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Shepherd’s Watch The magazine for and by the people of the Good Shepherd

September 2010

60p  Harvest Season  COGS Outreach  Diving Teddy Bears


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

The Clergy Vicar

Fr. Felix Mascarenhas The Vicarage 272 Dyke Road Brighton BN1 5AE Tel (01273) 882987 felixmas@hotmail.com

Sept 2010

Churchwardens Ian Hill 77 Hove Park Road Hove BN3 6LL. Tel (01273 888607) David Nissen 1 Shirley Road Hove BN3 6NN Tel (01273) 554183

Stewardship Secretary David Nissen 1 Shirley Road Hove BN3 6NN Tel (01273) 554183

Reader Meets on second Thursday afternoon and fourth Thursday evening of the month. Please contact Christine James telephone (01273) 724802

Parish Office Michael Miller 68 Ainsworth Avenue Ovingdean Brighton BN2 7BG Tel (01273) 240287

The Parish Office is open on Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9.30 to 10.30. The Parish Office telephone number is (01273) 553747

Tea Club Meets on the first Monday of the month at 1.30pm. We welcome all who are 50 years plus, who are free and would like some company. Just come along.


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Back to ... with great expectations! Summer’s over and it’s back to business. Moving houses, choosing schools and resuming jobs, make me feel September, rather than January, as the year’s beginning. Perhaps more commitments are made and maintained now than the unfulfilled resolutions of January. Best wishes to all in this new season! The imminent Harvest Festival, is an inspiring reminder to be more determined to plough, sow, weed and nurture and take good care of all that is within and around us. “Ora et labora”, -pray and work- the famous Benedictine motto could inspire us as we tread on the routine of working months. Unexpected tempests, thorny weeds and nasty snails haven’t deterred anyone from farming. From my part I shall try to make our church one of today and for all. Among the many dates set on our calendar, it is worth noting that on 12th Dec. 2010 Revd. Rachel Gouldthorpe, recently ordained priest, will preside in our church. I am sure, we shall all be very glad to welcome her. With so many of you engaged in prayer and works spiritual and social, our church is like a modern combined-harvester. I think it is even more than that. Because we believe, even though the parts are human, it’s engine and power-source are divine. God bless us all! Fr Felix


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A Toe in the water (or the feeding of the 5,000?) Liz and I were enjoying a stroll along one of Tenerife’s promenades when between the numerous cafés we spotted “Royal Fish Spa”. Liz immediately recalled a magazine article on a new “treatment” whereby little fish nibble away at the dead skin on ones feet. The “Spa” consisted of two rows of 5 benches going away from the promenade each with a tank of fish in front of it. Immediately I was relieved of 5 Euros and Liz removed her shoes and rinsed her feet. We then had one of those one sided eyeball to eyeball conversations that many husbands will recognise! “You will do it if I don’t want to won’t you”. It was neither a question nor a command just an understanding and I had said nothing! One might debate whether Liz’s foot stayed in the tank for 12 seconds or just 8 but it certainly came out rapidly with the message “You take over”. I then had the pleasure of the remaining nineteen and a half minutes “treatment”. There were about 200 little fish in each tank; they looked something akin to Whitebait. Approximately 30 surrounded each foot and started nibbling away. The sensation was like “pins and needles” without too many needles or similar to electrolysis. Opposite me sat the wife and son from the next door Chinese restaurant. The boy had about twice as many fish around his feet which were obviously younger and tastier than mine. He seemed very content with the experience whilst his mother sat next to him on the bench with her feet in the same tank. She was also holding a young baby and giggling away, she presumably found it a somewhat erotic experience. The next customers were a very smart and very pregnant Spanish woman and her equally glamorous mother who sat down and very gently lifted their skirts to their knees without interrupting the conversation that they were engrossed in. In due course my time was up and I lifted out my significantly smoother feet. They were not perfect but they were improved. I think the experience was worth 5 Euros. Ian Hill PS I am still not keen on Whitebait!


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Street Pastors For Brighton & Hove Forgive this impersonal email, but I wanted you to know that following a training session last night I am delighted to say we now have a further two Street Pastors for Brighton and Hove. Mark and Lyn will be able to help us get through the Summer weeks hopefully without us missing a week. A team of 4 or more people have been out on the Streets of Brighton each Friday since 18th June and the group who are going out this week will mean that with one or two exceptions most of the Street Pastors have been out on a couple of evenings (full marks to Ian Smith who has been out 4 times in that period - Ian you can have a few weeks off!) We are learning a great deal about the best way to operate and getting to know some of the door staff, taxi marshals, police officers and of course our partners at Safe Space. Our grateful thanks to the folk at St Paul's Church who have bent over backwards to make this service a success. We are hoping to organise a new training course for September and I would be delighted to know of people who are interested in joining in so they can make this as much of a success as the group that began back in March. Best Wishes, Ian Chisnall Thank You COGS—Pakistan Flood Relief Thanks to the generosity of the congregation of the Good Shepherd £658 over the last two weeks (including the income tax refund on gift aided donations) has been raised for the victims of the floods in Pakistan. A £800 cheque has been sent to the appeal this week 16th August 2010. Dick Aynsley-Smith


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Copy of a pastoral letter to the Diocese 08 July 2008 from The Right Reverend Dr John Hind, Bishop of Chichester Dear brothers and sisters in Christ You will have heard the result of the latest vote in General Synod on the Manchester report. Contrary to media reports the debate was not about the principle of ordaining women to the episcopate in the Church of England, but about the next stage in the process. The motion eventually passed was: ‘That this Synod: (a) affirm that the wish of its majority is for women to be admitted to the episcopate; (b) affirm its view that special arrangements be available, within the existing structures of the Church of England, for those who as a matter of theological conviction will not be able to receive the ministry of women as bishops or priests; (c) affirm that these should be contained in a statutory national code of practice to which all concerned would be required to have regard; and (d) instruct the legislative drafting group, in consultation with the House of Bishops, to complete its work accordingly, including preparing the first draft of a code of practice, so that the Business Committee can include first consideration of the draft legislation in the agenda for the February 2009 group of sessions.’ The main question Synod was asked was “the extent to which it wishes to continue to accommodate the breadth of theological views on this issue that [the Church of England] currently encompasses” and, in order to do so, whether special arrangements should be made for those whose convictions would make them unable to receive the ministry of women bishops. The answer to this question was “yes”. From the range of options suggested in the Manchester Report, the Synod decided it wanted to proceed by way of a “statutory national code of practice”. This decision was carried by the vast majority of members of the Synod, although it was opposed by all those with theological objections to the ordination of women bishops. It will be difficult for a code of practice to be drawn up that will satisfy those for whom it is apparently designed, but these are still early days. In due course, if the Legislative Committee is able to produce a draft that


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satisfies General Synod, it will then be referred to the dioceses before General Synod gives final approval. Until then it will not be possible to be clear about the long term future for the Church of England, although the direction now seems pretty clear. Reactions in the Diocese will be as varied as in any other diocese. Some will be rejoicing and others weeping. I hope that everyone will do their best to maintain as high a degree of fellowship as possible with each other and above all to act charitably and graciously especially towards those who take sharply different views from their own. Charity and graciousness were not, I fear, the most obvious characteristics of the Synod debate. I am grateful to those who have shared with me their reflections on the dilemmas facing the Church of England and the Anglican Communion, including the members of various societies and other groups who have met with me over the past few months. I was particularly appreciative of the generosity that most people in the Diocese seem to want to show towards each other and pray earnestly that that may continue. Yours – in prayer and some confusion,


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Grub Club We have a new programme of events planned for the Grub Club over the next year – some familiar venues – some different to try out. Here’s what we propose from September to December: Monday 20 September

Supper at Hangleton Manor

Monday 18 October

Beetle Drive and shared tea at Daisy’s

Monday 15 November

Carvery lunch at The Sportsman

Monday 20 December

Pre-Christmas tea at the Hunters’ Pat and Daisy


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Sept 2010

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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Sept 2010

You are so blessed! If you woke up this morning with more health than illness, you are more blessed than the million who won’t survive the week. If you have never experienced the danger of battle, the loneliness of imprisonment, the agony of torture or the pangs of starvation, you are ahead of 20 million people around the world. If you attend a church meeting without fear of harassment, arrest, torture, or death, you are more blessed than almost three billion people in the world. If you have food in your refrigerator, clothes on your back, a roof over your head and a place to sleep, you are richer than 75% of this world. If you have money in the bank, in your wallet, and spare change in a dish someplace, you are among the top 8% of the world’s wealthy. If your parents are still married and alive, you are very rare, especially in the United States. If you hold up your head with a smile on your face and are truly thankful, you are blessed because the majority can, but most do not. If you can hold someone’s hand, hug them or even touch them on the shoulder, you are blessed because you can offer God’s healing touch.


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If you can read this message, you are more blessed than over two billion people in the world that cannot read anything at all. You are so blessed in ways you may never even know. Blessings to you! (If you are feeling blessed, repay the blessings bestowed unto you and do something for others.) Patricia Hunter


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Helping our neighbour …. in difficult times. No one can be under any misapprehension about the difficult state of the finances of the Church. Despite repeated attempts to boost our income, it remains uncertain how far we can meet our financial commitments to pay for our Church and Ministry costs. Without doubt this issue must be tackled, but at the same time we need to try to maintain our Christian obligation for charitable giving. To help with this the PCC set up an “External Giving Fund” a few years ago. The aim of this fund is to provide a source for charitable donations from the Church. To date the fund has provided matching or top up donations for money raised from our Harvest and Christmas card appeals and from individual fund raising events. It has also been used to top up in-Church collections for disaster appeals (such as the Pakistan flood and Haiti earthquake appeals). The Mission Outreach and Publicity Committee recommends to the PCC each year how the fund is used.


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But the External Giving Fund is not inexhaustible and needs to be topped up. At mid year 2010 it stood at just over £2,500; this could provide additional support for three or four appeals, but could soon run out. Of course most of us already donate directly to individual charities, and our annual Christian Aid collection involves many of the congregation. And all of us are feeling the pinch in current financial circumstances. It may therefore seem a bad time to ask for further commitments; however if you can make a donation to the External Giving Fund from time to time or even on a regular basis (in addition to your regular Church giving), it will ensure that our vital charitable role continues. In turn this demonstrates to our neighbours in the Parish that we are not just inwardly focused. The story of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10: 29-37) should inspire us in our action. Donations to the External Giving Fund should be given to the David Nissen, Stewardship Secretary. Cheques should be made payable to the Church of the Good Shepherd and marked “External Giving Fund” on the reverse. If you are a UK taxpayer, please complete a gift aid form unless the Church already holds one for you.


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Mothers' Union Autumn Calendar Saturday 4th Sept @ 9.00am Corporate Communion in the Lady Chapel Thursday 9th Sept @ 2.45pm Prayer Group led by June Woodhams at 1 Avondale Road, Hove Thursday 23rd Sept @ 7.30pm In the Green Room What's in the news Speaker Victoria Hall –Smith Saturday 25th Sept 10.30 till 3.00 Overseas Day at Haywards Heath. See poster for further details Saturday 2nd Oct @ 9.00am Corporate Communion in the Lady Chapel Thursday 14th Oct @ 2.45pm Prayer Group (see weekly sheet for venue) Saturday 23rd Oct Diocesan Council at Bishop Hannington Church, Hove Thursday 28th Oct @ 7.30pm Green Room. Discussion Saturday 6th November @ 9.00am Corporate Communion in Lady Chapel Thursday 11th November @ 2.45pm Prayer Group (see weekly sheet for venue)

Christine James


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Pastoral Care Update It seems a good time, at the start of September, to write a bit about the development of Pastoral Care since the earlier magazine article last December describing the launch of a renewed group of "carers" In essence, about ten of us interested in actively visiting, writing letters or phoning those in the Church community needing caring support, have met three times with Felix to discuss issues relating to our involvements. Our focus is on supporting those who, for a variety of reasons, find it difficult to get to Church services or activities. Such members of our church family often feel lonely and isolated. It is our purpose to assure them that they are not forgotten, that the Church does care for them, and wants to offer the hand of loving fellowship to them. During these last eight or so months we have been in touch with over 15 church members,( many on a regular basis,) have arranged home Communions for several who have requested them, written letters to some on the weekly intercession list assuring them of prayerful support, visited in private homes, hospitals, Nursing and Residential Homes , phoned others who like to be remembered in this way, and last but not least, given car lifts to church to a few who would otherwise be unable to come to the services. We recognise that much valuable caring does already take place among church members, unheralded and often unnoticed by others, but we also realize that much more could and should be done to 'grow' this pastoral ministry....not just by the vicar or by a few of us interested in that sort of thing, but by each one of us in the church looking out for the well-being of others. Which others? The person sitting near us in the same pew. Do we know how life is going for them? The person we haven't seen at church for a long while .Could we find out a bit more and phone them or drop them a note? The one who sits alone at coffee time in the Hall after the morning service. What about sitting down by them instead of sitting with friends? It could make all the difference to a lonely person. These little acts of kindness can speak volumes about how much we are willing to put our faith into action, and by doing so, to grow an increasingly caring church. Didn't Jesus say," By this shall all men know that you are my disciples, if you have love one for another." Margy Weir, Coordinator


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Time For God Programme for Sept -Dec 2010 (plus some social events) Sunday 5 Sept

9.45 Breakfast+ Breakout

Sunday 12 Sept

10.15 Time for God

Sunday 19 Sept

10.15 Pet Service & Family Eucharist

Sunday 26 Sept

10.15 Time for God

Sunday 3 Oct

9.45 Breakfast+Breakout

Sunday 10 Oct

10.15 Time for God

Saturday 16 Oct

Harvest party for all

Sunday 17 Oct

10.15 Harvest Family

Sunday 24 Oct

10.15 Time for God

Friday 29 Oct

Fireworks

Sunday 31 Oct

10.15 Time for God

Sunday 7 Nov

9.45 Breakfast+ Breakout

Sunday 14 Nov

10.15 Time for God

Sunday 21 Nov

10.15 Family Eucharist

Sunday 28 Nov

10.15 Time for God

Sunday 5 Dec

9.45 Breakfast+ Breakout

Sunday 12 Dec

10.15 Time for God then Children’s party

Sunday 19 Dec

10.15 Craft activity 5.00 pm Family Carol Service with children’s procession

Thursday 23 Dec

Crib rehearsal

Friday 24 Dec

6.00 pm Crib Service

Christmas Day

10.15 Christmas Service

Eucharist

You are very welcome to join us


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Sept 2010

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The Good Shepherd Magazine

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Sept 2010

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Thanks for life – End Polio now For centuries, Poliomyelitis has been one of the most dreaded diseases on earth. It has crippled and killed millions of people. Hundreds of thousands of individuals who were stricken with the disease spent the rest of their lives in iron lungs. Parents lived in fear that their children would either be crippled for life or might even die. Then, in 1952, Dr. Jonas Salk created the first Polio Vaccine and in 1954 more than 1.8 million children participated in the field trials of the new vaccine. Following the successful trials, more than 10 million children in five countries were immunized by the end of 1955. In the late 1950's Dr. Albert Sabin worked on the development of an oral polio vaccine and in 1961 the vaccine was approved for use. Because it was so easy to administer and gave longer-lasting immunity, the oral vaccine became the weapon of choice in the global campaign against polio. Our Harvest appeal this year will support the Rotary International of Britain and Ireland “Thanks for life” campaign to eradicate Polio from the face of the earth. Polio eradication has been Rotary's top priority since 1985. Rotary International has joined forces with partners


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including the World Health Organisation, the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to form the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI). This partnership has the single objective of achieving the eradication of Polio worldwide. Since 1985, polio cases have fallen from 350,000 a year to a recorded 1,600 last year. Thanks to Rotary’s help, two billion children in 122 countries have been protected from the disease, and the number of endemic countries has fallen from 125 to just four: Afghanistan, northern India, Nigeria and Pakistan. It is estimated that five million children have been spared from disability and 250,000 deaths have been averted. It is these four endemic countries that represent the "last inch" in achieving the goal. Money raised goes towards funding national immunisation drives for all children under age five in endemic and high risk countries, as well as tracking possible incidences of the disease, measures to control outbreaks and improving public health infrastructures. Eric Gill, who used to be a member of our congregation and is this year’s President of the Rotary Club of Brighton, spoke to us briefly about this earlier in the year and will visit us again 3 October for our Harvest appeal. Let us contribute towards ending polio as a visible sign of our thanks for the harvest. Peter Rose


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Dealing with Dawkins The following is an edited extract of a public lecture on “Faith in media?” given in October 2009 by the Reverend Richard Coles to Canterbury Christ Church University. Fr Coles is Curate at St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge, a writer and regular broadcaster (and former member of the 1980’s band “The Communards”). Recently the media has been fascinated by the arguments of people like Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dennet and, pre-eminent among them, Richard Dawkins; the New Atheists, as they have been described, a loosely allied, if not heterogeneous, group, united in their disdain for religion, which they believe to be a dangerous delusion we would all be better off without – speaking as a clergyman, I know that feeling only too well. I admire all three, particularly Richard Dawkins, who has done more than any other scientist to put the ideas of Charles Darwin within the reach of a general readership. I don’t want to bang on about this, but I found it very difficult to believe that the author of The Selfish Gene was also the author of The God Delusion. The former is a work of acute intelligence, lucid argument and admirable style. The latter isn’t. Full of indignation, idiosyncratic (shall we say) in its treatment of the material, and about as readable as a Trotskyist denunciation of bourgeois formalism, I think Terry Eagleton got in right in the London Review of Books: Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology. How can someone so acute be so obtuse? How can someone so subtle and thoughtful in his treatment of the ideas of Charles Darwin be so maladroit in his treatment of some of the foundational ideas of western civilisation? And so grudging. One of those most striking things about the book is its furious reluctance to give credit where credit is due. For example, religious people whom Dawkins likes – Gregor Mendel, the father of genetics and a monk, and Martin Luther King Jr, a Baptist minister – aren’t really religious at all; but Hitler and Stalin, who presided over two of the most atheistic regimes of the twentieth century, are. Why? Because Dawkins is so hostile to religion he can’t concede it contributed to the achievement of those whom he admires – on the contrary, their achievement, according to Dawkins, was in spite of it. But compared with Christopher Hitchens’ book, God Is Not Good, The God Delusion is a model of moderation and restraint. Reading


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Hitchens felt like being cornered by a bore in a pub, breathing menacingly in your face because he thought you were looking at him funny. Without style, as shapeless as a jumper knitted by your Gran, full of mistakes that would make a GCSE student blush, I wondered if the publishers had actually bothered to read it. What really surprised me about those two books was how extravagantly they were praised. I can understand the appeal of Dawkins, battle-hardened in the Creationist culture wars, and Hitchens too has his charms; but both books are simply bad, as anyone with the lightest grasp of the Bible, or Church history, or theology, would see in an instant. I can only assume that Dawkins and Hitchens and their admirers don’t have any grasp of the Bible or Church history or theology and neither do those who praised them. I got into an argument with a friend last Christmas, who generously reviewed both Dawkins and Hitchens in the literary press, and when I suggested that the influence of Christianity, like it or not, had really been quite significant we lapsed into a sort of Monty Python tribute sketch. What has Christianity ever done for us? Well, schools, hospitals, care of the poor, urban sanitation, the university, the Renaissance, the civil rights movement, our language and literature, so on. Blindingly obvious, I thought, but my friend didn’t. I wouldn’t want to overstate the significance of the impact made by Dawkins and others, but it does influence the thinking of people who edit newspapers and magazines and commission television and radio programmes, many of whom in my experience, if they think about religion at all, take it about as seriously as morris dancing. I was on a Newsnight Review special marking Darwin’s bicentenary year. Among the other guests was Richard Dawkins, whose latest book examines the evidence for evolution, a riposte to the history-deniers, as he calls them, Creationists who insist on the literal truth of the accounts of our origins in the Book of Genesis. As a faith representative, the man in the dog collar, I was a bit apprehensive, for I am much more enthusiastic about his profession then he is about mine. On air our discussion was pretty civilised, concerned much more with areas of agreement than disagreement, which may have disappointed the producers but I hope avoided the danger of media contests between scientists and religious people, so polarised they end up caricaturing one or both of the participants.


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One thing that particularly struck me was the assumption that the issue of human origins is critical to Christian faith, a matter that has to be settled before anything else. When pressed on this point I said something bland about some questions are matters of faith, others of science, and he said well, he would say that, wouldn’t he. And indeed, I did; but, thinking about it afterwards, I wish I’d said that Christian faith begins for me not with an argument over the authority of the biblical account of Creation, but with the perception that in Jesus Christ the mystery of God is revealed, in a life and death that answers once and for all the sum of human cruelty and suffering and opens up for us unimaginable possibilities of transformation, hope, joy and life in its fullness. That’s not a soundbite, it doesn’t sum anything up; it points, however awkwardly, to something beyond. Jesus taught in parables, because, he says, “seeing they do not perceive, and hearing they do not listen, nor do they understand.” What Christians say and do is no different from what others say and do – we are not alien life forms – but beyond the recognisable shapes of our lives, the landscapes we move in, the language we speak, is a reality which is unimaginably strange but unmistakably there. You can read a full transcript of Fr Coles’ lecture at www.canterbury.ac.uk Badly treated – glad to go! We live in Hove, near the top of the Downs, in a detached house on a nice road – at least it was, but the developers have had their eyes on the larger plots and there are rumours of a block of flats. What’s to be done about it? I don’t know. Perhaps the recession will reduce the number of concrete mixers. Ours is one of the more modest houses, but we have a pretty garden. I can’t believe the prices, but they’re coming down and not before time. I’ve been retired for some two years. My company’s new Managing Director was a real terror. Within two months of his arrival he had sacked 15 per cent of the workforce and made me redundant. He treated me badly, and I had to fight for every penny. He told my colleagues that my budgets were unreliable. In the end I was glad to leave. I kept in touch with the boys in the office – sadly, they no longer call. It’s months since we have an evening out. I had thought that I would like to live in Spain, but


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Rose MOP The Good Shepherd MagazinePeter Sept 2010 Constance – that’s my wife – won’t hear of it. She’s a redhead, or was, and can’t stand long sunlight. Then there’s Mumsy, and dear old Dad – they’re lovely people, but it shouldn’t be the highlight of my life to drive them to Sidmouth for their holidays. The truth is I’m rather lonely, and on some days a little frightened. I know that sounds silly – I’ve been a salesman all my life, and a good one. But now I look forward to Wednesdays, when Charlie, our contract gardener, calls. He’s too busy to stop for long, but I enjoy our chats.

Last week I asked him if I could help with his work. He thought I was joking. When he saw I was serious he rushed off, looking embarrassed. Constance is a good wife but I sense she’s fed up with me hanging around the house, particularly on the days when she entertains Mavis, a frightful bridge queen, and her cronies from Patcham. I did my best – last Thursday I drove to Eastbourne to make sure I was out when Constance entertained her ‘gals’, as she calls them. It was raining, a lorry jack-knifed, and I arrived home very late. ‘Did you have a nice time, dear?’ asked Constance. I was upset. She should have been worried. My name’s Victor, and although the TV Series is long gone, one of Constance’s friends refers to me as ‘that Mildew.’ What’s to be done? I must do something. I’ll start making a list. Just occasionally I go to church. I like the singing, but I’m not sure about the rest. I used to do some sailing, and on a dark night I would wonder at the heavens and the stars. Trouble is we’ve light pollution nowadays, and it’s a rare night that we can see the stars and the planets from Hove actually. Perhaps I should play golf with that hopeless old couple Pat and Derek. What about an evening class in Spanish history? That sounds interesting. And somebody in the church suggested Meals on Wheels. Trouble is I’m not too good with old people. I’ll let you know how I get on. Tim Parker.


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A Different Wedding in Devon The envelope arrived in the post – a wedding invitation, how lovely! We read the details – a church in the middle of a field, a Celtic ceremony by the river on Dartmoor, a campsite. Wow, that would be a challenge for us! Should we go? The bride was the special daughter of a muchloved cousin – yes, of course, we���d go. Later, reality set in and we wondered if we’d been wise to accept but hey, you only live once. The church is on the outskirts of the tiny village of Nether Exe a few miles north east of Exeter. Thanks to Google and some strategically placed balloons, we found our way to the field and there on the far side was the tiny church nestling in trees. We parked and, with the aid of an usher, pushed the wheelchair towards the church. The field is normally home to a herd of cows so, in addition to the bumps, there were plenty of other hazards to avoid! The tiny church dedicated to St John the Baptist held just 32 guests. There had been a church on the site since the 13th century but this one was built in the 15th century.

The bride walked across the field on her father’s arm whilst the church bell chimed and her sister played the guitar and sang folk songs in the church. As they were not resident in the parish, the couple had to marry in a register office beforehand (how stupid are some of these rules when people wish to make their vows before God) so this was a service of dedication and blessing of their marriage. Afterwards, we enjoyed champagne outside whilst the obligatory photographs were


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taken. Then we all set off down to Ashburton and up onto Dartmoor to the Tavistock Inn for lunch. Afterwards, the campers continued a few miles on and we returned to our comfortable hotel. Lucy and Mike had another ceremony planned for the next day down by the River Dart. They were going to “tie the knot” – literally. The expression comes from the ancient Celtic tradition of Hand fasting. This is the custom of lightly binding the hands of a couple together using a cord and is meant to symbolise the couples’ coming together as one. During the ceremony, they promised to honour each other, share each others’ dreams and laughter. They admitted they might burden each other, cause each other pain or anger but that was not their intention and they would seek to share the burdens, pain and anger and use them to strengthen their union. Their hands were then bound together with the words: “As this final knot is tied, so are your lives now bound. Woven into this cord, into its fibres, are all the hopes of your friends and family, and of yourselves, for your new life together.” A second knot was passed round the circle of friends and relations and, as each received it, they were invited to offer good wishes or guidance to the couple. Finally, two sticks were brought and given to the couple. These were later bound together with the cord. After this ceremony more champagne was produced and then everyone went back up to the campsite for a bumper barbecue, the traditional speeches, cutting the cake and later in the evening, a ceilidh – as Lucy said: “... bringing a bit of Scotland to me in Devon.” Patricia Hunter


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Sept 2010

Teddy Bear Sky Dive “My bear is frightened of heights.” “I won’t let my bear jump.” “Only one of the Brownies wants their bear to jump.” These were some of the comments I heard in the week before the Festival. As only two entry forms had been returned, we feared the worst......... Two weeks earlier, three cuddly toys – a bear, a panda and a dog – had been our test pilots with experimental parachutes and a stiff breeze blowing away from the road. The first dropped quite swiftly, the second blew wide, slid down the Vicarage roof and landed on a ledge (fortunately retrievable from a window), the third floated successfully down into a bush – we now knew which the best parachute was. We set to work to make more and hoped for a moderate breeze on the night.

........We needn’t have worried. No sooner had we set up a reception area at the base of the tower than we had a queue reaching back to the church hall. Nearly 100 children and adults alike had all brought their bears (one looking remarkably like a lion!) Most were prepared to dive off the top of the tower but some just to compete for the Best Dressed Bear prize. As soon as we’d noted the name of each bear and owner, we sent them off to the church porch where another team of volunteers were frantically putting the parachutes on and placing them into a bag to be winched up to the tower roof and launched by Felix and Ian.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Sept 2010

Soon the bears were floating down to the delight of everyone below. One drifted dangerously near the road but James soon had that covered and retrieved them within the walls. Any bear taking a hard landing was taken to the MBSH (Mobile Bears’ Surgical Hospital) where “Dr David” checked their temperature, their blood pressure and covered any grazes with a plaster before declaring them fit to collect their certificates from Anna and Patrick. Meanwhile the picnic had started. Everyone brought an item of food and drink to share and, as usual, the tables were groaning with a wonderful selection of goodies for all to enjoy. The bears entering the Best Dressed Bear competition had been judged by the Rev’d John and Brenda-Ruth from St Cuthman’s at Whitehawk (Brenda-Ruth is a Good Shepherd bellringer). All of the winners were Brownies. First was Cassia Dexter with her bear Debbie, second was Maddie Burnham with Daisy and third was Emily Darragh with Mr Brown.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Sept 2010

A few days later, a letter arrived in the post:

Dear Anti Pat Thank yew 4 a luvli party. Barnie is sory he ran away B4 he jumped. Mum tuk us home. Sum people wer coming 4 a meating. Lov Barnie Grandma Bear Bob & Panda Patricia Hunter


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

8am,

OUR REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICES: Holy Communion

10.15am,

Parish Eucharist

Sept 2010

10.15am, “Time for God”, informal worship for all ages, in the Church Hall; On the third Sunday of each month there is a single Family Eucharist in Church at 10.15 6.30pm,

Choral Evensong on third Sunday of each month and Evening Worship on other Sundays. (Eucharist on Thursday at 10.30am followed by Coffee and on Saturday at 9am)

SEPTEMBER: Autumn Study Groups begin in this week, Book of Exodus 13th : Wedding of Naomi Adamson & Andrew Kenyon, 1.30pm 18th : BLESSING OF ANIMALS to take place during the Family 19th : Eucharist, 10.15am Choral Evensong, 6.30pm OCTOBER: CTP Quiet Day 09th : L.Prep. at Mowden, Harvest Festival, 9.15am 15th : Harvest Supper, 7pm 16th : Harvest Festival, Family Eucharist, 10.15am 17th : Choral Evensong, 6.30pm Windlesham School, Harvest Festival, 10am 20th : PCC, 7.45pm 21st : Bonfire, Fireworks, 7pm 29th : Wedding of Ella Williams & James Whitnall, 12pm 30th : NOVEMBER: 02nd : All Souls “Requiem”, 7.30pm REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY, Eucharist at 10am 14th : Family Eucharist, 10.15am 21st : Choral Evensong, 6.30pm 24th : Eucharist for L.Prep at Mowden, 9.15am 27th : AUTUMN GARDENING, 9.30am, Volunteers please! 28th : ADVENT SUNDAY, Eucharist 10.15am ADVENT CAROL SERVICE, 6.30pm


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

The Church of the Good Shepherd Service Times Sunday Worship 8am Holy Communion 10:15 Sung Eucharist* 10:15 Time for God** 6.30 Evensong *On one Sunday each month this will be a Family Eucharist to which children are particularly welcome. ** Time for God Services are held in the Church Hall. Weekday Eucharists Tuesday 8:30am Thursday 10:30am Saturday 9am Morning Prayer Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8.30am Evening Prayer Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings at 5.30pm

Sept 2010

Grub Club Meets on third Monday of the month. All welcome. Please contact Daisy Walpole at (508600) and Pat Hunter at (555954)

Choir Choir practice every Friday evening in the church. New singers are always welcome. Please contact: Derek Froud (681007)

Hall To book the hall please Margaret Bell (505763)

contact

Keep Fit With Yoga Classes are held on Tuesday mornings – 10:15am to 11:15am. All ages welcome. Please contact Joanne Cassidy (508010)

Flowers If you would like to donate an arrangement in memory of someone or help with the flower arranging, please contact Gloria Cruttenden (505225).

Bell Ringing Ringing practice every Tuesday evening in the Tower. New ringers are always welcome. Please contact either Pat Hunter (555954) or Margaret Bell.

Notice-boards Information (lists and posters) for the notice boards may be placed in the tray in the church porch windowsill or contact Gloria Cruttenden (505225).

Magazine Contributions to the magazine are welcome. Please leave copy at the back of Church by 15th of every February, May, August and November or e-mail da i s y . w a l p ol e @ bt i n t e r n e t . c om or nicholson8@msn.com by these dates.


Harvest 2010 SW