Page 1

Simon & Garfunkel The Boxer

Cream

WhiTe room

Goo Goo DollS iriS

L e a r n t o P L ay

iron maiden run tO the hIlls (RIFF)

m a s t e r

rhythm & lead

how to…

Set up your guitar for drop tuningS

Over 20 exercises tO help yOu…

Sharpen your rhythm playing Develop your lead vocabulary Learn how to combine the two

interviews

Brian Fallon Michael Schenker Black Rebel Motorcycle Club

technique

Play Delta blues Start reading music notation

reviewed inside

The hoTTesT new gear Orange, Ibanez, Yamaha


editor’s letter Future Publishing Quay House, THe ambury, baTH, ba1 1ua Tel 01225 442244 Fax: 01225 822763 Email totalguitar@futurenet.com Website: www.totalguitar.co.uk

ediTorial Editor: Stuart Williams Content Editor: Rob Laing Production Editor: Katie Nicholls Group Art Director: Graham Dalzell Senior Music Editor: Jason Sidwell Guitars Feature & Tuition Editor: Chris Bird Content Editor, Musicradar.com: Michael Astley-Brown Music Co-ordinators: Polly Beauchamp, Natalie Beilby

ConTribuTors Steve Allsworth, Richard Barrett, Jon Bishop, Simon Bradley, Phil Capone, Rich Chamberlain, Chris Corfield, Jack Ellis, Thea de Gallier, Charlie Griffiths, Nick Guppy, Jonathan Horsley, Alex Lynham, Cliff Newman, Matthew Parker, Adam Rees, Amit Sharma, James Uings, Simon Young Music Engraver: Simon Troup Photography: Will Ireland, Olly Curtis, Neil Godwin, James Sharrock

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liCensing International Licensing Director: Matt Ellis, matt.ellis@futurenet.com Tel: + 44 (0)1225 442244

managemenT

Welcome… We could have named this month’s issue ‘Become a better guitarist’, because defining yourself as either a rhythm or lead player is an easy trap to fall into. No doubt some of us consider ourselves to be stronger at one than the other, but there’s also plenty of crossover between the two. Skills that apply to one will definitely benefit the other and, indeed, the two are certainly not mutually exclusive. Just take a look at legendary lone guitarists like Jimmy Page, Hendrix, Andy Summers, The Edge, Clapton, Tom Morello and many, many more who have combined rhythm and lead techniques to create a huge sound within their bands for the proof. So this month we’re taking a look at each side of the coin to show you how to improve at both, while learning to blur the lines between the two. Elsewhere, we’ve lined up the usual stellar mix of songs to learn, tips and lessons, the hottest new gear and insight from players. We’ll see you next month!

Management Director: Julian March Group Content Director: Paul Newman Head Of Art: Rodney Dive Group Editor-In-Chief: Daniel Griffiths Group Art Director: Graham Dalzell

Future is an award-winning international media group and leading digital business. We reach more than 49 million international consumers a month and create world-class content and advertising solutions for passionate consumers online, on tablet & smartphone and in print. Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR). www.futureplc.com

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All contents copyright © 2017 Future Publishing Limited or published under licence. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored, transmitted or used in any way without the prior written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. Registered office: Registered office: Quay House, The Ambury, Bath, BA1 1UA. All information contained in this publication is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. You are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price and other details of products or services referred to in this publication. Apps and websites mentioned in this publication are not under our control. We are not responsible for their contents or any changes or updates to them. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage. We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

Stuart Williams Editor

making this month’s mag

CHris bird

miCHael asTley-brown

rob laing

Stuck in his nest during a bout of icy weather, Birdman took off his feathery mittens and passed the time playing bass. Chris is often heard playing grunge covers and emulating Jeff Ament’s 12-string Hamer with an EHX Nano POG, but, with Maiden, Clapton and Goo Goo Dolls on the menu, TG’s very own CD provided ample entertainment.

This issue’s baritone round-up has Mike jonesing for a bari to call his own. “Sometimes going lower takes you higher,” our resident gear sage tells us, in a rare moment of rig-based profundity. Plus, it’s an essential piece of kit if you’re going to tackle the surf guitar line in Ricky Martin opus, Livin’ La Vida Loca!

The plight of the rhythm guitarist is something that Rob feels keenly. Underrated and under-appreciated, it remains the essential guitar skill. So he was happy to meet Brian Fallon (p40) and find a player making the most of his role as a singer/guitarist to develop his rhythm chops. april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

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#304 the gas Contents station Monitor

048

04

master rhythm & lead Learn the techniques you need to know to become an all-round better player over a range of styles

Photography: Neil Godwin

subscribe!

Subscribe to Total Guitar and save a whopping 30% on the regular cover price – turn to p46 for full details.

ToTal GuiTar march 2018


contents

Monitor

040

006 First Look 008 Scene 010 Five Minutes Alone: Joe Trohman 012 On The Up 014 Me & My Guitar: Warren DeMartini 016 Album reviews 018 Back Track: Jon Bon Jovi

brian Fallon

How to 020 20 Minutes To… Better finger dexterity 022 Riff Of The Month: Iron Maiden: Run To The Hills 024 Getting Started With… Major 7th chords 026 The TG Guide to... Amp modelling 028 What The F? Reading music, part III

Features 030 Rig Tour: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club 034 Michael Schenker 040 Brian Fallon 048 Improve your rhythm and lead

Learn to PLay

096

yamaha Fs-ta

098

the tG test: baritones

05

060 Jam Track: alt-rock 062 Classic Track: Cream – White Room 070 Open-mic Songbook: Goo Goo Dolls – Iris 072 The Turnaround: Son House

tG unPLuGGed 078 News 080 Interview: Scott Matthews 082 Simon & Garfunkel: The Boxer

tHe Gas station 088 Start Me Up 090 Orange Brent Hinds Terror 094 Ibanez RG550 096 Yamaha FS-TA 098 The TG Test: Electric baritones 104 Pedal Round-Up: Multi-FX Units 106 Trace Acoustic Transit A 108 Fix Your Guitar 114 The Playlist: Mark Holley

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


Monitor people ✪ news ✪ noise

pro acTive Photography: Neil Godwin

Squier releases well-spec’d Contemporary Active Stratocaster HH

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ToTal GuiTar april 2018


FirSt LooK people ✪ news ✪ noise

The reverse headstock is one of strat’s most appealing new features

hile attention was focused on Fender’s American Original and Parallel Universe lines, Squier quietly unveiled some tasty new electrics for 2018, most notably the Contemporary Series, whose flagship is the Active Stratocaster HH that adorns these very pages. As you’ll note, it’s a departure from traditional Strat stylings, boasting a Floyd Rose locking vibrato, active humbuckers and a very-cool reverse headstock. It also possesses a lightweight poplar body, available in Olympic White or Flat Black. None of those features exactly scream ‘contemporary’ to us, but regardless of the name, this is a very nicely spec’d Strat indeed, especially given its £420 price tag. Here’s why it’s got us developing a fresh need for speed…

W

up close

pickups squier’s own-brand active humbuckers are onboard here, and their output is running hot

Floyd rose Duck, dip, dive and wail with this Floyd Rose licensed double-locking vibrato, complete with body rout

Neck The slim C-shaped maple neck is topped off with a 12" radius’d, jumbo-fretted rosewood fingerboard that’s built for speed

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

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Monitor people ✪ news ✪ noise

scene

Your month in guitars Tips For EnTErinG 1. focus Get to the point fast. Our expert judges are looking to be impressed so 15 minutes of noodling won’t make the grade. 2. think musical We’re all for fretboard blazing and next-level sonics but not at the price of musicality and genuine mastery of multiple techniques.

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3. only your best Just your best video! Don’t make us wade through multiple entries where one will do. 4. three to enter Want to enter all three categories? ‘Guitarist’ ‘Young Guitarist’ and ‘Acoustic’ Guitarist Of The Year? Yeah! Go for it, providing your entries qualify, of course.

rules All entries must be via videos uploaded to YouTube with a link emailed to guitaristoftheyear@ futurenet.com. No other emails or points of contact please. Don’t call us – we’ll be in contact if we like what you’re doing.

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

previous Guitarist of The Year winner,

event

GuiTarisT oF ThE yEar ttention all players - TG needs you! We’re on the hunt for the best new guitar talent and if you’re reading this you’re already one step closer to lifting the trophy and walking away with a prize booty from the top names in guitars. Past winners of Guitarist Of The Year include Guthrie Govan and Roger Waters guitarist Dave Kilminster so this could well be your springboard to greatness! We’re working alongside our sister titles Guitarist, Guitar Techniques and MusicRadar.com to find our 2018 Guitarist Of The Year, Young Guitarist Of The Year and Acoustic Guitarist Of The year at our new UK Guitar Show on 28 and 29 September. There will be lots more details on the show soon. So how do you get involved? It’s simple. Upload a video of your playing to

A

YouTube… And then send us the link. Make sure that it’s a video that shows why you deserve to win as our experts will be picking the best and broadcasting a playlist of favourites to our millionplus audience as The UK Guitar Show draws closer. Send a link to your video by email to guitaristoftheyear@futurenet.com. Subject line your email as ‘Guitarist’ ‘Young Guitarist’ or ‘Acoustic Guitarist’ to let us know which category you’re entering. Then our pick of the best will be invited to play at our final in September, live from London at the UK Guitar Show. The competition is now officially open so get practising, shooting and uploading today! Good luck!

When The competition is open now for entries. The UK Guitar Show takes place 28 and 29 September 2018


scene

HOME GROWN TONE SINCE 1958

anniversary

50 yEars oF oranGE range founder Cliff Cooper) has been reflecting on the amp icon’s early champions as it reaches a landmark golden anniversary. “In those days I really idolised Peter Green in Fleetwood Mac,” Cliff (pictured above right) tells us of Orange’s

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beginnings as a shop in the late 60s. “When he came into the shop and we started making the amplifiers, he said, ‘Yeah I like it’ and he used it. Then we had Stevie Wonder use it almost straight after… when you’ve got people with ears like that endorsing you… it was lovely.”

MICHAEL AMOTT ARCH ENEMY

ROTOSOUND PLAYER

album

smokin’ acEs lackberry Smoke leader Charlie Starr has told us about how he finally got to write with his old friend and former Buckcherry lynchpin Keith Nelson on the band’s new album, Find A Light (review p16). “We’ve been friends for over 20 years but we’ve never worked together before,” says Charlie, who co-wrote the album’s I’ll Keep Rambin’ with pedal steel icon Robert Randolph (left) too. He was also inspired by two Fender vintage specials; “I picked up a really clean ’62 Princeton. It’s on several songs...and a ’63 Esquire makes tons of appearances too.” When 6 April

Photography: Evan R. Bartleson

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WORLD FAMOUS MUSIC STRINGS WWW.ROTOSOUND.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY • TINA-K.CO.UK


Monitor people ✪ news ✪ noise

Joe Trohman: an admirer of Gilmour’s ‘restrained’ style

for me. I remember when Mary Jane’s Last Dance came out and my dad took me to see them in Cleveland, which was my first ever concert. He’s one of the greatest ever guitar players/songwriters.”

I’m hot for teacher “If could have a lesson with anyone alive, I’d pick David Gilmour. He’s the king of restrained playing. I’ve seen the making of Dark Side Of The Moon documentary loads of times where everyone replays their parts and he does his exactly like the originals. That’s a skill… it’s so different to Led Zeppelin, where it was more freeform. No-one except for maybe John Paul Jones would play exactly the same every time. I would love to sit with David and find out about his tricks and approach!”

Caught in a mosh “I’ve played in The Damned Things with Scott Ian from Anthrax. That guy has a signature sound, you can hear those chugs and instantly know it’s him. He is someone I grew up admiring – and he taught me that if you have a style that you are comfortable with, trust it and stick with it. I think it’s so easy to question yourself. People might say you are doing it wrong, but those are the people that have no identity. It’s better to have an identity than be the world’s ultimate shredder!”

10

The one that got away

five minutes alone

Joe Trohman The Fall Out Boy axeman on giving up the trombone, his biggest playing weakness and starting a band with one of his all-time guitar heroes There goes my hero

“I originally played trombone in the school band but I wanted to play guitar. I was a bad student, so at 10 my dad said, ‘If you get all Bs, I will buy you a guitar!’ So I got a HarmonyBarclay Bobcat with a matching amp, probably costing around $50 for both! Junk guitars are very cool now but I wanted a real guitar like a Strat copy, so I moved onto a Squier.”

“I was lucky to grow up in the 90s, with all those brilliant rock bands dominating the radio – from Smashing Pumpkins to Nirvana, The Jesus Lizard and Soundgarden… but when I got into guitar, I was really into the classics. In my first lesson, I asked to be taught Purple Haze and Kick Out The Jams, but I must admit Mike Campbell from The Heartbreakers was the one

if you have a style you are comfortable with, trust it... it’s so easy to question yourself ToTal GuiTar APRIL 2018

Jekyll And Hyde “My biggest weakness is never forcing myself to practise. I don’t warm up either… I just go onstage and warm up while I am playing, which is probably a bad idea. The funny thing is, the times I have warmed up, I’ve played so much better straight off the bat. It’s probably fine for the audience, but sometimes I’ve noticed the difference. As for strengths, I think I have a good vibrato. I don’t use it much in Fall Out Boy, where I play very straight, but I think it works really well in a band like The Damned Things.”

Fall Out Boy’s new album Mania is out now on Island. The band play Birmingham, Cardiff, Manchester and London between 27 and 31 March; falloutboy.com

Photography: Marcus Maschwitz

I got my first real six-string…

“When I lived in New York, the mentality was to purge your stuff and live in a shoebox. So I had a storage space in Brooklyn, another in Chicago, plus the band storage in California… there was so much shit. I had this 1980 Flying V with a flame top that sounded cool as fuck, but I never played it standing up – always sitting down which was uncomfortable, so I sold it. When I moved to LA, I went to the storage space and thought someone had stolen because I’d forgotten I sold it… I was so bummed out. Then I realised how fucking dumb I was!”


Monitor people ✪ nEwS PEoPLE news ✪ noiSE noise

O N T H E U P STarcrawler Live-wire punksters, Starcrawlers, with Henri Cash (far right)

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Ryan Adams-approved rising rockers prize grit and grandeur A band Starcrawler take classic rock showmanship, punk attack and the fingernail grit of their Tinseltown forbears and present it within stinking proximity of your face. Henri Cash is the beaming, whirling dervish at the heart of their powerful sound. “I’ve always been inspired by guitar players who aren’t just standing there,” says Henri. “Except Johnny Ramone, who’s in the power stance and that’s powerful in itself! But when you see Brian Setzer jump up on the kick drum and play this rad rockabilly solo, you want to do

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ToTal GuiTar April 2018

that – it’s more intriguing for somebody who doesn’t play music to watch that.” That’s not to say Starcrawler are all style and no substance. Henri has previously indulged extensive excursions into tuba and drums. “We are, surprisingly, a band that have a lot of technical knowledge,” laughs Henri. “When I came back to the guitar, I wanted to incorporate the other aspects as if I was a conductor.” Their live reputation is formidable, with fake blood,

bruised bodies and solos performed the way they should be – with flailing limbs and wild abandon – all supported by an underlying tightness. Their Rough Trade-released, self-titled debut was recorded with a similar philosophy and helmed by Ryan Adams. “I learned [from Ryan], to just go for it,” says Henri. “We were doing this one solo and he was like: ‘Hit it on the

ground!’ I was like, ‘Dude, I’m not going to throw your Strat on the ground!’ But you want the record to be fierce – and the record sounds fierce because of things like that… “[My favourite players] have balls, man. When you listen to them you feel power. Listen to Kick Out The Jams and you get this deep feeling in your gut – that, for me, is the reason why guitar players play guitar.”

For FanS oF The ramones, The Cramps GEar Fender Tele Custom, Les Paul with Bigsby, Fender Super reverb

My favourite players have balls, Man. when you listen to theM, you feel power...


oOnN tHE THE UP

people ✪ nEwS PEoPLE news ✪ noiSE noise

weSS MeeTS weST

TeenaGe wriST

ince 2005, Connecticut’s Wess Meets West have been crafting the type of airy post-rock that encourages the creation of montages involving sped-up footage of the natural world. Pondering life and death, new album A Light Within The Fracture (due 6 April) channels some suitably big themes, but with vocals a rarity, it’s a diverse and absorbing listening experience. “I like that you can take different emotions from the music

f your default reaction to world events is to envelope yourself in layers of warm, fleecy fuzz and hope it goes away, consider Teenage Wrist your new security blanket. The LA trio share a common ground with the likes of Philadelphia’s Nothing in their blend of shoegaze, punk rock and pathos, but they produce a more diverse, brighter sound. “My chops are awful,” says guitarist Marshall Gallagher. “But I have a good ear

Go ’West, where the skies are blue

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depending on your mood,” reflects guitarist Sam Stauff. “We also demand some patience from the listener at times and I think that’s great in the fast-paced world to be able to take a second and slow down and just listen.” Tracks build and crash, tension is beautifully balanced and there is something near-meditative about WMW’s segues between stormy distortion and oxygenated reverberation. For FanS oF Explosions in The Sky GEar Les Paul double Cut Classic

MinT Field Reilly having a jam in the desert after a krautrock binge GEar: Fender Starcaster, Roland Jazz Chorus, MXR Phase 90, MXR Carbon Copy, EQD Talons

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for composition and layering parts, so I play to that strength. I’m a big fan of the wall of sound.” Modesty aside, Marshall’s a dab hand at a killer lead line – Swallow’s scything whammy solo cuts across the fuzz folds like a hot knife through butter – and we can already assert that debut album Chrome Neon Jesus (due 9 March) offers some of the year’s best distortion sounds. For FanS oF nothing, rain GEar ibanez roadstar

Black liGhT, whiTe liGhT

BearFooT Beware

wHo: Danish indie popper Martin Ejlertsen SoundS LikE: Scuzzy electronic baroque and

people who like late 90s Dischord and exorcising existential anguish GEar: Telecaster Custom, Vox AC30, Carl Martin PlexiTone

roll – retro synths and vintage fuzz tones GEar: Gretsch Tennessee Rose, Vox AC30 For FanS oF Temples, The Horrors HEar Teenage dream

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wHo: Leeds-based guitarist Tom Bradley SoundS LikE: Smarty-pants punk rock for

For FanS oF Mclusky, Les Savy Fav HEar Point Scorer

April 2018 ToTal GuiTar

Photography: larsBech, Autumn De Wilde, Dan Monick

wHo: Tijuana psych rocker Estrella Sanchez SoundS LikE: The Durutti Column’s Vini

For FanS oF warpaint, Beach House HEar Viceversa

Shoegaze for days


Monitor pEOpLE ✪ nEwS ✪ nOISE

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“This says: ‘Too fast to live, too young to die’ in French. Or it’s supposed to be. It’s not correct French but I just thought it looked cool. So I took this blank, it was primed white, to a friend, Gene Hunter who used to play bass in Jake’s [Jake E Lee] band in San Diego, a band called Teaser. He was an artist, so we just spent an evening and we applied the clip art where it looked appropriate. In two or three hours we had this done. After a couple of days I took the body out to Charvel and he assembled it with a neck and that ended up becoming Frenchie.”

Photography: Adam Reiver

me and my guitar

Warren DeMarTini raTT 14

The lead man talks Charvel past and present with his new Frenchie signature

3

“This has a pickup that Seymour Duncan designed for this whole line. It’s called the RTM pickup, and that stands for Rattus Tonus Maximus. It’s quite a hot output. I took the Cross Sword Charvel to the Seymour Duncan factory in Santa Barbara and we spent an afternoon putting different pickups in it when we started this line back in 2008. I was playing it through a cleaner amp that didn’t have a lot of distortion, so we ended up going with a hotter pickup as it sounded better that afternoon. On my setup I tend to back off the distortion a little bit because the output of this pickup is quite hot, probably around 17k. That’s pretty high. It just sounded good in that guitar.”

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“This is a Seymour Duncan Quarter pounder. The earlier Charvels I had didn’t have the neck single-coil pickup. I added that later… I have a ’58 Fender Strat and I started recording with that sound in the late 80s to early 90s. I just really liked the sound of this pickup for certain things in this position. It was something we started from scratch when we did the signature series in 2008. I use it live, nothing too planned out. I switch it on and off throughout the show for parts of the leads.”

4 3 5 1 2

5 1

“we call this the Frenchie. [The original guitar design] was made right around when we released a Ratt album called Reach For The Sky [1988] and Mike Shannon took a Strat and cut around it to make a kind of Telecaster edge. I went to Charvel – at that time it was in San Dimas, California. Grover [Jackson] had these blank [bodies], four of them: one was red, one was white, one was black and one had no finish on it at all. And the one that had no finish on it ended up becoming the snake guitar. Because I actually had a real snakeskin that I got in new Orleans, a friend of mine applied that to one of the four blanks and the other one, the white one, became this guitar.”

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

“Live, I tend to make it so that the Floyd Rose doesn’t float – though I do like that when I use it in a situation where I’m not moving [otherwise] the tuning tends to get a little dodgy during a Ratt show anyway. It’s also good if a string breaks because you don’t completely lose the tuning and can finish the song. If the bridge is set to float and you break a string you have to just stop.”

Ratt will tour during 2018. Dates to be confirmed; therattpack.com


Monitor

exceptional

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people ✪ news ✪ noise

albums turbowolf the FRee liFe

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ristol hard rockers Turbowolf have had more killer rock bands kip on their sitting room floor than they’ve had hot dinners. And this their third album features guest spots from Idles, Vodun, DFA1979 and Royal Blood’s Mike Kerr, which all goes to cement their position as influential in-laws to the new wave of British rock. The Free Life is a trippy, saw-toothed take on space punk that still levitates across the deep chasm between Hawkwind, MGMT and Lightning Bolt, but compared to their slicker second record Two Hands, released in 2015, this is noticeably rawer, more ambitious – anarchic, even – and more exciting for it. Rest assured, The ’Wolf remain hungry. Matt Parker download The Free Life

Manic Street PreacherS

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Resistance is Futile

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hirteen albums in, it’s an unpredictable event listening to a new Manics album. The four-year gap since their last burst of creativity could allow trepidation to creep in. But if the loss of the band’s Cardiff HQ and move to their own studio did sidetrack their creative union, it doesn’t show. Instead, we find James Dean Bradfield still in love with the guitar on an album that nods to the Manics' iconic eras. Lead single International Blue boasts an Everything Must Go majestic sweep with heroic Gold Against The Soul guitar leads. While today's political climate could have fuelled fury, instead there’s joyous pop heart on sleeve in these songs. It doesn’t

always make for compelling music – the subject of the Hillsborough families’ fight for justice is delivered with unabashed love on Liverpool Revisited, but the sincere tribute jars a bit as a song. JDM wears the Bowie/Ronson strum and lead dynamic well on Vivian, a paean to photographer Vivian Maier and the prog moves in Sequels Of Forgotten Wars suite the trio. It heralds a strong trio; Hold Me Like A Heaven is anthemic immediacy, In Eternity balances the spirit of Bowie again with a Generation Terrorist chorus before Bradfield goes whole guitar hog with Broken Algorithms. This is a band who still love what they do. Rob Laing download sequels of Forgotten wars

Photography: Olly Curtis Alex Lake

the last album i bought…

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

brian Fallon U2 achtUng BaBy “i’ve just been crushing that album on the bunk. it’s so good. there’s a lot of really cool guitar playing

and the songwriting is incredible. even the changes that the edge did, the experimenting with

sounds. so many subtle things for the ear. that’s what i listen for when i listen to records.”

the teMPerance MoveMent a DeepeR cut

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ou can’t fake this kind of music; it’s gut and soul-driven. Scottish frontman Phil Campbell has been plying his trade in fine songwriting for years but he’s found his true calling in this band, and after guitarist Luke Potashnick’s departure after 2016’s White Bear threatened to derail the band, they’ve soldiered on. It could do with a couple more rockers later on, but the songs find blues economy and taste balanced in the fretting hands of Luke Sayer and Matt White. Like a leaner Black Crowes led by the second coming of Paul Rodgers, they’re doing this better than most right now. Rob Laing download Beast Nation


ALBUMS people ✪ news ✪ noise

blackberry SMoke FinD a light

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here’s a convincing train of thought that suggests a band only really becomes one on the road. And this Atlanta five-piece are certainly well-honed in that regard. Mainman Charlie Starr knows how to walk the line between country and rock to hook those who appreciate the classics. Best Seat In The House beats Nashville as its own game, and I’ll Keep Ramblin’ brings Robert Randolph in for a supreme display of honky tonk and gospel chops. Starr’s just as comfortable stripping back the sound with the bluegrass harmonies of closer Mother Mountain alongside The Wood Brothers, again showcasing the benefits of a talented songwriter who’s open to collaboration. David Hands download I’ll Keep Ramblin’

JoSienne clarke and ben walker seeDlings all

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hey say write what you know. Here the wide-ranging, Rough Trade-signed folk duo return with their first album of entirely original material and, following the aforementioned adage, record a relatable rumination on the personal life of a songwriter and performer. Opener Chicago’s ode to failure (‘It’s not Chicago’s fault that no one came to see me play’) will ring true for any performer and proves the highlight. Elsewhere, it feels flatter, sparser and seemingly more piano-led than previous albums (a shame, given Walker’s acoustic talents), but nonetheless rewards patience with intimacy. Matt Parker download Chicago

Stone teMPle PilotS oceanS of SluMber stone temple pilots

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tone Temple Pilots’s first album with new singer Jeff Gutt, who replaces the sadly departed Scott Weiland and Chester Bennington, initially shows a lot of promise: Gutt’s voice strikes the right balance of familiar yet fresh, while the DeLeo brothers maintain their reputation as the most tasteful guitarbass partnership in rock. Sadly, however, the album veers into the same stodgy mid-tempo territory that plagued the band’s last two releases, and while elegantly-arranged ballads such as The Art Of Letting Go right the course somewhat, it all adds to up to something of a solid rather than spectacular comeback. Michael Astley-Brown download Meadow

the banisheD heaRt

O

ceans Of Slumber’s last release, 2016’s Winter signalled the band as something special: daring, riveting and impossible to pigeonhole. The follow-up is even more creatively sublime. Cammie Gilbert’s probing, inescapable vocal talents steal the show but the band do an incredible job of establishing myriad canvasses for her to paint, whether it’s the emotionally fraught doom of opener The Decay Of Disregard, the bludgeoning metallic complexity and lush expanses of Etiolation or the fragile melancholy of the title track and The Watcher’s delicate electronics. By the time No Color, No Light strips you bare, some part of you will have been changed for the better. Adam Rees download No Color No Light ApriL 2018 TOTal GuiTar


Monitor people ✪ news ✪ noise

The hirsute pursuit of Bon Jovi during the soft rock hey day of the 80s

Back track

18

A GuitArist’s Guide to the Artists You Need to KNow

Photography: Shinko Music/Getty

Bon Jovi Starting out in 1983 as just another American hair metal band dreaming of greatness, the New Jersey quintet, led by the mercurial Jon Bon Jovi, have endured to become probably the genre’s biggest band with record sales sufficiently monumental to ensure their status as true rock legends. The departure of guitarist Richie Sambora has done little to slow the momentum as the band’s fast-approaching inductance into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame confirms. Here are some pointers to help with your appreciation of the band. ToTal GuiTar april 2018

start with

Slippery When WeT

1

(1986)

When Sambora revs up the talk box riff to Livin’ On A Prayer it’s obvious we’re in the company of greatness and this album is a joy from beginning to end. The amiable guitarist is in his element here with the reverse pick-scrapes and perfectly-judged whammy dives of You Give Love A Bad Name and spluttering harmonics of Raise Your Hands just some of the highlights. Elsewhere the tear-stained Never Say Goodbye would cause an avid non-smoker to wave a lighter in the air, while the gleefully non-PC Social Disease sees Jon lodging his tongue in as many cheeks as possible. The miniepic Wanted Dead Or Alive has also inspired a million suburban cowboys to seek out both a 12-string acoustic and a steel horse; if you only try one BJ album, then this is it. Recommended track: Livin’ On A Prayer


back track people ✪ news ✪ noise

then try

don’t miss out

neW JerSey

(1988)

2

The band went straight back into the studio mere weeks after coming off the lengthy ‘Slippery...’ world tour and subsequently produced another squillion-seller chock full of great songs. Standout moments include Bad Medicine’s flat-picked solo, romping Born To Be My Baby and the massive chorus of Stick To Your Guns the latter abetted by a stark acoustic and rocking dynamics. Wedding stalwart I’ll Be There For You, with heartfelt lyrics, bombastic melodies and an occasional Beatles flavour, is arguably the defining BJ ballad, and although 99 In The Shade and Homebound Train, both strewn with seriously heavy guitars, fare less well under scrutiny, New Jersey’s success proves that lighting can indeed strike twice. Recommended track: Bad Medicine

Keep The FaiTh

also recommended (1992)

3

After recovering from a two-year world tour that almost killed them, the band returned to the stage with an accomplished release that reinforces their ability to both bulldoze and seduce in equal measure. Bed Of Roses is surely up there with American rock’s greatest ballads with Sambora wringing floods from his neck pickup, while the desperation evident in both the lyric and guitar lines of Dry Country is harrowingly real. The title track blatantly flicks a middle finger to those who doubted their survival and the stomp-along chorus of Sleep When I’m Dead, which would get any party started, is coloured by a wah and laced with plenty of feel-good fun. Bon Jovi were back and yet more global success ensued. Recommended track: Bed Of Roses

STranGer in ThiS ToWn

(1991)

4

Sambora’s first solo album allowed him to explore the bluesier side of his style and, what’s more, he handles all the lead vocals with the ease of a man used to crooning to full stadia. There are some smart tracks to unearth here with highlights including Mr Bluesman, written about and starring a certain Eric Clapton who pulls off a flawless solo, and Rosie, originally intended for inclusion on 1988’s New Jersey, which bears many familiar hallmarks. The title track is built around a restrained solo and the gloriously catchy melodies of One Light Burning are earworms in waiting. Although other songs, The Answer for one, are somewhat cloying, this is solid stuff. Recommended track: One Light Burning

worth a spin

wild card

avoid!

ThiS houSe iS noT For Sale

ThiS leFT FeelS riGhT

7800° FahrenheiT

5

6

(2016)

When Sambora unexpectedly quit halfway through 2013’s Because We Can world tour, many assumed the jig was up. Not a bit of it and their latest release is the first to feature both co-producer John Shanks and the indomitable Phil X on guitar. The spanking riff and fluid solo of the title track pave the way for the band’s new direction and there’s a flavour of The Edge’s chopping style throughout many of the guitar parts too: Knockout being a good example. Tracks like Born Again Tomorrow are built on unashamedly contemporary pop foundations, while Come On Up To Our House signs off with another top solo. A great band proving they’re not dead yet. Recommended track: This House Is Not For Sale

(2003)

An intelligent approach to the ‘Greatest Hits’ concept, this fascinating album comprises acoustic and, in some cases, wholly rearranged versions of some of the band’s biggest hits and, as such, allows the listener to really dissect their construction. A soulful electric piano and acoustic 12-string ushers in Livin’ On Prayer, and the vocal to It’s My Life, is complemented by simple, Japaneseflavoured classical guitar lines. Be it the slide intro to Bad Medicine, the rocking stabs and urgent acoustics of Wanted Dead Or Alive, or the sassy rhythms of You Give Love A Bad Name, this is an idea that works wonderfully and the songs remain unscathed irrespective of treatment. Recommended track: It’s My Life

(1985)

7

Eclipsed by the riches that were just around the corner, the band’s patchy second album is often overlooked. A shame, as the finger-stretching opener In And Out Of Love and bouncing Tokyo Rose are evocative slabs of 80s guitar-driven rock. However, the plodding King Of The Mountain and terribly dated To The Fire are hardly up to scratch and clarify why outside writing assistance was urgently sought next time out. But if you’re looking back even further, be warned: only completists should actively search out Jon Bon Jovi’s contribution to 1980’s ear-clobbering R2-D2, We Wish You A Merry Christmas. Recommended track: In And Out Of Love

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

19


how to what you will learn How to organise and strengthen your fret-hand fingers How to improve finger coordination for greater fluidity and speed How to take a more lateral approach to the fretboard

20

20 minutes to…

Better finger dexterity Improve your playing with four exercises designed to tighten up both your fretting skills and picking technique eveloping your fretting skills is part of a bigger picture of simultaneously improving your picking technique. As you gain TGR304.20mins.fig01.musx File Date: better 14:22coordination 09/02/2018you’ll greatly improve your overall speed, accuracy and Page 1 of 1 fluidity – whatever style of music you play, Notes: rhythm or lead.

It’s mostly about training your fretting If this sounds familiar, then this month’s fingers to move at a consistent speed, as most exercises are for you. Each is designed to target mistakes occur due to small inaccuracies the fret-hand fingers in a variety of ways, as it’s between pick and fret hand – this can lead to Betterimportant not to simply repeatCoordination the same Finger Dexterity - Picking ‘stumbling’ or rhythmic stutters. Even in the exercise. Speed isn’t necessarily20 themins target, to... fret hand itself, guitarists often favour the first although this can come as your playing Contributor: Steve Allsworth three fingers and find they neglect the weaker progresses. Just make sure everything sounds Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com fourth digit. clean, whatever speed you decide to play at.

D

Picking coordination

TRACK 7

q = 60-90

b E7 9

& 44 .. . .

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8

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8

12

10

≤ ⇥

0

10

12

~~~~~~ .. œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~~~~~ . . 0 12 13 0 13 16 0 16 17 0 16 13 0 13 12 ⇥ ≤ ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ 1

1

1

1

1

This Muse-style riff is based on a challenging line phrased mainly around three-note groupings. With the steady 16th-note rhythm, this means each grouping starts at a different place in each beat. Use down-up style alternate picking and pay attention to the slides, which require greater control over when you are engaging the pick.

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

Guitars and backing: Steve Allsworth

T A B

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2

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a 12-bar A. In heory e A7 (A and D7 C) include rom of A A B C# D – giving

ssion gy, sound.

TGR304.20mins.fig02.musx

Better Finger Dexterity - Stretches & Picking Coordination 20 mins to...

File Date: 14:22 09/02/2018 Page 1 of 1

20 minutes to better finger Contributor: Stevedexterity Allsworth

Notes:

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

StretcheS and Picking coordination q = 60-80

Bm7

# & # 44 .. . .

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2

4

File Date: 14:21 09/02/2018

TRACK 8

4

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E b dim7

bœ œ

4

3

1

7

Em7

œ

nœ œ

2

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7

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4

3

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1

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≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ 5

œ

œ

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B b dim7

bœ œ 3

1

14

12

4

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Bm7

nœ 1

3

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2

3

14

14

œ ~~~~~~ œ .. ~~~~~~

15

14

16

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. .

⇥ ≤ ⇥ ⇥Better ≤ ⇥Finger ⇥ ≤Dexterity ⇥ ⇥ -≤Neoclassical ⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥Workout

9

10

12

13

14

20 mins to...

This exercise be in parallel with the fretboard with Page 1 ofwill 1 help develop your fret-hand stretching and fingertip accuracy. You need to have a good hand position here, so aim toContributor: Steve Allsworth a good arch in your wrist. This will help prevent your hand angling diagonally in order to reach the bigger stretches.

Notes:

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

neo-claSSical workout

TRACK 9

q = 60-90

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Am

& 44 ..

1

. .

T A B

E

4

5

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7

4

8

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Dm Am E œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ œ .. 7

A 4

10

1

12

4

2

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4

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12

1

13

10

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4

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14

13

. .

TGR304.20mins.fig04.musx ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ Better ≤ ⇥ Finger ≤ ⇥ Dexterity ≤ ⇥ ≤ - Stretch ⇥ ≤ &⇥ Slide ≤ ⇥Workout ≤ File Date: 14:21 09/02/2018 20 mins to... This is a great Malmsteen-style exercise for conditioning your fourth finger. Guitarists often play sequentially (first finger, second finger, third finger etc), so Page 1 of Yngwie 1 Contributor: Steve Allsworth jumbling up the finger order will develop your fret-hand dexterity. It can feel a little off balance at first, so break the lick down into shorter phrases to begin with.

Notes:

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

Stretch and Slide workout q =60-80

TRACK 10

œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ 4 . œ œ &4 . œ œ œ œ Eadd 9

Dadd 9

Asus 2

G5

A m add9

4

4

3

2

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. .

1

9

11

7

10

12

⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ 7

7

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3

1

4

3

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2

3

1

9

11

7

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12

⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ 7

7

5

3

4

1

7

≤ ≤ ⇥

12

10

12

14

16

⇥ ≤

17

. .

This Andy Summers-style riff is designed to get you moving along the length of the fretboard, helping you to gain a better feel for those challenging position shifts. The wide add9 chord shapes test fourth finger dexterity in particular. Carefully lift your finger after every note, so that no two notes ring together.

Practice Plan 1. two minutes: Play through one exercise slowly 2. three minutes: experiment and improvise with the ideas over the backing track 3. try the other examples Once you’ve tried the tab exercises, try moving them to another area of the fretboard to see how they sound at a higher or lower pitch and how they feel played with different fret spacing. Playing in every possible fretboard position is the key to unlocking your potential when it comes to fretting skills. You’ll need to think creatively with the first exercise though – the open sixth string may be tough to transpose.

neXt MOntH 20 minutes to… Better rock rhythm April 2018 ToTal GuiTar

21


how to Get the tone 4

chAnnel overDrive 6

4

9

gAin

2

bASS

MiD

Treble

reverb

Dave Murray famously uses a humbucker-loaded Fender Strat, typically into Marshall amps for a classic tube overdrive tone. This type of part works best with a high gain rock tone, so turn up the gain and add a dash of reverb to help the notes sustain and trail off naturally. Use the bridge position pickup for a bright, trebly tone that will cut through the mix. Bridge humbucker

riff of the month

22

Words and Music by Stephen Percy Harris © 1985 Imagem London Limited Reproduced by kind permission of Music Sales Ltd All Rights Reserved International Copyright Secured

iron maiden T

Intro rIff

q =118 q =118

4 &4 &4

appears at: 0:09-0:50 tempo: 118bpm Key: A minor/A minor pentatonic Main techniques: String bending/vibrato

& & T T A A B B3

œj œ

. ... . .. .

j œj œ

BU

œ œ

œ œ

j œj œ

BU

BU (17) 15

15 (17)

~~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~~˙ œ ˙

D5 D5

BU

BU (17) 15

rhythm guitar on some ‘root-5th’ powerchords. We’ve tabbed out the lead part for you, which consists of notes from the A minor pentatonic scale (A C D E G). Dave Murray plays all of the notes along the second string and bends up to each one from two frets below – so each bend is a tone wide.

j œj œ

~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~

j œj œ

BU

13 (15)

œ œ œ œ

œj œ

13 (15)

~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~œ œ œ

BU

BU (15) 13

~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~[17]

BU (17) 15

13 (15)

TrAcKS 11-12

E5 5 jE

BU

BU (15) 13

BU (15) 13

15 (17)

œ. œ.

Accuracy is key here; bend too little or too much andRiff you’ll lose the song’s tight-pitched Of The Month - Run To The Hills Riff OfTry The - note Run in Toyour Thehead Hillsbefore delivery. to Month hear the Iron Maiden you bend. Practise by frettingIron eachMaiden target note Contributor: Charlie without a bend and memorise theGriffiths pitch before Contributor: Charlie Griffiths Engraved DigitalMusicArt.Com attempting thoseby bends. Eventually, your ear Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com and your fingers will work together.

15 (17)

[17 ]

œ œJ J BD BD

‰ ‰

(15) (15)

1 1

j b œj bœ

C5 C5

œ. œ.

BU BU

11 (13)

11 (13)

3

j œj œ

œ œ œ œ

BU BU

11 (13)

11 (13)

~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~œ œ œ

D5

jD œj œ

BU BU

œ œJ J

5

~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~[15]

13 (15)

13 (15)

[15 ]

BD BD

(13 ) (13 )

‰ ‰

G5 G5

j œj œ

œ. œ.

BU

(8) 6BU

6 (8)

j œj œ

œ œ

BU

BU (8) 6

6 (8)

œ œ

j œj œ

~~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~~œ œ œ

A5 A5

BU

~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~

BU (10) 8

8 (10)

Œ Œ

.. .. . .. .

Place your third finger on the 15th fret and bunch your first and second fingers up behind it, so all three fingers are on the string. Use your wrist and forearm to turn your hand and bend the string up. Add the vibrato by dipping below the target string bend slightly, then back up to it.

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

Guitars and backing: Charlie Griffiths Photography: Michael Putland/Getty Images

T T A A B B

0:06 0:06

œ. œ.

E5 5 jE

(Guitar Tab with chord symbols and lyrics, 160pp, £18.95 ref. AM1006599) The Complete Guitar Player: Rock Songbook features a massive collection of 50 hard-rocking hits from the best of classic and contemporary rock music for guitar. Each song includes full lyrics and guitar chords as well as strumming and picking patterns, making this songbook great for the aspiring rock rhythm or lead guitarist. Includes classics such as Roxanne by The Police, Whiskey In The Jar by Thin Lizzy, Born To Be Wild by Steppenwolf and Highway To Hell by AC/DC. musicroom.com

Cheat sheet…

Run To The Hills

his legendary intro featured on Maiden’s 1982 heavy metal TGR304.rotm.fig01.musx TGR304.rotm.fig01.musx classic, The Number Of The Beast. File Date: 12:19 22/02/2018 After four bars of Nicko McBrain’s File Date: 12:19 22/02/2018 Page 1 of 1 drums, the bass and Page 1thumping of 1 Notes: two guitars enter, with Dave Murray on lead Notes: duties and Adrian Smith holding down the

Play GuitaR With... 18 ClassiC sonGs

Run to the hills

what you will learn Whole tone string bending Slick position shifting Accurate vibrato playing


how to GettinG Started With…

Major 7th chords

Following on from last month’s chord lesson, in this issue we’re looking at the relaxed, mellow sound of the major 7 chord

24

WhAt yOu WIll leARn The distinctive sound of major 7th chords A selection of open-chord shapes An arpeggio and a strumming pattern

“Are ‘maj7’ chords such as Cmaj7 the same as ‘7’ chords like C7? I’ve seen both kinds in some songs I’m trying to learn.”

shapes are just as easy to play as any basic major and minor chord. Jump in and try them.

Despite their similar names, these two chords have very different sounds. We looked at ‘7’ chords last month – hopefully, you remember how they sound tense and edgy, and are well suited to blues or any song that needs a bit of bite. Maj7 (aka major 7 or major 7th) chords have a much more relaxed sound, ideal for mellow ballads or smooth jazz.

“Remind me what all the dots mean…”

“Got it. Can you give me some examples so I can take a listen?”

“Some of these are quite easy to play.”

Major fun… Easy major 7ths to get you started

The dots tell you where to put your fingers on the fretboard. The numbers tell you which of your four fingers to use. Black dots are root notes, eg, a C note in a Cmaj7 chord or D note in a Dmaj7 chord; all the other notes are red. Finally, an O denotes an ‘open’ un-fretted string and X means the string stays silent.

o

x

o o

o

x

Filethat’s Date: 08:17 06/02/2018 “Oh, great! So how do I get started?”

We’ve Pagewritten 1 of 1out some chord boxes for you on the right. It might seem like there are lots of Notes: chords to learn on the guitar, but this month’s

2

##4 & # 4 .. T A B

. .

œ

2

œ

1

œ

3

œ

let ring throughout

⇥ 0

2

1

2

œ 0

2

1 3

Amaj7 o o

o

1

x

x

Gmaj7 x

o

x

o

1

2 2 3 4

3

2 3

Emaj7 Dmaj7 Fmaj7 Take a look at the two shortTGR304.gettingstarted.fig02.musx tab riffs at the Major 7 Chords bottom of the page. The first is an arpeggio. Hopefully, you already know the basic C, A, G, E,Started D File Date: 08:27 06/02/2018 Getting With... This means you play one note at a time instead and F major chords. These major 7ths are all just of strumming the whole chord. It’s1a of good Page 1 way Chris Bird simple finger changes to the majorContributor: shapes. to check for accurate fretting. Follow that with Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com the strummed chord in our second example.

2 StRummed ChORdS q = 85

œ 2

œ 1

œ 2

You’ll need accurate fretting here – all the notes should ring out over each other. Stay on your fingertips so you don’t deaden an adjacent string.

ToTal GuiTar APRIL 2018

o

“What’s my next step?”

TRACK 13 – 14

Amaj 7

3

3

That’s right! Lots of guitar chords have complicated names but are easy to play. It reminds you not to worry when you see a chord name you don’t understand.

1 ARpeGGIO q = 60

o

1 2

Cmaj7

Sure! The verse in Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On begins on an Emaj7 chord under the ‘Mother mother’ line. Something by The Beatles is a good one to listen to – its verse begins with C, Cmaj7 and C7 chords, so you can compare the sounds of all three. TGR304.gettingstarted.fig01.musx

o

o

.. . .

Amaj 7

##4 œ & # 4 .. œœœ œ 3 1 2

T A B

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0 2 1 2 0

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œœ œœ œ

TRACK 15 – 16

œœ œœ œ 0 2 1 2 0

Dmaj 7 4 3 2

œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

œœ œ œ

2 2 2 0

2 2 2 0

2 2 2 0

⇥ ⇥ ≤

œœ œ œ

œœ . œ . œ 2 2 2 0

You can choose which fingers to use here. You can play Dmaj7 with first, second and third fingers, second, third and fourth, or a one-finger barre.

. .


how to

The TG Guide To amp modellinG having redefined the amp sound in the 1960s, the future is still looking orange 1

The conTrol panel The Orange OR120s unique preamp used a Frequency Analysing Control (a six-position rotary switch that varies mid content), together with a Baxandall tone control circuit with knobs for bass and treble. Combined with the HF drive control, this unusual preamp design is actually very versatile with a lot more flexibility than the traditional interactive bass, mid and treble tone stack found on contemporary Fender and Marshall designs.

2

ValVes Much of the classic Orange sound is a result of the power stage being driven hard by the phase inverter circuit. Four EL34s linked to huge power and output transformers gave the OR120 a true 120-watt power output with massive headroom. Many original OR120s used the Blackburn-manufactured Mullard ‘XF2’ EL34, which is renowned as one of the best power valves ever produced.

2

3

speaker cabineT Most speaker grill cloths are made to be sonically transparent, however, the thick basket weave fabric used on Orange speaker cabinets works to subtly roll off high frequencies, making it possible to drive the amps harder without harshness. The cabinets used wooden skids instead of rubber feet, which acoustically coupled to stages for even more volume. The punch and impact of an OR120 through its matching PPC4x12 cabinet is unmistakable.

3

it’s in the power stage that the classic orange tone is produced ToTal GuiTar april 2018

The sound behind Brit bands from Led Zep to Oasis ack in the late 1960s, a London-based entrepreneur called Cliff Cooper upset the guitar amplification apple cart with a new brand that grew rapidly in popularity. Orange amplifiers had a distinctive look and sound with a smoother, guitar-friendly overdrive, boxy midrange and plenty of clean headroom. The Orange OR120 is the quintessential Orange head, and can be seen in many archive images behind influential players of the era, including Paul Kossoff, Peter Green and Jimmy Page. Introduced in 1972, the earliest versions had control panels with symbols and no lettering and became known as ‘Pics only’ heads. The simple control layout included a Frequency Analysing Control (a six-position switch that varies mid content) together with high and low frequency Baxandall tone controls, HF drive (a high treble/presence level control) and volume. The OR120s incorporated some circuit changes from earlier Orange amps, which pushed the EL34 power valves harder for a warmer, more driven sound in response to player demands, and marked a sonic turning point that many view as the birth of the famous ‘Orange sound’. There were other components, including the distinctive picture-frame speaker cabinets with basket weave grilles. This material has a subtle filtering effect, smoothing out high frequency content and helping to make the amp less tiring to listen to at high volume. The circuit used a pair of 12AX7s to drive a quartet of EL34s, producing a comfortable 120 watts of power; it’s really in the power stage that the classic Orange tone is produced, which in the lesssensitive 1970s meant turning it up very loud. Thankfully, digital modelling can approximate that sound at more comfortable volume levels.

B

1

26

Orange Or120


amp modelling

# classic tOnes Get the tone #1

Get the tone #2

Get the tone #3:

Typified by bands such as Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac, which not only featured Greeny but the extraordinarily talented Danny Kirwan and Jeremy Spencer, Orange was at the heart of the British blues boom of the late 1960s. Check out tracks like Green Manalishi and Oh Well to hear classic Orange tone, often teamed with Orange’s standalone spring reverb unit.

The undisputed king of the riffs was Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page. While Page was known to favour using a variety of amps when he was working in the studio, for many of his years on the road, his live rig has usually included at least one Orange head and it’s been the same from the early 1970s, right up to the O2 Arena reunion in 2007.

After a few lean years during the 1980s, Orange returned to centre stage with the arrival of Brit rock and bands like Oasis who favoured Orange amps during the mid 1990s hey day. A wall of overdrive and fat midrange formed the sonic backdrop for some of the biggest hits of this era, including tracks such as Roll With It, Wonderwall and Rock ‘n’ Roll.

BriT Blues

power of Zep

Get the tone 4

4

6

wall of sound

Get the tone 4

5

4

7

Get the tone 6

5

5

BAss

Reverb spring Delay approx 1500ms

Mid

TREBLE

MAsTER

gAin

5

5

TREBLE

MAsTER

8

6

gAin

6

3

BAss

Reverb spring Plate approx 1500ms

Mid

TREBLE

MAsTER

gAin

BAss

Mid

Tubescreamer gain 7, volume 5 Plate reverb approx 300ms

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Tune up, plug in and play it loud

mod squad How to find the Orange OR120 in your amp or software Line 6: mandarin 80 Fender mustang gt: British Color IK Multimedia amplitube: or50 Native Instruments guitar rig: Citrus Yamaha thr10: lead Blackstar id: od1/el34 Vox VX: Brit. Marshall Code: plexi/el34

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


how to

what you will learn Learn the notes on the stave Learn the notes on the fretboard Four music-reading exercises

What the F?

Reading music

ith last month’s music reading exercises under your belt, the next step is to look at higher and notes. In music notation, this is done TGR304.wtf.fig01.musxlower with ‘ledger lines’ – lines placed above and below the stave so that the notes can continue File Date: 12:00 09/02/2018 into higher and lower registers. It’s a logical extension of the Page 1 of 1 notes found within the stave; so, the seven notes (A B C D E F and G) continue in order as you ascend through the ledger Notes: lines. The only difficulty for guitarists is that we have to move up the fretboard to reach the high notes.

W

Advance your playing, learn some basics in music reading and tackle tricky position shifts with this essential theory lesson 1 notes on the stave D B G e

The position of a note on the stave tells you its pitch – as shown here with red dots. In written music these would be traditional note heads. The higher the position on the stave, the higher the pitch of the note. It’ll help with the learning process if you can memorise a few notes on the stave (the open first string E note is easy to remember).

C A F

D B G e

C A F

TRACK 17

œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ &4 q =75

T A B

5

6

8

5

7

8

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

10

0

3

2

0

3

1

0

Here are those notes written in notation and guitar tab. Hopefully, you can see how the ledger lines work. As the notes you play go higher (or lower), so do the ledger lines!

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notes on the Fretboard It’s a lot easier to remember the notes of the stave if you can visualise them on the fretboard. TGR304.wtf.fig02.musx This way you’ll always know where they are on your guitar. Come back File Date: 14:15 09/02/2018 to these visual references as you Page 1 of 1 tackle the music exercises that follow. All the information you Notes: need is here!

A e F TGR304.wtf.fig03.musx File Date: 14:15 09/02/2018 Page 1 of 1

D A

G

F

œ

2TGR304.wtf.fig04.musx First and second strings only

œ

œ

TRACK 18

œ

..

4 two strings or three?

œ

œ

œ

œ

TRACK 20

œ

œ

œ

œ

Our fretboard diagram tells you to play this example across three strings; alternatively, play the D note on the fifth string (5th fret) to use only two strings.

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

3 Position shiFt lick TGR304.wtf.fig05.musx œ œ File 4Date:œ14:14 09/02/2018 . & 4 1 .of 1 Page Notes:

œ

TRACK 19 Reading Music: Ledger Line œ What The F œ .. Contributor: Chris Bir Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

This is another line that benefits from being played on two strings instead of one. Watch out for the jump up to the high D – you’ll need to move up the fretboard.

You’ll only be playing on the first and second strings here. You could play this all on the first string, but if you use two strings you can stay in one fret position.

& 44 ..

What The F Contributor: Chris Bir Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

C Notes:

B

e

œ œ File 4Date:œ 14:14œ 09/02/2018 . & 4 1 .of 1 Page Notes:

C D GReading Music: Ledger Line

B

..

5 two strings or three, again!

& 44 ..

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

œ

TRACK 21

œ

œ

Once again, the highest note is the open fourth string D note, so, if you find it easier this way, play this note at the 5th fret on the fifth string.

..


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ToTal GuiTar april 2018


rig tour Words Amit Sharma Photography James Sharrock

1

2

3

the other was more of a baseball bat neck. The guys said they’d get one over to me and I was like, ‘Really?!’ because I wasn’t talking about the cheaper one. Months went by and I didn’t want to bug them, I just figured it was going to happen. And sure as shit, they surprised the fuck out of me and came up with one to keep! I used it in regular tuning for Fault Line, Some Kinda Ghost, Ain’t No Easy and Devil’s Waitin’.”

V16 Delta king

3

“This was made by a friend of ours in Denver, who runs a company called V16. It’s a tanky guitar and weighs a lot. He made us a baritone guitar as well. This one’s actually a bit of a floater – at the moment I’m using it for Awake, in a C open tuning. But a lot of the time it’s in regular tuning in case any of the others go down.”

Black ReBel MotoRcycle cluB The instrument-swapping BRMC pair take us through the secrets behind their magical sonic alchemy... lack Rebel Motorcycle Club have long defied convention. They blur the lines between indie garage and stoner fuzz, swap sides/rigs mid-set, plug hollow bodies into bass amps and use live loops. It could all go horribly wrong. And yet it never does and the San Franciscan trio stockpile an orchestral wash of riffs drenched in wetness, split through a variety of amps. Welcoming TG on stage at Brixton Academy are founders Peter Hayes and Robert Levon Been, the mad scientists behind their whirlpool of noise.

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PeteR Hayes giBson es-335

1

“This guitar is the most personal one to us, it’s a 60s Gibson in cherry red that we started off writing all our songs on. It was Rob’s dad’s guitar and it’s got a really nice neck. I’m not sure how long he had it, but it was used in his band, The Call. It’s in C tuning for Red Eyes And Tears, Six Barrel Shotgun, American X and a few others. I would say

it’s a scary guitar to be taking out because if something happens to it… I have the original pickups at home, something went out so they’re in a box waiting to get repaired. Right now it has the same Rio Grande pickups that are fitted in all my guitars.”

giBson J-45 acoustic

2

“This is a 1945 reissue, which they made two versions of so I called up Gibson when they came out – one was more affordable with a thinner neck and body and

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giBson sg “I stole this from Gibson! I think they know I took it and I probably owe them for that. I like the sound of this. I’ll use it for Teenage Disease, Little Thing Gone Wild, Steal A Ride. I dig the sound of SGs, they’ve got a tough feel to them that’s different to other guitars. And it’s a very direct sound compared to the semi-hollow ones. I like guitars that aren’t necessarily friendly to play. I’m not really into having the action real low or any of that – when guitars get too smooth and easy, they almost sound a bit weird.”

FenDeR BanDMasteRs

4

“There’s nothing classy about how I use my amps but I really don’t know how people can get everything they need from just one. I like the mixture of cabinets with open-back combos with hollowbody guitars. The signal is split into three and comes out of four amps. The Bandmasters are amp one and two, working as left and right. april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


rig tour

14 15

11

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8 At the beginning I had three or four Fender Twins, but I soon discovered I preferred doing it this way. I throw in loops using the Akai Headrush for a lot of songs – chucking things in through certain amps for a chorus and playing over the top... most of the time I just let it fly!”

QuilteR laBs tone Block 200

5

“This is the amp simulator driving the Marshall. A lot of delay come from amps one and two and the sound guys needed more of a direct sound. So the option is always there, say if a solo gets too muddy. I do have a 60s Marshall head, but it costs a fortune to fix and it got beat up real bad on the road. I’d like to bring it out, but this started as a backup in case the head went down.”

FenDeR twin ReVeRB

6

“I usually use a Pro Reverb but a lot of shops don’t have them

ToTal GuiTar april november 20182015

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for rental. This one at the back is constantly running reverbs, distortion and octavers that come through the TC Electronic stuff. It’s a heavily-effected signal, I guess! There might be a high octaver on amp one, a low octaver on amp two, the Marshall cab will be dry distorted and I throw even more on this just to make it even more swimmy, ha ha! It must be a nightmare for our sound guys.”

klon centauR [in Rack] “I don’t know if it lives up to the hype, but it’s always on. I can understand if you had just that, a guitar and an amp, that could sound cool. I haven’t done that, I don’t really have the option. I have to see how it reacts to the machines. I’m not using it to its full potential. But our front of house guy was telling me it was the shit, so he went and got one for me, so I had to fuckin’ use it, ha ha! Distortion isn’t ever easy – especially when you’ve got

different guitars, pedals and amps reacting with each other.”

Big Joe DistoRtion

7

“This pedal, like a few others, came from the fans that come to shows and bring along the pedals that they make! This one, I throw on pretty much everything because it’s a nice little booster.”

DigitecH wHaMMy

8

“I use this on 666 Conducer, anything where it’s just one lick. I don’t do solos, but whenever there’s a line on one string I’ll kick this in as an octaver. It’s good fun for messing around with riffs. There’s a song Rob wrote using the bass version of it called Circus Bazooko and that pedal really inspired the music.”

Xotic sl oVeRDRiVe

9

“I was looking for things that were small, with the least amount of buttons, knobs and little twisty things, which is how I ended

19 13


black rebel motorcycle club

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6 4

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“DisToRTion isn’T easy when you’ve goT DiffeRenT guiTaRs, peDals anD aMps ReaCTing wiTh eaCh oTheR” up using this. There’s another one at the back of the rack, which I use as a clear boost, this one gives me that extra little bit of distortion. It’s completely random, I use whatever’s in front of me whenever I remember to get around to them. There are a couple of songs with wahs written into them, but most of it is completely random and that’s totally the fun part.”

JiM DunloP cRy BaBy VoluMe waH

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“Just to kill two birds with one stone! I only use the volume function for one song – all amps are always going at the same time. This sends the signal to only amps one and two for a song called In Like The Rose.”

MXR caRBon coPy “This delay goes to amp three, which is mostly dry. I give it a bit of delay. I use a Boss DD3 for the reverse function.”

electRo-HaRMoniX FReeze

11

“This almost sounds like a sitar, it basically holds whatever notes you’re playing as you kick it in and it will hold them for you – it freezes your chords. There are a couple of different ways you can use it... I just use it to hold drone notes.”

RoBeRt leVon Been giBson es-125

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“These are two sister archtops we picked up in Cincinnati. They’ve been with us since The Howl and we used them to write a lot of that album. They really are beautiful acoustics and they inspire a different kind of approach for songwriting. That’s when I started adding in different EQ pedals so I wouldn’t have to bring a guitar amp out with me... believe it or not, I actually run these through my bass amps!

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Because the guitars are hollow I can carve and shape them into what I need, so they don’t feed back. The smart thing would be getting guitar amps and running different lines into those, but it’s more fun to see how badly it all falls apart this way. I think these models were known for being a learning version of the 175.”

MaRtin acoustic

13

“I wanted something with a lot of body – I play outside on park benches a lot, so I was after something that resonated really loud. The pickup was put in for live shows. I’ll use it for Beat The Devil’s Tattoo and the acoustic breakdown of the show… it’s my baby. We switch back and forth, Pete will come over here and play bass… I then take over on his side. Nearly all the time, I’m going through my bass cabinets – which I prefer. I like the idea of making acoustics work in that kind of world… it’s a juggling act!”

tc electRonic suB ‘n’ uP

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“I was using a Boss Octaver before this tour, but the Sub ‘N’ Up is working really well to fill out the low end for me right now. It’s always growing pains, I’m trying to figure out how to use all this stuff together. Then there’s this bass whammy thing… you can mix high and low octaves on the Digitech.”

Vintage eFFects oVeRDRiVe/DistoRtion

15

“These pedals don’t even have names. They’re made by this guy in the States called Vintage Effects. He does a lot of custom stuff for me – one is an overdrive and the other is a different distortion. I use one for lows and the other for highs. I’ve never been able to find one distortion that gives me the full range that I like. So these are just weird one-offs. The guys show up with toys in the bag and we fuck around with them!” april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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STORMB Words Amit Sharma / Photography Will Ireland

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


feature

M

ichael Schenker is easily one of the more philosophical guitarists seen in our pages. When you talk to the ‘blonde bomber’ who rose to fame in the late 1970s and early 80s playing on legendary recordings by Scorpions and UFO, he speaks with a profound sense of spiritualism – not so much in the religious sense, but rather with an introspective faith that reveals much about his creative path and the extraordinarily personal relationship he has with music. Over the course of an afternoon, the guitarist describes much of his fretwork using analogies like hunting for goats, swimming in the Olympics and studying insects in order to build helicopters – all of which somehow makes perfect sense coming from his brilliantly bizarre, mad professor-like personality. His genius is a rare one indeed – ask the guitarists in any rock/metal band from Metallica to Opeth who they’d consider to be the European equivalent to Eddie Van Halen and the answer will be virtually unanimous. From a young age, Schenker’s choice notes, silky-smooth bends and piercing tone rapidly elevated him into the highest echelons of guitar godliness. So with a new retrospective collection, A Decade Of The Mad Axeman, and the debut from the Michael Schenker Fest band, Resurrection, out in March, TG looks for tips from one of the all-time greats…

RUNNING FREE FEELING GOOD 1 Playing guitar is all 2 Schenker explains about making your fingers where he got that magical catch up with your brain…

vibrato from…

“Some guitar players might feel they can’t catch up with me, but maybe they can catch themselves! That’s all I’m doing when I play – I’m catching myself. So, instead of recycling something that’s already out there, like my solos, try to catch yourself. Because, when you think about it, you can’t escape yourself! Sometimes, we get so busy with all the external stuff, we forget about what’s inside. It’s all in there, somewhere. The art of lead guitar is really about pure self-expression and, at least for me, it’s about expanding into places you haven’t been to before.”

“My early heroes were all the late 60s guitarists, they were all very bluesoriented and with lots of feel. Guys like Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Johnny Winter, Rory Gallagher, Eric Clapton… and if you asked any of them who their influences were, they would all name the original black blues players. Look at Paul Kossoff’s vibrato, it’s not really my taste but it was definitely his style. Kirk Hammett has a vibrato a lot like mine on [1972 Scorpions debut] Lonesome Crow, but I’m not sure if he’s doing it on purpose. This one time he jammed with us, when I heard him play, it sounded a lot like my vibrato on that album. It could just be that he was attracted to it and kept it in his head. It could be a coincidence or somehow my playing on that album left an impression on him. I don’t know! When I listen back to that album, it just sounds like the beginning of my development.”

“the art of lead guitar is really about pure self-expression”

RINGER One Of the wOrld’s mOst respected lead guitarists, michael schenker, gives tg his guide tO six-string mastery…

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

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michael schenker WHO DO 3 WE THINK WE ARE

For Schenker, it’s what’s inside that counts…

go for the throat How Michael Schenker found the half-cocked wah sound heard on UFO’s Just Another Suicide and many other of his great leads… 36

When Michael Schenker first acquired a wah pedal, he was so young and inexperienced that he plugged it in the wrong way and he remembers it “sounded like a police siren!”. However, it didn’t take long for the burgeoning musician to come up with his own sound – and it was that instantly identifiable half-cocked wah tone that would hold the secret to many of his finest solos… “I would describe myself as treble-sensitive,” he explains. “So when an old-fashioned wah-wah is all the way down, it’s piercing to my ears. I love the Jim Dunlop Dimebag model because you can change the EQ, but the more vintage ones were too harsh. Back in the day, I opened mine up and found this wheel inside… after some experimentation, I found the exact position that I liked and tweaked the pedal so that it would never go past that point. To my ears, that sweet sound is very nasally.” The guitar player soon got into the habit of using the pedal differently to all the Hendrix/Clapton wannabes also competing for the same crown. To him, it was more like an EQ pedal than anything else… “I wouldn’t use it traditionally, I would just use the frequency rather than the scoop, like on the UFO instrumental Lookin’ Out for No. 1 (Reprise) or Just Another Suicide. All of that stuff is very mid-rangey. I tend to like one straight tone in general, there’s no real difference between my rhythm or lead channel. I leave everything exactly the same, to be honest I don’t think of myself as a gear hound – there’s delay in the send/return and then the wah. I try to invent things with just the basics! Somebody once pointed out that I don’t really use my pinky. And I thought to myself, ‘Why would you notice that… who cares?!’ You can use just one finger and make it sound great. I told him to forget about the pinky, I use mine to pick my nose, ha ha!” ToTal GuiTar april 2018

“When I was about 17, I stopped listening to other music and other guitar players because I understood there was something in me that was unique and not known in this world, just as with any individual. “If I express myself, something new materialises – it’s like a new colour. If you keep doing that over and over again, you are showing people your true colours. You can do what I do, if you want, but it’s much better and more interesting to do things the way you see it. The problem is a lot of players don’t have the confidence, they think what’s inside of them is worse. But that’s a misconception – every single person has something unique inside of them, somewhere in there. The reason why some musicians don’t follow that is because they simply don’t have the confidence to believe that what they have in their heads is worth anything. You have to look at it and say, ‘This is art, this is expression!’ You don’t measure it – it’s not bad, it’s not good – it’s just expression. When you think like that, playing as pure as possible, at some point people will turn around and say, ‘Wow, this sounds truly unique…’”

ON WATER 4WALK Fluidity is everything…

“Sounding fluid is definitely the key to my approach. I love how Jeff Beck plays because he leaves the gaps, it’s incredible – he knows exactly when to play and when not to play. I love those gaps, but I don’t feel like they are my true calling. I’m more into building fluid passages, with less spaces but still managing to say something with each note. I have no time for filler notes, I throw them out because they just don’t fit into my personality. The key is making each note carry a meaning. I might use a passing note that’s wrong but because it introduces the next note, which is a right note, it works. If you don’t follow it up, then of course it will sound bad. You can make a mistake and always fix it if you are quick enough. Of course, I may accidentally come out with things while building it all up. Rock Bottom is a song I would improvise. Some days it would be good, other days not as good. A lot of times I wasn’t even

aware of what I played until I hear it back, I might have thought it was rubbish and then find out it was good!”

SCALES OF 5 JUSTICE The less regimented your

playing, the better…

“I don’t really have scales in my head. I don’t understand terms like Aeolian, or whatever. People always used to say to me, ‘Did you study classical music, or this symphony, or this or that?’ But no. That classical style is one particular way of playing, just like Spanish guitar has its own tendencies – going from E major to the F major and back – so that’s when more flamenco-style note choices may work well in different combinations. It’s not that I know all these different scales off by heart, they’re all inside me and I just pick what works best in the moment. A person who practices scales, they don’t need to hear themselves, they can play without needing to. When I play, I need to hear myself because I don’t know what the next note needs to be. I have to hear the previous note in order to figure out the next one.”

STUCK IN A RUT 6 Even lead masters like Schenker have been prone to the same creative frustrations…

“There were times when I’ve felt stuck in one particular position, it took me a while before I could play things in different areas of the neck. That’s how you force yourself to play differently. Using different strings and patterns will give your ideas a different effect. It’s like copying how an insect flies and making a helicopter using the same concept. “Everything is there somewhere inside you, you just have to find it. If you find yourself stuck, there are some important questions to focus on – who are you? How will you focus? What is your agenda? What do you expect and hope to achieve? All of those things make a difference in how you express yourself. I never wanted to be famous, I just wanted to enjoy playing and to always find a combination of different sprinklings.”

STATE OF PLAY 7 Work hard but always play harder… “Force yourself to play on the spot and discover yourself. I don’t stick with one technique or scale because I want to


feature modal man He’s happy to talk styles but just don’t mention modes: “The [scales] are all inside me”

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“there was something in me that was unique and not known in this world...” april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


michael schenker move on and develop to discover new things. If you just go up and down one scale practising, there’s no real point to it other than keeping your fingers conditioned to move. You won’t really develop anything beyond that. So I call it ‘play’ – and play is a recreational place where you don’t score, you just enjoy. “That’s how you reach new places, by enjoying what you play. It’s a bit like going goat hunting, you have to enjoy walking around to find the goats nearby – and actually you enjoy the hunt more when you know you are going to find something. ‘Play’ is just like that! That’s what progresses you… every time I make a new album, there are new discoveries that will be sprinkled all over it and I keep moving forward like that. “Sometimes, you might accidentally over-bend and come up with something that fits perfectly that I never would have thought of. For me, it’s a waste of time just to go through exercises. I like going straight into play and do moves in directions I’ve never gone in before.”

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PERFECT 8 IMPERFECTION It’s the little nuances that

give your guitar playing personality…

“I like the suspense of things when they aren’t 100 percent right. I like hearing things that surprise me so in order to achieve that, I try to play in and out of the key and also with the timing. That’s why it creates this mysterious sound. “Whenever I’m getting ready for a tour when there’s a new album out, I learn all the basics of the lead playing so I can stick with some of it. People expect to hear some songs the way the way they were recorded… you wouldn’t start the solo in Stairway To Heaven any different to how it is. People would be wondering, ‘What happened to that great thing I really wanted to hear?!’ And it’s a fine line: what to keep, what is necessary. You might want to keep the beginning or the really catchy parts that people latch onto. “Learning my own stuff is so hard because it’s in the moment, the rhythm goes out and in by milli-milli-milliseconds. How are you going to know how you felt in that moment when it’s all done completely free? In many ways, there really is no reference point when you are recreating things that were done in the moment – everything should always feel different to the last time you played it.” ToTal GuiTar april 2018

TOUCH TOO 9 MUCH Fast runs are all well and

good, provided they actually arrive somewhere…

“Overly complicated playing is exactly what I stay away from. You do not want to get one single technique into your head, because once that groove is there, you will find it hard to get out of it. “I thought Yngwie Malmsteen was sensational. Even though I wasn’t really listening to other music, some things you can’t ignore – they pop up everywhere. Somebody told me he was really into Reasons Love by UFO, where I play a really fast solo, and he took it a step further himself in a classical way. “The thing with fast playing is that it becomes very repetitive very quickly, especially if you stick to one style, like classical. When things go that fast, you

“i stay away from overly complicated playing” can’t really feel or sit with the notes because it’s always running. “I can almost imagine BB King saying, ‘Is this the note you are looking for, Mr Malmsteen?’ Because it’s like continually searching. That said, Yngwie was fantastic and so was Eddie Van Halen. Like Yngwie, he was everywhere – you couldn’t escape him. “I was fascinated by that first album because I didn’t know how he was doing everything so rhythmically perfectly with a great sense of melody and taste. Unfortunately, then came all the schools in LA where, suddenly, people became stars because they took a shortcut and learned his tapping technique. But all these people learning his style in a crash course, in their thousands, didn’t have that taste or bother learning the things that can’t be taught overnight. Poor Eddie became overexposed and destroyed! That’s why it had to disappear, people didn’t know who was who. When you hear things everywhere and everywhere, you don’t want to hear them anymore… so then came the 90s and it all changed!”

PACE OF MIND 10 There’s only one way to make sure you’re on

the money, says Schenker… “I’ve done a lot of metronome practice, it’s a reference point to make sure you are not slowing down. The mind is a funny thing – without that reference point, you might think you’re playing at a certain speed and actually you’re not. The mind can trick you! When it comes to faster playing, you need to make sure you are ready. A metronome will help you find out if you are near where you should be. “As you get older, you naturally slow down without noticing it! So if you don’t want to slow down, you need to set that reference point and make sure you stay there. It’s like an Olympic swimmer who sets a record: they won’t get any faster but they might want to want to at least stay there and the only way to do that is to time it. It’s like keep fit for guitarists!”

A Decade Of The Mad Axeman is out on 8 March on Inakustik; Ressurection is out on 2 March on Nuclear Blast schenker’s way Not an Olympic swimmer but a world-renowned lead guitarist


feature

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learning to fly Words Rob Laing / Photography Olly Curtis

As BriAn FAllon’s solo Journey Finds him moving into A Freer spAce As A plAyer And writer, we tAlk putting down the pick, stripping BAck the rig And leAving comFort zones ToTal GuiTar april 2018


brian fallon

I

t’s fortuitous timing to meet Brian Fallon during our ‘rhythm and lead’ issue, because through Gaslight Anthem, The Horrible Crowes and now his second solo album Sleepwalkers he’s again proved that his willingness to learn from others and question his own approach as a rhythm player and songwriter makes him an inspiring musician to speak to. “When you’re picking up other styles, you’re constantly learning,” he tells us. “I learn tons of John Frusciante’s licks from the Red Hot Chili Peppers. I’m never going to play like the Chili Peppers but I might use that if I’ve got a dub beat or reggae thing mixed with a soul thing. You can use those pockets, and I think it’s very wise to learn to play rhythmically because that’s really the thing that everyone is missing now. I would get bummed out when I would go and see people play acoustic and at festivals and it would be this onslaught of guitars. I was like, ‘You’re not separating anything.’ It’s essentially like a stream of chords. And when you’ve got your Marshall turned up to eight… the rhythm guitar could not even be there.” It’s not long before we see for ourselves how Brian’s realisations are changing what and how he plays with live band The Howling Weather. And it’s clearly taking him to a good place at the show in Bristol tonight; chatting playfully with the crowd, using a stripped-down rig, playing fingerstyle and even performing Gaslight’s modern classic The ’59 Sound on piano. There’s plenty to catch up on…

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

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feature Have you consciously moved towards playing more fingerstyle?

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“Yes, and that took effort. I was playing with a pick for a long time, and then there were things that I couldn’t get out of it. I’ll strum sometimes and I’ll use a pick, if the whole song is strumming I’ll use a pick. But I find as I get older and learn more about the guitar, I really veer away from strumming. I use little half chords and suspension licks and things like that. It comes from the need to accompany myself because I was playing acoustic sets and it’s such a drag when you’re playing an hour and a half show and just strumming all the time. It’s a real drain on the audience – they’re hearing the same frequency over and over again, the same pattern. Then I would go and see other people play and they would have these little fingerstyle things. And I thought, ‘I wonder if I could change it up like that?’ Then I carried it over to the electric. “The more rhythm you add in your songs, the less you need to play. So I started looking into all the people that were doing that kind of thing, like Mark Knopfler and other fingerstyle guitar players. But I was also looking at players that use picks and adapting that style for fingers. I’ve got to the point where I can do it well. I played a bunch of songs on the record without a pick.”

everything I can do the way I’ve done it for so many years. I had to find something else. And I was so into soul music and R’n’B stuff, I had to add it in, you know? Figure out how to blend it with the punk rock and rock ’n’ roll I grew up on. I know there’s another way to do it. Mark Knopfler was a good guide to me – watching his career. When I first started fingerpicking, the first thing I learned was Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright from Bob Dylan. So I learned that the way that the record is. Because it’s mega fast, Travis-style. But it’s not incredibly difficult if you slow it down to 30bpm. I isolated: my thumb does the three low notes and then my first finger does the third string, my middle finger does the second and my ring finger does the first string. Then my pinky (you’re not supposed to) but I brace it on the guitar. You’re not supposed to do that with proper fingerstyle but that’s too hard. Knopfler does it with three fingers. You just have to slow everything down. If you can learn it slow, the muscle memory will kick in and you can

a couple of stabs to get a melody. Then I’ll play on the piano or the organ and the rhythm will dictate the pace of the vocal and that will dictate the pace of the melody. I definitely don’t sit down with a guitar and strum. That happens almost never. It used to happen but not any more because I know it too well. It’s like too much of an old friend. “On the last record I wrote a lot on the piano, almost all of it. A lot of it on the piano and a lot of it in my head. A couple of things, but not much came from the guitar. I know the guitar really well so it’s tough for me to find new places to go. I have to sort of trick myself. I was never a fan of open tunings, because some people will do that and fumble around. But that’s not my jam.”

You started to play piano last year and you’re playing keys onstage for a few songs now – what prompted you to do that? “I’ve just always wanted to learn the piano and I’ve seen Bruce [Springsteen] do it solo and I think some of those versions of his songs are the most beautiful versions in the world. I’m a giant Tom Waits fan and a giant Tori Amos fan too. I was 37 and I thought, ‘Man I’ve got to learn how to play this thing.’ And I struggled, I still struggle. I’m big time struggling. I’m playing it every night and I’m hitting bad notes but I’m doing it and I’m letting people see me hit bad notes because I don’t want them to think it’s just that he’s got more talent than me. I don’t have more talent than you, I’m just working. The only thing that might separate me from someone else is that I might be able to focus longer and practise harder. I definitely don’t have the most talent. Kids can do it and I hope that it encourages kids: ‘Well, that guy’s fumbling around, why can’t I do it?’”

“there’s never a point when i’m not practising”

For a lot of players that initial transition from pick to fingers can be quite daunting and uncomfortable…

“I practise all the time. There’s never a point when I’m not practising. It’s not something where you can just jump in the driver’s seat and be like, ‘Tonight I’m going to play with my fingers,’ because your fingers will be bleeding and you won’t sound good. You’ll hit a chord and it’ll just sound like ‘splat’. You have to really manipulate it. And no one ever notices, I wonder if anyone does – it might only be for me but I put a lot of effort into it. I don’t want to be a lead player, I don’t want to shred and play fast licks. I just want to be the best rhythm section ever.”

That’s something that is noticeable on the album – rhythmically you’re trying new things. Were you consciously taking yourself away from comfort zones and habits? “Big time because I think I’ve done ToTal GuiTar april 2018

use it fast. That’s how you can do Don’t Think Twice. “So I thought, ‘Okay, I’ve got this on acoustic, what do I do on the electric?’ And really the main guy is Knopfler. He’s the best at it. He can do those heavy riffs in Money For Nothing but he’s got this really cool, pedal steelstyle in Sultans Of Swing and So Far Away. He’s playing pedal steel licks and it’s great. And that spoke to me: ‘What if I mixed that with what I do?’ You’re playing guitar like an organ now. Now you’re covering both bases. So I picked up Romeo And Juliet on the resonator and that pattern. That was hard because it’s got sweeps and stuff in it. But you just isolate everything. Slow slow slow.”

Do rhythms come into the process early with writing now? “I’ll start with it and once I get a rhythm down I’ll start playing along on the guitar but really, really spare. Maybe just

Does it affect your perception when you return to the guitar? “It does make it easier to know where the notes are. My bass player [Nick Salisbury] is insane, the way he plays is so good, and the drummer [Dave Hildago Jr] too. And they’re like, ‘Put the minor third down on the seven’ and I’d be like, ‘What?’ Now I know. They said something to me the other day; ‘Can you flatten the third?’And I would have

rigged up Brian's Custom Shop Wildwood 10 Tele (right) is a back up


brian fallon

the ’18 sound

Brian guides us through his light but very carefully-chosen rig Keeley MeMphis sun

“I don’t use effects much, just once in a while. Every delay pedal will do slapback but I thought it was cool that it was specifically for it. It was just easier to get all those sounds in one little box.”

Catalinbread belle epoCh tape eCho

“The tap tempo is difficult from night to night because we’re particular about the rhythms so we set it. And what I do, like for the timed delay in Come Wander With Me or something like that, it has to be the same every time. So I’ll set it to the record and then I pull the knobs off. So wherever the knobs are when it’s right, I’ll pull all the knobs off and then set them all at noon. That way it never changes, there’s no questions. Because I don’t like to be fiddling – I’ve got enough work to do up there!”

Jhs doublebarrel

“It’s a light overdrive. The left side is their Morning Glory, so I guess you could compare to like a Klon but it doesn’t have that midrange thing like the Klon has and I find if you just put it on a little bit, it can sort of act like a compressor or a really light overdrive. Sometimes you can’t even hear it – the overdrive I mean, you can hear the pedal. It’s mega transparent. Everyone says, ‘This or that pedal is transparent’… but this is transparent. “The other side is their take on the Tube Screamer. I only use that for one song. Even a Tube Screamer with the gain all the way down is too much gain. But sometimes I need to stack it, because otherwise if I’m playing a single-note riff it just sounds thin. JHS put a blend knob in so you can blend your clean signal. So I have the drive all the way off and volume and tone at noon.”

Jhs pulp 'n' peel CoMpressor “If you play as clean as I do sometimes you need that compressor to hold everything together, especially if you’re fingerpicking real fast. It’s based on the Dan Armstrong Orange Squeezer that Mark Knopfler used on Sultans Of Swing. That’s exactly the type of compression I’m going for. I don’t squeeze it too hard. In the studio [Dire Straits] were using Fairchilds and all this other stuff like 1176s, and it’s tough to replicate. The Pulp 'N' Peel is

cool because it does the compression thing, again it has a blend knob, but it also has a little switch on it that adds a little dirt to it, it’s what an 1176 will do.”

JMi 15t

“I have two JMIs and then I have a bunch of Voxs. But do you know the funny thing? I only have one AC30, the rest of them are all Twin AC15s. Because I run mine less than halfway up, it’s not loud. But it’s clean and they’re bright. They work really well with Gibsons. It does everything for me in the way I play clean. The Vox compresses really nice but it doesn’t get muddy. It’s got a nice overdrive that cuts but it’s not too bright. A Fender one takes my head off. But with a Vox the bass and the treble knob are interactive so the more you turn them up, the less midrange you get. So it’s all midrange when they’re off. Then as you turn the bass and the treble up you get less midrange.”

2018 Gibson es-335 anChor stud Vos

“They did a limited run when they took the stoptail out and put the anchor studs in. For me, a 335 feels like I’m playing an acoustic and when I’m playing it onstage, even though it’s electric I get that feeling of being at home and writing. If you put on a Les Paul, a Telecaster or even a Junior you want to rip. But you lose that connection of the songwriter thing. And for me having to put my arm around it and hold it, the same way you do with an acoustic – you’re cradling it. It sort of hugs you back in the chest. I love that I can feel the vibration in the guitar and it does something different – you don’t get it from another guitar. “I have this weird trick where I’m using the AC30 but I use 335s with it with Luther Lee humbucker-size P-90s in them. If one thing is really bright, the other thing has to be really dark. So it’s bright amp, dark guitar, bright and snappy pickup. And I find that position and the way I set the amp, allows me to fingerpick and it doesn’t lose anything without the compressor.” “I think the Bigsby changes the tone of the guitar. If it’s off the 355 it has this weird midrange thing. The Bigsby clamping on there definitely does something. It’s not massive but I think the fingerpicking would go wacky if I took that off.” december 2017 ToTal GuiTar

43


feature had no idea what they were talking about if I hadn’t played piano. The third, the middle finger – put the flat on the third, I’ve got it. Or drop the third; that’s a big AC/DC trick. Play the chord but drop the third. That’s why the chord is so punchy, so it helps big time.”

key man Learning piano has affected the way Brian approaches chord voicings on the guitar

Gaslight moved so fast after The ’59 Sound came out 10 years ago and there seemed to be pressure on the band. Are you able to reflect and take in things a bit more now?

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“i can do a folk, a soul or a punk song...” ToTal GuiTar april 2018

“Definitely. It’s much more satisfying this time, just to be able to travel and do this thing. Before it was so fast and there was so much pressure – sometimes self-inflicted pressure, that I didn’t enjoy any of it. I didn’t see it. But now I’ve sort of gotten licence from people to do what I’m going to do. As long as I stick within my thing… if I released a grime record I don’t know if people would like that! They give me a lot of freedom. They’re like, ‘You want to do a dubby kind of song like Elvis Costello? Cool.’ At the same time I can do a folk or soul or punk song. I’ve got this freedom and I feel lucky to have it because that comes from the people, and I’m able to be free. I feel free. In the band with all the pressure that came with it and as big as the band is, you’re not as free because you do have to please everyone who comes to the shows. You do have to do the thing. When you go to see the Foo Fighters at Wembley they better be playing. There’s no experimenting. No jamming; ‘Yo check out this raga tune.’ People would be fuming, because as a band, you’ve got to go and do the show. “I was so cool with it when I was younger and I was so in because I was burning with excitement; if you’re excited, I’m excited. Bang! Go! And I wanted to do it. Now I just want to do this thing. I want [the audience] to be happy but let me take you on this little trip now. It’s not just about slamming home the excitement: ‘Let me strip this down on the piano, let me play this with a little beat to it, I think I’ve learned something. Follow me along, let me see if you’ll come with me.’ So far it’s been working. But it’s a different thing.”


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ToTal GuiTar march 2018


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PluS GeT a FRee

MARSHAll MS-4 MInI AMP The MS-4 is the ultimate portable mini amp. It may be just 25cm tall, but this tiny stack packs full Marshall tone, with switchable clean and overdrive modes, a tone control for focusing the bass and treble, and an additional gain control (compared with the MS-2). Add a headphone output for rocking in private and to drive an external power amp and you’ve got a mighty mini amp for Marshall sounds anywhere! 47

march 2018 ToTal GuiTar


Cover feature

m a s t e r

rhythm Words Chris Bird, Jon Bishop photography neil godWin 48

F

or every Angus and Malcolm style ‘lead and rhythm’ pairing you encounter, there are just as many lone axe-wielders – players who fill out their sound without a bandmate covering their backs. Jimi Hendrix, Van Halen, Muse, The White Stripes and Royal Blood all spring to mind, but trying to create a bigger sound is something most players will need to think about. This month, we’re taking a look at techniques to help you fill out your sound. From richer chords and a funk rhythm workout to creative lead techniques that will help you break any soloing plateau. Turn the page and let’s get started!

lead Learn the techniques you need to know to become an aLL-round better pLayer with tG’s inspirinG Lessons that cover a whoLe ranGe of Guitar styLes

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


m

go beyond the limits of familiar chords and scales and start playing more creatively

on your disc Find audio tracks for every example on your Guitar Skills CD

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


cover feature track 22

chords to Fill 01 10 out your sound Adding a few choice notes to the basic major, minor and powerchords you already know adds flavour and can help fill out

o

o

o

o o

your sound. Here are 10 tasty shapes to help you create the slick-sounding rhythm parts of your favourite players.

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o o

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3 4 1 Eadd9

2 Emadd9

3 Csus2

4 dadd9add11

5 Cadd11

If you add an F# note to an E chord the expansive sounding Eadd9 is produced. Guitarists like Andy Summers from The Police have used chords like this to great effect.

Start with an Em shape this time and add the F# note for the minor version of the add9 chord. It’s equally lush sounding, but with a darker, mournful vibe.

Add a D note to a C5 powerchord and a Csus2 chord is produced. It works well with a clean or light overdriven tone, strummed or as an arpeggio.

Dadd9add11 has a cool dissonance due to the open third string being only a semitone from the 3rd interval on the fourth string. Great with jangly clean tones.

This is one of several easy changes you can make to the good old open C shape. The name tells you that you’re simply adding in an 11th interval – an F note here.

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6 d6/9

7 Cmaj9

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9 Em11

10 E7#9

As the name suggests, add 6th and 9th intervals to a D chord to make D6/9. It’s heard a lot in rock ’n’ roll, country, rockabilly and it’s a great sound to finish a jazz progression on.

This chord is a little tricky to finger, but it is well worth the effort. It can be moved anywhere on the fretboard and sounds great in the higher registers.

This chord sounds super in blues and funk styles and is easy to play. When strumming, make sure to mute the fifth string by lightly resting a fretting finger against it.

The Em11 sounds huge. The open sixth string adds weight but isn’t essential, so you could move this one around the fretboard using the fifth string as the root note.

Often referred to as the Jimi Hendrix chord, this shape is synonymous with funk-rock and aggressive blues-rock. In E you can add the open first and sixth strings for breadth.

Delay… U2 style Delay Use this simple effect to create rich cascading guitar tones, U2 style

D

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

to match the song’s 125bpm tempo. You’ll have your guitar weaving around itself and filling out your sound quicker than you can say ‘Achtung, baby!’. 5 3

DElAy

FEEDbACk

4

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Kevin Winter /Getty

ave from U2, as his mates call him, ruddy loves nothing more than a bit of modulated delay. To get some of that Where The Streets Have No Name vibe for yourself, set your delay time to a dotted-eighth note rhythm, dial in about three repeats and set the level just below halfway while you play straight eighth notes. Aim for a delay time of around 360ms


master rhythm & lead track 23

strumming 02 practice

TGR304.coverfeature_02.fig02.musx

TGR304.coverfeature_02.fig01.musx

File Date: 16:47 13/02/2018 Page 1 of 1

mixture of 16th-note rhythms. Our drills will be sure to

Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com tighten up your strumming hand and help you deliver a truly solid performance.

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Cover Feature Contributor: Jon Bishop

File Date: 16:47 13/02/2018 Page 1 of 1

No rhythm workout would be complete without at least some attention to your strumming technique. Get your skills up to speed as we take a look at the cool, funky sounds of a

Notes:

16th Note Strumming

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Page 1 of 1 This line will help you establish a basic down-up strumming pattern. Emphasise Notes: the on-beat chords (the first of each group of four strums) then release pressure

File Date: 11:32 16/02/2018 Cover Feature ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ cont. sim. Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Jon Bishop Here the same pattern is ‘moved’ so the offbeats are accented. you may find this Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com one trickier to play even though it is essentially the same thing. Have a good listen

so that the strings are muted in between.

to our version so you can hear how it sounds.

⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ cont. sim.

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Here we mix up the rhythms and a much funkier-sounding part is the result. Remember, the down-up strumming pattern stays the same – it’s just the fretting hand pushing down on the strings that creates the rhythm.

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Play 4 times

Finally, we look at how leaving space can break up the monotony of constant muted strokes. keep moving your picking hand up and down to ensure good timing – just don’t make contact with the strings on the rests.

tracks 24-25

creative with 03 get arpeggio solos TGR304.coverfeature_03.fig01.musx File Date: 12:13 16/02/2018 Page 1 of 1 Notes:

If you feel like you’re stuck in a minor pentatonic rut, give your lead playing a boost by using arpeggios Arpeggio Lead instead of scales. By employing notes from chords, Cover Feature you’ll play something that fits with the music you’re Jon playing over and the widerContributor: intervals offer up Bishop a different kind of melodyEngraved to plodding by through familiar scale shapes. DigitalMusicArt.Com

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51


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bar 1 ends on an E minor arpeggio (E G b) – or Em7 if you include the D note. bar 3 features an A minor arpeggio (using A, C and E notes). This works over the C5 chord because the key of A minor (A b C D E F G) and C major (C D E F G A b) use the same notes.

tracks 26-27

the 04 cover Fretboard by using diagonal scales

go explore Get more from the fretboard with diagonal shapes and expand your creative potential

A great way to go beyond the limits of familiar scales and start playing more creatively is to use a shape that covers more notes. Many major, minor and pentatonic shapes can limit you to one fret position; ‘diagonal’ shapes, however, incorporate position shifts, allowing you to explore the fretboard without leaving the comfort of a pre-learned shape. Take a look at these shapes and try using them to make up your own riffs and licks.

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1 a majOr sCalE using thrEE nOtEs pEr string

2 a natural minOr sCalE using thrEE nOtEs pEr string

by playing three notes on each string you’ll cover lots of ground melodically. If you find this shape a bit of a stretch, try moving it higher or lower along the fretboard for an easier starting point.

1

4 4

4 4

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

3 1

Using the same principle of playing three notes per string, this shape crosses the fretboard with the darker-sounding natural minor scale. Again, try playing it in other fret positions.

1

3 3 3 3 a minOr pEntatOniC sCalE in thrEE pOsitiOns If you can’t live without the minor pentatonic scale, fear not! This ingenious fingering links three shapes into one monster diagonal fingering. Also try a ‘first second fourth’ finger pattern on the fifth and third strings.


master rhythm & lead tracks 28-29

05 rhythmic solo ideas Sometimes less really is more… By limiting how many notes you’re going to use, you can devote more vital grey matter to rhythm and timing – key musical elements that often go overlooked in favour of widdly solos. You TGR304.coverfeature_05.fig01.musx could also employ the rhythm of a famous riff, but replace the notes with yourFile ownDate: melodic ideas.16/02/2018 This is a tried-and-tested method that’s sure to 16:37 fire you up with creativity. Use our simple tab exercises as a springboard Page 1 of own 1 ideas from. to develop your

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TGR304.coverfeature_05.fig02.musx Example A - Two Notes: Rhythm In Solo Lines File Date: 16:35 16/02/2018 Cover Feature Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Jon Bishop

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1/4

1/4

13

13

13

Cm

œ

b & b b 44 ..

.. . .

. .

T A B

TGR304.coverfeature_05.fig03.musx File Date: 11:38 16/02/2018 of 1 we have only the C and E b notes to play with and we’ve used a InPage the first1example simple yet effective rhythm. Add another note to take the lick somewhere new. Notes:

œ

œ œ

1/4

1/4

1/4

1/4

11

8

11

8

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ~~~~ 1/4

1/4

8 11

1/4

~~~~

1/4

11 8

8

8 11 8

.. . .

Example C - Four Notes: Rhythm In Solo Lines Cover Feature This example follows the contour of our first lick but a G note helpsJon buildBishop Contributor: excitement. you’ll be playing in a different fret position, which can offer new Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com phrasing options too.

3 fOur nOtEs

b 4 & b b 4 .. ‰

Cm

T A B

. .

œ J

œ

œ

œ

1/4

œ

œ

œ

œ

1/4

12

11

11 12

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ œ œ. œ J

œ

1/4

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1/4

13

12

11

..

11

13

12

. .

[13 ]

This example expands on our established rhythm, adding in a fourth flavour from a bb note. bring the melody to life with string bends and vibrato, then take it somewhere new.

Pitch shifter… royal BlooD-style octaves No bassist? No problem! Fill out the bottom end with a pitch shifter

Mike Lewis Photography/Redferns

y

ou can replicate the sound of a guitar and bass playing an octave apart by using a pitch shifter (or the simpler octaver) to shift your pitch to an octave down, then blending in your original signal too. Royal Blood’s Mike Kerr does this in reverse, playing bass guitar with an octave-up setting instead. Try it also

with some single-note pentatonic runs and you’ll be guaranteed to be pumping out hefty RATM/Zeppelin riffs in no time. 50%

-12

PITCH

blEnD

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

53


cover feature tracks 30-33

and response… an easy 06 call way to develop any lick TGR304.coverfeature_06.fig01.musx

Call and Response

File Date: 16:38 16/02/2018 Established by early blues artists, the idea of call and response is Page 1 of 1 inspired by the trading of vocal lines in workers’ songs. At its Notes: simplest, one person sings a line before another sings a line back,

Cover Feature developing the melody as they go. Think like this when play Contributor: Jon you Bishop and you’ll give your solos a solid sense of direction whatever style Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com of music you play.

1 ClassiC bluEs OpEnEr q = 123

C7

b œ œ~~~~~~ . œ

j 4 .. œ ˙ &4

j œ

~~~~~~

11 TGR304.coverfeature_06.fig02.musx 13 . 13 (15) T File 16:41 13/02/2018 A Date: . B Page 1 of 1 Notes: BU

BU

10 (11 )

j œ

BU

11 (12)

j œ

œ

BU

12 (13)

j œ

BU

13 (14)

j œ

œ

j œ

BU

13 (15)

b œ œ~~~~~~ . œ

œ

BU

13 (15)

11

1/4

~~~~~~

13

Œ

Ó

..

1/4

Call and Response . Cover Feature . Contributor: Jon Bishop Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com 11

Our first example uses a classic blues idea as the opening line. An upward run of string bends builds the excitement before the opening idea is repeated to finish the lick. Try applying the same approach with your own lead ideas.

2 rEpEat an OCtavE highEr

b œ ˙~~~~~~~~ ‰ œj œJ œ . b œ œ œ œ b œ 4 . œ . b œ ‰ . &4 œ J ~~~~~~~~ BU BD . T (12 ) (10 ) 8 8 10 8 A 10 10 8 . 8 10 10 B C7

54

10

Œ

j bœ

œ . b œ ˙~~~~~~~~~

11 13

11

~~~~~~~~~

13

œ œ . b œ ˙~~~~~~~~~~ .. ‰ J j œ

BU

13 (15)

13

11

~~~~~~~~~~

13

Here in our second example the opening idea is restated as a response in bar 3, but played an octave higher. The octave up idea is a top trick and is used in many songs and solos. blues greats such as bb king and Eric Clapton are masters of this approach.

flanger… in a Bottle Get the Police guitarist’s famously rich tone with this well-known effect

P

lug in a flanger pedal, dial in these settings and you should hear something close to the classic Andy Summers-style modulation sound. The overall effect is actually very similar to what you might associate with a chorus but, in fact, the Police guitar legend often used a flanger pedal to produce his signature sound. Compared to a bare clean tone you’ll notice more richness and an overall fuller sound.

Jorgen Angel/Getty

5

RATE

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

7

DEPTH

6

FEEDbACk

bring me the chorus Summers simulated the effect of a chorus by using a flanger pedal

. .


master rhythm & lead tracks 34-50

07 blurring the lines… Many guitar techniques, perhaps most, can’t really be categorised as either purely for rhythm or purely for lead, and a ‘chords and solos’ way of thinking may actually limit your creativity. Here we’re looking at a mixture of ideas that bridge the gap between rhythm TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig01.musx and lead. They are, of course, short examples but play19/02/2018 through each one with the aim of File Date: 12:12 developing the musical ideas. Each line could Page 1 of 1 easily be more focused on lead or more on Notes: chords... or neither. It’s up to you!

Crossover Exercises - Octave Melodies

crossing the bridge Cover Feature blues, jazz, funk, country... our 10 examples show how Contributor: Jon Bishop to combine rhythm and Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com lead in any genre

1 OCtavEs fighting On thE grEEn

traCks 34-35

q =160

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

C5

G5

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 44 .. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

.9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 T A .7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 B TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig02.musx

F5

C5

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

12

12

12

12

10

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9

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9

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G5

G/B

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 7

7

7

7

4

4

4

4

. .

7 7 7 Exercises 5 5 5- Open 5 2 string 2 2pedaling 2 Crossover File Date: 12:12 19/02/2018 Cover Feature Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Jon Bishop This punk-rock riff is inspired by bands like Green Day and Foo Fighters, who often use octaves to form melodies. Holding down the octave shape means you can’t indulge in Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com widdly solos, so you’ll more likely be focusing on the melody and how it works with the chord progression. The technique is also used a lot in jazz. cont. sim.

2 pEdal tOnEs liCk Of thE bay q =140

C

œ & 44 .. œ

œ

œ

œ

traCk 36

œ œ

Em

œ

œ œ œ

let open third string ring throughout

5 8 .5 T 0 A . 3 3 7 B TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig03.musx

8

0

œ œ

œ j œ œ ‰

G

8

œ œ

12

0

œ 12

œ œ

F

œ œ œ

10

œ

œ j œ œ ‰ ..

10

0

. .

10

8 8 8 - Melodic 8 8 Crossover Exercises Chord Fills File Cover Feature Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Jon Bishop James bay fills out his sound in songs such as Hold back The River and let It Go by allowing the open third string to ring out (known as a pedal tone) with his two-note chords. Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com m p i m Date:p 11:47 16/02/2018

7

m p

p

7

i

7

p

m

p

7

m

10

10

p cont. sim.

Try our simpler lick, which should be played fingerstyle. There are only really two chord shapes here – the all-important open string provides the colour.

3 ChOrd fills wing it q = 90

# 4 œœ & # 4 .. œœ T A B

. .

D

7 7 7 5

traCks 37-38

œœ œœ œœ 10 9

12 11

œ œ œ œ

10 9 7

9

7 7

j œ

7

œœ

œœ

7 9

7 7

œœ

œœ œ œœ

7 9

7 7

9

7 7

œ 9

œ œ œ œ. 7

9

7 7

.. . .

In this example we stack notes of the D major pentatonic scale to provide a cascade of fills that are beautifully melodic, but without the thin sound you sometimes get with single-note solos. Jimi Hendrix was a master and players like Stevie Ray vaughan and John Mayer have adopted similar approaches.

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

55


cover feature

most guitar techniques can’t really be categorised as either purely for rhythm or purely for lead 56

ToTal GuiTar january 2018


TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig04.musx

Crossover Exercises - Jazz Style Chord Melody

Cover Feature

File Date: 12:12 19/02/2018

Contributor: Jon Bishop master rhythm & lead

Page 1 of 1 Notes:

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

4 jazz ChOrd mElOdy mmm, niCE! q =120

# 4 œ & # 4 .. œœœ

Em11 4 1 3

2

œ

A 13

œ

œ

1

traCk 39

4 2 1 1

8 . 107 T 7 A 9 9 . 7 B TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig05.musx let ring throughout

œœ œ œ

3

1 2 1 1

7 6 5

6

œ œœ œ

1

Dmaj 7 4 2 3 1

5

5 6 5

5

œ

œœ œœ

1

˙.

..

Œ

. .

5

7 6 7 5

5

˙.

Crossover Exercises - Blues Cover Feature

File Date: 12:11 14/02/2018

Page of 1 harmony and tough playing techniques, jazz guitar strikes fear in the heart of most players, but you can get started with this Contributor: Jon Bishop With often1complex simple, yet sophisticated chord melody. The challenge is making sure you leave the correct finger free to play the melody notes that follow each chord. Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com Notes: 5 ChOrd tOnEs bluE riffing

traCks 40-41

q =123

~~~~~ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

j œ œ ~~~~ bb b 4 .. ‰ j œ & 4 œ ¿ œ ‰ J Cm7

~~~~

11 (13) . T 8 7 A . ¿ 10 B TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig06.musx

BU

8

11 8

11 10 8

10

10

10

œ ‰ œœ œ ‰ J J 1/4

~~~~~

8

10 8

10

œ

œ

~~~~ ¿ œ œ Œ ~~~~

1/4

8

8 8

10

8

10

10

¿

7

.. . .

Crossover Exercises - Funk File Date: 12:11 19/02/2018 Cover Feature Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Bishop The G and Eb notes in bar 1 are found in the Cm7 chord (C Eb G bb ) they’re played over – giving a sense of the chord in the lick itself. After a blues scale run the initialJon lick is repeated Notes:at the end in a true call-and-response fashion. Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com 6 funk grOOvE lE liCk, C’Est ChiC Am7 ¿¿ ¿¿ # œœ. 4 ¿ ¿ . œ . &4 œ q =100

traCks 42-43

¿¿ œœ Œ

¿¿ ¿¿ 7 ¿¿ 5 . T 7 5 ¿ ¿ A .5 7 B TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig07.musx ⇥

⇥ ≤ ⇥

⇥ ≤

¿¿ ¿

¿¿ ¿¿ ¿ ¿

¿¿ ¿ ⇥

¿¿¿ ⇥

¿¿ ¿ ≤

¿ œ ¿ œ ¿ œ ⇤ ¿ œ œ œœ œœ œ

œ

¿

4

5

¿

4

¿

¿

4

⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ ≤

5

7

5 5

5 5

7

.. . .

Crossover Exercises - Country ≤ ⇥ ⇥ ≤ ⇥ File Date: 12:10 19/02/2018 Cover Feature Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Bishop Inspired by guitarists like nile Rodgers and Jimmy nolen this riff features chords and muted pick strokes punctuated with staccato single-note lines. This mixJon of techniques and sounds gives a groovy, percussive rhythm style, peppered with melodic interest too. A little compression and reverb are theEngraved icing on a funky Notes: bycake. DigitalMusicArt.Com

7 fingErstylE COuntry living q =140

D7

# 4 & # 4 .. œj 3

T A B

. .

1 2

œ œ

let treble notes ring throughout

traCk 44

D 7/A

3

œ

3 5 p

4

5

4 m p

5 p

i

D7

2

œ

œ œ

œ

3 4 p

5 m p

4 p

D 7/A

œ

œ

3

5

i

œ

4 5 p

m

p

.. . .

Our country-style, fingerpicked groove combines a bassline with chords and a melody all in one. Practise the bassline on its own to begin with – use your thumb for this. you can then add in the melody notes and bring the part up to speed. Our D7 chord is the same as an open C7 shape, but played two frets higher.

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

57


TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig08.musx

Crossover Exercises - Polyphonic Melodicism

File Date: 12:10 19/02/2018

Cover Feature

Cover feature Page 1 of 1 Notes:

Contributor: Jon Bishop Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

8 ChOrds and lEad strait talkin’ q =140

#4 & 4 ..

j

œœœ œ J ‰ œœœ ‰ ‰ œœœ J J

Em

traCks 45-46

G/B

D/A

2 1 3

œœ œ

1 1 1

8 . 10 (12)(10)(12) T 7 A 9 . B TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig09.musx

Œ

j œ 3

4

œœ œœ œ œ œ 1

3

Em

œœ‰ Œ

œœ œ ‰ ‰ œœœ J J

G/D

D

œœ œ

Œ

j 3œ

~~~~ œ œ œ J ‰ .. 2

~~~~

BU BD BU

7 7 7

10 10 9 (11) 9 BU

10 7

9

12 12 12

7 9

10 11 12

15

[15 ]

14 16

. .

Crossover Exercises - Funk Rock

File Date: 12:10 19/02/2018

Cover Feature

Page 1 of to 1 intertwining lead lines and chords with his vocals, Mark knopfler is one of rock’s very best. Take a look at our Dire Straits-inspired Contributor: Jon When it comes lick and you’ll seeBishop a mix of lead fills, two- and three-note chords, plus bending, sliding, hammer-ons and vibrato. Despite all the action, our lick isn’t too challenging. Just practise slowly! Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com 9 OpEn strings in riffs funky rOCky

traCks 47-48

q =105

# E7 9

# # # 4 ~~~~~ n ‹ œœœ & # 4 .. œ J œ œ ~~~~~ 8 . T 7 A 6 . 7 B

j œ

4 3 1 2

58

2

# C7 9

œœ œœ œœ œœ n œœ R 0 4

0 4

œ

0 0

2

2

b œœœ ... nœ. 4 3 2 3

œ œœ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ œ œœ

1/4

3 3

4 3 2 3

¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿ ¿¿¿

1 1

n œœ

œ nœ. . .

1/4

14 14

12 12

14 12

. .

TGR304.coverfeature_07.fig10.musx Crossover Exercises - EVH Rock 0 0 File Date: 12:09 19/02/2018 Cover Feature Pageto1their of resonant 1 Contributor: Jon Bishopby Thanks nature, open strings can really fill out your sound. The E7#9 chord we looked at earlier is also used to great effect here in this funk-rock riff inspired guitarists Notes:such as John Frusciante and Richie kotzen. The muted 16th-note strumming adds in that funky quality to the proceedings. Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com 10 harmOniCs and trEmOlO piCking halE tO thE king q =125

E5

D5

E5

#4 œ œ & 4 .. Jœ ‰ ‰ œœ œœ œ Œ J 3 3

T A B

. .

1 1

9 9

7 7

9 9

D5

2 1

traCks 49-50 E5

œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ 1

‚‚ .. ‚ ‚‚ ‚

w/bar

NH

w/bar 8 7

7 9 9

7 7

9 9

7 7

(4) (7) (4) (7)

œ @

œ @

A5

œ @

œ @

˙~~~~~~~~~~~

13

12

13

12

10

C5

@

@

@

@

~~~~~~~~~~~

.. . .

Maybe it was thanks to sheer virtuosity, but despite being van Halen’s sole guitarist in the early days, Eddie always seemed to fill in the gaps. To keep things interesting in our typical EvH line, the two-note chords keep changing and then we switch to a whammy-bar harmonic and a fast tremolo-picked line.

harmoniser… twin-gUitar lines Need another guitarist? You might just get away with a harmoniser

t

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

within the scale as you run up and down. If the song includes ‘out of key’ notes, simply switch your pedal off during the more troublesome moments. 50% 3rds

HARMOny

blEnD

Paul Natkin /Getty

hree-part harmony lines? You can do that with a pitch shifter or harmoniser effect. Get your Maidenstyle lead lines and Thin Lizzy twin-guitar licks on by setting your harmoniser effect to a 3rd, 5th or a combination of both intervals. If your pedal has the option to select major or minor, along with the key, you can make sure that it stays


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ja m t r ac k jam track play guitar with a band!

AlternAtive rock Dust off your delay pedal for an atmospheric and experimental jam session with this month’s alt-rock style backing track

T

60

his month’s jam track is inspired by legendary alt-rock bands such as U2, Radiohead and Muse, and has three sections for you to jam along to. The verse and pre-chorus follow the same four chords (D5, D5/A, Bb and Csus2); the chorus uses three chords (D5, Em7 and Fmaj9) and we have included a fingering for every shape so you can jam along on rhythm guitar. These chords use notes from the key of D minor so the D natural minor scale will sound great throughout the track,

providing a pool of notes for simple melodies and blazing solos alike. We recommend experimenting with textural ideas to give the track some variation during the repeating chord progression. Think about how loud or soft you play, your amp tone, including dirty fuzz and distortion sounds, as well as cleaner, more atmospheric tremolo, phaser and delay effects, which sound great in the verse and chorus. Octave-based melodies are a suitably authentic way of filling out your sound too.

scAles

T

he D natural minor scale (D E F G A Bb C) provides all the notes you need to jam your solo ideas along to the track. For a bluesy burst, try using the D minor pentatonic scale (D F G A C) – all the notes are contained within the natural minor scale, but the two-notes-perstring layout makes it better suited to a blues feel. 1

9 1

1

1

2

chords

D

5 is a basic powerchord; D5/A is the same shape, except you play the open fifth string. The rest of the chords adapt the powerchord shape to incorporate an open string in the midrange. Play the lowest note of each shape with your first finger to make the position shifts easier – your other fingers should fall roughly into position. x

1

5

1

x x

3 3 4

x

o

x x

1

5

3 4

3 4

D5

D5/A

4

1

1

1

1

3

o

x x

x

x

o

x

x

Bb

x

o

x

1 1

3 4

3 3

3

4

1

4 4 4

D minor pentatonic scale

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

Csus2

Em7

Fmaj9

Guitars and backing: Jon Bishop Photography: Carrie Davenport

1

x

3

D natural minor scale 1

x x

4 4

4 4

10

o

1

2 3

x


TGR304.lick4jam.fig01.musx File Date: 14:45 09/02/2018

90's Alt Rock Lick Lick 4 Jam

backing track (track 51)

Page 1 This ofsong 1 comes with a backing track on your CD. Simply insert the disc in your player, press play and jam along, guitaraoke style! Notes:

Contributor: Jon Bishop Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

jam track / 90s alt-rock

jam traCk 90s alt-rock harmonics q =118

‚. # & # 44

D 5/A

0:15

T A B

NH

w/delay 381ms

12

‚ J 12

TRACK 51

‚.

‚ J

Bb

¥

12

This simple, yet effective line uses natural harmonics with a delay pedal. Lightly touch the string over the specified fret, and, as you strike the string, lift your finger to sound the harmonic. If your delay pedal has a dotted eighth setting then dial this in for a cool ambience with a U2-style rhythmic feel.

jam track

A-Mus e Yo ur self 61

Cheat sheet

tempo 118bpm time signature 4/4 key/scale d minor

Verse

||: D5 / / / | D5/A / / / | Bb / / / | / / Csus2 / :|| x4 Pre-chorus

||: D5 / / / | D5/A / / / | Bb / / / | / / Csus2 / :|| chorus

||: D5 / / / | Em7 / / / | Fmaj9 / / / | / / / / :||

Try elaborating those gentle verse arpeggios with some extra notes from D minor. The pre-chorus is heavier so kick in with a drive tone and a more aggressive rhythm. The chorus chords ascend in pitch; so, whether your lead lines rise or fall, try to lock in with the ‘contour’ of the chord changes.

April 2018 ToTal GuiTar


cl assic T r ac k

Cream White Room Get your wah-wah skills and blues phrasing sorted with TG’s transcription from the supergroup’s classic album, Wheels Of Fire 62

Photography: iNa /Getty Guitars and backing: phil Capone

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


cl assic T r ac k

E

SOUND aDVICe

ric Clapton’s importance in the history of rock can’t be overstated. He was an early pioneer of overdrive. Later with Cream his blistering wah-wah solos would inspire legions of players. There are two ways to use a wah-wah in your solos. The first is to rock the wah pedal in time with the music as if tapping your foot to the beat. The second is to open and close the pedal slowly to create expressive vocal-like sounds. Experimentation is vital to this approach because you have to match the rhythm of the wah with the phrases you play. Eric uses both techniques in White Room and he occasionally rocks the pedal in ‘double time’ when playing a repeated lick to create psychedelic effects. Check out bars 7 and 8 of the solo for an example.

Everything you need to know before playing White room

Get the tone 4

7

10

BASS

MiD

TREBLE

x

x

1

should have a suitable patch. Use a Vox

Use a humbuckerequipped guitar and select either the bridge or middle position. Dial in plenty of treble for a biting attack to your sound.

x

x

x

1

7

1

o

x

o

x

o

x

1

o

x

1

1

1

D5

3

3

3

3

single-pickup Firebird. One hundred-watt

and his volume! Any digital modelling rig

x x

1

7

Eric used his Gibson ES-335 and

4x12 cabinets were key to Eric’s tone,

N

o

bridge position – on Cream’s final tour

REVERB

Marshall Super Lead amps paired with

otice that Eric uses a lot of inversions here; for example, C/E and C/G contain the same three notes (C, E and G) but the slash chords are played with E and G in the bass. They’re essentially still C chords – just with the notes in a different order. It’s the same with Bb/D and Bb/F, A/C# and A/E, and with D/F# and D/A too. Try to think of these as more the basic C, Bb, A and D chords and you may find things a little easier. x

D/F#

SCaleS

E

ric’s lead style is based heavily around the minor pentatonic scale – and three shapes of this one scale feature in White Room, with only a few other ‘outside’ notes to be found. Shape 1 is the basis for most of Eric’s soloing here. Verse 2 sees him dip briefly into the blues scale. In bar 9 of verse 3 he heads up the fretboard to shape 3; and bar 7 of the solo is an example of shape 2. Practise the shapes shown here and notice how Eric moves fluently through them.

12

Gm/Bb

G/B

D/A

or Cry Baby wah pedal for the soloing.

1

1

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x x

x

1

1

1

1

3 3

x

x

o

x

A/E

o

x

x

2 2

4

4

E minor pentatonic scale (shape 1)

1

2

3

x

x x

x x

1

x

x

1

12

x

2

1

3

1

2

4 4

3 3

Bb/F

Csus2

C5

4

4 4

E minor pentatonic scale (shape 2)

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C/G

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4 4

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3 1

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5

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3 4 4

16 x

1

14

1

3

3

A/C#

1

3 3

4

3

G

1

1

1 2

1

x x

x

1 1

1

2 3

x

‘woman tone’, White Room is not a prime example of Eric’s signature

equipped guitar set either to a middle or

10

GAin

hough famed for his Cream-era

sound. You’ll need a humbucker-

3

ChOrDS

x

T

ChAnnEL OVERDRiVE

4

3 3 4 4 4

4

E minor pentatonic scale (shape 3)

E blues scale

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

63


cl assic T r ac k

Cream

TGR304.cream.fig01.musx

full tab

White Room File Date: 13:19 13/02/2018 Page 1 of 1 Notes:

WhIte Room Words and Music by Jack Bruce and Peter Brown © 1968 Dratleaf Music Ltd. Warner Chappell Music UK/EU reproduced by kind permission of Faber Music US/CAn reproduced by kind permission of hal Leonard Corporation All Rights Reserved. international Copyright Secured

White Room Cream

Contributor: Phil Capone Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

Cream White Room Intro q =108

~~~~~~~~~~~~ ˙. ˙

~~~~~~~~~~~~ ˙. ˙

Gm

& b 45 ..

~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ˙. ˙

F

~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~~~~~~~~~~

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C

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Am7

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Dm

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~

10

. .

8

8

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

White Room

File Date: 13:23 13/02/2018 Cream Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Phil Capone There are three harmony parts in this section. We’ve tabbed the highest and left the lower two parts on the backing track for you to play along to. Don’t forget this section Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com is inNotes: 5/4, which means you’ll need to count to five to stay in time with each bar of music. Our audio track has five clicks to count you in. Cream White Room Verse 1 D5

64

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3 . ( 232 ) T 2 A 0 0 . TGR304.cream.fig03.musx B

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(

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..

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let ring

. .

3 0 0

2

œœ œ 3 0 0

White Room

1

File Date: 13:51 13/02/2018 Cream Page 1 of 1 Contributor: Phil Capone Lower your guitar’s volume slightly for a cleaner tone here – you’ll be turning back up when you reach the lead guitar parts later on. Keep your third finger on the 3rd fret of Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com the second string throughout the descending riff. The bracketed notes are not always sounded, so you can choose whether you want to play them.

Cream White Room Bridge (guitar 1)

& b 44 .. 0:58

. .

T A B

w ww

j œ

5 5 7

0

C/E

j œ

5

B b/D

G/B

w n ww

j œ

0 0 2

3

A/C #

1.

ww w

j nœ

3 3 5

..

w # ww

. .

2 2 4

2

1

2.

&b T A B

D/F #

C/E

j œ

ww w 5 5

5 7

j œ

7

œ # œœ 7 7 9

j œ

œœ œ 7 7

7 9

j œ

œ œœ 7 7

7 9

j œ

œœ œ 7 7

7 9

j œ

7

œ # œœ .

Œ

Ó

7 7 9

5

This rhythm part uses some cool ‘first inversion’ chord shapes, which means that the 3rd interval in each chord is in the bass instead of the root note. They’re easy to play – just barre across all three strings with your first finger and hammer on the lower notes with your third finger.

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


WhiteCream Room

TGR304.cream.fig04.musx File Date: 13:56 13/02/2018 File Date: 13/02/2018 Page 1 of 13:56 1

Cream Contributor: Phil Capone Phil Capone EngravedContributor: by DigitalMusicArt.Com Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

PageFull 1 oftRack 1 + BackIng (tRacks 52-53) Notes: This song comes with a full demo track and a backing track (minus guitar) on your CD. Simply insert the disc in Notes: your player, press play and jam along, guitaraoke style!

Cream / White room

Cream White Room Bridge (guitar 2)

ww .. C/G w .. www

& b 444 & b0:584

T A T B A B

. . .

0:58

1

B b/F

n www n www

C/G

3 4 5 3 4 5

.. ..

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B b/F

G

5 5 5 5 5 5

1.

w www ww

G

1.

3 3 3 3 3 3

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2 2 2 2 2 2

1

2.

#D/A ˙˙ # ˙˙˙ ˙

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C/G

œ nœ œ œ nœ œ

D/A

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N.C. N.C.

œ. œ.

œ œ

Œ Œ

Ó Ó

White Room WhiteCream Room TGR304.cream.fig05.musx File Date: 14:00 13/02/2018 White Room TGR304.cream.fig05.musx 5 7 T Date: File 13/02/2018 Cream Page 15of 14:00 1 Contributor: White Phil Capone 7 7 7 7 Room TGR304.cream.fig05.musx A Date: File 14:00 13/02/2018 Cream 5 7 7 9 9 5of 1 7 T Page 1 Contributor: Phil Capone B 5 7 7 7 7 Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com File 13/02/2018 Cream A5 Date: Page 15of 14:00 1 Contributor: Phil Capone 7 7 9 9 Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com B 1 of 1 Page Contributor: Phil Capone Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com 5 ThisNotes: second guitar part matches the chords played by guitar 1, this time using ‘second inversions’ with the 5th interval of each chord occupying the low end. Create the Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com wah-wah sound by rocking your foot – from heel to toe – once on every beat. Keep this action going when you reach the lead lick in bar 6.

& bb 444 & b1:194 & 44 b4 & 1:19 T 1:19

D5

Csus 2

D5

Csus 2

A T B A T B A T1 B 1 A B1

Bb5 Bb5

G/B G/B

Csus 2

Bb5

G/B

C5

D5

C5 C5

D5 D5

Œ Œ Œ Œ

C5

D5

1:19

& bb &b & &b T 1

A T B A T B A T5 B 5 A B5 5

& bb &b & &b T

A T B A T B A T9 B 9 A B9

& bb &b & &b T 9

D5

Bb5

G/B

5 Csus 22 Cream WhiteDRoom Verse

œ œ œ2 j œ œCsus j œ œ Csus 2

2 j Csus œ 2 Csus j

Csus 2

G/B

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Bb5 Bb5 Bb5 Bb5

G/B G/B

C5 C5 C5 C5

œ œ œ œ

D5

Œ DŒ5 Œ Œ D5 D5

10 10 10 10

D5

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1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4

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G/B

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G/B

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Ó Ó Ó Ó

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C5

D5

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8 10

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10 10

12 12

10 10

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8 10

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10 10

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13

13 13

13

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j œ b5 jB œ j œ j œ

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12

(14) 12 BU

10 10

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12 C5

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april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

65


cl assic T r ac k

White Room

TGR304.cream.fig06.musx

Cream Contributor: Phil Capone

File Date: 14:10 13/02/2018 Page 1 of 1

Cream White Room Verse 3 Notes:

D5

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

Csus 2

G/B

œ. œ. œ. œ œœ ‰ J

& b 44 Œ

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j œ

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BU 12 (14 )

12

BU 12 (14 )

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10

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14 12 14

12 10 12

C5

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12 12

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1

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14

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14

15

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15

15

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16

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17

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17

15

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œ BU

15

BD (18)

5

66

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(17)

15

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16

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n œ.

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18 15

17

G/B

18 15

18 15

17

17

18

15

17

18

15

17

18

15

17

18

15

17

18

15

17

18

15

8

Csus œ œ~~~~œj n œ œ œ~~~~ J ‰ &b ‰ D5

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2

~~~~

15

15

14 16

~~~~

15

15

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14 16

15

15

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15

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15

15

14 16

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15

14 16

15

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15

17 (19)

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~~~ ~~~~~ . ‰ œ n œ. œ œ ~~~

17

15

~~~~~

15

16

16

11

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(19)

œ BD

(17)

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17

j œ

# œ.

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15

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~~~~~~ œ # œ œ

15

15

15

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16

~~~~~~

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(19)

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j œ

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œ nœ

(17)

15

17

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Bb5

C5

~~~~~~ . œ œ ~~~~~~

15

15

14

Whereas verse 2 has lots of space, here you’ll be soloing pretty much constantly. Take note of the various position shifts – if you’re ready to move you’ll find it easier to hit the first note of each new phrase and keep your timing steady. Keep your wah foot moving slowly during the longer notes in bars 3 to 6.

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


Full tRack + BackIng (tRacks 52-53)

Room Cream /White White room WhiteCream Room

TGR304.cream.fig07.musx This song comes with a full demo track and a backing track (minus guitar) on your CD. Simply insert the disc in your player, press play13/02/2018 and jam along, guitaraoke style! TGR304.cream.fig07.musx File Date: 14:20

Cream Contributor: White Phil Capone Room White Room Phil Capone EngravedContributor: by DigitalMusicArt.Com Cream Cream EngravedContributor: by DigitalMusicArt.Com Phil Capone Phil Capone EngravedContributor: by DigitalMusicArt.Com

File Date: 13/02/2018 Page 1 of 14:20 2 TGR304.cream.fig07.musx TGR304.cream.fig07.musx Page 1 of 2 Notes: File Date: 14:20 13/02/2018 Cream White Room solo File Date: 13/02/2018 Notes: Page 1 of 14:20 2 Page 1 of 2 Notes: Notes:

& b 444 b4 & 4:05 b 44 & 4:05 T b 4 & 4:054 A T B A1 T B A T1 B A B1

4:05

œ œ œ œ

j D5

œ j 5 œ D 5 jD œ j œBU

A T4 B A B4 4

œ œ œ œ

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&b &b &b T b & A T B A9 T B A T9 B A B9 9

&b &b &b T b & A T B A11 T B A T11 B A B11

12 10

15

13

15

13

15

13

15

œ œ œ œ

13 13 13 13

~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ Dœ5 5 D ~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ 12 ~~~~~~~ 12 ~~~~~~~ D5 D5

12 12

œ~~~~~~~~~ Dœ5~~~~~~~~~ D 5~~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~~ 10 10~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ 10 D5

10

œ œ œ œ

12 10

13

D5

Bb5

12 10

œ œ œ œ

13

Bb5

12 10

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13

10

G/B

D5

13

10

G/B

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13

10

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4

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10

12 (14)

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12

10 12

12 12 12

10 10

œ œ Csus 2 œ 2œ Csus œ œ œ œ 1/4 1/4

1/4 1/4 1/4

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13

15

13

15

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12 12 12 12

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12

10

12

10

12

10

12

10

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13 13 13 13

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D5 D5

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15

13

15

13

15

13

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13

15

13

15

13 13

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13

15

13

15

12 12 12 12

œ. œ. œ. œ.

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Csus 2

10

12

10

12

10

12

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10

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10

12

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12

10

12

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12

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12 12 12 12

12

10

12

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12

12

10

12

10

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12 (14 )

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13 13 13 13

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Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

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13

10

12

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10

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12

10

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G/B

2 Csus j

10 12

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œ G/B œ G/B œ G/B œ

Csus 2

G/B

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œ œ œ œ

(12 )

12 (14)

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12

10

12 (14)

12

10

12

10

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10

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15

13

15

13

15

13

15

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12

œ œ œ œ

12 12 12 12

œ œ œ œ Bœb 5 œ œ œ Bœb 5 œ œ œ œ œ œ 13 13 13 13 13

Bb5 Bœb 5

13

15

13

15

13

15

13

15

œ œ b 5 œ B 3 Bœb 5 œ œ 3œ 10

12 3

10

10

3 12

10

10

12

10

10

12

10

œ œ œ œ

Csus 2

13 13 13

œ œ œ œ

10 10 10

12 12 12

Bb5 12

~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~ 10 10~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~ 10 10

C5

C5 œ B˙b~~~~~~~~~~ 5 C5 œ B˙b~~~~~~~~~~ 5 C5 ~~~~~~~~~~ ˙ œ ~~~~~~~~~~ œ ˙ 12 14~~~~~~~~~~ 12 14~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 12 14 Bb5

10 12 14

œ œ œ œ

C5

14

œ œ C5 œ œ 12

10

14

12

10

14

12

10

14

12

10

œ œ œ œ

C5

C5 C5

œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ

12

10

12

10

12

10

12

10

œ œ œ œ

œ Cœ5 Cœ5 œ 10

œ œ 3 œ 3œ

12 3

10

10

3 12

10

10

12

10

10

12

10

œ œ œ œ

C5

10

œ. œ. C5 . Cœ5 œ. 13

10

13

10

13

10

13

10

13

10

13

10

13

10

œ œ œ œ

13

œ œ œ œ

Bb5 œ. Bb5

œ. . Bœb 5 œ. Bb5

œ. œ. œ.. œ

12 12 12 12

C5

C5

œ. œ. œ.. œ

12 12 12 12

œ œ œ œ

11

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar

67


cl assic T r ac k 2 Csus 2 œœ œ Csus œœ 2 œœ œ Csus œ œ œ œ

Cream White Room solo (continued) D5

œ œ œœ œœ œœ Dœ5 œ b & &b œ œ œ œ œ &b 5 D D5

T T A A B T B13 A 13 B13

13 13 13

10 10 10

13 13 13

13 13 13

13

10

13

13

D5 5 D D5

Dœ5 œ b & &b œ &b 13

T T A A B T B15 A 15 B15

D5 5 D5 D

b & &b &b

68

17

œœ œ

j 5 œjj D œœ j œ BU BU BU (14) 12 (14)) 12 12 (14 BU 12 (14)

œœ œ

12 12 12

10 10 10

12

10

(15)

13

15

D5 5 D5 D

13 13 13

13 13 13

13 13 13

13

10

13

10

13

10

13

13

œœ œ

œœ œ

13 13 13

10

13

œœ œ

12 12 12

12 12 12

12

12

10 10 10

BU BU BU 13 (15) ((15 13 13BU 15))

D5 5 D5 D

13 13 13 13

Csus 2 2 Csus 2 Csus

œœ œ

œœ œ

œœ œ

Csus 2

10 10 10

13 13 13

10

13 (15)

13

Csus 2 2 Csus 2 Csus

œœ œ œœ œœ Csus œœ 2 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ

10 BU BU 10 (13 ) 12 10 12BU 12 ((13 13 )) 12 12 12 BU 10 12 (13 ) 12

10 10 10

12 12 12

10 10 10

10

12

10

G/B G/B G/B

œœ œ

BU BU

BU (14) 12 12 ((14 14)) 12 BU 12 (14)

Csus 2 2 Csus 2 Csus

œœ œ

œœ œ

10 10 10

12 12 12

let ring 14 14 14

10

12

14

œœ œ

Csus 2

œœ œ

12 12 12

10 10 10

12 12 12

12

10

12

13 13 13

15 15 15

BD BD ( ) BD 12 ((12)) BD 12 (12)

13

15

j œjj œœ j œ

13

10 10 10 10

10

G/B G/B G/B

œœ œ

G/B

14 14 14

12 12 12

14

12

G/B G/B G/B

œœ œ 12 12 12 12

œœ œ 12 12 12 12

10

13 13 13

10 10 10

13

10

12 12 12 12

œœ œ Cœœ5 œ œ œ œ

10

12

10 10 10

101/4 10 10

10

12

10

10

12 12 12

10 10 10

12

10

œœ œ

œœ œ œœ

13 13 13

13 13 13

13

13

13 13 14 13 14 14 13 14

12 12 12

10 10 10

12 12 12

12

10

12

G/B

12 12 12 12

12 12 12

10

12

B bb 5 5 Bb5 B

œœ œ œœ

j œjj œœ j œ

Bb5

œœ œ

3 3 3

œœ œ 10 10 10

13

10

13

10

œœ œ

(fade out) (fade (fade out) out) BU BU (fade BU out) BU BU BU ( ) 10 12 14 12 (15 ) 10 12 12 ((14 14 )) 12 ((15 15 )) 10 12 BU BU 10 12 (14 ) 12 (15 )

B bb 5 5 Bb5

œœ œ

jB œjjB b 5 œœ j œ BU BU

12 12

10 10

12 12

12

10

12

œœ.. œ.

œœ.. œ.

10 10 10

13 13 13

10

13

œœ œ

C5 5 C5

jC œjj C 5 œœ j œ BU BU

10

œœ œ

12

B bb 5 5 Bb5 B

œœ5 œ

C5 5

œœ œ

BU BU BU

BD BD BD

BU

BD

15 (18 )

15 (18 )

C5 5 C5 C

C œœ œ œ œ~~~~~ ~~~~~ œ œ œ~~~~~ œ œ œ œ ~~~~~ ~~~~~ 10 ~~~~~ 10 12 10 12 10 5

10

12 12

10 10

12 12

12

10

12

œœ~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~ œ~~~~~~~~~~~

C5 5 C5 C

œœ œ

j œjj C 5 œœ j œ

13 (15) ((15 13 13BU 15))

13 13 13

13 (15)

13 (15) ((15 13 13 15)) BU

13

j œjjB b 5 œœ j œ BU BU BU

D5 5 D5

œœ œ

jD œjj D 5 œœ j œ BU BU

j œjj œœ j œ

œœ œ

BU BU

13

C jC œjj 5 œœ C j œ

15 (18 ) 15 ((18 18 )) 15

12

13 13 13

10

10

BU

12 12

œœ œ

10 10 10

10 10 10

BU BU

b5

10

BU

12 (16)

BU 15 (18 ) 15 ((18 18 )) 15

B œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ~~~~~ œ ~~~~~ œ œ œ~~~~~ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~~~~ ~~~~~ 10 12 10 ~~~~~ 101010 12 121212 10 12 10 12 10 12 10 12 10 12

BU BU

BU (16) 12 12 ((16 16)) 12

œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ

C5 5 C C5

10 10 10

13 13 14 13 14 14 13 14

nn œœ nœ

j œjj œœ j œ

C5

B bb 5 5 Bb5 B

œœ œ

j œjj œœ j œ

12 12 12

B bb 5 5 B Bb5

œœ œ

3 13 13 13

œœ œœ .. œ œ.

1/4 1/4 1/4

10 10 10

œœ œœ Bœœb 5 œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 12 12 12

10 10 10

j G/Bœœjj œ j œ

10

12

10 10 10

13 13 13

G/B G/B G/B

10 10 10

12 12 12

G/B G/B G/B

10

œœ.. G/B œ.

œœ œ

BU BU (15 ) 13BU 13 ((15 15 ) 13 BU ) 13 (15 )

œœ œ

10 10 10

œœ œ

let ring let ring ring let

13 13 13

10 10 10

œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ

j œjjG/B œœ j œ

œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

15

œœ œ

œœ .. œ.

10 10 10

~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~ 15 15 ~~~~~~~~~~~~ 15

j œjj œœ j œ

10

13

10

12

12

œœ œ œ j b œ D 5 œ œ œœjj b œ œ b & & b œ œ œ œj b œ &b

T T A A B T B 23 A 23 B23

12 12 12

12 12 12

15 15 15

10 10 10

10 10 10

~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~

œœ œ

13 13 13

œœ b & &b œ &b

21

13 13 13

BU BU 12 BU (15) 12 ((15)) 12 BU 15 (15) 12

BD BD (15) 15)) BD((15

D5

T T A A B T B21 A 21 B21

10 10 10

Csus 2

œœ b œ & &b & bBD

19

13 13 13

2

C5 5 C C5

1/4 1/4 1/4 1/4

10 10 10

Csus 2 Csus Csus 2 ~~~~~~ bb œœ~~~~~~ œœ 2 Csus ~~~~~~ bœ œ

œœ œ

G/B G/B G/B

13 13 13

2 Csus 2 Csus ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Csus œœ 2 œœ œœ œœ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ œ œ œ œ

D5 5 D5 D D5

T T A A B T B 19 A 19 B19

œœ œ

10

œœ œ

BD BD ( ) [16 ] BD 14 16 ]] ((14 )) [[16 BD 14 (14 ) [16 ]

15

T T A A B T B 17 A 17 B17

œœ œ

10 10 10

Bb5

b5 B Bb5 œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ G/B B œ œ b5 œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ

Csus 2

BU BU BU

~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~

13 (15)

Csus 2 2 Csus 2 Csus

œœ œ

j œCsus j 2 œœj j œ BU BU

j œjj œœ j œ

œœ œ

BU BU

(14 ) 12BU 12 ((14 14 )) 12

(15 ) 12BU 12 ((15 15 )) 12

(14 ) 12BU 12 ((14 14 )) 12

(15 ) 12BU 12 ((15 15 )) 12

BU (14) 12 12 ((14 14)) 12

BU (15) 12 12 ((15 15)) 12

12 (14 )

12 (15 )

12 (14 )

12 (15 )

12 (14)

12 (15)

BU

BU

BU

BU

BU

BU

23 Use three fingers for the big four-fret bend in bar 14. Practise by checking the pitch of the fretted note before you bend – this way you’ll hear when you hit the right pitch. The same rules apply to the alternating two- and three-fret bends in the last two bars. The track fades out so be prepared to improvise an ending if you’re playing with a band.

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


learn to pl ay open-mic songbook

Goo Goo Dolls IrIs

try out John rzeznik’s unusual tuning, or jam along in standard in this much-loved power ballad from the 90s

D 70

espite enduring a lengthy bout of writer’s block, it didn’t take frontman John Rzeznik long to write the Goo Goo Dolls’ career-defining hit single, Iris. “It probably took me an hour or two,” he revealed to ultimateguitar.com. Not bad for a song that would go on to top charts in several countries and still be getting airplay two decades on. Guitarists might be surprised that the track came together with such an

chorDs

unusual altered tuning being used – namely BDDDDD. It was strange for a melodic rock band, but certainly not a first for Rzeznik, who had written GGD hits Name and Black Balloon in DAEAEE and Db Ab Db Ab Db Db respectively. Though the tuning is the most striking element, we recommend tackling Iris in standard. You’ll have to make a few concessions on authenticity but you won’t need to restring your guitar just for one song!

I

1

1

1

1

1

3 4

Bm

Bsus2

o

2

1

1

1

Em7

2

x

o

2

1

3

3

D

o

x

o

D/F# x

o

1 3 4

2

o

o

1

2 3

3

4

G5

x

o

1

2

1

4 3

Asus4

1

1

F#m o

o

2 3

o

x

1

Bm7 x

3 4

x

o

3

o

1

x

2

3 4

IrIs

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

1

1

x

2

1 from the Motion Picture City Of Angels Words and Music by John Rzeznik Copyright © 1998 BMG Platinum Songs and Scrap Metal Music All Rights Administered by BMG Rights Management (US) LLC All Rights Reserved Used by Permission Reprinted by Permission of Hal Leonard LLC

x

A/C#

1

Gmaj7

A

Guitars and backing: Simon Young Photography: Tim Mosenfelder /Getty Images

n Rzeznik’s bizarre BDDDDD tuning the sixth string is lowered by five semitones; the fifth string is tuned down seven semitones; the fourth string is standard; the third string is the same as the fourth; the second string is three semitones higher than standard; and the first string is the same as the second. This tuning isn’t necessarily practical or advisable without strings of a suitable gauge, so we’ve provided chord shapes in standard tuning here so you can easily strum along. However, we’ve tabbed the intro in Rzeznik’s tuning for you to try out.

x

x


backIng Track (Track 54)

GOO GOO DOLLS / IRIS

This song comes with a backing track (minus guitar) on your CD. Simply insert the disc in your player, press play and jam along, guitaraoke style!

Iris

song sheet Intro Bm Bsus2 Bm G5 Gmaj7

Bm7 Asus4 G5 ’Cause I don’t think that they’d understand

G5 x2

Verse 1 D Em7 G5 And I’d give up forever to touch you Bm7 Asus4 G5 ’Cause I know that you feel me somehow

D Em7 G5 And you can’t fight the tears that ’ain’t coming

D Em7 G5 And all I can taste is this moment Bm7 Asus4 G5 And all I can breathe is your life D Em7 G5 ’Cause sooner or later it’s over Bm7 Asus4 G5 I just don’t want to miss you tonight

D D D DD DD BD D D B

1

q.= 52

# & ## 686 & #8

q.= 52

T A T B A B

Bm add 9

Bm add 9

12

12

12

12

12

œœœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œ œ œœœ 0 0 0œ 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 11

0 0 11 0 0 11

12

D

Em7

G5

D

Em7

G5

œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ .. œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ .. œœ œœœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ>œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ >œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ > œ

. .. .

œœ >

let ring throughout

0 0 0 let ring 0 throughout 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 00 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 30 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3

œ >

0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 50 0 0 5

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

Bm7 Asus4 Bm7 I just want you to know who I am

outro

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

>

0 0 80 0 8

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

> œ >

0 0 0 00 0 0 0 0

0

0 00 00 0 0 0

G5

œœ œœ œœœ >œœ œ 0> 0

G5

0 50 50 0 5 5

œœ œœ œœœœ œ œ

Bm

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ 0 0 0 0

Bm

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 00 00 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

71

Bm7 A/C# D

0 0 0 50 50 0 5 5

œœ œœ œœœœ œ œ 0 0 0 50 50 0 5 5

œœ œœ œœœ >œœ œ 0> 0 0 50 50 0 5 5

repeat to fade

Gmaj 7

G5

Gmaj 7

G5

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ0 0œ >0œ 0œ 0œ > 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 50 0 5 5

0 40 50 0 4 5

0 40 50 0 4 5

0 40 50 0 4 5

0 00 50 0 0 5

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

œœ œœœœ œ œœ œ 0 0 0 00 50 0 0 5

Asus 4

G5

Asus 4

G5

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœ œœ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 0 0 0 00 0 0 0

Bm7 A Strumalong G5

GooStrumalong Goo Dolls Goo Dolls Contributor:Goo Simon Young Contributor: Simon Young Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

Bm7 A/C# D Bm7 A G5 x2 Bm7 Bsus2 Bm7 G5 x4

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ .. Bm .. >œœœœœœ œœœœœœ œœœœœœ>œœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœ>œœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ >0 0 0 0> 0 0> 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 00 00 00 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 .. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 12 0 12 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 . 12 12 12 12

1

Bm7 Asus4 G5 I just want you to know who I am

MIddle

chorus

T A T B A B

Bm7 Asus4 G5 I just want you to know who I am

repeat chorus

TGR304.googoodolls.fig01.musx TGR304.googoodolls.fig01.musx File Date: 12:34 22/02/2018 File Date: Page 1 of 112:34 22/02/2018 Page 1 of 1 Notes: Bm7 Asus4 G5 And I don’t Notes: want the world to see me

# & ## 444 & #4

Extended chorus

Bm7 Asus4 G5 Or the moment of truth in your lies D Em7 G5 When everything feels like the movies Bm7 Asus4 G5 Yeah you bleed just to know you’re alive

Verse 2

Bm

repeat chorus x2

Verse 3

Bm7 Asus4 G5 And I don’t want to go home right now

q =77

Breakdown Bm7 A/C# D Bm7 A G5 x2

repeat intro

D Em7 G5 You’re the closest to heaven that I’ll ever be

Goo Goo Dolls IrIs Intro q =77

solo G5 F#m G5 Bm7 G5 F#m Bm7 G5 D/F# Bm7

Bm7 Asus4 G5 When everything’s made to be broken Bm7 Asus4 G5 I just want you to know who I am

0 0 0 0 00 0 0 0 10 0 0 0

10

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

0 0 0 00 0 0 0

œœ œœœœ œ >œœ œ 0> 0 0 00 50 0 0 5

Bm

œœ œœœœ œœœœ 0œ 0œ

Bm

0 00 00 00 0 0 0

œœœ œœœ œœ œœœœ 0œ 0œ 0 00 00 00 0 0 0

œœ œœœœ œœœœ 0œ 0œ 0 00 00 00 0 0 0

œœ œœœœ œœœœ 0œ 0œ 0 00 00 00 0 0 0

.. .. . .. .

68 68

Play 4 times

œ .. œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœPlayœœ4œtimes œœ œœœ œ œœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ . œ . œ >œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ > > œ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 > 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 . 0 0 80 0

0 0 0 0 00 00 00 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

8

0

0 0 0 0 00 00 00 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

.. .

The opening two bars are in 4/4 time, so try to pick up on the eighth-note pulse – count ‘1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &’ to keep time and emphasise your pick strokes on the first, fourth and seventh pulses. The rest of the song is in 6/8 time so count ‘1 & a 2 & a’ and emphasis the ‘1’ and the ‘2’ to get the right feel.

AprIl 2018 ToTal GuiTar


turn A rou n D the turnaround licks of the blues legends

Son HouSe Get to the heart of traditional acoustic blues

with this slide tutorial, including five examples in the style of the legendary Son House

B

orn in Mississippi in 1902, Son House was an early influence on none other than the great Robert Johnson. He took up slide guitar, aged 25, after hearing a drinking buddy playing one night. Many slide players use an open tuning to facilitate chord playing and House generally TGR304.turnaround.fig01.musx tuned his guitar to open G (low to high: File Date: 08/02/2018 DGDGBD). As a17:49 solo musician, there was often no reference point Page 1 of 1 to tune to, so many of the old recordings vary as much as a tone or so in

72

pitch. Our examples, however, are recorded in actual open G – though we’ve ‘aged’ our recordings by reducing the treble to recreate a sound like the resonator guitars House played. We recorded with a metal slide, so there is a little handling noise. Position your slide directly over the frets (not behind them) for proper intonation. Mute the strings with your idle fingers behind the slide for a clear note. House wore his on his second or third finger, using other fingers to form chords and riffs.

Notes:

Son House The Turnaround Contributor: RIchard Barrett Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

1 Around the houses

TRACk 55

q = 83

# & 44

G

œ

G7

œœ œ

nœ † œ j œ

let ring throughout D

G6

œœœ

œ œ

0 0 T B 0 0 A GD 0 2 3 3 0 0 B GD TGR304.turnaround.fig02.musx

2 0

⇥ ⇥ ⇥ ⇥ File Date: 15:48 08/02/2018

† w/finger slide

Page 1 of 1

œœœ

Gaug

# œœ

0 0 2

1 0

œœ œ 0 0 1

G

œ n œœœ 0 0 0

C

œ ⇥ 0

D

œ œœœ

w/slide

œ œœœ

5 5 5 5

7 7 7 7

7 7 7 7

œ œœœ

œœ œœ

N.C.

œœ œœ œœ n œ œ bœ 7 7 7 7

0 0

3

0

⇥ ≤ The ⇥ Turnaround ⇥ 3

Son House

Contributor: RIchard Barrett

Start with conventional playing for the descending turnaround in bar 1; the slide is brought into play in bar 2 for the quick shift between the C and D chords. Thanks to the Notes: Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com open G tuning, this is achieved simply by laying the slide across the strings at the 5th fret and sliding up to the 7th. Easy!

2 son’s up

# & 44 D B G D G D

Bb5

G5

œ

œœ

j œ œ

nbœœ

let ring throughout w/slide throughout

0

0 0

2 2

3 3

Bb5

G5

œœ 0 0

j œ œ œ

n bb œœœ 2 2 2

3 3 3

Bb

G5

œœ 0 0

j bœ œ œ

n œœ œ

2 2 2

3 3 3

G

n œœ œ 0 0 0

G5

œ

œœ

œ

~~~~~~~ jœ œ nœ ~~~~~~~

3 5

0

0 0

0

œ

Bb5

Bb5

G5

n b œœ œœ

j œ œ

œœ

2 2

3 3

5 3 3

0 0

All the slides and the little bit of vibrato in bar 2 are played using the slide. There will likely be some string noise, but this can be minimised by muting behind the slide with a gentle touch from a free finger – many slide players use a high action to assist further. To reach up to the high G, angle your slide so that it only touches the first string.

ToTal GuiTar AprIl 2018

Photograph: Apic/Getty Images

T A B

TRACk 56


TGR304.turnaround.fig03.musx Full tracks (tracks 55-59) File Date: 17:49 These tab examples08/02/2018 come with audio tracks on your CD.

Son House The Turnaround

the turnaround / Son houSe Contributor: RIchard Barrett

Simply insert the disc in your player, press play and jam

style! Page 1along, ofguitaraoke 1 Notes:

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

3 get in the house

# & 44 ‰

TRACk 57

C

j œœ œ

j bœ nœ bœ

œ œœ.

œœ œ

w/slide throughout

T A B

D B G D G D

0 0 0

3 3 3

¿

5 5 5 5

¿ ⇥

5 5 5

5 5 5

~~~~~~ œœ œœ œœ œœ

~~~~~~

Bb5

œ œœ œ

œœ œ œœ œœ œ

5 5 5 5

0 0

C

j bœ nœ bœ

3 3

œ œœ.

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5 5 5

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≤ ⇥

¿ ¿ œ ¿¿ ¿¿ œœ

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œ œœ

¿ ¿ ¿¿ ¿¿ œœ œœ œœ

¿¿ 5 ¿ 55 ≤ ⇥

¿¿ ¿ ⇥

¿¿ ¿ 33 ≤ ⇥

¿¿ ¿ ⇥

0 0

3 3

Again, all the slides and little bluesy bends are achieved exclusively with the slide. This rhythmic approach is not an exact science, so don’t be too concerned with reproducing exactly what is written here. Listen to the audio example on your CD and concentrate more on the getting into the Son House groove.

TGR304.turnaround.fig04.musx File Date: 17:50 08/02/2018 Page 1 of 1 Notes:

Son House The Turnaround Contributor: RIchard Barrett Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

4 son blues

TRACk 58

D

œ. œœœ

# 4 †œ & 4 œœ T A B

D B G D G D

¿

† w/finger slide

œœ œœœ

œœœ œœ

7 7 7 7 7

¿ ⇥

7 7 7 7

7 7 7

œœœ œœ

Bb

† ¿¿ ¿ œ n b œœœ œ

¿¿ 3 ¿ 00 33 ⇥ ≤ ⇥

7 7 7 7 7

C

œœ œ

œœœ œ

œœ ¿ ¿ œœ ¿ ¿ œ

5 5 5

5 5 5 5

¿¿ ¿¿ ⇥ ≤ ⇥

Bb

œœ œœœ

œœ œ

5 5 5 5 5

œœ œ œ

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

††

0 0 0

œ nbb œœœ

73

†† w/slide

Another rhythmic example, this time using a single finger placed across the strings to begin with, then bringing the slide in at the end of bar 2 for contrast. You’ll notice this gives a completely different sound – something Son House made frequent use of in his own playing.

TGR304.turnaround.fig05.musx File Date: 15:55 08/02/2018 Page 1 of 1

Son House The Turnaround Contributor: RIchard Barrett

Notes:

Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

5 swooping And sliding

# & 44

Bb5

G5

œ

D B G D G D

⇥ 0

Bb5

C5

A5

G5

bœ œœ n b œœ

œœ

œœ œ

œœ

œœ œ

œœ œ

œœ œ

0 0

0 0

5 5 5

0 0

3 3 3

2 2 2

0 0 0

w/slide throughout

T A B

TRACk 59

3 3 3

C5

C#5

D5

6 6 6

7 7 7

œœ # # œœ œ #œ 5 5 5

œ œœ

œœ œ

D

œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 7 7 7

7 7 7

⇥ ≤

7 7 7

7 7 7

≤ ⇥

G

œ œœ œ.

Œ

Ó

0 0 0 0

This final example uses the slide throughout. Those slides don’t start on a specific fret – that would sound way too regimented. Just experiment with swooping into the chords until you are happy. Note the chromatic movement in bar 2. This is played with the slide, but kept static rather than sliding between each chord.

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


Tab Guide Get more from TG by understanding our easy-to-follow musical terms and signs What is tab? Tab is short for tablature, a notational system used to give detailed information as to where notes should be played on the fretboard. Tab appears underneath conventional music notation as six horizontal lines that represent the strings of the

guitar, from the sixth (thick) string at the bottom to the first (thin) string at the top. On these lines, numbers represent which frets you place your fingers. For example, an A note on the 2nd fret, third string, will be shown as a number ‘2’ on the third line

down on the tab. Unfretted strings are shown with a ‘0’. The key and time signatures are shown in the notation. TG also includes a timestamp to tell you where in the original track you’ll find each example and tempo expressed in beats per minute.

Fret BOXes: chOrds, scales and caPO nOtatiOn Hand labelling 2

3

nut and Fretboard i

1

m

cHord example

o o o o o o

a

o o o

c

4 T

1

p

2

74

3

G Here are the abbreviations used for each finger. Fretting hand: 1, 2, 3, 4, (T) Picking hand: p (thumb), i (index), m (middle), a (annular), c (little finger)

This fretbox diagram represents the guitar’s fretboard exactly, as seen in the photo. This design is used for ease of visualising a fretboard scale or chord quickly.

This diagram represents a G chord. The ‘o’s are open strings, and a circled number is a fretting hand finger. A black ‘o’ or circled number is the root note (here, G).

capo example

capo notation

scale example

o o o

CAPO 2nd FRET >

CAPO 2nd FRET >

o

x

o

4

1

1

2

2

3

4 4 4 4 4

A major scale

d (C)

The blue line in the diagram represents a capo – for this A chord, place it at the 2nd fret. Capos change the fret number ordering. Here, the original 5th fret now becomes the 3rd fret, 7th fret now 5th fret, etc.

1 2 2

3 3

3

A (G)

1 1 1 2 2

Here the chord looks like a C in the tab, but the capo on the 2nd fret raises the pitch to make it a D. The 2nd fret capo’d notes are shown with a ‘0’ in the tab as if they were open strings.

The fret box diagram illustrates the fret hand fingering for the A major scale using black dots for root notes and red dots for other scale tones. The photo shows part of the scale being played on the fourth string with the first, third and fourth fingers.

Guitar techniques: PickinG down and up-picking

tremolo picking

palm muting

pick rake

appreggiated cHord

The symbols under the tab tell you the first note is to be down-picked and the second note is to be up-picked.

Each of the four notes are to be alternate-picked (down and up-picked) very rapidly and continuously.

Palm-mute by resting the edge of your picking hand palm on the strings near the bridge saddles.

Drag the pick across the strings shown with a single sweep. This is often used to augment a rake’s last note.

Play the notes of the chord by strumming across the relevant strings in the direction of the arrow head.

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


tab guide FrettinG hand Hammer-on & pull-oFF

note trills

slides (glissando)

Fret-Hand tapping

Fret-Hand muting

Pick the first note then hammer down on the string for the second note. Pick the third note and pull-off for the fourth note.

After picking the first note, rapidly alternate between the two notes shown in brackets using hammer-ons and pull-offs.

Pick the first note and then slide to the next. For the last two notes pick the first, slide to the next and then re-pick it (RP).

Sound the notes marked with a square by hammering-on/tapping with your fret hand fingers, instead of picking.

X markings represent notes and strings that are muted by your fret hand when struck by your picking hand.

bend and release

re-picked bend

pre-bend

quarter-tone bend

Vibrato

Fret the first note (here, the 5th fret) and bend up to the pitch of the bracketed note, before releasing again.

Bend up to the pitch shown in the brackets, then re-pick the note while holding the bent note at the pitch shown.

Silently bend the string up from the 5th fret (PB5) to the pitch of the 7th fret note, pick it and release to the 5th fret note.

Pick the note then bend up a quartertone (a very small amount). This is sometimes referred to as a ‘blues curl’.

Your fretting hand vibrates the string by small bend-ups and releases. Exaggerate this effect to create a ‘wide’ vibrato.

pincHed Harmonics

tapped Harmonics

toucHed Harmonics

BendinG and ViBratO

harmOnics natural Harmonics

artiFicial Harmonics

75

Pick the note while lightly touching the string directly over the fret indicated. A chiming harmonic results.

Fret the note as shown, then lightly place your index finger directly over ‘x’ fret (AH‘x’) and pick (with a pick, p or a).

After fretting the note in the triangle, dig into the string with the side of your thumb as you sound it with the pick.

Place your finger on the note as shown, but sound it with a quick pick hand tap at the fret shown (TH17) for a harmonic.

A previously sounded note is touched above the fret marked TCH (eg, TCH 9) for it to sound a harmonic.

sustained note and diVebomb

gargle

wHammy bar Vibrato

ViBratO Bar / whammy Bar wHammy bar bends

The note is picked as shown, then the vibrato bar is raised and lowered to the pitches shown in brackets.

scoop and doop

Scoop: depress the bar just before striking the note and release. Doop: lower the bar slightly after picking note.

A Note is sustained then the vibrato bar is depressed to slack. The square bracket indicates a further articulation.

Sound the note and ‘flick’ the vibrato bar with your picking hand so it ‘quivers’. This results in a ‘gargling’ sound!

Gently rock the whammy bar to repeatedly bend the pitch up and down. This sounds similar to fret hand vibrato.

Violining

Finger numbering

pima directions

pick Hand tapping

Turn the volume control down, sound the note(s) and then turn the volume up for a smooth fade in.

The numbers in the traditional notation refer to the fingers required to play each note.

Any kind of fingerpicking requirements are shown at the bottom of the tab notation.

Tap (hammer-on) with a finger of your picking hand onto the fret marked with a circle. Usually with ‘i’ or ‘m’.

Others pick scrape

The edge of the pick is dragged either down or up along the lower strings to produce a scraped sound.

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


Unplugged

78

YOUR MONTH IN THE ACOUSTIC WORLD

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


Acoustic TRACKs 60-64

Five add11 chords Essential chords to fuel your creativity x

o

1

1

2 3

Cadd11 o

x

1

guitar getaway

Tommy Emmanuel brings Guitar Camp to Europe

O

ne of the world’s greatest acoustic players will share his knowledge in stunning Scottish surroundings with students this May. Tommy Emmanuel’s Guitar Camps have already found success in the US and his homeland of Australia, but the Scottish event – which is running between 11-15

Tommy’s chosen some great players who are teachers too, including jazz virtuoso Frank Vignola, British fingerstylist Richard Smith, rhythm man Vinny Raniolo and John Knowles who, like Tommy, was also awarded the rare distinction of Certified Guitar Player by Chet Atkins. “I really pick the people I want at my camps because they have to

I tAlk About how hArd you hAve to work to Get Anywhere In the musIc busIness be good teachers,” says Tommy. “There are a lot of good players out there but not everyone can teach. So that’s exactly what these guys are all about.” Aside from playing wisdom and getting to grips with specific pieces at the four-day camp, a lot of players ask Tommy Emmanuel for his advice on making a career in music.

3

4

Dadd11 x

o

79

o

o

2 3

Aadd11 o

o

1 2 4

3

Gadd11 o

x

o

1

2

4 Adam Gasson

May in 2018 – will be the first time Emmanuel has brought the camp to Europe. All playing levels are catered for, and there will be nightly performances and morning Q&As with Tommy. The grandiose surroundings of Atholl Palace and Fonab Castle in Pitlochry are the perfect locations to focus completely on guitar. And

“Most people want to know how they can get to be doing what I’m doing,” the musician notes. “How can they become good enough to be a concert player and travel the world. How do you do that? And I talk about all that stuff. I talk about how hard you have to work to get anywhere in the music business. I try to tell people the realities of life in music and I don’t sugarcoat it. Because I think that’s really important.” For those of us not lucky enough to attend the Guitar Camp this year, there will be plenty of opportunity to study Tommy’s incredible playing up close when he hits the road with Frank and Vinny afterwards. The trio will play gigs in Buxton, Warrington, Whitley Bay, Birmingham and Bristol, ending with a show at London’s prestigious venue, Union Chapel in Islington. For more information, visit tommyemmanuel.com and tommyemmanuel guitarcampscotland.com

2

Eadd11

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


Acoustic

Words Thea de Gallier

Scott Matthews In the constantly evolvIng modern musIc Industry, scott matthews found InspIratIon In IsolatIon and created an entIre album on hIs own

A

80

s any parent will tell you, having As for the topics that have inspired this new, bubbles away.’” One area where the magic isn’t children is one of the biggest insular mode of songwriting, Matthews likes to so tangible is the business side, but Matthews upheavals one can experience. keep things vague. His favourite kind of song, says the fact that he’s able to sustain a career as At the time of talking, Scott he says, is one that makes you think. Leaving a full-time musician in an industry in a state of Matthews’ son was yet to be his poetic and often introspective lyrics open to flux is enough to keep him inspired. born, but he was already feeling the seismic interpretation keeps an air of mystique around “I was asked at a gig once what I deem as shift that is impending fatherhood. his work and the element of artistry alive. success, and the fact that I’m sitting here “It’s definitely had a big influence on the “Ambiguity is a big factor. I love the mystery talking about a sixth album and I’m able to be a ideas I had on this new record,” he says. He’s of songs. That’s where the charm is,” he full-time musician… I know a lot of my friends talking about The Great Untold, his second muses. “I think Sufjan Stevens has that quality. in bands have had to pack it in because of the release through his own label Shedio Records, Judy Tzuke once said to me that it sounded like I financial situation, and it’s a crying shame. through which he released his last album, wrote Elusive [the song that bagged him the You’ve got to find ways in today’s climate just Home Part 2, in 2016. Ivor Novello Award in 2007] without thinking to cut through.” The Great Untold is very much a labour of about it. And I thought, ‘She’s right, don’t Matthews’ means of getting his album heard love. Working entirely alone – Matthews wrote overthink it because that’s when the magic was Pledge Music. Independent artists are and played every song himself – he increasingly turning to crowdfunding – combined his creativity with the business Ani DiFranco was one of the earliest demands of running a label, and is honest pioneers – and he says the process was about the fact that it wasn’t always easy. invaluable, not just for generating funds “It’s the first time it’s been just me but for connecting with fans. playing everything. It had its ups and “I crowdfunded the last record, which downs; you become your own boss and proved pretty successful, it’s more your own worst enemy,” he admits. “But insightful for the fans during the it’s been rewarding as well because when recording process,” he says. “It gives you you spend a lot of time with a band that outlet, you create the page but they touring, it can get monotonous. Being set everything up and the infrastructure isolated has a big influence, but then is brilliant because of the ways people can you’re pulling your hair out at 2am trying invest. And fans because don’t have to to mix the last song before the day of part with any money until the record’s mastering. You go crazy, paranoia kicks made. Shedio Records is my own label, in, but something gets you over the line which struggles to generate the capital to and suddenly you’ve made a record.” do everything, from manufacturing the His guiding light was the spirit of the album to hiring PR and radio pluggers. Stumbling across an independent pedal songwriters he admires. “I look at Paul You need a starting point.” company shaped Scott’s sound Simon in my head [when I write] and go, The fact that Matthews has been active ‘Paul, is this any good?’” he says. “The in the industry for over decade proves “The new record includes a combination of gear I’ve had over the years. I’ve got a Maton C50 from the 70s, more the songs started to evolve, he’s a much more savvy businessman a late-70s Guild D25 and a Guild F30, which is the different ideas came in.” They say never than he gives himself credit for, but for workhorse. It’s all pretty stripped-back. to mix work and pleasure, but his wife him, everything comes back to the art. “Bright Onion Pedals made [me] a custom pedal,” he also had a big part in bringing the album “The music industry is like football – explains. “It’s like a switcher pedal. I try to bridge the gap to life. “My wife is becoming quite the doing keepy-ups,” he says. “You just between the live sound and recorded. I’ve got two pickups co-writer. I like that chemistry, I think have to believe in it, and wake up and coming from the acoustic; there’s a pure acoustic signal Tom Waits and his wife write songs find the reason every day.” from one pickup then the second pickup goes to the together as well, it adds another string to electric amp and effects pedals. I like to think it sounds the bow and I’m proud of what that The Great Untold is out 27 April with a like so much more than just my voice and guitar.” brings to the surface for us as well.” UK tour in May; scottmatthews.uk

Deep panneD piezo

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


interview / scott mAtthews

81

“You go crazy, paranoia kicks in, but something gets you over the line...”

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


Acoustic Rockschool

Simon & Garfunkel The Boxer

As Paul Simon announces his farewell tour we take a look at Rockschool’s Grade 6 arrangement of this fingerstyle classic

O

riginally appearing on Simon & Garfunkel’s classic Bridge Over Troubled Water album, The Boxer has been covered by many artists, from Bob Dylan and Joan Baez to Mumford & Sons, who recorded a version with Paul Simon himself. The fingerstyle pattern has the lower strings pounding out the roots and 5ths of the chords – an approach often referred to as ‘Travis picking’ after the great country player Merle Travis.

Rockschool’s arrangement maintains this bass pattern and the harmony is filled out on the treble strings. The best way to practise is to go slowly – after all, you are programming your fingers to ‘remember’ the movements, so the slower and steadier you go, the easier it is. If you’re unsure of where the notes fall rhythmically, remember that each bar of music can be counted as ‘1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &’ and every note synchs up with this count.

82

full tab

TGR304.grades_rsl.fig01.musx The Rockschool Acoustic Guitar TGR304.grades_rsl.fig01.musx Grade 6 book contains File Date: 12:37 22/02/2018 everything you need to pass your File Date: 12:37 22/02/2018 Grade 6 exam in one essential For more info, visit: Page 1 of 4 book. Page 1 of 4 rslawards.com Notes: Notes:

Simon & Garfunkel - The Boxer Simon & Garfunkel - The Boxer Acoustic Grade 6 Acoustic Grade 6 Contributor: RSL Contributor: RSL Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com Engraved by DigitalMusicArt.Com

Simon & Garfunkel Words and Music by Paul Simon © Copyright 1968 Paul Simon International Copyright Secured. All Rights Reserved Used by Permission

Simon & Garfunkel The Boxer

Tracks 65-66

q = 90 q = 90

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œ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ bb œœ œœ œœ

N.C. N.C.

T T A A B B1

8 8

0 0

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7 7

7 7

0 0

8 8

3 3

0 0

0 0

3 3

0 0

1 1

3 3

0 0

j j ‰‰ œœ œœj ‰‰ œœ œ œœj œ œœ œ œ œœ

C C

1 1

3 3

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2 2

0 0

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C

j œœj 0 0

ŒŒ œ œœ œœ œœŒ œ Œ 0 0

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1 1

3 3

5 5

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j ‰‰ œœj ‰‰ œjj ŒŒ œœ œœ œ œœ

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2 2

3 3

2 2

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j G/B œœj ‰‰ œœ œ œœ œ

j œœj

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G/B

2 2

0 0

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j ‰‰ œœj ‰‰ œjj ŒŒ œœ œœ œ œœ

3 3

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2 2

0 0

1 1

3 3

2 2

0 0

jj ‰‰ œœ jj ‰‰ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ

Am Am

0 0

G6 G6

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1 1

2 2

2 2

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2 2

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Photography: Tom Copi/Getty Images

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j œ0 + backinG œ ‰ 0œ œj Œ ‰8 track 0 & .. full œ0 Œœ (trackS œ65-66) 3 T œ œ œ3 0 œ1 œ œ 7 7 0 Œ A 8 C B j j & ... ‰œ œ1 œ œ Œœ œ œ œ1 ‰œ œ1 œ œ Œœ T 0 Œ0(continued) 2 0 0 A .& Garfunkel 2 0 Boxer 2 Simon The 3 3 B C j j T & G... ‰ œ1 œ2 œ0 Œœ0 œ2 œ0 œ1 ‰ œ1 œ2 œ0 Œœ0 A œ3 œ3 Œ B œ j œ j j Œ ‰ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ & œ 1 1 1 . T G œ œ œ 0 0 0 A œ. œœ 3 2 2 j œ 0 j2 Œ j œ0 B œ 3 ‰ œ0 ‰ œ ‰ œ0 ‰ 3 & 3 T œ œ œ 0 A Gœ œ œ œ 0 0 0 B 3 3 3 3 œ3 j œ j 3 T ‰ œ0 ‰ œ0 j Œ ‰ œ0 ‰ & A œ0 œ0 œ0 B Cœ3 œ3 œ3 œ3 j j j & ‰3 œ œ œ0 ‰ œ œ œ ‰3 œ œ œ0 ‰ T œ A Cœ œ 0 0 œ 0 0 B 3 j j j 3 3 3 & ‰œ œ1 œ œ ‰ œ1 œ œ ‰œ œ1 œ œ ‰ T 0 0 0 A œ œ 2 2 2 3 B C3 3 j ‰ œ1 j ‰ œ1 j ‰3 1 œ T ‰ & œ œ2 œ0 œ2 œ0 œ3 œ2 œ0 A B G3 œ3 œ3 F/C j j j œ & ‰ œ1 œ œ ‰ œ1 œ œ ‰œ 1 œ œ ‰œ T 0 0 0 A Gœ œ 2 2 2 F/C 3 3 B j 3 j 3 j & ‰ œ0 œ œ ‰ œ0 œ œ ‰ œ1 œ œ ‰ T œ œ 0 0 2 A œ œ 0 0 3 C

b œ3 œ0

This song comes with a full demo track and a backing track (minus guitar) on your CD. Simply insert the disc in your player, press play and jam along, guitaraoke style!

1

5

5

9

9

9

13

13

13

B 17 T & A B 17

T A B

0

0

0

1

3

j j & 1.‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ G œ j œ j & ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ T œ 0 œ 0 0 0 A 0

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j œ œ œ j œ œ œ 1

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2

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j œ j œ 0

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3

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2

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3

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j œ œ œ ‰ j œ‰ œ œ œ 1 œ 0 2

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j j ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ j ‰œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 œ 0 0 0

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3

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j j ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ j ‰œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ 0 œ 0 0 0

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April 2018 ToTal GuiTar

83


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65

April 2018 ToTal GuiTar

85


Acoustic Simon & Garfunkel The Boxer (continued)

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Bars 5 to 43 use the Travis approach to create an accompaniment to the melody. Pick the roots and 5ths on the fourth, fifth and sixth strings with your thumb; use your first, second and third fingers for the third, second and first strings. It’s essentially a repeating pattern, needing only slight adjustments to ensure you’re striking the right notes.

ToTal GuiTar April 2018


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we CAn’t Be Bought

We’re not gear snobs here at Total Guitar. We judge it on whether it looks good, sounds good and plays well – not by the name on the headstock.

TG review scores are a true reflection of our experts’ opinion on the product they’ve been testing. You’ll never find a rating in our mag that has been bought and paid for.

*WHAT IS GAS? Gear Acquisition Syndrome is the guitar-player’s never-ending urge to acquire new gear, irrespective of whether they actually need it. Don’t pretend you don’t have it – we all do!

SuperB, A BeST Buy

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

excellenT

reAl world reviews

TG Best Buy Awards are reserved for stand-out products that earn a five-star rating. This is the best, most exciting new gear that you need to check out

Five new products you need to check out

090 orange Brent hinds terror

A beastly offering from the Mastodon man

Best Buy award

094 iBanez rg550

Best for…

096 yaMaha fs-ta

Different guitarists have different needs. This badge highlights a particular strength that a product has in a TG Test or Group Test, so you can choose what’s best for you

We test every product under the conditions that they were designed for. For example, if an amp is designed to be played loud, rest assured that we’ll have tested it at rehearsal/gig volumes!

ABove AverAGe kIT

088 start Me up

Some ISSueS

Shredding in neon style

Look! No wires! An addictive TransAcoustic

098 the tg test: electric Baritones

Low down and dirty with four of the best

Best for…

104 pedal round-up: Multi-effects units

Small, integrated and good for grab-and-go

poor

106 trace acoustic transit a A do-it-all solution for gigging


gas station

05

01

04

02

89

03

start Me up!

Five awesome new products to get your gear engine revving this month… Gator ‘led edItIon’ GuItar cases

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Picture the scene: you’re in the darkness backstage, with seconds before you go onstage, but your pick is lost in the hardcase. Disaster? Not so with Gator’s new LED Edition guitar cases, which feature LEDs integrated into the interior lid of the case. Two editions are available: GC cases are made with ABS plastic and EPS foam, while the GTSA feature military-grade polethylene exteriors, black padded interiors and TSA-approved locks. (£119, gatorcases.com]

IK MultIMedIa leslIe

2

IK has partnered with Hammond USA and Suzuki Music Corp to nail the authentic whirl of Leslie rotating speakers and amps. Available as a collection for download in AmpliTube, the collaboration brings control over mic distance, amp and cab combinations, acceleration and deceleration of the rotary speaker, horn/drum balance and more. Five amps are onboard and six rotating speakers. All promise authenticity courtesy of IK’s Dynamic Interaction Modelling and Volumetric Response Modelling. ($129.99, ikmultimedia.com)

Bare KnucKle Boot caMp pIcKups

3

Cornish tonehounds BKP has launched an affordable line, the Boot Camp series. Three designs are on offer: Old Guard (Alnico II for classic blues, rock and country); True Grit (Alnico V for hard rock, grunge and old-school metal) and Brute Force (ceramic humbuckers, Alnico V single coils for prog-metal, thrash and extreme metal). Humbuckers, Strat and Tele-style single coils and P-90 options are available, with prices ranging from £47 up to £107 for individual pickups. (from £47, bareknucklepickups.co.uk)

d’addarIo MultI-tool for GuItar & Bass

4

New guitars come with a plastic bag full of allen keys, which you use once before you misplace the small one that adjusts the saddles. Enter D’Addario’s Multi-Tool, which boasts 10 tools ready to sort your guitar out. It spans US and metric-sized keys made of heat-treated S2 steel and the whole lot folds up into a small form factor. Three fractional hex keys, four metric hex keys, two Phillips screwdrivers and one slotted screwdriver add up to one seriously handy gadget.. (£17.49, daddario.com)

dava power GrIp

5

Picks don’t get much more versatile than Dava. If you’re not familiar with the Dava concept, the company’s plecs allow you to switch between the feel of a soft-gauge for rhythm playing to a hard gauge for leads, all while playing, thanks to a flexible core and reinforced tip. The latest tweak is the Power Grip, which offers a thicker, heavy-duty feel, paired with the company’s signature rubber grip. If you’ve never tried Dava plecs before, these are a great gateway into their adaptable world. (£7.99 for 6, www.davapick.com)

April 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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ToTal GuiTar april 2018


review 2

Best Buy award

3

1

at a glance

£569

Type: All-valve preamp and power amp OuTpuT: 15 watts, switchable to seven, one or 0.5 watts ValVes: 3x 12AX7, 2x EL84 COnTrOls: Natural channel volume, Dirty

channel gain, master volume, bass, mid and treble. sOCkeTs: Guitar in, effects send/return, footswitch (changes channels), speaker out x3

WeighT: 9kg DimensiOns:

[HxWxD] 150 x 350 x 130mm COnTaCT: Orange Amplification 020 8905 2828 www.orangeamps.com

Orange Brent Hinds terrOr

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pOWer

The Brent Hinds Terror has a clever, three-way standby switch, which offers a choice of full or half power delivering 15 watts or seven watts

2

3

TaTTOO

The Brent Hinds Terror has special graphics based on the original ‘pics only’ Oranges of the early 1970s, with modifications inspired by Hind’s tattoos

VOlume

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The rear panel Headroom/ Bedroom attenuator drops the Terror down to one watt in full power mode or 0.5 watts in half power – that’s still surprisingly loud

Full metal jacket: Mastodon’s axeman-in-chief gets a signature Terror

photography: Neil Godwin

T

his year marks Orange Amplification’s 50th anniversary. In an industry where amplification brands are often short-lived, it’s a stellar achievement, more so because Orange is still owned by its original founder, industry legend Cliff Cooper. Things haven’t always been plain sailing, but today Orange enjoys well-deserved international popularity, thanks to products that are always on target for the players they’re aimed at. One of Orange’s biggest successes in recent times was the Tiny Terror, which sold well over 30,000 units worldwide and almost single-handedly kickstarted today’s ‘lunchbox’ head trend. Although that amp was discontinued in 2016, the Terror range is still with us, and Orange has just unveiled a couple of new

additions, in the shape of the Rocker 15 Terror and this very special signature version for Mastodon’s lead guitar maverick, Brent Hinds. Based on the Rocker 15 Terror, which in turn is based on the Rocker 15 combo, the Brent Hinds signature head has the same

rear panel a built-in attenuator switch lets you choose ‘Bedroom’ and ‘Headroom’ settings. In Bedroom mode, power output drops to one watt, or 0.5 watts in the half-power setting. There’s also a valve-buffered series effects loop and a choice of eight and 16ohm speaker outlets.

make no mistake, this is a seriously tough amp... twin-channel control layout, including a Natural channel with a single volume control, and a Dirty channel with conventional gain, volume, bass, mid and treble controls. There are a couple of very useful output power options: a three-position standby switch lets you choose full or half power (15 watts or seven watts), while on the

The Brent Hinds head is housed in Orange’s familiar all-steel Terror chassis, which is powdercoated inside and out and features the iconic ‘pics only’ graphics first used way back in 1972. The familiar artwork has been slightly modified, inspired by Hinds’ distinctive tattoos, while on the back there’s a Mastodon logo.

Inside the chassis, most of the electronics are housed on a top-quality PCB, with a smaller one for rear-panel sockets. Components include metal film resistors for low noise, and high temperature Carli film capacitors, with neat wiring and shiny bright solder joints; all typical of Orange’s usual high attention to detail. Make no mistake, this is a seriously tough amp that’s built to last. While the Brent Hinds model shares the same controls as the Rocker 15 Terror, it sounds quite different, having been re-voiced by Orange’s technical director Ade Emsley to suit Hind’s personal tastes. The Natural channel is fatter and warmer, but without losing the sweet, sparkling treble and tight bass response that makes this channel such fun to play with. You might think that april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


t h e ga s station Another ferocious incarnation of Orange’s Tiny Terror

Orange amplification 1968-2018 Orange at 50: the sound of Brit rock and more

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with no tone controls, the Natural channel loses out in versatility; in fact, the opposite is true. Without a tone network, the simple, high-headroom circuit lets all the natural resonance of the guitar through. It’s superb with pedals or if you want to hear what classic Orange drive sounds like, you can engage the low power settings and max the volume control to hear real output distortion without risking an ASBO – but beware: even on 0.5 watts the Brent is still indecently loud. The Dirty channel adds a lot of extra gain, more than the Rocker 15 Terror and perfect for ToTal GuiTar april 2018

alsO try...

EVH 5150III LBXII

£508

EVH’s lunchbox version of the 5150 head may have fewer features, but the killer tones we’ve come to expect from EVH haven’t been compromised.

the heavy riffing and power leads that contribute to the Mastodon sound. This channel sounds great with single coils, but really needs the punch of a good humbucker to set it on fire, creating thick distortion tones. It’s often the case that signature amps lose out on flexibility with tightly-focused sounds that aren’t so accessible. That isn’t the case with this particular head, though. As long as you like metal and modern rock, you’ll love this particular collaboration; it’s full of shred-tastic fun, contrasted by a wonderful clean channel that’s

practically perfect for pedals. Players looking for more clarity and a slightly more classic-rock bias should check out the amp the Brent Hinds Terror is based on, the equally covet-able Rocker 15 Terror. These very aspirational heads are under £600, making them affordable too. Nick Guppy

SuMMarY

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his year Orange celebrates its 50th year of manufacturing. The first Orange amps were assembled in the basement of Orange founder Cliff Cooper’s shop in London’s Old Compton Street. Cooper found it difficult to stock his shop with name brands, so with a background in electronics he solved the problem by designing his own range. The iconic ‘pics only’ amplifiers were first produced in 1972. The legendary Orange Graphic became synonymous with classic rock; users included Paul Kossoff, Jimmy Page and Peter Green. After a quiet time in the 1980s, Orange relaunched with the arrival of Brit rock in the 1990s. Orange’s biggest modern hit – the Tiny Terror – was first produced in 2006 and went on to become one of Orange’s all-time best sellers.

Features sOund quality value FOr mOney Build quality playaBility Overall rating

VIctory SHErIff 22 £799 The Sheriff 22 offers twin-channel flexibility and superb build quality, with tones approved by some of the world’s top players, including Guthrie Govan.

PEaVEy 6505MH £595

Peavey’s 6505MH has a footswitchable crunch option on the rhythm channel, along with all the juicy high-gain stuff the 6505 range is renowned for.


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t h e ga s station

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


review

Ibanez RG550

£899

The godfather of shred guitars wants its crown back

P

layers of a certain age will remember the doublepage adverts in mags like TG, crammed full of tiny images of the guitars that made up our imaginary wish lists. For many, Ibanez was the aspirational brand of choice. Fender and Gibson were very grown-up, a bit too much like what your dad would play. Ibanez, on the other hand, projected a vision of futuristic precision and technicality that pressed all the right adolescent buttons. Consequently, the Ibanez RG550 became the default aspirational guitar of choice for an entire generation of player. Expensive enough to make it lust-worthy, but not so expensive that we’d

was so popular about the original RG550 and piece it back together in a way that enhances its legacy. The Japanese-made 2018 vintage is, essentially, a masterclass in everything that is good about shred and metal guitars. The neck feels lithe – your hand glides, rather than simply moving – while the Edge vibrato is rock solid and the overall craftsmanship is exemplary. It’s actually better than our 15-yearold selves could have expected when we stared at those adverts. Tonally, the RG550 covers a lot of bases. It always did, despite its pointy appearance, meaning you could comfortably stray into all kinds of genres without too much fuss. The US-designed V7 bridge

1

HeadStock

at a Glance

Colour-matching the headstock to the body is a nice nod to the original RG550 and contrasts perfectly with the black hardware

2

Body: Basswood Neck: Super Wizard

1

Neck

Five pieces of maple and walnut combine to make up the Super Wizard neck, which is reinforced with two titanium bars for extra rigidity

3

PickuPS

Two humbuckers and a single coil (American designed) offer plenty of tonal variation. This is no mere metal guitar

5pc maple/walnut neck Scale: 647.7mm (25.5") FiNgerBoard: Maple FretS: 24 jumbo PickuPS: V7/S1/V8 (H/S/H) coNtrolS: Tone, volume, five-way selector Hardware: Edge tremolo leFt-HaNded: No FiNiSH: Desert Sun Yellow (pictured), Road Flare Red, Purple Neon coNtact: Headstock Distribution 0121 508 6666 www.ibanez.co.jp

2 95

never get to own one, the RG550 hit that rare sweet spot of quality and other-worldly attraction. Introduced in 1987 and discontinued in 1994, the Ibanez RG550 remains the childhood sweetheart of many players. Designed as a mass-appeal version of Steve Vai’s famous JEM777 model, it had character in abundance. We loved its pointy horns and headstock. We marvelled at the thought of the ultra-thin Wizard necks and their promises of unrivalled speed. And we were unreserved in our love for the garish, frankly bonkers colour options. But tastes change as we grow up – or do they? Apparently not, if you’re Ibanez. Which explains why, after so many years, it’s brought the old stallion out of retirement. Wise decision? You bet. Ibanez has skillfully managed to extract the very essence of what

humbucker delivers the razorsharp riff platform you’d hope it would, while the V8 neck ’pup offers a hint of compression at higher gain settings, which levels lead lines nicely. It is, in the best way possible, everything you remembered from the original. Competition is strong – Schecter, ESP and Jackson all produce superb-quality shredders. But the RG’s pedigree is powerful. The entire SuperStrat niche of guitars owes the RG550 a huge debt of gratitude. With this reissue, Ibanez is casually reminding everyone who’s boss. Chris Corfield

SuMMarY

Photography: Neil Godwin

it’s a masterclass in all that is good about shred...

best buy awaRd

3

FeatuRes sound qualIty value FoR money buIld qualIty playabIlIty oveRall RatInG april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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ToTal GuiTar April 2018


review

Yamaha FS-Ta

£676

Yamaha’s acoustic innovation just got more affordable

C

ertain things will make us smile here at TG, and Yamaha’s TransAcoustic is one of them. That is, once we’d got over the shock of hearing reverb and chorus effects coming out of an acoustic guitar that wasn’t plugged into anything. But how? If you peek inside the soundhole, just under the top there are the electronics of an actuator, and this responds to the vibrations of the strings as you’re playing. These vibrations are pumped back through the guitar’s body, moving the air inside and around it and... bingo! Controllable reverb and chorus sounds come from inside the guitar! It takes a little while to get your head

controls for a few seconds. That’s also your level control, applicable for both when you’re unplugged or playing through a PA. The other two controls select the level of room or hall reverb and chorus. We kept going back to the hall reverb because it’s such an inspiring place to be – organic and cinematic. Like an instant church around you, fingerpicking takes on a new drama. The chorus needs a little more subtlety when it’s dialled in to prevent things getting too clinical and 80s. But balance it right and there’s a really useful tool for thickening rhythm parts. It’s worth keeping in mind that the F Series model this is based on retails for £346. So, there’s no

1

mode

aT a Glance

You enter and exit TransAcoustic mode by holding down the level rotary control momentarily and allowing for a brief delay before it kicks in. But there’s no way of knowing if it’s on or off until you play. The LED is a battery low indicator (it takes two AAs and battery life is quoted around 10 hours with TA mode in use)

2

Type: Concert-size electro acoustic with reverb and chorus effects Top: Solid spruce Back and sides: Laminated mahogany neck: Nato scale: 634mm (25") FreTs: 20 Tuners: Die-cast chrome (TM29T) Finish: Brown Sunburst conTacT: Yamaha 020 8962 5080 uk.yamaha.com

Finish

There are two other finishes available for the FS-TA besides this Brown Sunburst (Ruby Red and Vintage Tint) and the guitar’s projection benefits from the scalloped bracing update Yamaha brought in for the FS Series in 2016

3

elecTrics

You can plug the FS-TA in and use it as an electro acoustic with level control, plus the effects via an end-pin jack and the battery compartment can also be found close by

97

around, and then you’ll be smiling. Because it’s really that good. This technology first surfaced on two Yamaha models in 2016 – the all-solid wood LL-TA and LS-TA – but the guitar on review here is based on Yamaha’s F Series instead (there’s also the dreadnought-esque FR-TA). The more reasonable price point reflects laminate back and sides, rosewood instead of ebony ’board and bridge, and there’s no gigbag. The lack of the latter is a shame because, as we’ll find out, this is certainly something you could use in a live situation. This concert size is a very nice player – action is low, no buzz thanks to a good setup – and its bright voice is measured by a welcome warmth in the low-end. It’s a good foundation for the effects here, activated by holding down the middle of three rotary

getting around the fact that you’re paying nearly double for the TransAcoustic technology and piezo. Whether that’s worth it for you can only really be decided by trying this unique experience. We found it both addictive and inspiring to have the luxury of reverb and chorus on call wherever and whenever we wanted. This could be a superb creative tool, and the piezo here also represents the FS-TA’s character well when we plugged in, so there’s plenty of scope for live work with onboard effects too. The potential is all here for you to explore. Rob Laing

SuMMarY

Photography: Neil Godwin

it’s addictive to have reverb and chorus on call 1

2

FeaTureS Sound qualiTY value For moneY build qualiTY plaYabiliTY overall raTinG

3

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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ElEctric baritonEs Words Chris Corfield / Photography Neil Godwin

If standard tuning isn’t doing it for you, maybe it’s time to consider going lower. Much lower...

ToTal GuiTar april 2018


thE tg tEst

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A

s anyone who has ever down-tuned a guitar will tell you, there’s fun to be had by going low. Down-tuning a regular guitar isn’t always ideal though. Aside from your low strings flapping around in the wind, short-scale guitars simply aren’t built structurally with that kind of action in mind. There is, however, an alternative. This month’s round-up focuses on the underrated joys of electric baritones. These guitars bridge the gap between guitar and bass, usually coming in four or five tuning steps lower. Crucially, all those chord shapes, scales and licks that you’ve learned can be played using exactly the same patterns,

only now they deliver a much deeper and a more rounded sound. Baritone guitars work across a range of genres, from Ennio Morricone westerns to modern day metal. The PRS SE 277 we’re testing here will cover most areas tonally while retaining that achingly cool, high-end vibe of its cousins. The Gretsch Electromatic G5265 features the same mini ’buckers and Bigsby-licenced trem as its more familiar stablemates, and we’ve room for a newcomer in the Chapman ML1 Modern Baritone, which builds on the burgeoning Chapman reputation. Finally, rounding off the list, we have a piece of glorious baritonal atavism in the Danelectro Vintage ’56. april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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PRS SE 277 BARitonE

GREtSch G5265 ElEctRomAtic JEt

£849

The same, only bigger

£589

Still got the sparkle

This looks a lot like every other PRS SE...

That’s a lot of chrome...

Yes, that’s absolutely true but there is one crucial difference: scale. The neck on this beast runs to a whopping 703mm (27.7") – that’s nearly 76 mm (3") longer than the Standard model. This is to accommodate the heavier strings that give a baritone its traditional low-end purr.

It certainly is and it’s even shinier in person. The finish – black sparkle – also lives up to its name. Safe to say, if you’re looking for something conservative or low-key then you’re looking in the wrong place...

Is a vibrato a normal thing to find on a baritone? Any other differences? Truthfully, not really. But we can take that as a positive. We certainly know from previous tests that the SE range is already home to some

Probably not, but then that just adds to the G5265’s unique charm. If you’ve ever tried tuning anywhere south of B on a regular guitar, you’ll know it can sacrifice intonation around the middle of the

100

great guitars, and the 277 is definitely at home in that company. The two humbuckers are incredibly versatile, and they allow you to thicken your sound up without sacrificing too much from the mid-range. The hardware is rock-solid, and the finish is as good as we’ve come to expect from the SE range.

neck, so anything that further messes with your tuning is frowned on. But here, the extra rigidity and strength provided by the 755mm (29.75") scale neck negates that, leaving you free to wobble away to your heart’s content.

It’s lacking a bit of fun though, surely?

The body is listed rather vaguely as ‘laminated hardwood’. What’s that?

Well, compared to some of the other guitars on test here, sure. You could say it’s playing it safe, but, if it’s quality and consistency you’re after, this has those in spades. It’ll do whatever you want, and do it well.

The extra tension provided by the combination of heavier strings and longer neck means extra sturdiness is required to keep everything rigid. Laminated woods do just that, and crucially, doesn’t have the negative impact on tone we were expecting.

at a glancE Key features: Mahogany body with maple top, maple neck, 703mm (27.7") scale, 22 frets, Rosewood fingerboard, 2 x 85/15 ‘S’ pickups, 1 x volume, 1 x push-pull tone control finish: Tobacco Sunburst (shown),

Scarlet Red ContaCt: PRS Guitars Europe 01223

874301; prsguitarseurope.com

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

at a glancE Key features: Laminated hardwood

body, maple neck, Rosewood fingerboard, dual mini-humbucking pickups, 755mm (29.75") scale, bolt-on maple neck, three-position pickup switch, Adjusto-Matic bridge, die-cast tuners and Bigsby vibrato tailpiece finish: Black Sparkle ContaCt: Fender GBI 01342 331700;

fender.com


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DAnElEctRo ’56 BARitonE

£569

Where it all began

chAPmAn ml1 moDERn BARitonE

£449

Expanding the Chapman empire

Can those lipstick pickups cope with the extra low-end?

Chapman guitars are building a nice reputation...

They can... to a point. Let’s be honest, this isn’t going to be the guitar your average death metal band crafts its riffs on, so the need for surgically tight, high-output pickups is not applicable. But don’t be fooled; the combination of the iconic lipstick pickups and the semi-acoustic body means it can certainly make a superb racket if you push it.

For a relative newcomer, this UK brand is fast getting a name for itself and the ML1 here is a great example of why. For a shade under £450 you get a very well-made, nicely thought-out instrument with superb attention to detail. Small things like the binding on the body, the rounded heel joint and locking tuners all add up to a guitar that is above what you’d expect for that level of spend.

So where have the savings been made?

Looks like it’s best suited to heavier styles?

At this price point, you’re not expecting high-end components.

Yep, although it’s not a one-trick pony by any means. Clearly,

101

Indeed, the bridge appears to rest against the body courtesy of two screws, and the overall finish is not what you’d call elite-level. But for some reason, none of this matters. We’re not after PRS-esque precision and engineering excellence. This Dano is meant to be quirky and fun.

djent-style riffers are going to benefit from the high output humbuckers, and the guitar has an overall heft to it, thanks to the alder body and ash top. But it’s far more versatile than it may first appear, largely down to the coil-splittable pickups, which offer an extra dimension tonally.

Vintage by name, vintage by nature?

The finish looks great...

Exactly. In fact, it’s generally accepted that Danelectro produced the first of what we now know as baritone guitars, and here we have its modern-day homage. Fans of genres like surf rock, hillbilly and country will be in their element.

Yes, and the good news is that it’s even better up close. Ash, as we know, has very attractive graining anyway and the graphite finish on review here really wouldn’t look out of place on a much more expensive instrument.

at a glancE

at a glancE

Key features: Single-cut body shape,

Key features: Alder body with ash

‘Dolphin’ headstock, 755mm (29.75") scale, 24 frets, adjustable bridge, 2 high output Lipstick pickups, master volume and tone, 3 way pickup selector

veneer, 28" scale, Maple neck with ebony fretboard, 711mm (24") scale, 24 frets, locking tuners, Graph Tech nut, Chapman Sonorous Zero Baritone humbuckers, three-way blade switch, master volume and tone with coil split

finish: Vintage White (shown), Metallic Red, Gloss Black, Dark Aqua

finish: Gloss graphite

ContaCt: John Hornby Skewes 0113

ContaCt: Chapman Guitars 01483

286 5381; jhs.co.uk

456777; chapmanguitars.co.uk

april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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hEAD to hEAD

The Danelectro: quirky and fun and perfect for surf rockers

Heading low down and deep with baritones...

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ined up on a rack next to each other, you’re reminded of how diverse the guitar world can be. On the one hand you have the classy, well-appointed stylings of the PRS SE and the Chapman, all high-quality hardware and professional sheen. At the other end sits the rather more rag-tag Danelectro, the odd uncle you only see at Christmas, and the glamorous Gretsch. It’s like two of them walked into the wrong party. It’s not only visually that these guitars are at opposite ends of the spectrum. Where the Chapman and PRS have the necessary tools to make the most of the added low-end frequencies on offer, the Danelectro and Gretsch both struggle for clarity when employing any sort of gain. Yet flip it on its head and you’ll see it’s not so clear cut. The Danelectro, for example, makes excellent use of its semi-hollow body to allow clean, open chords to ring out superbly - the best of the

thE rag-tag danElEctro is thE odd unclE you only sEE at christmas... bunch - while you can tease some quite wonderful, mildly-driven sounds from the Gretsch’s mini-humbuckers. Naturally, each guitar has a tendency to overpower at the low-end if you use too much drive. You’ll find yourself reaching for the volume control on the guitar more than you perhaps would otherwise, and each suffers a bit here. On every model, the ‘sweet spot’ was annoyingly tricky to find, with each offering very little gradation between zero and full. In terms of build quality though, the SE and the ML1 stand quite comfortably ahead of the Dano and the Gretsch. This is even more remarkable when you consider the SE is almost twice the RRP of the Chapman. Credit where it’s due, if this battle was scored pound for pound, the Chapman would have walked it quite comfortably. When you throw in the coil-splittable pickups and included gigbag which the SE also features - you see quite a package building up. ToTal GuiTar april 2018

The PRS SE 27 with 2 x ‘S’ type pickups


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finAl vERDict

Which baritone is the right one for you?

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f you’ve never played a baritone before, you’re in for a treat. Realistically, any of the four guitars on show today would serve as a solid gateway to the world of long-scale playing but, depending on your style, not all would keep you there. The SE, in our opinion, is perhaps the best all-rounder on account of its tonal versatility. This gives it the edge over the Chapman, which shines as a metal guitar but is let down slightly by its ability to excel in other styles.

prs se 277 BariTone

The SE, despite lacking a bit of personality (compared to the other models on review) has enough quality in the tank to make for a hugely-rewarding, extremely playable guitar. It’s the model that most inspired us to keep playing, writing, tinkering and experimenting – a good indicator of how much it’d be used under real-world conditions. Yes, it’s pricier, but this is a guitar you’d keep in your line-up. In saying that, there is still a place for both the Danelectro and the Gretsch. After all,

GreTsch G5265 elecTromaTic JeT

bEst allroundEr

music is about enjoyment and, for all the minor snagging points, both guitars are a lot of fun to play in their own ways. Of the two we’d be more inclined to part with our cash for the Gretsch, on account of its better build quality and inclusion of the Bigsby, yet there’s something undeniably cool about the Danelectro that we kept coming back to. However, if we’re looking for something we’d return to again and again, it’d have to be the PRS SE 277.

DanelecTro ’56 BariTone

chapman ml1 moDern BariTone

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bEst for dabbling

bEst for twang

bEst for mEtal

fEaturEs sound quality valuE for monEy build quality Playability ovErall rating

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fEaturEs sound quality valuE for monEy build quality Playability ovErall rating

summarY

fEaturEs sound quality valuE for monEy build quality Playability ovErall rating

bEst buy award

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bEst buy award

fEaturEs sound quality valuE for monEy build quality Playability ovErall rating april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


t h e ga s station

TacTile mulTi-FX round-up T-rex Soulmate

ToTal GuiTar April 2018

£399

Valeton dapper

Meet your Match

tidy tones

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he Soulmate is the largest of the units, and the tones available are appropriately massive to match. Given that it’s about the size of a Pedaltrain Nano, it might not actually slim down a small rig by very much, but at least it’s built like a tank. There’s an overdrive, distortion, reverb and delay on offer, with a separate boost, stereo outputs and a tuner function. The delay and reverb are solid, but nothing to write home about when compared with discrete stompboxes. On the other hand, the overdrive is stellar, and although the distortion was a bit tricky to dial in, the two stacked make for a killer lead tone.

Features sound quality value For money build quality usability overall rating

£145

he smallest and cheapest of the units, the Dapper still has a sturdy construction and solid feel, with an overdrive, distortion and delay with tap tempo all individually footswitchable, as well as a tuner on the front panel. The distortion has a limited two-band EQ, but there’s some decent heavy clipping saturation on offer. The red flag is with the overdrive where, depending on the guitar used, the tone control is only really usable after three o’clock if you want anything other than quite thumpy, muddy blues tones. Not the most versatile, but for a straight-up rock or blues player it fits the bill.

SummarY

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he multi-effect unit has had a particularly bad rap in recent years and has been much maligned, especially with the advent of the boutique guitar pedal revolution. However, with units at the top end like the Line 6 Helix series rehabilitating their image, an interest is slowly redeveloping at a more affordable price point. Especially for ‘grab-and-go’ situations, or playing in function bands on small stages, there is certainly a case for small, integrated multi-effects units. Here, we’ve selected a few of the best contenders in the rugged, compact multi-effect category to pit them head-to-head and see which one emerges on top. Let’s dive in...

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Features sound quality value For money build quality usability overall rating


pedal round-up

best buy award

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Need a grab-and-go board with analogue-style control? We’ve rounded up four of the best on the market

Tech 21 Fly rig5

£329

mooer red Truck

Break free

truckful of tone

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Features sound quality value For money build quality usability overall rating

he Red Truck has all the effects you could want in a simple channel strip, with reverb, delay, modulation, distortion, drive and an inline boost. Within each effect there are also a lot of options, like subdivisions on the delay, choice of tone between digital, analogue or tape emulation, and usable phaser, tremolo and flanger settings on the mod patch. The only setting that lacks is the shimmer on the reverb, which is devoid of the smoothness of other octave ’verbs. The overdrive is great for pushing an amp into saturation and has a lot of gain; the distortion is RAT-like with a powerful three-band EQ.

SummarY

SummarY

n terms of looks, the Tech 21 wins hands down. The features are stripped-back with a SansAmp (preamp), Plexi and delay with tap tempo, but no tuner. The design and form factor are great and it feels slick and intuitive to use. The delay in particular has a really nice tone to it, and the addition of modulation makes it more versatile. When not running into a DI, the SansAmp section can be temperamental depending on which amp you’re using it with, but the Plexi delivers a startlingly close drive tone to the gain channel of a Marshall we tested it with. Combine that with the boost footswitch and it really rips.

£220

Features sound quality value For money build quality usability overall rating

at a glance Bypass Buffered power

T-Rex Soulmate – 12v 350ma (supplied) Valeton Dapper – 9v (supplied) Tech21 FlyRig5 – 12v 150ma (supplied) Mooer Red Truck – 9v 300ma (not supplied) ContaCt

T-Rex: Westside Distribution 0844 326 2000 westsidedistribution.com Valeton: Zoom UK +44 8432 080999 zoom-uk.com Tech21 Fly Rig5: Rocky Road +44 (0)1494 535333 rocky-rd.com Mooer Red Truck: Strings & Things +44 (0) 1273 440 442 stringsandthings.co.uk

April 2018 ToTal GuiTar


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£435

Trace acousTic TransiT a

BesT Buy award

A do-it-all gigging solution

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here’s a common misconception that playing acoustic live means plugging the guitar straight into a DI and job done. But why should electric players have all the fun of effects? Reverb, delay with tap tempo, chorus and boost – there are useful tone shapers and a whole preamp too in this compact-but-sturdy, sleek, black metal unit. Trace Elliot are presenting a do-it-all solution that’s reflected in the price. Is it worth it? For ease of use the Trace Acoustic Transit A certainly takes

some beating – the control layout and bright green LEDs let you know exactly what’s in operation at any point. There’s a handy Pre-Shape button – boosting lows and highs while cutting mids for a smooth EQ for piezos. There’s also a piezo button that raises the input gain and impedance – effectively a 10db boost, in addition to a dedicated boost switch with a level control. That comprehensive approach to options is reflected at the back with outputs including post and pre-EQ XLR. The latter allows you to send a signal direct to the PA that’s unaffected by your changes

perfecT for a GiGGinG acousTic player who wanTs more conTrol ToTal GuiTar april 2018

to the preamp controls. The post option allows your processing to be heard front of house. In practice, with both magnetic soundhole pickup and piezo guitars we found the Transit A to be very intuitive. The preamp boosts levels considerably, which could be especially useful for passive piezo players; the effects, though certainly not as editable as standalone stompboxes, sound very good. This represents an investment for a gigging acoustic player who wants more control – and its performance reflects that. Rob Laing

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feaTures value for money Build QualiTy usaBiliTy overall raTinG

aT a Glance TYPE: Acoustic preamp

and effects unit FEATURES Three-band

EQ; chorus, reverb, and delay with tap tempo; notch filter; phase reverse; boost and gain controls; pre-shape and piezo presets; chromatic tuner; INPUTS 1/4" instrument; 1/8 " aux OUTPUTS 1/4" out (Mono and Stereo); 1/4" dry; XLR Pre and Post outs with ground lift; 1/8" headphones out POWER 9-volt DC power supply (included) Nylon carrying case included CONTACT Barnes & Mullins 01691 652449 traceelliot.com


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Fix Your GuiTAr

Top Tip!

Drop tuning Drop your guitar’s tuning without compromising performance

If you play dro constantly, p tuned consider a baritone g uitar (see th is month’s TG Test on p9 8), which has an elongate d scale leng th for better clari ty

Words: Jack Ellis

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rop tuning can be great fun but the string rattle you get with a lower tension isn’t as enjoyable. So, let us show you how to keep your axe happy when sporting some beefcake strings. The first decision you need to make is which tuning to choose… you have to make your mind up as the set up can be specialised around that tuning’s tension. Whichever tuning you decide to go with will have a recommended size of string, some packs are designed and advertised for ToTal GuiTar april 2018

specific tunings, which makes it easy, but for more off-thewall tunings you will have to be creative. D’addario’s String Tension Pro is a useful web page, you can choose a reference set like 10-46s and figure out what size set you’ll need to keep a similar tension. Visit them at stringtensionpro.com. Our ESP here is getting a set of 12-60s and it will be tuned in drop C (C G C F A D). Those big-boy strings will provide the necessary girth to handle anything the player throws at it. Djent ’n’ all.

Meet Your expert

what you need A pack of suitable strings PH2 screwdriver String winder String cutters

Two capos Feeler gauges Short steel ruler Allen keys Tuner Lead

Skill level Intermediate

Jack ellis runs Jack’s Instrument Services from his workshop in Manchester. In his career he has worked on thousands of instruments, from simple fixes and upgrades, to complete rebuilds. For more info, see: www.jacksinstrument services.co.uk


fix your guitar

1

Consider what tuning you’re going to use and stay at. For this LTD we’re going for drop C and have chosen a set of D’addario 12-60s, which will behave nicely. Some string makers are making specialised sets for more common tunings. Change tuning and you’ll have to set up your guitar again!

2

String up your test patient with your new strings – don’t be put off by the setup or tremolo going wild. If you have gone off-piste here with some very large strings you may need to enlarge the tuner hole by means of drilling, just be sure to de-burr the sharp edges away to avoid string breakage.

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3

We’re now fully at pitch in your desired tuning. This means that the guitar is under the right tension – we now need to wrestle this guy back into shape. The first rule of setup is to look at the truss rod. If you go straight for the action screws, you will go round in circles.

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5

6

The rule is ‘lefty loosey, righty tightey’ for adjusting the truss rod. Make a change then check your progress with the feeler gauge again – keep the guitar in tune for this process. You might aim for a larger gap if you’re planning to batter the strings and less of a gap if you’re planning to shred.

Using a feeler gauge and two capos measure the relief (the bend in the neck). Attach your capos at the 1st fret and 15th fret. We’re looking at the gap between 7th fret and the string using the string as a straight edge. The gap should be .006" to .012”. If it’s already laying on the frets, your truss rod is over tightened.

The nut is always a tricky one. As the nut carries out a few important jobs all at once we recommend having a pro adjust your nut for you. They have specialised gauged files. The slots will have to be widened so as not to pinch the strings, the depth of the slots should not be altered unless required. april 2018 ToTal GuiTar


t h e ga s station

7

If you have a Floyd, well, you will have 99 problems and the pitch will be one. The main issue is that our new tension is dictated by the strings and the tuning will have messed with the floating tremolo’s setting. This needs balancing again. The baseplate for the floating tremolo should be parallel to the paintwork of the guitar top.

8

9

Time to sort out your action, so adjust the grub screws to and fro until you get a decent height. Measured from the top of 12th fret to the bottom of the string a good clearance would be 2.2mm on the sixth string and 1.5mm on the first string. The remaining strings should be set according to the radius of your fretboard.

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11

12

The two wood screws inside the rear cavity are responsible for adding more or less tension onto the tremolo. Tighten to increase, this will pull the bridge down to the body but will also raise the string’s pitch. Take a guess at how much to tweak the screw and retune the guitar – repeat until it’s balanced and in tune.

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Sometimes the saddle for these new strings needs to go further back and the spring is stopping it moving. Take out one of your springs and chop it in two to free up some extra room. If you don’t want to mess up your original springs, find a ‘clicky’ pen and nick the spring out of that!

ToTal GuiTar april 2018

With your action set and test played for buzzing, it’s time to set the intonation. Your new, larger gauge strings will have a different intonation setting required for sure. Play a harmonic at 12th fret then compare it to the fretted note at 12th fret. If it’s sharp, move the saddle backward, if it’s flat move it forward.

We’ve put some super-massive strings on, so they will have a greater mass for the magnets to work with, this means they’re louder! For most people of the drop-tune persuasion this is a good thing. Consider how flappy the string will be though and make sure you don’t clang the string onto your pickup’s top when playing.


the playlist

The Playlist Black Foxxes frontman Mark Holley reveals the songs that inspire him and admits he’s not a fan of guitar solos

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he song that made me want to play... Voodoo Child (Slight Return) – Jimi Hendrix

“I remember hearing that riff blaring on the vinyl player and having an urge to play it. I actually started learning classical guitar, and my dad said that if I could play Classical Gas, he’d buy me an electric, thinking I’d never be able to learn it. So I learned it to spite him and he had to buy me one!”

The first song I covered... Breakfast At Tiffany’s – Deep Blue Something “I remember we did Breakfast At Tiffany’s. Also (and this one wasn’t a cover) we wrote a song about Jason Donovan! The first band I was in was just awful. Sometimes people will send me their band’s music and they’re like, 16-year-olds, and I listen and think, ‘How are these kids so good?’ Because what I was writing at that age was an absolute shambles.”

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A song I’d like to cover... Suffragette City – David Bowie “Actually, we already do Suffragette City. We’ll always play around with covers but it’s got to translate to our style for us to use it. We tend to like going down the 60s/70s route – this Bowie song translated amazingly.”

A solo I love... Stairway To Heaven – Led Zeppelin

Words: Thea De Gallier

“It’s not the solo as such, it’s more the way the guitar builds around the song. I think that’s more appealing than a two-minute shred solo. I’ve never been into twiddly, fast-paced solos that tend to fall into metal genres like Dragonforce. It’s incredible but it’s never appealed to me.”

The song I’d play to someone who had never heard my music… I’m Not Well – Black Foxxes “I think from the ToTal GuiTar april 2018

first record, the title track I’m Not Well really sums everything up. I’m proud of that track, it feels like a stadium track the way it builds and everything comes in at the end. From the new record, there’s a song called Joy, which is a five minute track, but three-and-a-half minutes are just a section that fades out. It’s just chaos, it’s so punk rock and different to anything we’ve done before.”

A song I’m currently listening to... Well Done – Idles “I love the Idles album, Brutalism, and the song Well Done, I’m obsessed with it. And Phoebe Bridgers’s Smoke Signals as well, she’s unbelievable.”

The song I’d like to be remembered for... Float On – Black Foxxes “I wrote that song before the guys were even in the band. It’s a pretty obnoxious five minutes, and I thought, ‘Nobody’s going to want to join this band!’ Now it’s on the new album as the closing track. It’s another self-indulgent five-and-a-half minute song. It’s about a cousin of mine who drowned in a river. Our family were losing their minds, there was a manhunt for him and everything. I figured I’d try something a bit different and write a song for him, and I’m really proud of the way it came out.”

A song I listen to when I’m touring... Daydreaming – Radiohead “I used to really struggle being out on the road, but now I can’t wait to get away! I think Daydreaming by Radiohead is a huge one for me. When the plane’s on the runway and I want to switch off, that’s the one I always go to.” Black Foxxes’ second album Reiði is out now on Search and Destroy/Spinefarm Records


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Total Guitar - April 2018  

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