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Shepherd’s Watch The magazine for and by the people of the Good Shepherd www.goodshepherdbrighton.org.uk

March 2017

60p

Refugees holding on to God's word pg 4 Lent & Easter Program pg 6 Just So Stories pg 7 Heart Prints pg 9 Are we being served? – Ethics pg 10 “Beating the Bounds” pg 16 Mothers’ Union Spring Calendar pg 18 Numbers are always important pg18 Chins Up, Knit and Natter ... Pg 21 Children and youth leadership Deanery initiative. Pg 22 What happens next? Pg 23 I Went To India for my Holidays! Pg 25 Our Regular Sunday Services pg 31 Good Shepherd Festival Program 2017 pg 32


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Vicar

Revd. Felix Mascarenhas The Vicarage, 272 Dyke Road Brighton BN1 5AE Tel (01273) 882987 vicar@goodshepherdbrighton.org.uk

Deacon

Reader

Helen Rawlings 6 Beacon Hill Ovingdean, Brighton BN2 7BN Tel 07967695753 hrawlings@sky.com

Michael Miller 68 Ainsworth Avenue, Ovingdean, Brighton BN2 7BG Tel (01273) 240287 michael.miller@tiscali.co.uk

Churchwardens David Stevens: 2 Shirley Road, Hove, BN3 6NN, Tel (01273) 555197; desandpms@yahoo.com Christine James: 22 Ranelagh Villas, Hove BN3 6HE Tel 01273.724802, cpjh22@googlemail.com

Parish Office The Parish Office is open on Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9.30 to 10.30. The Parish Office telephone number is (01273) 553747


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Year of the Bible We are about to begin Lent. And in this year of the Bible, besides our usual Lenten practices, many of us shall meet and study the Bible. That some of us will have more than one copy of the Bible is no surprise! This, in spite of Frank Skinner saying: “Once every house had a Bible in this country and read it; then they had a Bible and didn’t read it. Now they don’t have a Bible”. Scripture scholars “know” the Bible well, and some of us “quote” the Scripture, often in our own defence. Bible therefore, we can say, is fairly very well known to the holy and even to the devil. Bible also remains to be most printed and the most translated book in the world; and yet few could claim to live the Bible. As Rowan William says, “the most important translation is the translation of our lives”. A faithful translation of any document, as we know, is already a very difficult task. The saying “Tradurre e’ tradire” would mean every translation is a betrayal. One can therefore only imagine how difficult it would be to translate the Word of God into our life. In our own or personal context, Lent is an excellent time to ask ourselves how much our life reflects the Word of God, or how much we are able to translate our life itself according to that Living Word. We are always in a multicultural and multi-faith world. Modern world challenges us how we can present it to the world. This would need both courage and wisdom as to when, where, how and whom one should speak in Biblical terms. For example, how would one quote the Christian scriptures to one who is a non Christian or of no faith at all? On the other hand, how much respect is to be given to the scriptures of other religions? Lord, help us to hear, read, mark, learn and inwardly digest the Holy Scriptures so that we may be your faithful missionaries in this world.

Fr Felix

While every effort is made to ensure all information in Shepherd’s Watch

is correct, neither the Parochial Church Council nor the individual contributors can be held responsible or accept liability for any errors and/or omissions. The PCC does not endorse the companies, products and services that appear in Shepherd’s Watch. Responsibility for any loss, damage or distress resulting from the use of or reliance on any information in Shepherd’s Watch, however caused, is disclaimed by the Parochial Church Council.


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Refugees holding on to God's word In 2016 I made two trips to Austria to witness Bible work there. It was an icy -4C. on my first visit in January , but by the time I returned in September it was a scorching 28C. What a difference, and yet the biggest change between the two visits was the way that people’s lives had transformed. I first met Hooloot in January, when the leader of a local Syrian Orthodox Church took me to visit her. We shared a meal and talked about how the Bible she’d received from Bible Society helped her during a distressing period in her life. Hooloot is one of many refugees who have arrived in Austria from Syria in the last couple of years. Refugees are not new to Austria; the German-speaking country first welcomed refugees in 1956 when The Lager on the outskirts of Vienna started receiving people escaping the Hungarian Uprising. The number of people arriving since 2015 however has been unprecedented, and has been equally accompanied by an unprecedented surge in demand for Bibles. The Austrian Bible Society is small but coping. The Director, Dr Jutta Henner, told me that in 2014 there were 20,000 people seeking asylum. By 2015 there were 100,000! They receive requests from ministers, missionaries, police and prison chaplains asking for Bibles for refugees. Each person’s story is different and each has had a profound effect on me, but it is probably Hooloot’s that I remember most vividly. When I visited her, she told me through a translator how a few years ago her husband was kidnapped by ISIS. She described how reading the Bible helped her in those dark days. My own daughter is in her teens and I cannot imagine trying to be a


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parent whilst your husband is going through such torment. And yet through all that, Hooloot held on to her faith. After the kidnapping, Hooloot paid the ransom. But following her husband’s return home, he fled the country and once again, Hooloot was on her own with her children. Once again she turned to the Bible for support. Eighteen months after his arrival in Austria, Hooloot’s husband was granted asylum and the family were finally reunited. Hooloot told me how scary it had been but that the Bible had supported her. She requested a Bible from Bible Society because she knew it was important to forgive people and not let it affect the rest of her life. Reading about how Jesus forgave people was an important part in that process. When I returned to Austria in September, I was delighted to see Hooloot after church. Since our first meeting she continues to read her Bible, attend church and she has been attending German lessons. She has passed the qualification she needs to get a job and has been offered employment as a teaching assistant. I am certain that she never envisioned working in a German speaking school, but throughout she has held fast to her faith and her Bible. Again and again I heard from people how they longed to have their own Bible either because they already knew it well and relied upon it, or because it had been banned in their home country and they were desperate to read it themselves. The verse that comes to my mind is Romans 12.21 – ‘Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good’ (ESV). Refugees in Austria are showing us that the Bible offers a real alternative to extremism and I count it a privilege to be part of distributing God’s word. Susan Wingrave, (courtesy, Bible a month, Feb/March 2017)


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PROGRAM FOR THE HOLY WEEK & EASTER 2017 Day

Palm Sunday 9th April

Time 8am 10.15am

Service Details Eucharist

Procession of Palms from Hall , Dramatised Passion Gospel & Sung Eucharist with a short sermon leading into the Holy Week We take part in the Dramatised Passion taking us back to the first Holy Week. ‘

10 th Mon.

8pm

Eucharist at the Good Shepherd church

11th Tue. 12th Wed.

8pm

Eucharist at St John’s

8pm

Eucharist at St Matthias’

Maundy Thursday 13th April

7pm 8pm

Bring & Share supper with Readings & Sermon Eucharist with Washing of Feet & Watch (8pm) Our Church becomes the Upper Room; we recall the Last Supper, welcoming Christ in Communion. Our Lady Chapel then becomes our Gethsemane; we keep vigil there and respond to Christ’s call: “Watch and pray with me!”

10am

Family Service followed by Hot Cross Buns Our young people will explore Jesus’ journey on Good Friday and build a garden to await his Resurrection. An Hour Before the Cross: Reflection & Hymns

Good Friday 14th April

1pm 2pm

8am Easter Day 16th April

10.15am

The Liturgy of Good Friday with the Proclamation of the Cross and Holy Communion We discover the Cross in Words (the Passion Gospel), the Cross in Wood (as the Cross is carried into Church as a focus of our devotions) and the Cross in Bread (as we share in the Sacrament). Eucharist Easter Eucharist

We light the new fire and the Easter candle symbolizing Christ, risen from the darkness of the grave. We celebrate the Easter Eucharist of the Resurrection as we welcome him into our lives. We bring flowers as darkness becomes light.

Treasure hunt for children at the end!


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Just So Stories On my eighth birthday I was presented with a copy of Rudyard Kipling’s Just So Stories. I later recognised that they were a good introduction to understanding parts of the Bible. The whimsical tales in Kipling’s book follow a common theme of explaining how peculiar differences between animals arise e.g. How the camel got its hump; How the elephant got its trunk. The story of the serpent in Genesis would have provided a fine addition to Kipling’s book. The serpent is one of my favourite characters in the Old Testament. He was treated particularly harshly by the removal of his ability to walk; but at least God allowed him to remain in the Garden of Eden, where he probably lies low in the wet grasses occasionally catching a frog! Such stories which explain why things are as they are abound in biblical texts. Ancient stories are often designed to explain a cause or reason for something. Philosophers refer to such written explanations as being etiological statements. Common examples are unusual creatures or curious events such as the rainbow, which you will find in Genesis chapter 9. It seems that whoever told the story of the Garden of Eden was concerned to give an account of the origins of the human condition. Once Adam had acquired a consort and the forbidden fruit had been consumed events leading to the banishment of the couple followed swiftly. Eating the apple elevated the consciousness of Adam and Eve to full self-recognition, an awareness of the past and future and an understanding of good and evil. Furthermore Eve’s arrival carried with her the power of procreation. God was henceforth no longer the sole creator and the Garden of Eden was set to fall like Valhalla1. Immediate expulsion of the couple was God’s only remedy if Eden was to be saved from a rapid increase in population and the mayhem that would follow. A further and pressing reason for God’s swift action is the particular concern that humanity should continue to share its mortality alongside the rest of His


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creatures2. This is one of the most significant etiologies in establishing the human condition3. It is the element of punishment which many find difficult to explain. Expulsion was clearly necessary in the circumstances, but why should God have acted with such cruelty? God’s only act of kindness was to provide clothing for Adam and Eve before sending them out to an uncertain fate. The curses inflicted on the couple were particularly harsh, especially in the light of Adam’s limited agricultural skills which had been confined to a little light work tending the garden. What God said to Eve was remarkably unkind, but here I feel that the author was carried away by his etiological concerns regarding the unfortunate woman: I will greatly increase your pangs in childbearing, in pain you shall bring forth children yet your desire shall be for your husband and he shall rule over you4. In this way the author explains the facts of a woman’s life as resulting from a curse from God. It is clear that God was also angry with Adam for listening to his wife. Was this because it set in train the events leading to the loss of his only gardener!? I prefer to call what happened as the release of humankind into the world rather than portraying the events as a humiliating banishment of two unsophisticated young people. One might ask whether God acted well in this tangled tale. I can only reply, Who am I to judge? In this Year of the Bible one may be tempted to explore more of the ancient books which comprise the Old Testament. Some are hesitant to approach these texts with other than considerable religious reserve. I urge you not to do so. A robust and challenging approach is more appropriate than undue reverence for the words on the page. 1Valhalla:

In Nordic mythology the home of the ancient gods which was destroyed by fire and replaced by a new, human era. 2 Genesis 3vv22-24 3 See also Genesis 6vv1-3 4 Genesis 3vv15-19 David Nissen


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Heart Prints Whatever our hands touch, there we leave fingerprints, On walls, on furniture, On doorknobs, dishes and books. As we touch, we leave our identity.

O God, wherever I go today, help me to leave Heartprints! Heartprints of compassion, Of understanding and love. Heartprints of kindness And genuine concern.

May my heart touch a lonely neighbour, Or an anxious mother, Or, perhaps a dear friend who is ill, Or someone in great trouble.

Lord, send me out today To leave Heartprints. And if someone should say, " I felt your touch," May that one sense YOUR LOVE, Touching through me. Margy Weir,(Courtesy, Australian Church Mouse)


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Are we being served? – Ethics ‘Without civic morality communities perish; without personal morality their survival has no value’. Bertrand Russell Ethics and the law are closely intertwined as they both have a focus on right and wrong and preventing immoral acts. But despite their equal benefit to society, ‘ethics’ in particular, continue to present problems. Clearly this may be due to the fact that whereas laws are defined and recorded, ethics lack a unifying set of core principles – not simply in the broadest sense, but for clear fundamental principles that can be defined and applied. Laws are rules that bind people living in a community; they protect our general safety and ensure our rights as citizens against abuses by other people, by organisations, and by the government itself. We have laws, which exist at local and national levels, to help provide for our general safety and control matters that directly bear on our lives e.g. laws about food safety, traffic control, registration of doctors and nurses, rights and discrimination. Clearly no one disputes the need or benefits of the law, but there is an underlying need to ensure that those creating and administrating laws are morally sound and advance the wishes of the people that they serve. At its simplest, ethics is a system of moral principles derived from religions, philosophies and cultures. They embrace debates on topics such as abortion, human rights and professional conduct. Ethics concern what is good for individuals and society. When considering ethics (or morals) most people think of the way in which they conduct their lives or a set of rules relating to professional conduct or religion e.g. the Hippocratic Oath or the Ten Commandments. But they are not simply a set of rules – they are the norms for conduct, which apply to all of us, that distinguish between what is acceptable or unacceptable behaviour in the conduct of our lives Most of us learn ethical norms at home, at school, in church or in other social settings. However, although we acquire our sense of right and wrong during childhood, moral development continues throughout


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our lives. To some, ethical norms may seem to be matters of common sense but if morality was nothing more than common sense – why are there so many ethical disputes and issues in our society? One explanation is that all of us recognise ethical norms but some people interpret, apply and balance these norms in different ways in light of their own values, life experiences and ambitions. In other words they confine their ethical norms to criteria that will satisfy their personal objectives. So do we need ethics? It is suggested that ethics provide us with an essential moral map; a framework that we can use to find our way through difficult issues. At the heart of ethics is a concern about something or someone other than ourselves, our own desires and self-interest. Ethics is concerned with other people’s interests, with the interests of society, with God’s interests, with ultimate goals and so on. Ethical principles demand honesty, objectivity and integrity that promote fairness, transparency and accountability – in other words the ingredients that are often lacking in today’s society. ‘Ethics’ concern all aspects of our lives ranging from the way in which we are governed, to the massive issues of the day such as euthanasia, abortion and eugenics, to the way in which we relate to one another. Regrettably, in my view, these issues are not receiving the attention that they warrant against a background where our leaders are prepared to cheerfully tear up any moral or ethical expectations in order to satisfy public demand: a situation that is aggravated due to the authority of the Church – the once acceptable face of morality – being undermined by the State and within its own ranks. ~O~ The ‘Permissive Society’ advocated new morality; this led to the onslaught on tradition, moral values, the family and marriage. People were encouraged to form casual relationships, have ‘love children’, take soft drugs and sample homosexuality. These self-perpetuating ideas were not challenged, as to do so was not ‘cool’ and they took root. In recent years legislators have plunged us into ‘reforms’ that tear up rights, duties and obligations that have underpinned the family for millennia. They have engaged in ‘post-modernist’ concepts of family, partnering and parenthood’. We now have a situation where ‘virgin births’ have come within scientific reach and all that matters is what adults want – and children adapt to it, whether they like it or not, as the ‘progressive intelligentsia’ engage in reshaping society.


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For years scientists who, in the God-like belief that they can eradicate disease and misery from the world, constantly push to be in the forefront of medical research regardless of any adverse consequences for society. My concern is that government officials see developments of this nature as opportunities for political advancement. In my view the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Bill, as an example, ignores moral and ethical codes relative to human conduct in relation to the sanctity of life to satisfy public demand. The Race & Religious Act 2006, was forced through Parliament, to pass a law against incitement to religious hatred. This proposal had previously been blocked by objections from a cross-section of horrified parliamentarians and peers who had condemned it as “an attack on free speech”, “sweepingly broad” and a “straightjacket on the freedom of expression”. As anticipated this Act has been the centre of problems for Christians where individuals of other faiths often argue that they are being victimised when they are unable to sustain their own arguments. Much more could be said concerning contentious issues, many of which are likely to be swept under the carpet in the hope that they will go away, ranging from failure to properly address the subjects of divisive and politically motivated multiculturalism and toothless Inquiries addressing matters such as the ‘weapons of mass destruction’, to attempts being made to gag the Press, drugs, sex education for children, protecting the elderly and biased broadcasting. My fear is that they will be ignored, with problems currently being exacerbated by unhealthy attitudes in some sections of society concerning the will of the people and our failure to recognise the need to put our own house in order before engaging in the business of others. ~O~ It is evident that ethics (moral values) provide a conduit to all aspects of our lives. In the circumstances it is essential that those occupying positions of influence apply consistent, defined principles to ethical problems and seek to unite society around a defined moral compass, with a view to creating trust between individuals and communities. It goes without saying that widely differing ‘opinions’ of what is right or ‘acceptable’ create conflict, a deep-seated culture of suspicion and lack of basic trust in society. In my view, preaching appeasement and acceding to demands at the expense of principle is threatening our survival as a global community.

Neil Kelly


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“Beating the Bounds” I write this note on Wednesday 22 February, which in Roman times was kept as the Feast of Terminus, the god of landmarks, to whom cakes and wine were offered while sports and dancing took place at the city boundaries. From this developed the medieval custom of ‘perambulation’, ‘going-aganging’ or ‘beating the bounds’. The latter name comes from the green boughs of birch or willow which were used not only to beat or mark the boundary of the parish, but also to beat the crowd of boys that would always accompany the procession. The idea was, that in days when the boundaries might be obscure, the boys would remember the occasion so that they would be able to identify appropriate landmarks in later life in case of any argument. And they’d also be rewarded with a ha’pence for their trouble! The point of all this was to avoid disputes, as with present day property. The parish in which anyone lived would determine where they would pay taxes, the courts that would have jurisdiction and the churchyard in which they could be buried. Psalms 103 and 104 would be said and hymns sung as the priest and churchwardens led the way and prayers offered for the protection of the residents and blessing of the lands. In latter years a link with the completion of Christ’s ministry on Ascension Day was established or on the previous Rogation Sunday with prayers for seedtime and the forthcoming summer season of growing, the fruits of the earth and a bountiful harvest. We will have our own go at all of this on Easter Monday 17 April when at 10am we will leave the Church and, probably for the first time, ‘beat the bounds’ of our enlarged parish. There will be some roads to walk of course, but we will try to make the route as interesting as possible by traversing Dyke Road Park, Hove Rec, Hove Park, Three Corner Copse and Withdean Woods before completing the return journey along the unmade-up Station Road to Preston Park Station. There will of course be refreshments on route, both at Hove Park Café and Hill Top Café at the top of Dyke Road Avenue. And we’ll find somewhere appropriate for us all to gather for lunch and beverage at the end as well – sadly this can no longer by the Dyke Inn. The whole route is about 5.5 miles but can be shortened at the end and there will be places to drop off along the way as well, notably at the second refreshment stop after 3.4 miles from where a bus will whisk those who wish back to the Church. You can see the idea of the route on the attached map. There’ll be a signup sheet nearer the time, but meanwhile save the date!

Michael Miller, Reader and Chief Beater!


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CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, BRIGHTON, BOUNDARIES


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MOTHERS’ UNION SPRING CALENDAR Saturday 4th March 9am Corporate Communion in the Holy Redeemer Chapel. Thursday 9th March 12.30pm Talk Time hosted by Christine James at 22 Ranelagh Villas, Hove followed by snack lunch. Please let Christine know if you will be there 01273 724802. (Please note change of venue from the programme) Saturday 1st April 9am Corporate Communion in the Lady Chapel Thursday 27th April 7.30pm Karen Hill (Mothers’ Union speaker) will talk about Mary Sumner- the untold story. Venue TBA Saturday 6th May 9am Corporate Communion in the Lady Chapel. Thursday 11th May 12.30pm Talk Time hosted by Carol Theobald at 44 Dyke Road Avenue, Brighton followed by snack lunch. Please let Carol know if you will be there 01273 556665 Saturday 13th May Previously know as Diocesan Council the newly named Member’s Meeting will be held at Bishop Hannington Church, Nevill Avenue, Hove. As well as the AGM there will be 2 free performances by Saltmine Theatre (a professional company) about the life of Mary Sumner. Those who have seen this say it is excellent so do come along if you can. More details to follow.

Christine James

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Numbers are always important From the archives of the Parish of Penn Street with Holmer Green in Buckinghamshire: On Mothering Sunday, 30th March 1851, the Government carried out a census to find out the extent of churchgoing. There were separate questionnaires for the Church of England, the Quakers and all dissenters, which included the Roman Catholics. It was expected to show a God-fearing nation of Anglican churchgoers but the results did not bear this out and the exercise was not repeated. There was a good


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response. Even though the weather was bad, it showed that 41% of the population attended a service, of which 48.5% were members of the Church of England. There was some temporary movement among those in service as it was Mothering Sunday, when they would have visited their families. The record for Holy Trinity Church, Penn Street, consecrated in May 1849, was completed by the Vicar, Rev Edward Bickersteth. The church was built as “an additional church for the benefit of the Parishes of Penn and Little …..(illegible) at the sole cost of the Earl Howe for about £6000”. There were 246 Free Sittings and 132 Other Sittings, the latter including 120 children’s sittings. On Census Day, the Morning Service had 106 in the General Congregation and 90 Sunday Scholars and the Afternoon Service had 175 and 90 respectively. There was no Evening Service. During the previous 12 months the average number of attendants for Morning Service was 100 in both categories and for the Afternoon 240 in the General Congregation and 100 Sunday Scholars. There was no Evening Service.

Pat Hunter


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The Little Lambs

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Brownies

7-10 years

Meet on Tuesday evening in the Church Hall. Please contact Tessa Pacey (01273) 551298

Chins Up I have been so pleased recently to find at some services that many parts of the service have been on the high screen. I had noticed some years ago at a nearby C of E Church that this was the custom and had hoped to see it at COGS. In the years when I brought my mother and Aunts to services at CoGS they had found difficulty in keeping track of the hymn books and prayer books and were embarrassed when they dropped them. The weekly sheets with the Readings were a help. Now that I am getting old and drop things – especially when we use candles – I appreciate the screen and it is noticeable that people lift up their chins and sing with enthusiasm when not looking down at hymn books. Thank you to those who struggle with the “”new” technology and help us all to raise our chins and voices.

Knit and Natter The group met regularly before the Christmas Fair and contributed many items to the stalls. There were some really lovely knitted garments and items for small children.


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The group also made many items for the Refugee Camp. These included newly knitted items for small children and babies. We had been deeply touched by the knowledge that some babies had been born and there was nothing to wrap them in. This gave people like myself who are not very skilled an opportunity to knit squares and sew them together to make small baby wraps . We usually meet fortnightly on Monday morning but if you would be interested in another occasional meeting we can adjust. NOW ! Have you any unused knitting wool hidden away? Would you like to make small items for children Perhaps you would like to join us occasionally. If you knit squares it would be easy if we all knit the same size I have been doing five inch squares but realise that six inches is better. Friends are not all Good Shepherd regulars. Daisy.

Book Review. Signalman Jones by Tim Parker. “When the mine exploded I awoke in inky darkness” As a schoolgirl and a young woman I had lived in Barrow where warships of all sizes were constantly coming in for repairs. They were visible from the buses and we heard many tales about them and were accustomed to the sight of young naval officers and seamen in the town. We heard some accounts of why badly damaged vessels were there but everything was “ Hush! Hush!” . Careless talk did indeed cost lives and one wondered which of these men would survive their next voyages. I could not leave the book until I finished it. Do get it. Thank you, Tim

Daisy Walpole

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

Church children and youth leadership Deanery initiative. Laudable as is the intention behind the paid appointment of a co -ordinator to promote all forms of youth ministry in Brighton parishes, the projects that person designed (?) to stimulate growth in regular attendances around the deanery through efforts which are not


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specifically ‘hands-on’ led seem unlikely to yield any marked, tainable success.

sus-

Since we submitted a profile we shall doubtless be expected to respond positively; however, we shall need to be convinced before we encourage the spending of the local church sale proceeds to a share of which the deanery parishes are entitled, that such expenditure is likely to be worthwhile, and not just for the person chosen to lead the project and being paid for doing so. Also can we support the whole of the £150K being dedicated to this adventure? Or should we not insist on a careful husbanding of the resource and regular reporting on supervised progress? Views? We should discuss this carefully, and others besides me will need to have read the 110 page submission. How to arrange this please, and between whom?

Martin Cruttenden &&&&&&&&&&&&&&

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? Well I guess that’s something we would all like to know, believers and unbelievers alike. When our Vicar Felix, unfailingly polite as always, asked me for another piece for the Church Magazine I wondered what I should write. Fleetingly I thought that I would re-introduce my friends Victor and Constance; I thought I saw them walking towards the Good Shepherd last week, but maybe it was a passing fancy. Now, back to reality. Pat Hunter’s Bells still ring and when the wind is coming from the east Beth and I find them a re-assurance that things are right with the world. But that is a debatable question for most of us in this year of the Bible, 2017. I have in the past written articles congratulating our Church on the warm welcome that it gives its Parishioners and visitors and how it does its very best to keep going in difficult times. With any luck the tide will change, it always does, but in the meanwhile our Church with many others has become disconnected from the younger generation. On Sunday the 12th February the Good Shepherd’s Morning Service set me thinking. As usual there was a warm welcome but the Church, to


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all outward appearances, was even less well attended than usual. But, a big plus, there were ten members of the choir in the choir stalls. All went well as far us I was concerned until the Bible reading which seemed full of Hell, damnation and all the old rubbish. No encouragement at all for younger people coming to church for the first time. As it happened the morning was saved by an excellent speaker from ‘The Mission to Seamen’, who spoke about Christianity in a way that I believe in and hope others do as well. I found it encouraging that at the end of the service our vicar remarked that the day’s Bible reading had been a difficult one. Now in the past I have made a number of suggestions as to what our Church might do. Of course I don’t hold any sure fire answers. If I did, I feel certain the Archbishop of Canterbury would ask me round for tea. Some of the suggestions I have made were not practical or too expensive. Moreover, as a half -believer at best, I am in no way qualified to give our Church which I love and respect any practical advice, but I will tell you a true story of my visit to a rival church, The City Church in London Road, Brighton. It was very different. I was late for the service which was full of young people. When I arrived, there were five musicians playing various instruments with everyone joining in with the singing. I sat myself on a bench at the very back of the Church and within a minute a young woman approached and asked me if I would like a cup of tea. A short Service of Healing took place during the Service. The City Church is also involved in running one of the most important charities in Brighton ‘Fare Share’. Something to think about? Now for one more suggestion: Expand the Choir and its repertoire. Recruit extra part- time members, give concerts and make our Church a leader not only for Church music but other music as well. As I type this Songs of Praise is just reporting on Jazz Church in Birmingham. Many years ago I was a Seaman on a Fleet Aircraft Carrier H.M.S Indefatigable. Sunday Church Parade was special. Fifteen hundred men singing ‘For Those in Peril on the Sea’ was a very moving occasion. And why not add in some of the other songs. We enjoyed those too: ‘Run Rabbit Run’, or even ‘She was a nice girl, a proper girl, but one of the roving kind.’ That would put a smile on our congregation’s face.

Tim Parker.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

March 2017

I Went To India for my Holidays! I had always dreamed of going to India and seeing the Taj Mahal since, as a little girl, my father had shown me a picture of a huge glistening, white, dome-like building. Working in textiles, he had more to do with India, than many of his generation as the cotton plantations were there. This meant occasional treats of mangos (rarely seen in shops in those days). My journey was seamless from Heathrow to Delhi and a lovely taxi driver was there to meet me as I came out of the airport. Wow! Gosh! Help! were my initial thoughts as we drove through thousands of horn-blowing trucks, cars, motor-cycles and camel-carts. The noise was unbearable and the driving ( with constant, under-taking, over-taking and cutting in) totally bizarre and undisciplined. The only non-scary thing was being driven on the left like us. I tipped the taxi driver for somehow getting me to the right hotel and was greeted by numerous people with hands held, as in prayer, lowering of their heads and loud phrases which I later came to recognise as “Namasthae” (good day) and bedecked with the ubiquitous marigold garland. This hotel and all the ones we stayed in were very westernised and a match for London’s best. I was to join a party from “Saga” to travel around the “golden triangle” and sure enough they arrived at the hotel. Our tour guide was enough to raise my pulse rate! He was six feet two, huge brown eyes and an air of oral tranquility around him. He was a high caste Brahmin and extremely learned. He had degrees and masters in biology, zoology, history, economics and philosophy. He was not just a brilliant organiser, but a fund of knowledge on all subjects and spent hours telling us about all the places we visited. He knew the history, the stories behind the buildings, and everything about the animals and birds we were later to see in Ramthanbore Nature Reserve. He managed to take me on a ten day tour of India arranging for every meal to be freshly cooked for me WITHOUT any spice (pretty amazing in itself) and allowing me to have intact bowels throughout my stay (probably more information than you needed). From the buildings point of view, we saw them all. Yes, the palaces, forts and the Taj were amazing and fulfilled the dreams from childhood, but it was the people, and the everyday happenings, that delighted me most about India.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

March 2017

The squatting, a skill still achievable in the very young and extremely fit in the UK, was ubiquitous. People, of all ages, chose to squat in the street whilst talking or taking chai (a fairly yukky taste of hot milk and sweet tea). 80 plus year olds were able to sit and eat whilst squatting and on every street corner, there are small groups of men squatting to talk. The ladies too squatted. Unfortunately this posture, so confidently performed by all the Indian people meant that all toilets were literally a hole, occasionally with footwells surrounding the hole. Whilst fine for the locals, for the Westerners, this posture is alien and so all the toilets I went to, other than the hotels, consisted of misfires from the Western ladies. Paper was rarely available but if so, at a price (to be discussed)! But the Rubbish, strewn along every highway and by-way had to be seen to be believed. Piles and piles of every sort of waste piled high along the streets and particularly street corners. The public buses were filled to over-capacity and the roof and back rail were heavily laden. Ladies, dressed in gorgeous saris, sat side-saddle on motorbikes that whizzed and many fabulous sari clad ladies swept dust in and around the famous buildings. Our lovely guide, Abhi, told us that in this part of India 80% of the population were Hindu, 12% Muslim and the rest 2%Christian, 2% Seikh, Zoroastrian, Jain, Buddhist or Judaic. There seemed to be no unease about different religions and people of different religions would sit and squat and eat together without any conflict. It was the first time I had seen ladies walking around with veils covering their entire face and it did somewhat shock me as they didn't appear to always take care as they crossed the road. Cows, of the Brahmin type with humps high up on their backs, roamed plentifully and freely as did the wild boar, camels and, in Jaipur especially, elephants. Fresh food of fruit and vegetables seemed plentiful and was sold by the side of the roads on the long journeys we made. A special note must be made to the golden Temple in Amritsar. It is a Seikh temple but I have never seen such Christianity at work. From 7 am every day, 500 people are fed every half an hour for free.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

March 2017

You do not have to be poor, religious or have any qualifications, to go and sit in a huge hall, eat rice, lentil soup and several vegetables arranged on a stainless steel plate. After twenty-five minutes, the hall is emptied and another 500 let in. The head chef and five other chefs are paid a lowly wage and the rest are volunteers . This goes on for 12 hours at least, every day of the week! The money comes from donations such as mine and other travellers. Could we do this at COGS? There were, as expected, many poor people, especially children, begging for money. The saddest were at the station on our unbelievable first class train journey from Agra to Jaipur. Eventually my heart cracked and I had to give my packed lunch and some money to a little girl of around six, whose entire English vocabulary seemed to be “money”! She was bare-footed, dressed in ragged clothes and skeletally thin. Maybe it was a racket, but I felt such sadness for her plight and had to break the guidelines. Felix said about 500 words please. I’ve done 1000+ and not started but suffice it to say, the birds, animals, buildings and UNESCO heritages sites, the temples, the mosques were all amazing BUT it is the people who will remain forever in my memories of India. Sue Lipscombe

C H A R I T I E S Each year our Mission committee discusses charities on which we should focus support. We choose international, national and local charities.

In 2017 we are supporting: International—Christian Aid supporting people of all faiths and none to rise out of poverty. National — RETT UK providing professional support to people living with Rett syndrome, which effects mainly girls and produces profound and multiple physical and communication disabilities. Local — Brighton Voices in Exile Support for asylum-seekers and refugees.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

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March 2017

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The Good Shepherd Magazine

March 2017

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The Good Shepherd Magazine

March 2017

us OUR REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICES: 8am, Holy Communion 10.15am, Parish Eucharist; 5pm, “Time for God @5 ” informal worship for all ages, etc. please look at the details on our website. (Eucharist on Thursday at 10.30am followed by Coffee and on Saturday at 9am) March 2017 1st : Ash Wed. Eucharist, 7.30pm 2nd: Lent courses begin .Groups at 10.30 am & 7.30 pm on Thursdays 4th:Spring Gardening, Followed by lunch 10am. Volunteers pl 5th: Lent 1, Eucharist with ashes, 10.15am 11th: Lent Breakfast/Talk on Christian Aid 9.30am 25th: Lent Breakfast/Talk on Rett UK 9.30am (Summer time starts, clocks go forward) 26th: MOTHERING SUNDAY, (4th of Lent), Eucharist , 10.15am April 2017 1st: Lent Breakfast/Talk on Brighton Voices in Exile (BVIE) 9.30am 2nd : APCM, soon after the Eucharist of 10.15am 9th: PALM SUNDAY, Please see details on page 6 in the magazine for the details of Holy Week 16th : EASTER 10.15am,Treasure Hunt for children after the 10.15am service May 2017 6th: Artists’ Open House, during May, see details on our web-site 7th: Easter IV, Good Shepherd Sunday 25th: Week of “Thy Kingdom come” initiative begins 28th: Ascension Sunday, June 2017 10th: Family Fun Day 2-5pm, Parish Festival week begins. Details on the next page


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

March 2017

GOOD SHEPHERD FESTIVAL 2017 Saturday 10th June: FAMILY FUN DAY ... 2 - 5 pm "Marvelous Mutts & Friends" Dog Show* Categories include: Prettiest Pet, Waggiest tail, Best Trick, Best rescued animal, Cutest cuddly toy pet, Best in show Entry for Dog Show £1 on the day. Admission Free! Bouncy castle, Live music, Local produce stalls, Books, Free Tea & cakes, Plant stalls, Tombola, Food stalls, Coconut shy, Games and competitions, Face Painting, Craft stalls, Bric a Brac Stalls, BBQ, and a Grand Raffle worth £100. WEEK-DAY PROGRAM Saturday 10th: 9 am: Eucharist 2 - 5 pm: Family Fund Day 2 to 5 pm Sunday 11th:

10.15 am: Festival Eucharist; Preacher: The Arch-

deacon of Brighton & Lewes, The Venerable Martin Lloyd Williams Tuesday 13th:

2 pm: Neighbouring Schools' Musical Concert; 6.30 pm: Open air picnic (please bring your own to

share) and Brownies' Games Thursday 15th: 10.30 am Eucharist at 10.30 am Sunday 18th: 10.15 am Festival "All age Service" organized by young people on the theme of " The Wedding Feast at Cana" *See www.goodshepherdbrighton.org.uk for details how to sign up


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Our Service Times Sunday Worship 8am Holy Communion 10:15 Sung Eucharist 10:15 “Time for God” 6.30pm: check on the web *On the 3rd Sunday of each month this will be a Family Eucharist to which children are particularly welcome. “ Time for God” Services are held in the Church Hall. Weekday Eucharist Thursday:10:30am Saturday: 9am =====================

Magazine Contributions to the magazine are welcome. Please leave copy at the back of Church by 15th of every Feb., May, Aug. and Nov. or e-mail daisy.kendall21@gmail.com or to The Vicar —————————————Tea Club Meets on the first Monday of the month at 1.30pm. We welcome all who are 50 years plus, and would like some company. Just come along. Tel. Sheena on 07932591172 or sheenarichardson@btintern et.com

March 2017

Hall Bookings: Tel. Sheena on 07932591172 or sheenarichardson@btinternet.com

Choir Choir practice: Sunday morning at 9. All are welcome. Please contact: Derek Froud (681007)

Flowers If you would like to donate an arrangement in memory of someone or help with the flower arranging, please contact church office 882987.

Stewardship Secretary David Nissen 1 Shirley Road, Hove, BN3 6NN Tel (01273) 554183 dnissen@btinternet.com

Bell Ringing Ringing practice every Tuesday evening in the Tower. New ringers are always welcome. Please contact Pat Hunter (555954)

Notice-boards Information (lists and posters) for the notice boards may be placed in the tray in the church porch windowsill or contact Martin Cruttenden (505225).

Shepherd's Watch, Spring 2017  

The Parish Magazine of the Church of the Good Shepherd, Brighton

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