH RATH Executive Director of Special Events LINDSAY LEAF Senior Director, Business EILISH MORLEY Executive Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief JENNIFER LANCE Contributors ELISABETH EGAN (BOOKS), KATHARINE O’CONNELL WHITE, M.D., KRYSTIN ARNESON

ANNA WINTOUR Artistic Director


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GLAMOUR (Incorporating Self and Mademoiselle)

ALISON MOORE Chief Business Officer Chief Industry Officer, Beauty / Head of Revenue LUCY KRIZ VPs-Revenue LAUREN KAMEN, ELIZABETH MARVIN, HEDDY SAMS PIERSON VP-Finance & Business Development CHRISTINE D I PRESSO MORRA

ADVERTISING Sales Director for Collection ABIGAIL BREENE Executive Account Directors DORENE BAIR, DEBORAH B. BARON, KELSEY KIRSCH, LAUREN DECKER LERMAN, STEPHANIE SLADKUS Senior Account Directors LAUREN HIMELSTEIN, CARLY GRESH PASTERNAK Account Directors ALEXANDRIA HAUGHEY, STEPHANIE LEINBACH, BERRY MORSE Associate Account Director MANEK A MAHAJAN Executive Assistants RACHEL HERRING, JAY R. MALSKY Sales Associates MANUELA BONGIORNO, GIULIA GIACOBELLI, MELODY HILL, SYDNE KILBERG, ALEX ANDRA KOTLER, AMANDA MADISON, TEAH SISTI, MADELINE WALKER, SUE WARDA

BRANCH OFFICES Executive Account Directors, Midwest CHRISTINA KROLOPP, ANGIE PACKARD PRENDERGAST Executive Account Director, Boston & Caribbean KRISTIN HAVENS Senior Account Director, Los Angeles KAYTE BENEDICT Account Director, San Francisco ALEXANDRA SLUSSER Account Directors, Italy LAURA BOTTA, ENRICA MANELLI Director Network Sales & Partnerships, Detroit MARISA HANSEN Southeast PETER ZUCKERMAN, Z MEDIA, 305-532-5566 Texas CAROL CONTESTABILE, LEWIS STAFFORD COMPANY, 972-960-2889

MARKETING VPs, Marketing JENNY RYAN BOWMAN, JILL STEINBACH FRIEDSON Executive Directors, Brand Marketing ERIN BRENNAN, CAMILLE SIGNORELLI Senior Directors, Brand Marketing STEFENI BELLOCK, TONI NICOLINO Senior Director, Experiences JENNIFER MA Directors, Brand Marketing KATIE MACK, KERRI-ANN OGRUDEK Director, Experiences CHRIS MANCIVALANO Associate Director, Brand Marketing BETHANY VERDONE Associate Director, Experiences NATALIE GREENFIELD Managers, Brand Marketing ABBY ADESANYA, HALEY HOOVER Associate Managers, Brand Marketing BIANCA D I IUSTO, MORIAH RAPAPORT, KATHERINE SIENKO Director, Marketplace Strategy JENNIFER FRIEDMAN PEREZ Associate Director, Marketplace Strategy CARA WOLF ERWIN Associate, Marketplace Strategy MARGARET HALL Associate, Marketing RACHEL MALONEY Executive Director, Marketplace Strategy LEAH ASHLEY Manager, Marketplace Strategy NICOLE SAFIR Executive Producer CARRIE CLAYTON Producer MCKINZY POWERS

BUSINESS Senior Director, Finance TOM MORRIS Finance Director JESSICA GIVNER LEVINE Associate Finance Director NILSA SERRATA Executive Business Director JENNIFER JACKSON Senior Business Directors KELLY HWANG, KAREN MANVILLE Associate Business Manager CHARLOTTE KWON

DIGITAL PLANNING & STRATEGY Director, Digital Sales Operations ASHLEY TABROFF Digital Account Managers KIM FEENEY, GINNY LASKOWSKI, MARY MASHBURN, ALEXA PIERRE, JODI SHERMAN Digital Sales Planners JENNIFER BRENNAN, ELSINA DENG, CHELSEA DONNELLY, NISHA HJARTOY, CHRISTINA NO, CHRISTINA TUOHY

ART Associate Creative Director MELISSA MELNIK POLHAMUS Design Director MORGAN REARDON WRAPP Digital Director ALEXANDER RATNER Designer ANGELO TIRAMBULO

PUBLISHED BY CONDÉ NAST President & Chief Executive Officer ROBERT A. SAUERBERG, JR. Chief Financial Officer DAVID E. GEITHNER Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer PAMELA DRUCKER MANN Chief Experience Officer JOSH STINCHCOMB Chief Digital Officer FRED SANTARPIA Chief People Officer JOANN MURRAY Chief Communications Officer CAMERON R. BLANCHARD Chief Technology Officer EDWARD CUDAHY EVP-Consumer Marketing MONICA RAY EVP-Research & Analytics STEPHANIE FRIED Head Creative Director RAÚL MARTINEZ

CONDÉ NAST ENTERTAINMENT President DAWN OSTROFF EVP/Chief Operating Officer SAHAR ELHABASHI EVP-Motion Pictures JEREMY STECKLER EVP-Alternative Programming JOE LA BRACIO EVP-CNÉ Studios AL EDGINGTON

CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL Chairman & Chief Executive JONATHAN NEWHOUSE President WOLFGANG BLAU Condé Nast is a global media company producing premium content for more than 263 million consumers in 30 markets. www.condenast.com www.condenastinternational.com


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SINGER LEXIE LIU, SHANGHAI, CHINA


A MAGAZINE EDITOR WALKS INTO A BAR. AND THEN…ERM…

KNOCK KNOCK. WHO’S THERE? A MAGAZINE EDITOR…NOPE.

Our cover star Kate McKinnon always nails it. Her insightful impressions and delightfully deranged characters are an absolute joy on Saturday Night Live, and she’s leading a generation of funnywomen who demand to be taken seriously. In a world short on joy, humor can be a unifier and a survival tool (see how Anna Akana used comedy to overcome personal tragedy on page 54). We feature multitudes of funny, fearless women this month, from the brilliant Sharon Horgan (page 88) to the incisive female writers reshaping late-night (page 92). Plus, today’s brightest TV stars give props to their hilarious heroes (page 98). HOW MANY MAGAZINE EDITORS DOES IT TAKE TO CHANGE A LIGHT BULB? ALMOST THERE…

I prefer comedy that’s dark and close to the bone; Irish humor is catastrophic, all about death and destruction. When life makes me feel a little too Handmaid-y, I count on Issa Rae, Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish, Ali Wong, or Amy Poehler to get me back on point. Still, too many female comics still get the finger wag of “That is not appropriate!” (see: Michelle Wolf at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner). I say they are doing their job, which is to take the piss and (hopefully) make us laugh like hell while they do it. I’VE GOT IT! A MAGAZINE EDITOR WALKS INTO A BAR. THE BARTENDER SAYS, “SAM, THERE’S NO TIME FOR A DRINK! YOU’RE ON DEADLINE!”

Kazakhstan, here I come! xx Sam

—Samantha Barry, Editor-in-Chief @sammybarrynews @samanthabarry

BARRY: JAMES RYANG. BANANA PEEL: ANTHIA CUMMING/GETTY IMAGES

AUGUST 2018 · EDITOR’S LETTER ·

14 · GLAMOUR.COM

I’ll find a decent punch line…eventually! I try to be funny, but sometimes only my friends laugh (they’d better). I once opened a speech at an embassy in Kazakhstan with a joke, only to realize that jokes really don’t land when they’re being translated on time delay through headsets. You’ve never heard crickets till you’ve heard Kazakh crickets.


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This Month on

AUGUST 2018 · @GLAMOURMAG ·

16 ·

Fearlessly Funny Maysoon Zayid, 43, jokes about everything from being Muslim to having cerebral palsy at a time when, she says, it’s dangerous to identify as either. IS THERE ANYTHING THAT YOU CAN’T MAKE FUNNY? I make everything funny. I talk about disability, religion, the stuff that you’re not supposed to. I’m doing it because it’s personal to me, not just to see if I can. WHY DID YOU CHOOSE STAND-UP? I didn’t see myself on TV. People with disabilities are 20 percent of the U.S. population, but we’re only 2.7 percent of the images

Where Has Your Glamour Been? “New York City! My friend Caroline and I traveled from Boston and Washington, D.C., to reunite with our college friends. We flipped through the May Money Issue while we waited for our pizza at Rubirosa in NYC’s Nolita neighborhood. Reading Melissa McCarthy’s cover story and all of the other articles with some wine was the perfect way for us to unwind.” —Mackenzie Sheridan, 25, Boston, near right, and Caroline Kaufmann, 25, Washington, D.C.

Got an opinion? Email us at letters@glamour.com; tweet to @glamourmag; comment on facebook.com/glamour; or write us at Glamour, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Submissions and comments become the property of the magazine and won’t be returned; they may be edited and can be published or otherwise used in any medium.

onscreen. If you can’t see it, you can’t be it. Comedy is a place for misfits, and I was a misfit. HOW HAVE YOU BEEN SINCE YOUR BREAKOUT TEDTALK IN 2013? I get threatened by people who know where I’m performing. I’m bullied online. But I grew up with hecklers in comedy clubs; you had to deal with them. And for every 100 nasty comments I get, there’s one that’s life changing. —LAUREL PINSON

ZAYID ONSTAGE: ROBIN MARCHANT/CONTRIBUTOR/GETTY IMAGES. ZAYID CENTER: DANIEL ZUCHNIK/WIREIMAGE. SHERIDAN AND K AUFMANN: TESS KORNFELD

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AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

19 · GLAMOUR.COM

Fashion for All

Annual Guide

Your New Favorite Denim Jeans—can you ever have enough? Thankfully, no. Because there are tons of subtle upgrades that will have you wanting more, more, more. We found the freshest washes, cuts, and add-ons to feed your obsession. BY AMANDA FITZSIMONS

Denim your way: Designer Shazia Ijaz, center, with models Mia Kang (@missmiakang), far left, and Kyrsten Sinclair (@kyrstianity). From left: Rachel Rachel Roy jacket, sizes XS–3X, $119; 3.1 Phillip Lim dress; Marc Fisher sandals, $79. Seek Refuge jacket, $180; Hudson jeans, $245; Mercedes Castillo slingbacks, $425. Lane Bryant jacket, $80, dress, $90, both sizes 14–28; Vans sneakers, $60. See Glamour Shopper for more information.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY NADYA WASYLKO STYLIST: AMY HOU


1

Bright denim, first popular in jeans, is back in everything from jackets and button-downs to miniskirts.

“Denim jackets are an essential, especially for summer,” says Kang. “You can wear them with anything: pants, skirts, dresses.” French Connection jacket ($198, frenchconnection .com). H&M T-shirt ($30, hm.com). Zara skirt ($50, zara .com). Shashi earrings ($48, shopshashi.com). Vita Fede necklace ($625, vitafede.com). Via Spiga sandals ($250, viaspiga.com).

HAIR: YUKIKO TAJIMA, MAKEUP: DEANNA MELLUSO, BOTH AT SEE MANAGEMENT

AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

20 · GLAMOUR.COM

The Colored Wash


The Colored Wash

3

4

Try pairing bold denim with equally blazing extras. 1. 3x1 jacket ($365,

Mother ($238, motherdenim.com)

Wrangler x MC (sizes 0–24, $89, modcloth.com)

The micro trend we can’t get enough of: front pockets with extraspecial details. Whether doubled up, in a contrasting wash, or tricked out with vintage-y buttons, they add an unexpected update to everyday blues.

Citizens of Humanity ($248, citizensofhumanity.com)

net-a-porter.com) .com) 3. Calvin Klein Jeans shirt ($90, calvinklein.com); Mlouye bag ($460, mlouye sandals ($195, select Nordstrom)

STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; STYLISTS: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS, PETER TRAN AT ART DEPARTMENT. HOUSE OF HOLLAND: LUCA TOMBOLINI/VOGUERUNWAY.COM

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HOT POCKETS

AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

22 · GLAMOUR.COM

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AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

24 · GLAMOUR.COM

Modest dressing isn’t typically associated with streetwear. So when Shazia Ijaz, 25, couldn’t find brands that offered much beyond floralprinted dresses and caftans, she took matters into her own hands. First, there was a crowdfunding campaign (nearly $27,000 in one month), then she launched the San Francisco–based label Seek Refuge. “The cool thing about streetwear is that it’s oversize and baggy, so it speaks to a lot of Muslim women,” says Ijaz. “[But] very few brands realize that.” Her line includes loose tees and an oversize denim jacket printed with a poem by a Syrian refugee, which includes the line “seek refuge,” hence the brand’s name. (She donates part of her proceeds to help build schools for Syrian refugees displaced to Jordan.) “I really wanted to make sure these pieces look like streetwear,” says Ijaz. “Super dope, but still harmonious with Islam.” —Halie LeSavage

Style hack, if you’re petite like Ijaz and coveralls are too long? “I peel down the top and tie them at the waist to make the fit work,” she says. Citizens of Humanity jumpsuit ($328, anthropologie.com). Juicy Couture bodysuit ($45, juicycouture .com). Jennifer Fisher hoops ($550, jenniferfisherjewelry.com). Converse sneakers ($55, converse.com).


2

1

2

AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

27 · GLAMOUR.COM

Philosophy

RUNWAY INSPO

The All-in-one

3 Overalls at night? Yes! Try a denim jumpsuit for a retro disco vibe. 1. Lucky Brand overalls (sizes 14–26, $119, lucky brand.com) 2. AG jumpsuit ($328, agjeans.com); Giles & Brother cuff ($295, giles andbrother.com); Mango bag ($50, mango.com) 3. Ganni jumpsuit ($475, ganni.com); Adidas Originals sneakers ($150, adidas.com)


3

Athleisure plus denim—a match made in heaven. Why didn’t anyone think of this sooner?

AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

28 · GLAMOUR.COM

The TrackPant Jean

“A typical look for me is an athleisure-style top with skinny jeans,” says Sinclair. “It just looks so cool.” Premme jacket (sizes 12–26, $79, premme.us). Gap T-shirt (sizes XS–XXL, $20, gap.com). Lane Bryant jeans (sizes 12–28, $90, lanebryant.com). Dinosaur Designs earrings ($385, dinosaurdesigns.com). Tory Sport sandals ($148, torysport.com).


3

1

The TrackPant Jean

Denim as Resistance Wear: A Brief History

MSGM

Levi Strauss’s first pair of jeans is an instant hit with factory workers and cowboys. “These democratic beginnings are key to why jeans became the garment of resistance,” says Tracey Panek, historian for Levi’s.

5

1960s

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Activist Joyce Ladner (right) at the March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom in 1963.

early 1970s

asos.com) 5. Levi’s jeans ($128, levi.com)

It’s still frowned upon for women to wear pants to work, a nice restaurant, or even a public library, so when women’s rights protesters march in jeans, “it is radical,” says McClendon.

1989

3

As the Berlin Wall comes down, German teens sit atop the rubble in—you guessed it—jeans. “The perfect choice because blue jeans were emblematic of freedom during the Cold War,” says Panek.

Today

Denim overalls, the uniform of sharecroppers, become a staple at civil rights protests.“It was a visual tool to align their cause with their history,” says Emma McClendon, associate curator at NYC’s The Museum at FIT.

The power of denim as a resistance statement may be fading, but it’s hard to imagine a march without it. “Denim,” says Panek, “is still important symbolism— for democracy, the working class, and rebellion.”

STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; STYLIST: GABRIEL RIVERA AT R.J. BENNETT REPRESENTS & PETER TRAN AT ART DEPARTMENT. DENIM OVERALLS: NBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY IMAGES. RUNWAY: ALESSANDRO GAROFALO/VOGUERUNWAY.COM

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4

Ulla Johnson, a women’s studies major turned designer, has a cult following for her boho dresses. But the pre-fall look we loved was these: classic blue jeans embroidered with dainty polka dots.

Ulla Johnson jeans ($355, ullajohnson.com). Tibi slingbacks ($485, tibi.com).

Lucky Brand jeans (sizes 14–26, $80, luckybrand .com). Yuul Yie pumps ($350, yuulyieshop.com).

AMO jeans ($286, fivestoryny.com). ASOS mules ($42, asos.com).

ACCESSORIES STYLIST: ELISSA VELLUTO

AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

32 · GLAMOUR.COM

The HaveIt-Your-Way Hem

Neat, frayed, tied—you can’t go wrong this season, especially with an elegant pair of low heels.


AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

34 · GLAMOUR.COM

Alexandra Shipp Won’t Censor Herself

“The time is up for people in this industry being opinionless,” says Shipp. Max Mara coat, tank top, $265, skirt, $695, Max Mara, Beverly Hills.

E

V E N A F TE R S TA R TU RN S I N TH E

biopic Straight Outta Compton and coming-of-age story Love, Simon, Alexandra Shipp has been able to stay a little under the radar—a critical darling still able to say whatever she wants on social media. But now the actress, 27, is stepping onto a bigger stage, taking on the role of Storm (originally portrayed by Halle Berry) in the latest installment of the X-Men franchise, out early next year. Shipp knows there will be even more eyes watching her, but she’s committed to being completely unfiltered. Late last year Shipp fired back at critics who felt she was “too light-skinned” to have been cast: “This conversation about Storm is so stupid, I’m out…. If I lose my job to another actress, I hope it’s for her talent and grace, not her skin [color].” We asked Shipp to do one of the things she does best—speak her mind: I get pushback for things I say on social media, mostly on Twitter, but I hope to never censor the things that come out of my mouth. Male actors have always been able to be way more opinionated when it comes to politics. As actresses, we only get to do things like help the hungry children. Take Angelina Jolie. She’s political in her actions, but you don’t know her opinion on Trump. I think people should speak their truth. I don’t give a fuck. I’m me. I’m exactly who I want to be every single day. I know it might be my demise—I’ll check back in with you in a couple years and see how it’s working out—but I’m my own artist, and you can’t be a great artist without having a huge opinion. [I tweeted back] at people who criticized me for not having dark enough skin for my role in X-Men because we’re not going to have this conversation about a cartoon character. You’re not going to tell me that my skin color doesn’t match a Crayola from 1970. Growing up, when I was reading the comics, I pictured her looking like me. For any black girl, for there to be a black superhero, we picture them looking like us. So when I auditioned for the role, I wasn’t like, “Oh man, I’m not dark enough.” I was like, “Finally, this is my moment.” I’m not playing Harriet Tubman with a prosthetic nose and darkening my skin tone. I would never do that. The time is up for people in this industry being opinionless…. If I was sitting here giving you all the answers you wanted to hear, keeping my political [beliefs] to myself, I would be acting. And that would be a really boring interview. —as told to Amanda FitzSimons

SHIPP: COURTESY OF MAX MARA

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Fun

T I M E S

Five

#look

Join the cast of Queer Eye for one perfectly curated night—and a shot (or two) of that famous chemistry. BY CAITLIN BRODY PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRIAN HIGBEE STYLED BY SARAH SCHUSSHEIM


Gang’s All Here Model Mical Bockru joins, from left, Antoni Porowski, Karamo Brown, Bobby Berk, Tan France, and Jonathan Van Ness for happy hour. On Bockru: Derek Lam 10 Crosby top, $650, skirt, $495. Alison Lou hoops, $165. Calvin Klein Jeans bag, $188, boots, $199. Bing Bang ring, $160. On Porowski: Zadig & Voltaire T-shirt. Uniqlo jeans. The Frye Company boots. On Brown: Adidas Originals jacket, sneakers. A.P.C. jeans. On Berk: A.P.C. jacket, jeans. Uniqlo x Tomas Maier shirt. Soludos espadrilles. On France: Frame shirt; AllSaints pants. Officine Generale scarf. Jennifer Fisher cuffs. Jennifer Zeuner Jewelry ring. A.P.C. sneakers. On Van Ness: Perry Ellis sweater. The Kooples shirt. AG jeans. Common Projects sneakers.


J AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

38 · GLAMOUR.COM

JUST BEFORE THEY WERE CAST ON NETFLIX’S

Queer Eye, the quintet we now know as the Fab Five took a leap of faith. “We started a group text the night before we knew we had the job,” says Antoni Porowski, the series’ resident food and wine expert. “Someone named it Fab Five, which was confident, ambitious, and very delusional.” Turns out the TV gods were listening: Bobby Berk, Karamo Brown, Tan France, Jonathan Van Ness, and Porowski are the reason the makeover of the 2003 makeover series became anything but a tired spin-off. “As Heidi Klum taught us, ‘One day you’re in. And the next day you’re out,’” jokes grooming guru Van Ness. “So for the reaction to be so positive has been so exciting.” “Positive” is an understatement. Queer Eye 2.0— and its quest to school schlubby men on the art of style, culture, grooming, cuisine, and home decor— immediately snagged millions of viewers and a near-instantaneous renewal when it premiered in February, with season two quickly released in June. “It’s not just ‘Let’s do your hair and fashion,’ ” says culture expert Brown, who previously worked as a psychotherapist and a social worker. “It’s touching on culturally relevant issues that we need to talk about, but not in a way that’s our point of view versus their point of view. It’s about finding common ground.” For most of the Fab Five, the opportunity to reinvent Bravo’s Queer Eye for the Straight Guy was irresistible. Brown, who learned about the reboot while watching Watch What Happens Live With Andy Cohen, immediately called his agent. The first round of auditions was over, but he managed to gain entrée to a 300-person, three-day Hunger Games–like affair that included group exercises, interviews, and chemistry

On Bockru, near right: Michael Michael Kors jacket, $350, pants, $225. Aerie tank top, $18. Jonathan Simkhai x Eye M by Ileana Makri earrings, $325. Oliver Peoples sunglasses, $590. Stuart Weitzman pumps, $375. For her curly look, try Göt2b Kinkier Gloss N’ Define Curling Mousse ($5, walmart.com). Center photo: On France: Coach 1941 shirt. AllSaints pants. Oliver Peoples sunglasses. On Van Ness: Sandro Homme sweatshirt. AG jeans. On Porowski: Gap jacket. John Varvatos Star USA T-shirt. AG jeans. On Brown: Fred Perry shirt. The Kooples pants. On Berk: PS by Paul Smith jacket. AllSaints T-shirt. Polo Ralph Lauren chinos. The Frye Company boots.


Five Things the Fab Five Want You to Know

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1. Bobby can’t read your mind.

AUGUST 2018 · #LOOK ·

“I get dozens of pictures a day on Twitter going, ‘What color should I paint my room?’” says the 37-year-old decor whiz, far left. “I don’t know what someone I haven’t met likes, so how can I tell them what color they should paint their room?” On him: Zara blazer. Vince T-shirt. Frame jeans. To Boot New York boots.

2. Tan isn’t the fashion police.

tests. Home design expert Berk drove nearly 300 miles—from Las Vegas to Los Angeles, at 1:00 A.M while battling the flu—in order to land his dream gig. “We were in a hotel in Glendale, and it was kind of like speed dating,” he says. “There were three tables with executives and producers, and you just went from table to table. I think I sat around for about 12 hours to do 15 minutes of auditions.” Van Ness, who has been a hairdresser since he was 17 and earned an Emmy nod for his popular Web series Gay of Thrones, auditioned back in December 2016… and then held his breath. “I did not think I was ever going to get it. I think I was really used to being told no,” he says. Only style savant France

needed some extra convincing. “I was terrified of being on camera. I was worried that whatever I would say, people would assume I’m speaking for every Muslim, every Pakistani, or every Middle Eastern person. That’s a lot of pressure,” says the South Yorkshire, England, native whose parents had emigrated from Pakistan. “But it also got me excited about what could be done, because I am a representative for people who are underrepresented. I hope I am doing it in a somewhat responsible way.” Somehow, in the process of whittling thousands down to 300 to a party of five, producers found chemistry magic. We’re talking “I’m not crying; you’re crying,” “Call your fam-

“I think that people assume when they meet me that I’m going to judge what they’re wearing,” says the 35-yearold style expert, second from left. “I’m never massively concerned about what somebody is wearing, as long as it makes them feel really good about themselves.” On him: Frame T-shirt. Ovadia & Sons pants. J.Lindeberg sneakers.


3. But Antoni is totally judging your condiments. “I’m very openminded with food, but ketchup on a hot dog…there’s just something wrong with it,” says the 34year-old foodie, near left. “There should be mustard. Think German. Something with acid and crunch.” On him: Blk Dnm top. Ovadia & Sons pants. Tommy Hilfiger loafers.

4. Karamo wants to redefine masculinity. “I play sports; I’m a father. So conventionally, you’re putting me in this masculine box,” says the 37-year-old culture expert, near right. “But when you go into the toxic masculinity of what a man should be, it limits us. I’m emotional, I’m vulnerable, I’m curious.” On him: John Smedley polo shirt. Todd Snyder pants. To Boot New York boots.

5. Jonathan never saw the Fab Five magic coming. “I kind of went into the show hoping to get along with everybody,” says the 31-year-old hair guru, center. “I was not expecting to actually walk away from [our set in] Atlanta with people who were in my life. And these boys are in my life.” On him: Rag & Bone T-shirt. AllSaints jeans. Carvil boots.

ily to say ‘I love you’ ” magic. And in so many ways, the Fab Five has invaded our homes at precisely the right moment. “I never expected that these idiots would become some of my favorite people on this planet, but they are,” France says of his costars. Adds Porowski: “The show sort of transcends all of the sociopolitical stuff going on right now. I don’t want to use the word escape, but it’s an opportunity to look at pure, genuine kindness. I think we forgot the feeling of what it’s like to watch people be kind to each other. How could helping somebody to become a better version of themselves possibly get old?” —interviews by Jessica Radloff

On Bockru, below: Maje jacket, $560. Cynthia Rowley top, $245. Rebecca Minkoff pants, $148. Mounser earrings, $225 for set. Michael Michael Kors bag, $168. Dolce Vita boots, $190. Opposite page: Staud jumpsuit, $325. Alison Lou hoops, $145. Tory Burch necklace, $158. Wolf Circus Jewelry bracelet, $160. Alumnae mules, $650. See Glamour Shopper for more information. Men’s styling: Gaultier Desandre Navarre. Model: Mical Bockru at Next Models; hair: Richard Collins, grooming for Berk, Van Ness, and Porowski: Fabiola, both at TraceyMattingly.com; makeup: Kathy Jeung at Forward Artists; grooming for Brown and France: Anna Bernabe, manicures: Sarah Chu, both at Executive Artists Management; set design: Nicholas Faiella at Art Department; production: 3 Star Production.


Beauty, Inside & Out

AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

PROP STYLIST: MOLLY FINDLAY AT WALTER SCHUPFER MANAGEMENT. STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

45 · GLAMOUR.COM

Backstage

Beauty Lessons GO BEHIND THE SCENES AT

Fashion Week and you’ll see where many beauty ideas are born. Once the shows are over and the pros go home, the rest of us get to try those tricks in the real world. This season the looks were ultra DIY-friendly: an upgrade on red lipstick, goof-proof bright eyeshadow, and topknots you can wear to work. Turn the page for all the how-tos.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOANNA MCCLURE

BY DEANNA PAI


RUST-RED LIPS

eyeshadow, as seen at Naeem Khan, above, can be worn as slapdash or as precise as you wish. Sweep your favorite shades (we love the lilac and seafoam green in CoverGirl TruNaked Dazed Palette, $12, ulta.com) on lids with a fluffy brush and pretend you’re a Monet in the making.

DRESSED-UP TOPKNOTS The world’s favorite weekend hairstyle appeared on runways with a ladylike twist: sleek sides that you can walk into meetings with your head held high. a smoothing cream like John Frieda Frizz Ease Secret Weapon ($8, target.com). It’s so easy you can hit snooze and still make it to your desk on time.

NAEEM KHAN, CUSHNIE ET OCHS: IMAXTREE.COM. CHANEL: STEPHANE CARDINALE/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES. STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

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Trade in your classic crimson. A burnt-red shade f latters all skin tones (seriously) and is basically fall’s answer to summer’s cheerful cherry. To get the earthy richness seen at Cushnie et Ochs, below, and at Jonathan Simkhai, layer multiple shades: Try Maybelline Color Sensational Shaping Lip Liner in Rich Chocolate ($6, target .com, below left) under Maybelline New York Superstay Matte Ink in Fighter ($9, maybelline.com).


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PRABAL GURUNG, ANNA SUI, SELF PORTRAIT: IMAXTREE.COM STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

48 · GLAMOUR.COM

This season nothing beats a back-fromthe-gym blush. At Prabal Gurung, left, makeup artist Diane Kendal buffed MAC Mineralize Blush in Flirting With Danger ($29), a warm coral, into cheeks before blending rose gold MAC Extra Dimension Skinfinish in Beaming Blush ($34, both maccosmetics.com) over it. Presto: a healthy glow.


It’s OK to Laugh

How Comedy Saved My Life BY ANNA AKANA

U

NTIL THE AGE OF 17, I WAS A HYPER-DRIVEN

was drinking myself into blackouts every night, regularly dropping acid or taking Molly (often alone), smoking up to eight joints a day, and refusing to go to college. I was depressed and dragging myself through a hopeless existence with drugs and alcohol to pass the time. That shift from ambitious student to desperate escape artist happened after I lost my little sister to suicide during my senior year of high school. My family will never know why she made that decision, and it certainly left us with a

Laughter Is Good Medicine Comedy, says Akana, “makes the pain in my life seem manageable.”

AK ANA: SELA SHILONI

AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

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student: 4.1 GPA, high SAT scores, and way too many extracurriculars. I had a plan to go into the Marine Corps, like my father, and become a veterinarian, which I’d been diligently working toward as long as I could remember. Anyone who knew me could see: I was going places. But by 19 I hadn’t laughed for two years, and my free time read like a DARE program’s worst-case scenario. I


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AK ANA AT MOCO MUSEUM AMSTERDAM: CAT CALICO

56 · GLAMOUR.COM AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

plethora of mindfucks to sort through. about your darkest moments means you have to find what’s To deal, we mainly cohabited in denial. Though we funny about them. You have to find a new perspective, a have a family history of both addiction and depression, unique angle; you have to take an honest look at the worst mental health was not something we talked about. (Years seconds you’ve ever seen. Writing jokes about my sister’s later, when I first went on Lexapro at 26, my parents suicide (yeah, I go there) forced me to have a new relationhanded me a bag of vitamin B3 and said, “Depression goes ship to it. It made me laugh about it, something I never away with old age.” Oh. OK.) My point: I had the odds thought I could do, and look at it head-on and explore it with an open, curious mind. Whereas I once cringed stacked against me and zero coping skills. whenever someone casuBut I needed a sense of purpose, bad, and I went ally said, “Ugh, I wanna Akana, in a Roy Lichtenstein exhibit in Amsterdam looking for it on Comkill myself,” I was now trying to make others comedy Central. I was high (as usual), and Margaret Cho fortable enough to laugh at came on my TV. For the that exact pain. next 30 minutes, I forgot Instead of running away my sister was dead. I forgot from my sister’s death, that my family was fucked comedy asked me to walk up. I forgot who I was, how slowly, to look around and sad I was, and how paintake notes. It asked me to work through what I was fully hopeless life felt. For going through and find— that half hour, I laughed not necessarily a bright and escaped in a way that side—but a side that, when felt a million times better looked at in the right light, than any high I’d been chascould make you shrug and ing. It changed everything. laugh. And I did. A nd so I de c ide d I O n s t a g e I ’ v e j ok e d wanted to do that. I puropenly about my depressued stand-up with the sion, losing my sister, and same tenacity I’d previthe aftermath of our shatously tackled academics: performing and watchtered family. I’ve relayed the story of when I told my ing several open mics a best friend that my sister night; inhaling special had died and he blurted after special, from Whitout: “Oh no! Is she OK?!” ney Cummings to Rodney “ NO T H ING F ELT Well, no. She wasn’t. Nine Da nger f ield; scour ing years of exploring that loss Comedy Central and NetA S G O OD AS T HOSE in front of an audience has f lix archives for more. finally made me OK with it. I dug into obscure rouL AUGHS F ROM C omedy a lso let me tines posted on YouTube internalize my struggle and spent hours writing T H E DARKNESS. with depression as a part jokes, rewriting jokes, and T H AT WAS HOPE. of my identity in a positive rewriting them some more. way: I’m no longer a victim. As I dived headlong into T HAT WAS L OVE.” I no longer see my life as a comedy, one thing became tragedy. Labels like “cliniclear: Many of the people around me were depressed cal depression” or “suicidal” and struggling too. The stories of my fellow comedians blew no longer scare me. They are simply part of my story. All me away. Some had cancer; some were orphans—some were of this makes me who I am, which I finally understand is orphans who had cancer! We each had a sob story, and we someone worthy. The hard stuff? I now have the emotional were trying to turn our tears into other people’s laughter. endurance to poke fun at it, to look it right in the face. Because nothing felt as good as those laughs from the darkMore important, I’m able to tilt my head to see it in just the right light—and laugh. ness. That was hope. That was love. Some might say it was also a drug. Sure, I may have replaced one high with another, but this one makes the Anna Akana is a comedian, author, and executive producer pain in my life seem manageable. To write punch lines and star of the YouTube Red series Youth & Consequences.


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Like the eighties-inspired makeup that was all over the fall runways? The cast of Netflix’s hit GLOW shows us how it’s done. INTERVIEWS BY JESSICA RADLOFF PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE HAHN STYLED BY DJUNA BEL


To get Brie’s look, try Lancôme Color Design 5 Shadow & Liner Palette in Amethyst Glam ($50, sephora.com), darkening the crease with a deep-purple shade and brightening lids with a lighter pink. On cheeks, blend Lancôme Teint Idole Blush Stick in 201 Red Flush ($39, lancome-usa.com) up to the temple.

Back to the Fuchsia “Eighties makeup was just more, more, more. Do a lip, do a cheek, do an eye, do it all! Crimp your hair. Put color in it. People looked really killer just going out to dinner,” says Alison Brie, 35, who plays wrestler Ruth Wilder. GLOW’s aesthetic has even changed the way she dresses IRL: “We spend a lot of time in leotards on the show, which has given me greater love for my body. I live in bodysuits and high-waisted jeans now.”

Alice + Olivia by Stacey Bendet top, $350.


AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

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For a high-impact lip, layer MAC Viva Glam Lipstick in Sia ($19, maccosmetics.com) over Maybelline New York Color Sensational Shaping Lip Liner in Very Cherry ($8, ulta.com). Top with Tom Ford Lip Lacquer in Vinyl ($36, sephora.com).

Bold Glam “With a red lip you’re sort of trumpeting that you’ve entered the room,” says Betty Gilpin, 32, who plays Debbie Eagan. “You have things to say. But you can’t eat anything. Or kiss anyone. Or experience wind, rain, or air because then it’s all over your teeth and face and sandwich. Still, there’s a pageantry to it that I love.”

Juicy Couture jumpsuit. Alexis Bittar earrings, $225.


Eighties blush extends up. Way up. Brush Sephora Collection Colorful Face Powder in Heated ($14, sephora .com) across cheeks and up to the brow. On lips, try Neutrogena Hydro Boost Hydrating Lip Shine in Ballet Pink ($10, drugstores).

Pink Power “In the eighties, it wasn’t like, ‘Oh, you’re wearing too much makeup.’ It was, ‘Oh, I love the shading, I love the color, I love the contour.’ I appreciate that,” says Britney Young, who plays Carmen Wade on the show. “I love how the pink lipstick makes my lips look full and my teeth look white. The hair works with my curls. It feels very Whitney Houston.”

Eloquii dress, sizes 14–24, $115. Fallon earrings, $175.


AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

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For intensely bright eyes, build color with Marc Jacobs Beauty Under(cover) Perfecting Coconut Eye Primer ($26, marcjacobsbeauty .com), then sweep Urban Decay Eyeshadow in Peace ($20, sephora.com) across lids. Add definition with L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Lash Paradise Mascara in Mystic Black ($10, lorealparisusa.com).

Electric Eyes “I have a playful personality, and this really amps it up,” says Sunita Mani, 31, who plays Arthie Premkumar. “The blue is incredible. Turquoise was my favorite stone back in high school. I think this is fulfilling a fantasy for me. I love the turquoise and the purples and pinks of eighties makeup—and the blush that comes up so high!”

Topshop jacket, $110. Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, $60.


To get this dewy sheen, smudge Clinique Chubby Stick Shadow Tint in Lavish Lilac ($18, clinique.com) along the lash lines. Finish with Milk Makeup Face Gloss ($20, sephora.com) on lids.

Ultraviolet “Iman and Naomi Campbell influenced me a lot growing up,” says Sydelle Noel, 35, a.k.a. GLOW’s Cherry Bang. “Back then, they were the only models who had my skin color.” This is a look she’d totally rock: “I love vibrant makeup and bright colors. The only time I wear gray and black is when I go to the grocery store.”

ASOS top, $42. Vince Camuto earrings, $35. See Glamour Shopper for more information. Hair: Sylvia Wheeler for Oribe; makeup: Grace Ahn for Marc Jacobs Beauty; production: Viewfinders.


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Sophie Turner On…

The Beauty of Experimentation

TURNER: WILLIAM CALLAN/BAFTA LA/CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES. STILLS: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

Glamour: Will you try a new hair color once GOT and X-Men wrap? Sophie Turner: I would definitely consider dyeing my hair brunette or something crazier like a bright pink. I’m not sure what mind-state I’ll be in once Game of Thrones ends, so I might want to stay just

the red. We’ll see!

Wella Fusionplex Intense Repair Conditioner ($22, ulta.com)

hair from heat damage, which is amazing, because when you’re on set, it’s always being curled or straightened. And I put on Wellaplex No. 3 Hair Stabilizer mask while I tidy up my room and watch an episode of 90 Day Fiancé.

Tom Ford Private Shadow Eyeshadow in Hush ($36, sephora.com)

Glamour: Other must-haves? ST: Tom Ford eyeshadow and Dior Diorshow Mascara. That’s my favorite mascara; I cannot go a day without it. And Charlotte Tilbury undereye cream. It wakes me up, gets rid of the puffiness, and deals with the bags. Charlotte Tilbury Magic Eye Rescue ($60, charlotte tilbury.com)

Glamour: to go with classic

is red. What’s your

Glamour: Has acting changed your approach to beauty? ST: When I see myself onscreen with bad hair or bad skin, it affects me. The world can see it. It’s important for me to maintain a healthy lifestyle to keep my skin and hair looking their best.

ST: I like to leave it

recently, which felt an antifrizz balm,

Glamour: What’s ST: I use Wella Wella Fusionplex Intense Repair Shampoo ($22, ulta.com) and Wellaplex No. 3 Hair Stabilizer ($14, in salons)

Glamour: Who’s your current beauty inspiration? ST: I love the way Zoë Kravitz changes it up so often. Like her hair: One minute it’s short, the next she has dreads, and then she’s blond. And Cardi B is killing it. Every look is so amazing and transformative. —Deanna Pai

AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

S

OPHIE TURNER IS a natural blond, but in her biggest roles to date—as Sansa Stark on HBO’s Game of Thrones

67 · GLAMOUR.COM

Turner’s Essentials:


68 · GLAMOUR.COM AUGUST 2018 · #FEEL ·

Healthy Confession

I’m a Wellness Lurker

L

AST NIGHT MY DINNER WAS A SINGLE STRIP OF LEFTOVER

chicken katsu, consumed cold, while I stood in the glow of the open fridge. And for dessert: a bowl of fuchsia fruit-flavored cereal called Cheetah Chomps, which I ate in bed. I have the health habits of a can’tbe-bothered college kid, but my Instagram feed tells a different story. I follow Jessamyn Stanley for all the body-positive yoga my heart can handle. I watch Kayla Itsines foam-roll her thighs on a loop. I’m rapt whenever I see tarot cards and crystals in my feed (what does the new moon mean for my emotional state and menstrual cycle?). But I almost never put any of it into practice. As a health editor and writer, I should believe “wellness is life,” as they say. Instead I lurk around the periphery, watching, following, rarely participating. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone. Wellness is a $3.7 trillion industry and growing, according to Global Wellness Institute data from 2015 (the most recent available). Clearly, plenty of people are buying in, and that includes me. This spring, for example, I signed up for ClassPass and gleefully swiped around the app to see innumerable exercise possibilities stretching out before me. Then I never used a single credit. (See also the two bottles of essential oils I purchased for I’m not sure what reason, which hang out in my shower.) Data suggests many of you are the same: The numbers of people saving “easy” and “low-key” workouts on Pinterest are up 155 and 83 percent, respectively, BY LAURA NORKIN

since last year. And Google searches for Bikram yoga (the hot kind, where you sweat until you pass out, then slither home never to attempt exercise again) peaked in January 2012 and have been on the decline ever since, while searches for Yin yoga (which is essentially instructor-facilitated lying down) hit an all-time high in January 2018 and have kept rising. Meanwhile, Itsines has 9.6 million Instagram followers, more than the populations of Houston, Los Angeles, and Chicago combined. Don’t tell me there isn’t at least a Delaware-sized faction who are there only to check out her cute gym clothes. Plenty of us are here for the inspo but not so much for the work. Recently my health voyeurism— uh, my job—took me to a breakfast with actress Kate Walsh, where she explained that one in three Americans her age don’t get enough protein. While I related to her saying, “Sometimes dinner is truffle fries and mayo,” I didn’t alter my diet. Still, I’ll happily lose an hour looking at ways to layer flax and chia in Weck jars, even though I can’t say I’ve ever attempted to eat such a thing. (Have you? Be honest.) It’s like I get a contact high from being wellness adjacent but can’t quite tolerate the real thing. I often say (to no one in particular) that I really have been meaning to work out—I’m just so busy. This week I was invited to try The Class by Taryn Toomey, which I’ve heard is a transcendental cardio experience, with Chanel skin care in the bathrooms. Before committing, I asked Toomey how to get over my block. “You always have a choice,” she told me via email. “If you would like to procrastinate in your own selfdevelopment and self-realization, you have a choice to do that. Sometimes it feels like tough love, but you have to use motivation and just do it…. Just begin.” And she’s right. I guess I could look at a class list to start. But first I think I’ll grab a yoga mat and see how lying down works out. Laura Norkin is a health editor and journalist in Brooklyn. ILLUSTRATION BY DENNIS ERIKSSON


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Jackie Aina Is Changing the Beauty Biz, One Product at a Time

W

HEN I STARTED MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL

in 2009, my goal was never to be an “influencer.” I was in the military, far away from friends and family, and really lonely. The one thing that always made me feel better was makeup. Originally, I think part of me wanted to get on camera to show that not every person who serves their country is rough and rugged. You can be feminine and fight for freedom. So I filmed a few tutorials in my uniform, and the response was crazy. People loved that I wasn’t this out-ofreach makeup artist—just a regular girl.

Beauty Guru “My channel,” says Aina, 31, “is about people feeling good, not intimidated.”

AINA: TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC FOR YOUTUBE. SCREEN SHOTS: COURTESY OF JACKIE AINA/YOUTUBE

Speaking Out


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Then, around 2015, I was feeling less excited by my channel and realized that I was trying to be too “professional” instead of showing my true crazy self. And that’s when I had my first viral video: a parody on all the weird beauty trends (like crazy eyebrows) from that year. Being myself paid off—I think that’s why I now have more than 2 million subscribers on YouTube. As my fan base grew, beauty brands started sending me lots of products. But it was disappointing to receive things that wouldn’t work for my skin tone. So I really began to take on more of a voice for the black beauty community, critiquing brands that aren’t inclusive. It’s always been a tough balance. It’d be easier to water down my content—I feel like a lot of people thought that once I hit a certain milestone, 1 million subscribers, then 2 million, I’d stop talking about race or “political stuff,” as so many people call it. I don’t think it’s political; I’m just talking about experiences that are true to me. My goal is to always make people of color feel good when they come to my channel. It’s not just about putting on lipstick. It’s about people feeling beautiful, not intimidated. I’ve learned that as long as I feel passionate about a critique, it’s important to stand by it.

Too Faced Born This Way Foundation in Ganache ($39, toofaced.com)

ence. For example, I recently teamed up with Too Faced Cosmetics to help expand its Born This Way foundation range (which comes out this month) and make sure the undertones would actually work for women of color. Jerrod Blandino, the cofounder and chief creative officer of Too Faced, could have hired anyone he wanted to help him on this project. Instead he gave a black woman a seat at the table and let me do my thing. He gave me a voice on this issue that is so important to me, and the ability to make a real change. That’s huge! I’m really proud of the darkest shade, Ganache. After multiple tries (it kept pulling a little too red), we finally got it right, and it’s beautiful. I was so glad they were willing to keep at it. We created nine new shades, and now the line’s full spectrum has 35 colors.

STILL: COURTESY OF BRAND

“P E O P LE LOV E D T H AT I WASN’ T TH I S OU T- O F- R E AC H MAKEUP ARTIS T— J U S T A R E G U LAR GIRL .” One downside of using my voice? People expect me to have an opinion on everything. Just because I don’t always comment on political issues doesn’t mean I don’t care about them—it just means I can’t take on the weight of everything. Some days I have to say, “Kitchen’s closed,” and log off social media. But I’ll gladly take on all those frustrations because my platform has given me the power to make a differ-

Inclusion doesn’t stop at foundation, though, and that’s what I hope all beauty brands can take away from this movement. Can I use your lipsticks? Are your eyeshadows pigmented enough to show up on my skin tone? Do you have blushes that work for me? For so many brands, I still can’t use anything; it’s literally only for light skin. We still have work to do, and I won’t stop talking about it until it’s done.


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K ATE M C KINNON IS UNPACKING HER LUNCH ONTO THE

New York City sidewalk. “If I could talk to everyone on this street, I would,” she says. “I’m always on the hunt for people—something I like about them or something that hooks me about them.” It’s the one o’clock lunch rush on a Thursday, and we are squatting on a six-inch ledge that separates a row of hedges in Rockefeller Center from 49th Street, balancing takeout containers on our knees. Tourists step around us on their way to 30 Rock without recognizing the Saturday Night Live standout in their midst. “I swear I’m not doing this so you have something interesting to write in your piece,” she says. “It’s just—where else is there to sit?” McK innon joined SNL in 2012 and now, at 34, is its longest-serving female cast member. She has built a career on the sweet eccentricity of her characters: Hillary Clinton unable to mask her longing for validation; Justin Bieber playing at a sexual persona he hasn’t yet grown into; Ruth Bader Ginsberg high on her own badassery. These renditions—precise, uproarious, tender—have earned her two Emmys, an army of devotees, and a rising career in film. Despite the quantity of material she produces each week for SNL, she never falls flat. It doesn’t matter who she’s playing or how deep in her archive you go, she’s like the hot sauce of TV: Put her in anything, and it gets better. I wanted to know how she manages that level of consistency. Does she have some kind of system? “So many YouTube videos,” McKinnon says. “Me, alone in my office, talking back to YouTube videos.” She mulls the question, breaking down the order of operations in her mind: “I like to devise axioms and notice patterns of what works and what doesn’t so I can codify those into little rules I can use. If someone has a vocal tic or an accent, it’s so much easier to hook into something. It always starts with the way they talk, and then you add the layer of their energy.” A basic resemblance is usually necessary, though she’s been known to stretch that guideline (see: her leering Rudy Giuliani). “Then it all depends on what they’ve done that week,” she says. “They can’t just be someone who did something five months ago. It’s got to be à la minute.” At the core of any impression is what sketch comedians call “the game.” The game is the unexpected conf lict buried at the center of a person. “With Jeff Sessions it’s his joy and impishness versus his being a political figure with a very important job,” McKinnon says, suppressing a smile. “That’s the genesis of


Just Warming Up “It always starts with the way they talk,” McKinnon says of creating her famous impressions. “And then you add the layer of their energy.” Theory blazer, $595, pants, $325. Alternative Apparel T-shirt, $42. Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, $90. Joanna Laura Constantine ring, $190. Tibi boots, $695.


Funny That Way “Comedy is a compulsion,” McKinnon says. “I have to be writing or playing the piano or doing something.” Michael Stars tank, $98. Valentino pants. Wolf Circus Jewelry ring, $160. Lady Grey earrings, $180. The Tie Bar suspenders, $25. Gianvito Rossi boots. Opposite page: Givenchy shirt, scarf worn as headband. Banana Republic pants, $98. Kenneth Jay Lane hoops, $75. The Tie Bar suspenders, $25. For McKinnon’s look, try Make Up for Ever Ultra HD Perfector Skin Tint ($36, sephora.com), Rimmel London Professional Eyebrow Pencil in Hazel ($5, at drugstores), Clarins Instant Light Lip Balm Perfector in 02, Coral ($26, clarinsusa.com), and L’Oréal Paris Elnett Satin Hairspray ($15, at drugstores).


a game, which you can then heighten: the juxtaposition between someone who is buttoned up and someone who is emotional.” I ask whether you can win the game. Can you push the juxtaposition so far or heighten the inherent conf lict so deftly that there’s nothing left to do? “No! That’s the beauty of sketch comedy; the game never ends,” she says. “No one ever really changes. In sketch, the person’s doomed to keep repeating their own foibles. They can’t get better.” K ATE MCKINNON GREW UP IN A SMALL TOWN ON

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Long Island, the daughter of parents who loved Mel Brooks and Christopher Guest movies. Her father, the late architect Michael Berthold, introduced her to Saturday Night Live when she was 12, and being on the show became, she says, “my only dream.” After studying theater at Columbia University, she joined the cast of The Big Gay Sketch Show, a vaudevillian comedy series created by Rosie O’Donnell, and performed for six years at the Upright Citizens Brigade. When she was 28, her only dream came true. If there’s a “game” about McKinnon, it’s the contrast between the fearless abandon of her performances and her

Sometimes I feel like that makes me unique and wonderful, and sometimes I feel like that makes me someone that people would rather have leave the room.” Preparing for this film, she worried about whether she might be off-putting in large doses. “I didn’t know what it would be like for me— being me—to be onscreen that much. Would people be able to tolerate it?” she says. “In all of the roles I had done prior, I was more of a side dish, a wonderful creamed spinach. And the creamed spinach can afford to be as odd as the creamed spinach wants.” The main dish, however, has to be more complex. A main dish has to have an arc and grow, which permits an actor fewer disguises. “I spend so much time in wigs and doing these voices that having to use my own voice made me feel quite naked,” she says. She recalls begging Paul Feig, who directed Ghostbusters, to let her use a Russian accent for the entire movie. While shooting The Spy Who Dumped Me, Fogel says, she often encouraged McKinnon to “play it real, take it down.” (Once, in a moment of playful panic, McKinnon teased, “Don’t make me act, you hateful witch!”) Fogel saw McKinnon change on set: “By the end she learned to trust that she’s an actress as well as a come-

“I DIDN’T KNOW WHAT IT WOULD BE LIKE FOR ME TO BE ONSCREEN THAT MUCH. COULD PEOPLE TOLERATE IT?” reserved offscreen persona. It’s easy to assume that someone who holds nothing back while entertaining—just watch her lick Lady Speed Stick off Charles Barkley’s face—holds nothing back in real life. But she’s retiring in person, with a low voice and a shrugging discomfort with talking about herself. It is rumored that she doesn’t like being photographed unless in character (though she obliged Glamour for this shoot), and in interviews she seems to mentally test each sentence before saying one aloud. “She is very, very, very, very shy,” says Mila Kunis. “One of the most shy people you’ll ever meet. Just very quiet.” McKinnon is the first out lesbian on SNL and one of the most famous gay women in America. Because of these facts, she is frequently asked about her sexuality, though she consistently declines to discuss her personal life. She seems to prefer to put pieces of herself—and her queerness—into her characters: the perfect drag of her Bieber bit, the unabashed flirtiness of Holtzmann in Ghostbusters, the hints of high camp when she plays ultrafeminine women. This month marks the release of The Spy Who Dumped Me, which stars Kunis and McKinnon as Audrey and Morgan, best friends who get embroiled in a little international espionage. Morgan, an actress with a penchant for splashy displays and a ferocious love for Audrey, is the largest film role McKinnon has ever played—she isn’t just the comic relief. Morgan’s “performative oddball” qualities come packaged with what the film’s cowriter and director, Susanna Fogel, calls “the insecurity people have when they feel like they’re only lovable when they’re ‘on.’ ” That hooked McKinnon. “I connected to this character on a level I didn’t expect,” she says. “The character is an actrice who is very performative. And I am that way as well.

dian, and that she is actually worthy of that level of depth and introspection in the character.” The experience also expanded her sense of what kind of film career she might want. Her models are Gene Wilder for career arc and, for pure ability, “what other answer is there besides Streep? It’s all Streep,” she says. Does she have Streepian aspirations? “We’ll see how it goes,” she says. The Spy Who Dumped Me may not be Sophie’s Choice, but it gives a sense of what McKinnon might do once she branches out from sketch comedy more permanently. She flourishes in Spy, where she’s given space to show a greater depth and nuance of emotion, to holler one-liners in a car chase and then, in the next scene, be sincere or quiet. In the movie’s most genuine moment of pathos, she cries. “An audience will follow her anywhere,” says Feig. Someone becomes a star, he says, because “the audience sees themselves in you. And you normally don’t get that with somebody who plays crazier characters.” But McKinnon is an exception. “She truly loves people, and I think that comes across on the screen,” he says. “That’s an unpredictable quality, like charisma. You can’t train that into somebody.” Feig is hinting at something that I heard in my conversation with Fogel: Kate McKinnon isn’t just a comic genius; she’s a nascent movie star. We’ve all just been laughing too hard to notice. A FEW DAYS BEFORE MOTHER’S DAY, SNL’S GUEST

star Amy Schumer, McKinnon, and a group of cast members are rehearsing a game show parody called “Mother Knows Best!” Schumer plays the host, quizzing mother-child duos. McK innon is “Ebisaleth,” a mother from “Fortress of the Lamb, (continued on page 118)


The Payoff “If you convey something true and other people also find it true,” says McKinnon, “you feel a sense of gratification unlike anything else.” Theory blazer, $585. Kendall + Kylie pants, $98. Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz earrings, $145. Calvin Klein Jeans boots, $249. See Glamour Shopper for more information. Hair: Laurent Philippon at Streeters; makeup: Cassandra Garcia at See Management; manicure: Deborah Lippmann at Starworks Artists; set design: Bette Adams at MHS Artists; production: Hudson Hill Production.


Personal History

How I Got My First Laugh EVERY COMEDIAN REMEMBERS HER FIRST. THE FIRST TIME SHE NOTICED AN OPENING IN

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Aparna Nancherla channeled Bollywood. “My cousins, sister, and I made a lo-fi Bollywood movie called Dil Kebab, because dil means ‘heart’ and a kebab is on a skewer. I think we were trying to take down love? We were mostly concerned with needing one dance number, a costume change, and a product placement.” Nancherla stars in Comedy Central’s Corporate.

Kathy Griffin helped the shy kid. “There was a boy in my class the kids were hard on. I remember shielding him by making fun of the others. That’s when I realized laughter can get you out of a fucking jam. Laughter can be a way that you can respond to a bully— without punching them. I honed some of my bitch skills at Catholic school.” Griffin is on tour with Kathy Griffin: Laugh Your Head Off.

Ali Wong did butt stuff. “I grew up going to a Chinatown youth group, and in sixth grade we played telephone—but with skits. The first person [acted out] washing an elephant. When I was up, I ran a sponge around what I later realized was the butt area. People were laughing so hard that I kept milking it by acting like I was about to stop, but then I’d just keep going. It all started with the butt; now we here.” Wong is the star of Ali Wong: Hard Knock Wife on Netflix.

Natasha Rothwell let it rip.

Bridget Everett stole the show.

“When I was 13, I spent my allowance on a whoopee cushion. One day my mom had her church friends over and was like, ‘OK, kids, go outside.’ So I blew up the cushion, put it in my jacket, and gave my mom a hug— and she just lost it, because it was funny. I remember thinking, Wow. Humor can even take down a parent.” Rothwell produces, writes, and stars in Insecure on HBO.

“I played Sister Berthe in The Sound of Music. I was pissed I didn’t get to play the mother superior, but I made the most of it. During this somber part, I made faces like, ‘What’s that smell?’ Or, ‘This is what I owe in taxes?’ I was the star—and I’m not gonna lie, there was something sexy about it.” Everett costars in the upcoming Camping on HBO.

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the conversation, cued up the perfect zinger, and slayed. “A laugh is so undeniable,” says GLOW star Betty Gilpin (see her in “Glow With It” on page 58). “It’s a surge of love that shoots through you, and you get addicted to that feeling.” We asked some of our favorite funnywomen to revisit their aha ha-ha moments. And for even more first laughs, check out glamour.com/first-laugh. —Samantha Leach


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Sharon Horgan Is the Realest Mother on TV BY JUSTINE HARMAN

B  

EFORE SHE WAS ONE OF COMEDY’S MOST CULT-

loved voices, Sharon Horgan was adrift. After moving to London from a turkey farm in rural Ireland, she waited tables, toiled away at an office job, and even sold bongs to stoners. “A lot of trying and failing,” she recalls of her twenties. “I basically did everything I could possibly do to avoid starting my actual, genuine career.” Then, at 35, she and longtime friend and fellow lackey Dennis Kelly wrote a sitcom all about their professional shortcomings. The raunchy Pulling, which aired on the BBC from 2006 to 2009, was a success—and a wake-up call. “With Pulling I found out that writing about something tragic and sad can be fully hilarious if you look at it from a slightly different angle,” she says. “I haven’t wanted to write in a different way since.” Sure, she is the mother dragon behind foul-mouthed tragicomedies like Divorce and Motherland. But it’s Catastrophe, the Amazon show she cocreated and stars in, that elevated her to the comedic

HORGAN: TOM VAN SCHELVEN

Person of Interest


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pantheon. She’s earned a Best Writing Emmy nomination for the show and a BAFTA nod for her turn as Sharon Morris, an Irish woman in London who gets pregnant after a weeklong hookup with American Rob Norris (Rob Delaney) and dives headfirst into an unlikely relationship. (The story is based on Horgan’s own life. Six months after meeting British entrepreneur Jeremy Rainbird, she found out she was expecting. The couple is now married, with two daughters.) The plot may sound like the setup for a schmaltzy rom com, but Catastrophe approaches everything from alcoholism and infidelity to motherhood with uproarious frankness. In season two, for example, Sharon is desperate to return to work after her second child is born. “To be honest, I didn’t realize how much I love teaching until I had to be around my own kids 24 hours a day,” she tells a stunned job interviewer before admitting that “it’s just hard… to know how to do things” and bursting into tears. “Sharon’s not afraid to admit when she’s lonely or depressed or any of those things you feel when you’re a mother,” Horgan, now 48, says. “She can be sweet and loving and scared and needy. And, equally, she can have balls of steel. I don’t know if that’s more common for Irish women, but I’ve got two personalities inside of me at all times.” Directness, friends confirm, is a Horgan trademark. “She’s quite straightforward,” Kelly says. “I don’t think she analyzes herself or what she’s doing, and I don’t think she wants to.

Partly because Sharon doesn’t want to be a wanker.” Says Delaney: “When we’re writing, we’re like two technicians in lab coats with the exact same goal of producing the best possible scripts. She’s taught me a lot about stories that make ironclad sense.” Despite the series’ brisk pace— each sea son is composed of si x 24-minute episodes—the emotional center always holds. At the end of last season, Sharon is grappling with her dad’s recent death. “She’s not grieving properly. She’s not feeling the things she thinks she ‘should’ be feeling,” Horgan says. “One of the mums from my daughter’s school came up to me on the playground and said, ‘I have those same feelings. They made me feel awful, and [after watching], I feel a little less awful.’ That’s been our yardstick: to say things that maybe seem a bit gross or terrible and then be pleasantly surprised that other people feel them too.” Horgan’s gift is finding the humanity in the humor. “When I look at Sharon’s work, I don’t think of it as deliberately dark,” Kelly says. “I think she’s just being honest about the world as she sees it.” And, for her, the funniest moments don’t require a clever pun or a zany coincidence. “It has to make us laugh. If we’re not laughing several times per page, we’re not doing it. But it doesn’t have to be a ridiculous sort of gag, either. It can be something so true it’s funny,” she says. “We like there to be two good story lines running solidly through the beginning, middle, and end. We don’t like to just have a series of events. We like shit to happen.”

CATASTROPHE: ED MILLER

Comedy of Errors Horgan, in the season three finale of Catastrophe, says that “writing about something tragic can be hilarious.”


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giving

the women

The Room Where It Happens “Fewer women [than men] are trying to be comedians,” says The Daily Show’s Kat Radley, far right. “You have to start with five-year-olds. Tell them they’re funny.”


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By SETH PLATTNER Photographs by DANIELLE LEVITT Styled by GRO CURTIS


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M U C H H AS B E E N M A D E OF TH E

political tenor dominating the land of late-night talk shows these days. And for good reason: In addition to cracking jokes, hosts are now expected to take a hard stance on the day’s divisive headlines. Unfortunately, with a few notable exceptions, the talent fronting late-night is still white, still male. (Among the top late-night shows we looked at, rarely are more than 30 percent of the writers women; only about 11 percent are people of color.) This means every whistle-blowing monologue or feminist sketch that makes it to air is more than just comedy—it’s a shot across the bow from the underrepresented. To f ind out what it’s really like in the late-night trenches, Glamour gathered top female writers from six shows to talk about how they check the guys, the highs and lows of being comedy’s secret weapons, and why, if we want our girls to be funny, we have to get to them early. GLAMOUR: Let’s get right to it.

Regarding diversity in the writers room, how are today’s shows doing? JASMINE PIERCE, staff writer, The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon:

I mean, we’ve made a ton of progress, even in the last year or so, regarding diverse rooms and diverse shows. But there is still a long way to go. KAT RADLEY, staff writer, The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: I would say it’s

still, what, 20 to 25 percent for women in the room? Does anyone have a 50-50 writers room? PIA GLENN, staff writer, The Opposition With Jordan Klepper: [Raises

hand.] Boom! Yes. We’re the newest of the bunch, so there might be a correla-

tion. But when we go one tier above…to the decision makers? We are right back at largely white men. MELINDA TAUB, head writer, Full Frontal With Samantha Bee: Tina Fey

said something about how some shows view women like cappuccino makers, like, “We have one. What would we do with another?” And while that’s still an issue—not just with women but also with other marginalized groups—I think shows are realizing that even if you don’t want to [equalize rooms] out of the goodness of your heart, it makes your show better. ARIEL DUMAS, writer and digital content producer, The Late Show With Stephen Colbert: We just hired our

fourth female writer, which is really exciting. But what’s more exciting, for me, is that people aren’t saying “women in comedy” so much anymore. I never think about being a woman in comedy. I’m just in comedy. JASMINE: Yeah, I’m not a comedienne. I’m just…a comedian. ARIEL: I mean, do we sit around wanting to know what it’s like to be a man in comedy? KAT: Um, I definitely feel like I know…. [All laugh.] While there is work to be done, everyone thinks that means actively going out and finding more women to write for you. Which is one way to do it, sure, but it’s also systemic, because fewer women are trying to be comedians. You have to start with the five-year-olds. Tell them they’re funny. Encourage them to express their comedy. Because it’s not occurring to so many until they’re 25 or 30 that they can do comedy.

MOLLY MCNEARNEY (NEAR RIGHT) CO–HEAD WRITER, JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!

HOMETOWN: St. Louis PAST LIVES: Writer for 2012 White House Correspondents Dinner, 2017 and 2018 Oscars “When I’m writing, I think of my aunts in St. Louis who all voted for Trump. I know they love Jimmy and I know they love the show and I know they watch. I’m just waiting for that one monologue to click and change the midterms.”

PIA GLENN ( C E N T E R ) S TA F F W R I T E R , THE OPPOSITION WITH JORDAN KLEPPER

HOMETOWN: New York City PAST LIVES: Producer for Black Weekend Update; starred as Condoleezza Rice in Broadway’s You’re Welcome America: A Final Night With George W. Bush “At work all I do is yell at the men. You can’t silence me, Jordan Klepper! [Laughs.] To be in a position of privilege where my ideas and thoughts are out there is huge, and I don’t take it for granted— especially as a black woman.”

MELINDA TAUB ( FA R R I G H T ) H E A D W R I T E R , F U L L F R O N TA L WITH SAMANTHA BEE

MOLLY M C NEARNEY, co–head writer, Jimmy Kimmel Live!: Most of the appli-

cation packets that are coming into any show are still white men. And it’s our job to reach out [to women]. We have to get into different communities, to people who might not think they can do our job because they never saw someone that looked like them doing it. Twitter has helped a lot. JASMINE: Yes! It’s a great tool for encouraging young writers. I used to write for Reductress, and now I make an intentional effort to support their new, good writers. I always tweet a writer’s stuff and then message

HOMETOWN: Champaign, Illinois PAST LIVES: Performer on UCB Comedy Originals; story producer for Adam Ruins Everything “Constantly writing about the awful things in the news is exhausting, but also very fruitful. A lot of us would be obsessing over this stuf anyway, but with no outlet. At least I can write down my feelings and a nice Canadian lady can say them on TV.”

On previous spread: On McNearney: Max Mara coat. Lucky Brand T-shirt, $40. Levi’s jeans, $98. Paul Andrew slingbacks, $645. On Dumas: Marcelo Burlon County of Milan x NBA jacket. Re/Done T-shirt, $125. Gap jeans, $99. Bruno Magli pumps, $425. On Taub: Rag & Bone sweatshirt, $225. American Eagle jeans, $40. Converse sneakers. On Pierce: Scotch & Soda shirt, $115. Fendi from Saks Fifth Avenue skirt. On Glenn: Karl Lagerfeld Paris jacket, $150. Lauren Moshi tank top, $88. American Eagle jeans, $50. Rag & Bone sneakers, $225. On Radley: French Connection sweater, $138. Helmut Lang from Saks Fifth Avenue skirt, $345. Paul Andrew pumps, $675. Dior earrings, ring.


Search Party “Most of the application packets that are coming into any show are still white men,” says Jimmy Kimmel’s McNearney, below left. “It’s our job to reach out [to women].” On McNearney: BCBG Max Azria robe, $498. Alternative Apparel T-shirt, $34. On Glenn: Rag & Bone T-shirt, $95. American Eagle jeans, $50. Adidas Originals sneakers, $80. On Taub: Champion hoodie, $80. Isabel Marant Étoile from Saks Fifth Avenue jeans, $395. Converse sneakers, $55.


In It to Win It “I never think about being a woman in comedy,” says The Late Show’s Dumas, bottom. “I’m just in comedy.” On Radley: Brooks Brothers shirt, $98. American Eagle jeans, $50. On Pierce: Guess jacket, $148. Maison Kitsuné sweater, $485. Miu Miu from Saks Fifth Avenue pants. Paul Andrew shoes, $675. On Dumas: Scotch & Soda jacket, $245. Lauren Moshi tank top, $88. Karl Lagerfeld Paris pants, $100. Converse sneakers, $55. See Glamour Shopper for more information.


HOMETOWN: Montclair, Virginia

HAIR: THOMAS DUNKIN AT BRIDGE ARTISTS; MAKEUP: TRACY ALFAJORA AT BRI WINTERS INC.; MANICURES: JACKIE SAULSBERY AT FACTORY DOWNTOWN; SET DESIGN: COOPER VASQUEZ AT THE MAGNET AGENCY

PAST LIVES: Comic on Laughs; released comedy album, The Important Thing Is That I’m Pretty, in 2015 “As women, even if we’re funny, no one tells us to be comedians the way men are encouraged to. Doing comedy never occurred to me because no one suggested it. One day I just had to decide for myself, I am going to do this. And I did!”

JASMINE PIERCE ( T O P) S TA F F W R I T E R , THE TONIGHT SHOW S TA R R I N G J I M M Y FA L LO N

HOMETOWN: Cincinnati PAST LIVES: Writer at Reductress; UCB house sketch team The Classic “We have to erase the narrative that women are all catty. We have to be supportive of each other. Young men don’t need that—they already have that confidence. Younger girls, because of how we’re positioned in society, need to hear it from women above us. Because if we know that a woman above us believes in us, then we believe it too.”

ARIEL DUMAS (BOTTOM) WRITER AND D I G I TA L C O N T E N T P R O D U C E R , T H E L AT E S H O W WITH STEPH EN COLBERT

HOMETOWN: Long Lake, Minnesota PAST LIVES: Performer at Second City; writer for The Colbert Report “At Second City I always wanted to write scenes about Elena Kagan’s confirmation hearings, but everyone was like, ‘Ariel, no one cares about your dumb Supreme Court sketch!’ But at The Late Show, we love the news, and we love comedy, and there’s no issue with loving them together.”

her and tell her, “You are so good. Keep going!” We have to be active about it. Otherwise it’s so scary. GLAMOUR: Do you have to actively navigate being the gender minority? KAT: It’s really just about working together. For us, it’s never been like: The men write the man stuff and the women write the woman stuff. Everyone can and does do everything. JASMINE: It’s the same for us. ARIEL: Us too. If I want to pitch a thing about IUDs, a super-female womanywoman story, I don’t feel like I am the one that has to write it. The guys can write that too. KAT: But we do have to be conscious of checking in. I noticed the other day in the rehearsal script someone had written “congressman.” I texted our head writer, “We need to change it to ‘member of congress’ or ‘congress people.’ ” He changed it immediately. ARIEL: I think that’s what’s really helped by having women in the room. Our writers are all so feminist and antiracist, but everyone has the ability to say something if they need to. MELINDA: You have to be as honest as you can with your staff. I think that helps me, and helps all of us, to find the most dangerous, true version of what we want to say, even if it means texting Sam in the middle of the night—which, for her, is like 9:00 P.M.—when you’re having feelings. PIA: In our room I think there is a real validity to everyone’s lived experience being different. I don’t ever blame anyone for things they might not know or have not been exposed to. It’s what you do once you’re made aware that matters more. I think about the sexual assault stories that came up and how we talk about it in the room—there’s a visceral anger that comes up when the women speak about it. And the guys know to shut up and take it in. GLAMOUR: How can writing for a host give agency to your perspective? MELINDA: It’s so different when it’s women-dominated from the top. I didn’t really realize how hard I was fighting to write in other people’s voices until I got to Sam and I was like, Oh, I can just be me. PIA: Jordan absolutely amplifies my voice in terms of point of view, because I am such an advocate for black female

representation, and in the comedy world [makes sad trumpet noise]. So, much of the time, even as filtered through this extremely white man, I can take credit for our angle on Trump’s America or dog whistles about racism. It might not sound like my voice coming out of his mouth, but it definitely is. MOLLY: I have a unique situation in that the host of my show is also my husband, so he’s uniquely qualified to amplify my voice as a comedian and writer. Like when our son went through his heart condition—his open-heart surgeries—Jimmy allowed me to tell a story that I never could have. I was feeling those same things but didn’t have the strength to go on national television and talk about it. I would have made Jimmy’s crying look like nothing. KAT: Trevor always asks questions, like with the Harvey and Me Too stuff. He’d ask if the approach was right, if we wanted to lead the discussion. ARIEL: Same with Stephen. He is so attuned to the hypocrisy women experience. Like how the Trump administration is pushing “abstinence education” by teaching women sex-refusal techniques. Stephen lost his mind and just let me riff around Trump’s 19 accusers and how he was helping them learn sex-refusal techniques with a real hands-on approach. KAT: Ha! It’s like, we already know the sex-refusal techniques. JASMINE: We’ve all tried them. KAT: We invented them. GLAMOUR: Was there a time when you had to say to a male writer, “No way. That won’t fly”? MOLLY: I remember when Hillary was coming on a year ago, people were still making pantsuit jokes. I was like, “What the fuck are you doing? You’re minimizing this woman to her clothes?” We’d never talk about a man’s outfit. Everyone heard me and they did cut it, but there is learning to be had. These men don’t know, ya know? So it’s our responsibility to teach them. In the same way, I would hope that we’d all be open to learning about things that might offend straight white guys! [All laugh.] MELINDA: Funny, I…don’t care about that? PIA: I am totally fine offending them.

Seth Plattner is a freelance writer and editor in New York City.

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( FA R L E F T ) S TA F F W R I T E R , T H E D A I LY S H O W WITH TREVOR NOAH

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KAT RADLEY


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My

Funny Very few comedians are deserving of “legend” status. Rachel Bloom and Yvonne Orji nominate two names to the list.

Valentine Friends First “The woman that helped me along was Lucille Ball, but she never considered herself a mentor. We were buddies. We were friends,” says Carol Burnett, far left, with Rachel Bloom. “And that’s what I consider Rachel.”

Photographs by Williams + Hirakawa Styled by Jessica de Ruiter


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RACHEL BLOOM on CAROL BURNETT AS I SAT BACK DOWN AT MY SEAT IN THE BEVERLY HILTON AFTER

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winning the Golden Globe for best performance by an actress in a television series in 2016, I did what any millennial with a touch of ADHD would do: I checked my email. And the first thing that popped up was a message from Carol Burnett congratulating me. Not to sound ungrateful to the Hollywood Foreign Press, but that moment was my real Golden Globe. A month or two earlier our mutual friend (and my Crazy Ex-Girlfriend costar) Donna Lynne Champlin told me Carol had asked for my email address. My response to her was, “OF COURSE YOU CAN GIVE CAROL FUCKING

Rachel Bloom is the cocreator and star of CW’s Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. Watch Carol Burnett now in Netflix’s A Little Help With Carol Burnett.

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She made it possible for me to do what I do.”

BURNETT MY EMAIL ADDRESS. GIVE HER MY SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND MY LIVER TOO.” It was laughable that Carol felt she needed permission to email me. But when I finally got to meet her, I realized that, in a wonderful way, her fame still hasn’t quite sunk in. Carol Burnett doesn’t know that she’s Carol Burnett. She was the first comedic actor whose essence I couldn’t put into words—all I knew was that I couldn’t stop watching her. When I performed my own rendition of “Little Girls” from Annie for my eighth-grade talent show, the director told me not to copy her mannerisms. (Not because I couldn’t try—of course I did—but because she is a performer who is un-copy-able.) I read Carol’s memoir One More Time during an eight-hour bus ride in 2009 and was struck by the fact that, like me, she had trouble booking acting gigs during her first year living in New York City. She put together her own musical showcase with women in her boarding house and got discovered singing the original song “I Made a Fool of Myself Over John Foster Dulles,” which reminded me of a song about an older gentleman that I had written called “F*ck Me, Ray Bradbury.” I had forgotten about it until I read Carol’s book. That song became a music video that got me my agent. I realize now that this is a lot about me. Forgive me, but that’s the only way I know how to gush over an icon who has done as much for female comics as she has. If Carol hadn’t ignored the head of CBS when he said that variety was a “man’s game” in the sixties, she wouldn’t have made it possible for me—and all of my female creatorperformers in TV—to do what we do. She may not ever know that she’s Carol Burnett, but at least now she knows how much I love her.


Yeah, It’s Mutual

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“I’m a fan of hers,” says Wanda Sykes, far right, with Yvonne Orji. “It means a lot when you see the younger generation appreciate what you’re doing, or what you’ve done.”

She helped me find humor in what makes me different.” YVONNE ORJI on WANDA SYKES


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similar career trajectories. We’re both from the D.C. area. She spent five years working as a contracting specialist for the NSA, and I got my master’s in public health. Chris Rock gave us both our big chances: She was a writer on The Chris Rock Show; I opened for him on his Total Blackout Tour last year. I started comedy in 2006. I didn’t even think it was a thing I could do. I have immigrant, African parents. They would say, in their Nigerian accents, “So you want to be a jester?” And I was like, “I don’t want to be a court jester, Ma. I want to be a comedian.” But what they meant was, Do people make a living from this? Who are the black female comics who are successful? I remember googling Wanda. Wanda has this certain cadence. She’s like a stern auntie telling you about life. She has this one bit where she’s talking about strip clubs in Florida. She’s like, “Florida got so many strip clubs they need to change their state flag to just a brass pole.” And that’s her humor. It’s like set up, boom. Set up, boom. It doesn’t take a long story to get there. And Wanda always has a point of view. She doesn’t just let life happen—she’s actively participating in it. And she’s honest about it. She was married to a guy. And then she came out and got married to a woman. And now she can talk about being with a guy and then being with a girl! That’s something very few people have the ability to pull humor from. As a performer, the thing you want the most is to be your authentic self. The fact that one of Wanda’s comedy specials is called I’ma Be Me exemplifies the freedom we get to have as entertainers. I’m a clean comic, and when I was starting out, people were like, “Wouldn’t this joke be funnier if you used the F-word?” And I’m like, “Nope! I can’t do that. Not my brand.” People would be like, “She’s funny, but she’s clean.” There was always an asterisk to my talent. But I have a point of view. I’m Nigerian. And I’m American. And

Christian. I’m waiting until I get married to have sex. I can speak to what that’s like. Wanda helped me find that sweet spot. She helped me find humor in what makes me different. Yvonne Orji costars on Insecure, which returns to HBO this month. Wanda Sykes is on tour this fall.

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This Is Me

Fatimah Asghar Doesn’t Want to Fit In BY FATIMAH ASGHAR

106 · GLAMOUR.COM AUGUST 2018 · #LIVE ·

borders, in the space between two countries or two places. Recently, as I stood in the Pakistani consulate, applying for a visa to visit my father’s family, a man stared quizzically at me. “Where’s your husband?” he demanded. I explained that I wasn’t married; I am a woman, alone. “You’re 28? You should be married,” he responded with the same judgment as my aunties’ at family barbecues; then he consulted his supervisors about what to do with me. On another day I might have corrected him, explaining how I don’t need to be with someone to be a full human; or how, because I am queer, my spouse wouldn’t necessarily be a man anyway. But because I needed a visa, I held my tongue. Interactions like this are common: people demanding to know what man claims me. I get it from strangers who slide into my DMs to family members who ask whether I’m ready to get married. A few weeks ago, my uncle called to tell me about an engineer in Pakistan I should marry. When I declined, my uncle asked if I had ever used a neti pot; he had recently used one and it changed his life. The call ended with him saying, “OK, just take some time to think about the marriage? And think about using a neti pot.” The surreality of these exchanges and their extreme casualness makes them hilarious. As a screenwriter I pepper them into my scripts because they’re part of the fabric of my life. I’m not a sitcom writer; I prefer dark comedy, diving into microaggressions and cultural misunderstandings. I’m also a poet, whereby I explore the bleaker undertones of these moments: what it’s like to have my queerness negated, to have my religion questioned in queer spaces, to always have to explain myself, and to not be honest about both my religion and sexuality.

It is the feeling of being forever stuck at the border, of never knowing why your identity might spark some trouble: because I’m Muslim? American? queer? brown? a woman? Once, when I was traveling from Jordan to Syria at night, a border control agent took my passport, locked it in a drawer, and said he would consider giving me a visa in the morning. Passportless, I played cards with my friends all night as we slept in shifts. Another time I was detained at the Israeli border and put into an isolated room for four hours as border agents questioned me about the nature of my visit. While these interactions are tense and riddled with fear, they also contain a strange beauty: In

in-between spaces, things cease to have definition; you don’t belong to one country or another. It’s a strange and poetic land of possibility where I get to define myself on my own terms. I’ve found my chosen family in queer communities of color and with other queer Muslims. What I long for most are spaces where I don’t have to explain myself, in which my identities are not contradictory, places where I get to be my full self. Where I—not a man or husband—decide who I am. Fatimah Asghar, 28, is the creator of the Web series Brown Girls, now in development for HBO. Her book of poems, If They Come for Us, is out this month.

ASGHAR: VALENTINA VON KLENCKE

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’VE SPENT A LOT OF TIME AT


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AUGUST 2018 · #THINK ·

BACKGROUND: RAINER BINDER/ULLSTEIN BILD VIA GETTY IMAGES. FRANKLIN AND SAFIAN: COURTESY OF JILL FRANKLIN. FRAME BACKGROUND: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE

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Elevating the Conversation

True Story

My Mom Left Me for the Wild Wild Country Cult BY PATTI SAFIAN

W

HEN I WAS GROWING UP, IN

the late sixties and early seventies, I thought I came from a normal, tight-knit family. My mom, Jill Franklin, and her sister Lois married two brothers: my dad, Ken, and his brother Chet. Dad had been a football player. Mom was a cheerleader. My mom had three babies, and my aunt had three too—each sister giving birth one after the other. Three boys and three girls with the same set of

grandparents. We were more like brothers and sisters. Well, by the time I was six, everyone was divorced. Blame it on the copy of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique my dad gave Mom, or blame it on the era. I was born during the height of radical change and the women’s and sexual-freedom movements. In many ways, blowing up a traditional family made sense for the time.


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In the late sixties Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh was becoming a popular lecturer in India. Americans began traveling east to learn more about the guru’s unique brand of faith, which combined wealth, free sex, and enlightenment. By the seventies he’d created an ashram in the city of Pune. In Riverdale life was less structured. When it was freezing outside and our electricity wasn’t working, Mom warmed the apartment by opening the oven doors while we got dressed. I remember coming home from third grade one day and taking the rickety four-person elevator up to our topfloor apartment. I opened the big wooden doors and called “Mooooom!” as I headed down the long hallway. I found her kneeling in the bathroom in front of a steaming tub of water filled with orange dye. “Hi, sweetie,” she said. “Today I took Sannyasin”—the ritual of adopting a new name and accepting Bhagwan as your guru. “My new name is Ma Satya Bharti. It means ‘divine mother of truth.’ Isn’t it beautiful?” Mom began dressing in all orange and wearing a beaded necklace with a picture of Bhagwan around her neck. (I later found out that the Rajneeshees wore orange, or pink and magenta, because the colors represent happiness, joy, and laughter. They’re also the color of the sun and of the chakra, or sexual energy.) She had always been a yogi—she taught me how to do a headstand when I was six—but there were new routines too. One day she asked me whether I’d mind if she practiced what she called dynamic meditation. Peering out from under a pillow, terrified, I watched her breathe rhythmically with her nostrils flaring. She threw her arms in a zillion directions. Her body rocked, and she began to shout, “Hoo! Hoo! Hoo!” until she collapsed to the floor, hyperventilating. When she opened her eyes she stared only at the images of Bhagwan plastered all over our apartment. Long, Strange Trip From left: The author’s mother kneels before Bhagwan. Her mom, center, with other followers circa 1976. The author, at right, with her mom and sister at the commune. A processional at Rajneeshpuram. The author, at left, with her mom and daughter in 2017. (Background: her mom’s letters from India.)

By the time I was in fifth grade, our apartment had become a meditation center. Soon there were orange people draped over each other in my bedroom, orange people doing dynamic meditation in our living room. My siblings and I moved in with Dad on the Upper East Side of Manhattan for what was supposed to be only a summer while Mom traveled to India. I started to go to a conservative school where I wore saddle shoes, a gray skirt, and a starched white button-down shirt. I wanted to be normal, like everyone else. So after my mom came back and my teacher suggested bringing my entire fifth-grade class to the meditation center at my mom’s apartment, I was flattered. Cut to Alexander Rabinowitz, on whom I had a huge crush, shouting “Hoo! Hoo! Hoo!” and Penny Shawn, one of my best friends, fainting after hyperventilating. Let’s just say that the experience didn’t make me feel normal. Soon after that, Mom told us she was going away for “a long time.” She talked about wanting to bring us with her, but Dad would say “over my dead body.” To him she was sickeningly irresponsible. We never lived with our mom again. In 1981, Bhagwan and his followers relocated to Wasco County, Oregon, where they created Rajneeshpuram, a commune in the desert and the subject of Netflix’s Wild Wild Country. Thousands of his devotees lived there until 1985. Some leaders of the sect were responsible for several scandals and crimes, including bioterrorism, espionage, and conspiring to kill a U.S. attorney. The pain I felt missing my mom was indescribable. For the next 13 years she would float in and out of our lives like a ghost, kind of like her blue par avion letters from India. I would anxiously await those letters, which often shared Bhagwan’s words of wisdom, like: “Look at the stars and the

LETTERS: COURTESY OF PATTI SAFIAN. BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTO: COURTESY OF JILL FRANKLIN. FRANKLIN AND DAUGHTERS: COURTESY OF PATTI SAFIAN. FRANKLIN, DAUGHTER, AND GRANDDAUGHTER: JOY GLENN.

In 1970 my siblings (my older sister, Nancy, and my younger brother, Billy), my mom, and I moved from our perfect red house in Eastchester, New York, to an apartment in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. Our playground was our tar-roofed balcony. I loved it there. And we would still see my dad Wednesday nights and go to the Berkshires with our uncle and cousins every weekend. Despite the divorce, there was still a semblance of continuity. For a little while, at least.


PROCESSIONAL: COURTESY OF PATTI SAFIAN. FRANKLIN AT THE RAJNEESH ASHRAM: COURTESY OF JILL FRANKLIN. POLAROID FRAMES: GETTY IMAGES

sky and the moon and know that I, your mother, am looking at the same stars, moon, and sky.” Those words didn’t help. They didn’t help when I got my first period or kissed my first boyfriend. Those words, I thought, were bullshit. In Scarsdale, where we later moved, people would ask, “Where’s your mom?” And when she’d show up, wearing all orange, I was mortified. My best friend Robin’s mom would buy me clothes. At checkout she’d whisper in my ear, “A girl needs a few nice things.” The other moms would say, “You poor thing. A mother shouldn’t leave a lovable girl like you.” When I was in college at Northwestern University, I wrote in my diary that “the only thing that could fill up the empty hole in my soul was about 10,000 bags of sand.” By 1986 the commune disbanded. Bhagwan was arrested and pleaded guilty to charges of immigration fraud. He was deported to India, where he died from heart disease in 1990. Shortly after Rajneeshpuram was vacated, my brother was randomly murdered. My mother had already been back in our lives, but when she lost her son, things changed. After being gone from the time I was 10 until I was 23, she finally began to understand the impact her absence had not only in our lives but in her own. Together we mourned. Seeing the specifics in Wild Wild Country has been like putting a puzzle together. There is no way I could have untangled this stuff when I was enmeshed in it. Growing up, I thought the situation was normal, because it was what I knew. Mom was always there and always not there. [Editor’s note: When contacted by Glamour, Jill Franklin wrote: “It’s important to Patti that she has a chance to tell her story. The filmmakers [of Country] didn’t contact me, and I didn’t know about the project until a week or so before it aired.”]

I waited until I was 37 to have my first child, because I didn’t think I knew how to parent. As a mother of two, I still don’t understand how a mother can leave her children. But without my upbringing I wouldn’t be who I am today, or have been led to my career as an acupuncturist who helps women—women who won’t take mothering for granted— get pregnant. As a parent and a wife, sometimes I want to split. But I don’t. I have made mistakes. As a result of not being mothered myself, I have overmothered. But my kids know the depth of my devotion to them. There has never been a second that they have felt unloved. In her book, The Promise of Paradise: A Woman’s Intimate Story of the Perils of Life With Rajneesh, Mom wrote about the mistake that forever altered our lives—how something she thought would infuse her life with meaning turned into a cult full of deception, drugs, terrorism, and guns. It helped me have some inkling of how she made these choices. I remember the orange people as happy, fun, sunny hippies who were seeking “enlightenment.” Their ethos was simple: to rid our lives of habitual and negative preconditioned ways of thinking. To be honest, sometimes I even have fantasies about the Rajneeshees, because free sex seems so appealing. Today I’m very close with my mom. I’ve forgiven her, even though the scars run deep. For years I would slam down the phone anytime she upset me, to test her, to make sure she wasn’t going to leave me again—it was as if I was going through adolescence with her when I was an adult. Sometimes I still get annoyed if she gets overinvolved with my kids or gives me advice about how to parent. Partially I am upset because I think she has no right, because she wasn’t around when I was growing up. But also, for the first time ever, I feel like we have that typical mother-daughter relationship, which feels pretty good. My mom has opened up a little more about her experiences. She recently wrote in The Daily Beast that she’d given up everything to be with Bhagwan and

she found her way back to me. Patti Safian is an acupuncturist specializing in fertility and pain management in New Jersey.


Are Women Afraid to

A

T ONE OF MY FIRST JOBS,

I was blogging for an entertainment media company but was eager to take on extra script writing. Shortly after I was hired, another female writer came on board. My editors asked us who wanted to take on a new assignment, and I didn’t raise my hand. She landed the gig, and the next one too. Now I realize why I held back—I was afraid our relationship would suffer. Anticipating a rift between us made me avoid competing with her altogether. What I ex per ienced is a rea l thing. Selin Kesebir, Ph.D., an assistant professor at London Business School, has studied how competition affects women’s relationships. Her team asked women and men to complete a simple typing task with same-gender and with oppositegender participants and rate how they felt afterward. The women going up against other women reported higher levels of negative emotions— like feeling nervous, insecure, or hesitant. Men competing with each

other were more likely to report positive reactions; they felt energized and excited. And when the women went head-to-head with the guys? They didn’t feel as threatened as with their female peers, nor did they worry their relationships with the men would suffer. It was a girl-ongirl problem. “When women had to compete with other women, they often felt like their relationship was negatively impacted,” says Kesebir. “Those feelings may lead women to avoid situations where they’d have to compete with female coworkers or to not compete as vigorously.” That means they may miss out on landing big career opportunities. There are so many obstacles to the path of success; is it really possible that women are holding one another back? Yes, experts say, but the reasons run deeper than you may think. Take a look.

When girls play as kids, Kesebir says, “they try to make things equal, whereas boys try to decide who is better.” Boys’ activities are traditionally competitive, while girls’ focus on communal goals, like helping and supporting each other. This made me think of when I was in sixth grade and I told a girl on my coed soccer team that I’d “kick her butt.” My coach told me to cut it out, and I asked why. “That’s how boys talk,” he said. Kesebir wasn’t surprised by my story. “The notion is,” she says, “that girls who try to compete tend to be disliked.” The message to young women today is starting to change. Think of the Always #LikeAGirl campaign, which embraces feminine qualities as markers of strength, or the increased visibility of women in sports. “But generally,” says Kristen Liesch, Ph.D., a consultant on gender equality and diversity, “girls are still implicitly discouraged to behave in ways commensurate with competing, like leadership.”

Workplaces tend to be cutthroat rather than cooperative. When Lauren, 37, started in marketing and communications in Los Angeles, she was assertive and ambitious, and viewed those qualities as strengths.

PROP STYLIST: MEGUMI EMOTO AT ANDERSON HOPKINS

Girls aren’t exposed enough to healthy competition.


There’s a scarcity of female leaders. “Women have made huge strides in getting to the top,” says Shaun Harper,

BY KRISTIN WONG

Ph.D., executive director of the University of Southern California’s Race and Equity Center, “but they’re still underrepresented in leadership. There’s this feeling that they have to compete against each other for a few coveted slots.” Lauren felt that and says it was magnified by her being a woman of color. “Growing up black, I thought there was room for only one,” she says. “That’s all you see. There’s only one black friend on the TV show, so that reinforced my competitive nature. So whenever I saw someone getting public praise, I thought, OK, I’ve got to roll up my sleeves and fight harder.” It’s not just promotions that seem scarce, but praise too. “There’s evidence that when women work alone or in a group of other women, credit is given appropriately and equally,” Liesch says. “However, when women work with men too, those men often get credit for the team’s work.” If you can’t change your office culture overnight (and who can?), it can help to reframe how you view it. When Chris Castillo, 29, now a career coach and trainer in Denver, worked in advertising, she had an unspoken rivalry with another woman on the

PHOTOGRAPH BY VICTOR PRADO

team with the same title. “We both wanted to stand out,” Castillo says. “She’d make comments about who was ‘the boss’ out of us two, and I got jealous every time I felt she was doing better than me. I made comments too.” It continued until Castillo confronted her coworker. “We admitted we were wrong, addressed our concerns, and agreed to move on,” she says. Rather than let their competitive dynamic be disruptive, Castillo says, they saw it as an opportunity to learn from each other and became each other’s support system: “I still talk to her, and I’m so thankful for that relationship.” It’s worth remembering that competition is not a bad thing, and it’s often a part of work. “I want women to not be afraid of competition, but to know that we can get ahead through collaborating too,” says Claire Wasserman, founder of Ladies Get Paid, an organization based in New York City that seeks to close the wage and leadership gap. “Looking out for yourself does not mean that it has to be to the detriment of others. You never know where that person is going to end up. They could help you get another job, or support you at being better at your own work.” That’s a win-win. Kristin Wong has written for The New York Times and The Cut.

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She’d go after promotions and wouldn’t shy away from negotiating her pay. But a few months into the job, she saw the downside to a highly competitive workplace—her female boss seemed to be taking credit for the team’s work. And the other women were quick to go behind one another’s backs and throw another female colleague under the bus. So Lauren had to look out for herself. “It felt like only one of us could move up,” she says. Some call this the Sisterhood Ceiling, a phenomenon whereby women prevent other women from advancing in the workplace by doing things like actively undercutting them. Kesebir emphasizes that it’s the workplace culture that’s a strain for women, not the inability of women to work together or compete in general. In fact, women in her study who were asked to cooperate reported fewer negative feelings and the lowest amount of relationship damage. In general, managers can help shift the culture. “They can focus on making things more egalitarian,” says Kesebir, by highlighting how everyone on the team can contribute, for example. Tapping into dynamics that work for everyone is good for morale and the bottom line, Kesebir says.


YEAR

WOMAN WITH GUN: 1001 NIGHTS/GETTY IMAGES

25, from Omaha, who bought her f irst handgun last summer. Two of the three women didn’t grow up in gun-owning households, they all cited self-protection as their chief motivation to buy, and they are content to own just one handgun (at least for now). And they each describe buying a gun as a kind of personal triumph. “We’ve found something that’s empowered us,” Prier says happily. ¶ These stories mark a success for someone else too: the NR A. “More women are buying more guns, and more of them are buying guns for selfprotection,” says Aimee Huff, a professor at Oregon State University who studies the industry’s marketing. As the percentage of men owning guns has dropped precipitously over two decades, according to a HarvardNortheastern study, the percentage of women has ticked up—from 9 percent in 1994 to 12 percent in 2015—a swelling of roughly 5 million. Handgun sales, the heart of the industry, have been particularly buoyed by this: Women make up 20 percent of long-gun owners (rifles, shotguns, and the like), but 43 percent of those who own only handguns are female. Meanwhile the NRA has been changing attitudes. In 2012, according to the Pew Research Center, 40 percent of women agreed that owning a gun is more likely to protect someone from crime than to put their safety at risk. By 2014 that number was 51 percent. ¶ This could hardly have come at a better time for the industry,

WANTS YOU THE GUN LOBBY IS INCREASINGLY TARGETING WOMEN, TRYING TO CONVINCE THEM THAT BUYING A FIREARM IS AN EMPOWERING, PERSONAL CHOICE. BUT ARE THOSE MULTIMILLION-DOLLAR EFFORTS REALLY PAYING OFF?

By Ben Wofford | Photo illustration by Matt Chase

AUGUST 2018 · #THINK ·

LAST

Samantha Prier, 31, an engineer in western Iowa with three children, was shopping in the local Target, her kids in tow, when she spied a khaki-clad man following her through the aisles. Security escorted the family to the car. The police were called. In minutes it was over. Prier wasn’t traumatized by the episode; she recounts it cheerily. But for weeks, she told me, she’d seen similar accounts on social media. “I see millions of stories about [crimes] targeting young moms, young women professionals,” Prier says. Experiencing something firsthand, she says, “was the last straw.” She decided to buy a gun. ¶ Prier bought a Ruger LC9 and joined a women-only training class sponsored by Sturm, Ruger & Co., one of the top five gunmakers in the U.S. “I was so nervous,” she says, “I had tears rolling down my face as [the instructor] asked me to pull the trigger.” When she fired, her anxieties “just melted away.” Prier completed the training, which included a tour of the company’s manufacturing headquarters next door and a Ruger gift package with a complimentary concealed-carry handbag. The event was called The Ruger Experience for Women. ¶ Prier is among the country’s new female gun buyers, whose numbers are growing. Her experience wasn’t uncommon to that of more than a dozen gun-owning women Glamour spoke with, like Tashonia Williams, 40, from Raleigh, North Carolina, who bought her first pistol in December, or Jenna Schartz,

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THE NRA


From Blogs to Big Business To understand the feminizing of American guns, you have to meet Carrie Lightfoot. In 2008, Lightfoot, a ministry worker in Arizona, bought her first handgun. The buying experience was doused in testosterone. “There was nothing for women!” Lightfoot says. “It was either about being sexy, or it was ‘You’re not smart enough,’ that you need a man to tell you what you need.” In 2012 Lightfoot started an online forum for women about gun culture (and to sell the latest gun ephemera). She called it The Well Armed Woman. In 2013 she launched a chapter program aimed at recruiting new women to gun ranges. Lightfoot was right: The industry had a rich history of failures reaching women, beginning with male-designed marketing in the late eighties. Some ads seemed to make light of assault: “You can’t rape a .38,” proclaimed one popular slogan. A 1993 ad—oblivious to the nightmare of a loaded gun left lying out near young children—shows a Beretta on a bedside table next to a photo of a single mother and two daughters. “That’s how a man would think to reach women,” says Shari LeGate, a Phoenix analyst for FMG Publications, a firearms media group. “They did a horrible job.” Selling a gun presents several challenges. Unlike, say, cell phones, guns are durable—just one lasts a lifetime. Guns are experiential: Hate the range, and you’ll hate the gun. And in the modern era, gun marketers faced a virtual ban on ads in the mainstream media, with companies from Comcast to NBC enacting policies stating they don’t accept firearm advertising. But perhaps the greatest obstacle to reaching future female customers was the

product on sale. In the United States, 50 women are shot each month by current or former partners, 4.5 million report having been threatened by one with a gun, and American women are 16 times more likely to be killed by a gun than women in other developed countries. Both gun-rights advocates and those pushing for gun control agree on these facts but use them to different effect: One side tells women to shun the tool of their tormentor. The other tries to accomplish something more difficult—persuade them to buy it. It was the Internet and social media, LeGate says, “that has blown everything open.” Lightfoot agrees: “It kind of changed everything.” By 2013 thewellarmedwoman .com and its chapter program had taken off. Industry executives descended on Lightfoot, offering to sponsor an annual summit with 100-odd chapter leaders, or to design custom female-friendly firearms. “We had Glock, Walther, Ruger, Liberty Safe, LWRCI,” Lightfoot ticks off. She partnered with LWRCI to design a specialty AR-15 and beta-tested it through The Well Armed Woman range program’s 400 chapters and 12,000 members. Soon after buying their first gun, Prier, Williams, and Schartz each discovered The Well Armed Woman. Williams, who lives with her husband and two children, bought a Glock in December after watching a news segment about a home invasion. She found the group online, which had a chapter 10 minutes away. “To see these women know how to handle a pistol, know how to shoot, work a gun and

Insta-Strong The NRA has been ramping up online and social ads, spending $4 million so far in 2018. Ads focused on women often carry a message of safety and empowerment.

NRA ADVERTISEMENTS FROM INSTAGRAM: @NATIONALRIFLEASSOCIATION

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which not so long ago found itself in a serious dilemma. By 2008 the percentage of gun-owning households in the U.S. had declined for the eighth year in a row, a slump driven by men. “Ten years ago the industry realized, OK, we need to keep growing” to make up for lost market share, says Huff. “Women were a logical next step.” The overtures are necessitated as much by politics as sales. Perhaps no greater variable predicts support for gun control than gender: According to a 2017 Gallup poll, about 60 percent of women consistently support stricter gun restrictions, compared with around 40 percent of men. “The demographics of the country threaten the NRA,” says Adam Winkler, a law professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has written extensively about gun politics. If the gun lobby was serious about protecting its political flank, Winkler says, “the NRA had to target women.”


clean it, I was just fascinated,” she says. “And all these women of color—not just Caucasian women. That’s when I was hooked.” Williams adds that “I actually feel safe now that I can carry. I have to protect myself. I can’t wait on my husband.” (She didn’t wait long: After watching Williams, her husband took his concealed-carry test as well.) The Well Armed Woman was not an outlier. About the same time it launched, a number of female gun enthusiasts were establishing other online brands, with names like Girl’s Guide to Guns, EmPOWERed, and A Girl & a Gun. (One of them was a St. Louis blogger beginning to wade into conservative radio named Dana Loesch.) Beginning in 2012, according to one NRA board member, the organization’s seniormost women began deliberating about how to capture the potential of the Internet revolution. Just five years later the NRA plucked Loesch (who had also contributed to Breitbart) from obscurity and turned her into the most recognizable female face of guns in America as the organization’s spokesperson. Lightfoot describes the transformation with pride: “We laid out the welcome mat for women.”

Next Step: Television Something else happened in 2014: The lobby group launched NRATV online. In programs like Armed & Fabulous, New Energy (Remington was an early sponsor), and Tips & Tactics (sponsored by Cabela’s), the Internet personae whom the NRA had been sponsoring now had a new platform, and they were given celebrity treatment. (Lightfoot, for her part, has been featured on Tips & Tactics.) One of NRATV’s most popular programs, Love at First Shot (sponsored by Smith & Wesson), is hosted by Natalie Foster, founder of Girl’s Guide to Guns. Season three, whose pilot is called “The Journey Begins,” follows three young women as they wade into guns for the first time. “I’ll walk through this journey with them, to discuss the lifestyle and cultural elements of becoming a gun owner,” Foster says to the camera, as a montage shows the women inspecting handbags, firing weapons, and laughing playfully. Throughout eight episodes the intertwined narratives of Erin, Jasmine, and Natalie are interrupted by product showcases and supportive group chats. Gathered in a hip microbrewery, the group is permitted to express self-doubt. “I think you’re giving voice to what a lot of women feel when they’re first getting into firearms,” Foster soothes. Huff says the marketing ref lects the best of what she teaches her classes: “An HGTV framework with bright, white aesthetics.

IS THE NRA WINNING OVER WOMEN? In 2012, 40% of women said that owning a gun is more likely to protect someone from crime than to put their safety at risk. By 2014,

51

%

thought so.

500 women participated in NRAsponsored handgun clinics in 2000. In 2014,

13,000

did. Another study found that 47% more women are shooting today than 10 years ago.

But women are still the strongest gun-safety advocates:

60

%

of all women (including gun owners) support stricter gun restrictions, compared with 40% percent of men.

A bubbly host who is equal parts friendly, inquisitive, knowledgeable. They’re signaling [gun ownership] is normal and acceptable.” The NRA’s message, she says, is that “getting together with girlfriends and going to a shooting range isn’t really that different from getting together and going to a spa.” (Attitudes aside, a day at the range is becoming more common. In 2000 just 500 women participated in NRA-sponsored handgun clinics; by 2014, 13,000 did—an incredible increase in just over 10 years.) The programming is complemented, of course, by carefully curated Facebook and Instagram campaigns. “Jasmine continues her journey to becoming a concealed-carry holder,” reads one Facebook photo of Jasmine and Foster, arms wrapped around each other. In another the four women hold hands in a freezeframe sorority jump: “Kicking off the journey!” Indeed, the industry’s online advertising has been mounting. In 2012 the NRA spent a few hundred dollars on Internet advertising (only $300 on banner ads in the second half of the year), according to Pathmatics, a marketing research agency. These promotions didn’t feature a single woman until 2014, when ads appeared showcasing young moms guarding a crib or a pregnant woman imploring viewers not to take away her rights. By 2018 the NRA had spent more than $4 million online before June on ads viewed a staggering 600 million times. About 23 percent of their Facebook ads targeted women, concentrated in metro areas like Los Angeles, Seattle, Boston, and New York City. Expanding their reach beyond Facebook—and using ad-buying technology that helps target specific demographic groups—the NR A hopes to reach women everywhere from the YouTube channels of female video gamers and children’s shows like Doc McStuffins to websites for companies like NBC, AccuWeather, DeviantArt, and even Glamour. (So much for that media embargo.) Kristi Faulkner, who runs Womenkind, a woman-focused marketing firm in New York City, told me that the gun industry was mimicking what the best companies were doing starting in 2010: selling empowerment. “All of a sudden every product had to either empower women or give them confidence,” says Faulkner. That soon gave rise to a new buzzword: journey. “It’s the yoga message—it’s not a destination; it’s a journey,” she says. “In the wisdom of the NRA, it’s: How do we convert these women permanently? The journey simulates loyalty. We’re your partner.” Faulkner doesn’t fault the NRA for expanding its base, as any company would do. “If I were the NRA’s CMO, I’d say: What’s the


Cover/Kate McKinnon

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biggest barrier for a woman buying a gun? Fear of using the gun. Fear of judgment. Fear that she’s the only one,” she says, almost Don Draper–like. NRATV, she continues, is a marketing creation in which the female buyer “has the support of other women, she has the comfort of other women, she has the affirmation of other women. They’ve nailed it. That’s exactly how—God forbid, if they were my client—I would solve the problem.” The shrewd ness of t a rget ing women could also have a powerful ripple effect: In many households women have a “veto vote” on purchases. As in the case of Tashonia Williams, getting more women on board, Faulkner suggests, may bring along more men too.

Will Women Change the NRA? Remember how gender is a strong indicator of anyone’s views on gun control? That holds true even among gun owners, Pew research found last year. A full 60 percent of Republican women gun owners favor banning assault weapons. Nearly as many favor a government-backed national gun registry, the NRA’s ultimate red line. Could the NRA’s newest recruits be the thing that changes its politics? While Prier is joining, Williams and Schartz have yet to plunk down the $40 annual fee and become NRA members—and none of them are entirely opposed to gun control. “I am not a Trump supporter,” says Williams, who voted for Obama (“twice!”). “I’m not the type of person that, if [a candidate] is talking about gun control, I’m going to vote [for or against them] on that topic only.” But Lightfoot’s next phase suggests where the NRA hopes to steer these women. This year she was elected to the NRA’s board of directors, where a record 17 women will serve the next term. In the process of being courted by gun manufacturers, she says, “I became more politically…”—she pauses—“…educated.” She has a vision to engage members in her national network of chapters, like the ones that found Williams, Schartz, and Prier, in new forms of political activism. But the same outreach may be less effective this time around. Faulkner

points to research she recently conducted for Citibank: “The two words women were most offended by in advertising? Empowerment and confidence!” she says with a laugh. Why? “Because you never hear those words in ads to men,” Faulkner says. “Ever.” Love at First Shot is replete with this kind of message. In one scene Jasmine passes the Texas concealedcarry exam. The exam is composed of 25 grade-school-level questions that can be completed perfectly in less than 10 minutes, yet the achievement is met with a splash of girl-power hugs. In the name of empowerment, NRATV seems to have made heroes of women and clichés of womanhood. That was one reason Faulkner, who grew up shooting in Texas, gave up the sport. As she began considering careers and children, she realized her idea of womanhood had changed. “I believe that it’s fine for people to own guns,” she says. “I’m not that person who gave up guns for a political reason”—though the perspective of her 14-year-old daughter, who fears shootings like the one at Parkland, Florida, could happen at her school, has weighed on Faulkner. Instead, she says, “I outgrew them as a practical matter of course.” Anne Fosnocht is a 26-year-old graduate student at University of Pennsylvania and would be a perfect NRA recruit: She’s a liberal, single woman in a big city who’s also been skeet shooting a few times. Glamour asked her to watch Love at First Shot to see whether its message was tempting. “I actually think their marketing is kind of alienating,” she reported after a few episodes. “In my mind, it’s a little bit manipulative—playing on women’s feeling of weakness, that they lack power. Women are disproportionately affected by gun violence, so it’s a little ironic.” Fosnocht stopped midsentence, as if seized by her next thought. Eventually, it spilled out: “But you know that episode where the girl is doing the competition? I was like, Oh, that does seem kind of fun.” She laughed: “It was a little bit outlandish. But I was thinking I’d like to do it.” Ben Wofford is a contributing editor at Politico Magazine.

(continued from page 84) Pennsylvania,” whose relationship with her son, played by Mikey Day, gets more inappropriately intimate by the moment. McKinnon is workmanlike and focused, dressed in black jeans and a pair of slippers. She’s physically affectionate and has a generous laugh—quick to find her scene partner funny, quick to snap back to attention. The technical challenge of this rehearsal is a piece of blocking: Schumer’s character asks all the mothers to leave, but Ebisaleth refuses to part with her son. McKinnon is also supposed to arrive center stage for a separation-anxiety meltdown. What happens next is a master class in incremental improvement. With each run-through, McKinnon makes a small change: She doesn’t just walk away; she clutches Day and begins to weep. She doesn’t just weep; she sobs. She doesn’t just sob; she collapses to the floor with a protean howl. Every take she finds a new detail to add, a funnier way to hold her hands, a funnier way to breathe, something to push the stakes higher. “Comedy is a compulsion,” she later tells me. “I have to be writing something or playing the piano or doing something. It’s a compulsion.” According to her coworkers, that compulsion presents itself in obsessive preparation. “It doesn’t matter how late the pretape or how early the call time, if you’re passionate about it, she wants to give it her all,” says Sudi Green, who writes with McKinnon on SNL. Kunis saw this during filming too: “Kate sits down in the morning and writes out a thousand versions of the joke. You look at her and go, ‘Oh my God.’ She’ll spend hours doing it.” When I ask Colin Jost, with whom McKinnon often writes, to characterize her talent, he nods to “the gap between how meticulous she is as a writer and how loose and free she is as a performer. She can be very cerebral when she’s writing,” he says, “but when you see her on camera, she is able to completely let go.” When I finally see her perform live at SNL, the moments I am most struck by are not her time on camera but the way she waits in the wings. She is grave and still, standing in the dark


with her eyes on the monitors, watching the camera angles. She doesn’t talk to anyone or seem to hear the audience laughing. She looks like a slingshot stretched tight, ready to release. EVENTUALLY A COP TELLS US TO

get out of the bushes in Rockefeller Center. We drift around for a few blocks, settling on the steps of St. Patrick’s Cathedral. I ask her when she knows she “has” a character and the work is ready. She looks at the sky. “When you have it, it feels easy, fun, joyful, and it feels true,” she says. “Like you’ve distilled the essence of somebody.” The question of truth—locating it, capturing it, and sharing it—comes up several times. When I suggest that maybe she’s a perfectionist, she thinks for a while. “It’s not really perfection that is the goal for me; it’s more the pursuit of truth,” she says. “If you convey something you find true and other people also find it true, you feel a sense of gratification unlike anything else. So I suppose I am relentless in my pursuit of that.” “And when you don’t get there?” She begins to demonstrate physical panic, the way anxiety rises up into the throat. “If you can’t figure it out in time,” she says, “you feel like you’re squandering something precious, which is the chance to communicate and connect. And I hate that!” She laughs and then repeats herself more quietly, “I really hate that.” Tired of talking about herself, she tries to turn the interview around. “What is your dream?” she wants to know. “Like, what is your greatest dream?” I promise to answer if she does. “I continue to be gobsmacked anytime I get an opportunity to work. And I don’t see that going away,” she finally says. “I wouldn’t ever want to stop looking around a set and going, ‘Holy shit. How do I keep this going? How do I do this again? I have to do this again.’ ” “Compulsion,” I suggest. This tickles her. “Yes! I wonder if it ever goes away for anyone? I haven’t asked.” Her voice tenses slightly, indicating a laugh is on its way. “I wonder how Streep feels. Streep’s gotta know.” Jordan Kisner is a freelance writer in New York City.

The Get-It Guide Cover: Blazer, $695, Pinko, NYC. T-shirt, $42, alternativeapparel.com. Earrings, $132, ladygreyjewelry.com. Page 19: Jacket, $119, rachelroy.com. Dress, $995, 31philliplim.com. Sandals, $79, marcfisher footwear.com. Jacket, $180, seekrefugeco.com. Jeans, $245, hudsonjeans.com. Slingbacks, $425, mercedescastillo.com. Jacket, $90, dress, $80, each, lanebryant.com. Sneakers, $60, vans.com. Page 27: Jumpsuit, $328, agjeans.com for similar. Pages 36–37: Derek Lam 10 Crosby top, $650, skirt, $495, dereklam.com. Alison Lou hoops, $165, alisonlou.com. Calvin Klein Jeans bag, $188, boots, $199, calvinklein.com. Bing Bang ring, $160, bingbangnyc.com. Zadig & Voltaire T-shirt, zadig -et-voltaire.com. Uniqlo jeans, $50, uniqlo.com. The Frye Company boots, $328, thefryecompany .com. Adidas Originals jacket, $80, sneakers, $75, adidas.com. A.P.C. jeans, $220, apc.fr. A.P.C. jacket, $290, jeans, $220, apc.fr. Uniqlo x Tomas Maier shirt, $20, uniqlo.com. Soludos espadrilles, $42, soludos.com. Frame shirt, $185, frame-store.com. AllSaints pants, $165, allsaints.com. Officine Générale, $190, lostandfoundshop.com. Jennifer Fisher cuffs, $70 each, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Jennifer Zeuner Jewelry ring, $176, jenniferzeuner .com. A.P.C. sneakers, $310, apc.fr. Perry Ellis sweater, $90, perryellis.com. The Kooples shirt, $295, thekooples.com. AG jeans, $225, ag.com. Common Projects sneakers, $498, needsupply .com. Pages 38–39: Michael Michael Kors jacket, $350, pants, $225, michaelkors.com. Aerie tank top, $18, aerie.com. Jonathan Simkhai x Eye M by Ileana Makri earrings, $325, eye-m-ileanamakri .com. Oliver Peoples sunglasses, $590, oliver peoples.com. Stuart Weitzman pumps, $375, stuartweitzman.com. Coach 1941 shirt, $295, coach.com. AllSaints pants, $165, allsaints.com. Oliver Peoples sunglasses, $590, oliverpeoples .com. Sandro Homme sweatshirt, $205, sandro -paris.com. AG jeans, $188, ag.com. Gap jacket, $368, gap.com. John Varvatos Star USA T-shirt, $88, johnvarvatos.com. AG jeans, $225, agjeans .com. Fred Perry shirt, $250, fredperry.com. The Kooples pants, $295, thekooples.com. PS by Paul Smith jacket, $395, paulsmith.com. AllSaints T-shirt, $60, allsaints.com. Polo Ralph Lauren chinos, $125, ralphlauren.com. The Frye Company boots, $598, thefryecompany.com. Pages 40–41: Staud jumpsuit, $325, staud.clothing.com. Alison Lou hoops, $145, alisonlou.com. Tory Burch necklace, $158, toryburch.com. Wolf Circus Jewelry bracelet, $160, wolfcircus.com. Alumnae mules, $650, themodist.com. Zara blazer, $199, zara.com. Vince T-shirt, $110, vince.com. Frame jeans, $229, frame-store.com. To Boot New York boots, $395, toboot.com. Frame T-shirt, $85, frame-store.com. Ovadia & Sons pants, $360, ovadiaandsons.com. J.Lindeberg sneakers, $275, jlindebergusa.com. Blk Dnm tank top, $55, Blk Dnm, NYC. Ovadia & Sons trousers, $360, ovadiaandsons.com. Tommy Hilfiger loafers, $180, tommy.com. Maje jacket, $560, maje.com. Cynthia Rowley tank top, $245, cynthiarowley.com. Rebecca Minkof pants, $148, rebeccaminkoff.com. Mounser earrings, $225 for set, select Barneys New York. Michael Michael Kors bag, $168, michaelkors.com. Dolce Vita boots, $190, dolcevita.com. John Smedley polo shirt, $225, johnsmedley.com. Todd Snyder trousers, $348, toddsnyder.com. To Boot New York boots, $395, tobootny.com. Rag & Bone T-shirt, $80, belt, $175, rag-bone.com. AllSaints jeans, $150, allsaints.com for similar. Carvil boots, $685, carvil.com. Page 59: Alice + Olivia by Stacey Bendet top, $350, aliceandolivia.com. Page 60: Juicy Couture jumpsuit, $1,400, juicycouture.com. Alexis Bittar earrings, $225, alexisbittar.com. Page 61: Eloquii dress, $115, eloquii.com. Fallon earrings, $175, fallonjewelry.com. Page 62: Topshop jacket, $110, topshop.com. Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, $60, kennethjaylane.com. Page 63: ASOS top, $42, asos.com. Vince Camuto earrings, $35, vince camuto.com. Pages 78–79: Frame blazer, $550,

pants, $295, frame-store.com. Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz earrings, $145, ben-amun.com. Calvin Klein Jeans boots, $249, calvinklein.com. Pages 80–81: Theory jacket, $595, pants, $325, theory .com. Alternative Apparel T-Shirt, $42, alternative apparel.com. Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, $90, kennethjaylane.com. Joanna Laura Constantine ring, $190, joannalauraconstantine.com. Tibi boots, $695, tibi.com. Page 82: Michael Stars tank, $98, michaelstars.com. Valentino pants, $2,100, similar styles available at select Valentino stores. Wolf Circus Jewelry ring, $160, wolfcircus.com. Lady Grey earrings, $180, ladygreyjewelry.com. The Tie Bar suspenders, $25, thetiebar.com. Gianvito Rossi boots, $1,295, gianvitorossi.com. Page 83: Givenchy shirt, scarf, select Givenchy stores. Banana Republic pants, $98, bananarepublic.com. Kenneth Jay Lane hoops, $75, kennethjaylane .com. The Tie Bar suspenders, $25, thetiebar.com. Page 85: Theory blazer, $585, theory.com. Kendall + Kylie pants, $98, kendall-kylie.com. Ben-Amun by Isaac Manevitz earrings, $145, ben-amun.com. Calvin Klein Jeans boots, $249, calvinklein.com. Pages 92–93: Max Mara coat, $4,490, Max Mara, Chicago. Lucky Brand T-shirt, $40, luckybrand .com. Levi’s jeans, $98, levi.com. Paul Andrew slingbacks, $645, farfetch.com. Marcelo Burlon County of Milan x NBA jacket, $1,380, marcelo brulon.eu. Re/Done T-shirt, $125, shopredone .com. Gap jeans, $99, gap.com. Bruno Magli pumps, $425, brunomagli.com. Rag & Bone sweatshirt, $225, rag-bone.com. American Eagle jeans, $40, ae.com. Converse sneakers, converse.com for similar. Scotch & Soda shirt, $115, nordstrom .com. Fendi from Saks Fifth Avenue skirt, $1,250, Saks Fifth Avenue, NYC. Karl Lagerfeld Paris jacket, $150, karllagerfeldparis.com. Lauren Moshi tank top, $88, laurenmoshi.com. American Eagle jeans, $50, ae.com. Rag & Bone sneakers, $225, rag-bone.com. French Connection sweater, $138, lordandtaylor.com. Helmut Lang from Saks Fifth Avenue skirt, $345, Saks Fifth Avenue, NYC. Paul Andrew pumps, $675, farfetch.com. Dior earrings, ring, select Dior stores. Page 95: BCBG Max Azria robe, $498, bcbg.com. Alternative Apparel T-shirt, $34, alternativeapparel.com. Rag & Bone T-shirt, $95, rag-bone.com. American Eagle jeans, $50, ae.com. Adidas Originals sneakers, $80, adidas .com. Champion hoodie, $80, champion.com. Isabel Marant Étoile from Saks Fifth Avenue jeans, $395, Saks Fifth Avenue, NYC; isabelmarant.com. Converse sneakers, $55, converse.com. Page 96: Brooks Brothers top, $98, brooksbrothers.com. American Eagle jeans, $50, ae.com. Guess jacket, $148, guess.com. Maison Kitsuné sweater, $485, kistune.fr. Miu Miu from Saks Fifth Avenue pants, $1,900, Saks Fifth Avenue, NYC. Paul Andrew shoes, $675, farfetch.com. Scotch & Soda jacket, $245, scotch-soda.com. Lauren Moshi tank top, $88, laurenmoshi.com. Karl Lagerfeld Paris pants, $100, karllagerfeldparis.com. Converse sneakers, $55, converse.com. Page 98: St. John blazer, $1,795, turtleneck, skirt, $495, stjohnknits.com. Jimmy Choo pumps, $650, jimmychoo.com. Ulla Johnson dress, select Barneys New York stores. Ventrone Chronicles earrings, $45, ventrone chronicles.com. M. Gemi pumps, $248, mgemi .com. Page 100: Crap Eyewear sunglasses, $79, crapeyewear.com. Page 102: Tse wrap, $1,650, pants, $595, tsecashmere.com. Sarah Chloe earrings, $148, sarahchloe.com. Stuart Weitzman heels, $415, stuartweitzman.com. Suistudio jacket, $499, pants, $200, suistudio.com. Mary MacGill earrings, $155, marymacgill.com. M. Gemi flats, $228, mgemi.com. Page 104: Helmut Lang dress, select Barneys New York. Sandro coat, $630, select Bloomingdale’s. Manolo Blahnik slingbacks, $725, neimanmarcus.com. Tse shirt, $695, tse cashmere.com. Helmut Lang pants, select Barneys New York. Mary McGill necklace, $185, marymacgill.com. Arianna Boussard-Reifel ring, $275, marteau.co. All prices are approximate.

GLAMOUR IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2018 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 116, NO. 7. GLAMOUR (ISSN 0017-0747) is published monthly (except combined issues in June/July) by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President & Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; Pamela Drucker Mann, Chief Revenue & Marketing Officer, Condé Nast. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: SEND ALL UAA TO CFS. (SEE DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: SEND ADDRESS CORRECTIONS TO GLAMOUR, P.O. BOX 37617, BOONE, IA 50037-0617. FOR SUB-

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the

Big Questions

AUGUST 2018 · THE LAST ·

120 · GLAMOUR.COM

CHRISTINA AGUILERA, WHOSE MUCH-ANTICIPATED SIXTH ALBUM, LIBERATION, IS OUT NOW, TACKLES THE TOUGH ONES.

What is your full name, and where does it come from? Christina Maria Aguilera. I’m half Ecuadorian, half Irish. My mom said she named me after a princess.

How do you stand up for what you believe in? You just do it! Very Nike campaign, but you have to be unafraid to go against the grain. You have to give up sex, booze, or laughter. Pick one. Booze. I’d have to start being a good stoner then, I guess.

If you could be anyone, who would you be? Wonder Woman. Real people are too complicated for me. I want to kick some ass!

What’s something you wish you’d written? “Imagine,” by John Lennon.

What’s the best invention of all time? Social media. It allows you to speak your mind and squash rumors. But it’s also the worst, for so many reasons.

What’s your most irrational fear? The dark. I sleep with candles lit, a night-light, a nineties sitcom in the background, and a sound machine…. Yeah, it’s special.

What three things would you bring to a desert island? I’d need company, so either my dog or my man, water or wine, and definitely a boat, so I can get the fuck out of there.

What advice would you give to your 18-year-old self? Start yoga. It helps everything.

BY TESS KORNFELD

ILLUSTRATION BY HELEN GREEN


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Glamour USA - September 2018  
Glamour USA - September 2018