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WHAT IS A SYLLABLE? A syllable is the sound of a vowel (a, e, i, o, u ) that’s created when pronouncing a word. The number of times that you hear the sound of a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) in a word is equal to the number of syllables the word has.


For Example:  Cake – has 1 syllable  Eat – has 1 syllable  Cheese - has 1 syllable  Eating – has 2 syllables ( eat - ing)  Chicken – has 2 syllables (chick - en)  Worrying - has 3 syllables (wor – ry - ing)


Syllables Rules: ď‚—A syllable is the sound of a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) that's created when pronouncing a word. ď‚—The number of times that you hear the sound of a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) in a word is equal to the number of syllables the word has.


How To Find Syllables: •Count the number of vowels (a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y) in the word. •Subtract any silent vowels (like the silent 'e' at the end of a word). •Subtract 1 vowel from every diphthong. A diphthong is when two volwels make only 1 sound (oi, oy, ou, ow, au, aw, oo, ...). •The number you are left with should be the number of vowels in the word.


 How To Divide A Word Into Syllables:  Divide off any compound words, prefixes, suffixes,

and root words that have vowels. sports/car, house/boat, un/happy, pre/paid, re/write, farm/er, hope/less  Divide between two middle consonants hap/pens, bas/ket, let/ter, sup/per, din/ner


Never split up consonant digraphs as they really represent only one sound ("th", "sh", "ph", "th", "ch", and "wh"). ď‚—Usually divide before a single consonant. o/pen, i/tem, e/vil, re/port. The only exceptions are those times when the first syllable has an obvious short sound, as in "cab/in". ď‚—Divide before an "-le" syllable. a/ble, fum/ble, rub/ble, mum/ble The only exceptions are "ckle" words like "tick/le".


syllables