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HERALD A SEABOURN CLUB PUBLICATION | VOLUME 30 NUMBER 1

EXPLORING ICY STRAIT POINT

ALASKA OYSTERS | JACK LONDON | DENALI DISTILLING

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CONTRIBUTORS

JANET GROENE is a professional travel writer and sea dog whose books include Creating Comfort Afloat, Open Road’s Caribbean Guide, Personal Paradise Caribbean and Living Aboard. She holds the NMMA Directors Award for marine journalism.

SUSANNA KELLY was born in Eagle River, Alaska, and as an adult pursues adventure in the form of snowboarding, fishing and traveling. When she’s not getting lost in the wilderness, you can find her speaking out on environmental issues or curled up with a good video game.

JACK FEERICK has written for Better Homes & Gardens, The Saturday Evening Post and Mental Floss, along with smallpress poetry, fiction and comics. He lives and works in western New York with his family; his scotch of preference is Auchentoshan 12-Year-Old — if you’re buying.

KEVIN REVOLINSKI has lived abroad in Italy, Panama and Guatemala, writing for Rough Guide guidebooks, Caribbean Travel & Life, Chicago Tribune and Wisconsin State Journal, as well as a memoir, The Yogurt Man Cometh: Tales of an American Teacher in Turkey.

JOHN ROBERTS, operator of InTheLoopTravel.com, calls New Jersey his home base while exploring destinations around the world in a fun, fit and adventurous way. John has written for publications such as AARP The Magazine, Cruise Critic, World of Cruising, Travel Pulse and TravelAge West.

LYNN AND CELE SELDON have spent more than 20 years mastering travel writing and photography, sailing in Antarctica, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, Alaska and Canada, and covering travel topics for publications including Cruise Travel, Cruise Critic, AAA magazines and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

For advertising information, contact sales@ppigroup.com

Bill Panoff CEO/CHAIRMAN

Corporate Headquarters: PPI Group 6261 NW 6th Way Suite 100 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 USA Phone: (954) 377-7777 Fax: (954) 377-7000 Website: www.ppigroup.com

William P. Jordan III PRESIDENT

Please address all correspondence to Seabourn Club Herald c/o PPI Group Corporate Headquarters 6261 NW 6th Way, Suite 100 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, USA

HERALD Bill Panoff PUBLISHER Linda Douthat ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR Phillip Crandall MANAGING EDITOR Skip Anderson ART DIRECTOR Alexandria Geubelle CREATIVE ASSISTANT Jon Philpott Photography, capturing moments, people, life / Getty Images COVER IMAGE

Alamy Stock Photo AWL Images eStock Getty Images Ingram Image Superstock CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Jack Feerick Janet Groene Susanna Kelly Kevin Revolinski John Roberts Cele & Lynn Seldon CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Deb Bottcher PROOFREADER

William P. Jordan III PRESIDENT Christina Hunting VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL MARKETING

We are currently assessing enhanced health and safety protocols in light of COVID-19 and how they may impact our future offerings. Our actual offerings may vary from what is described in this magazine. Learn more about our Current Operations Update and Travel Health Advisories at Seabourn.com/News. Seabourn reserves the right to correct errors.

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Audrey Balbiers-Panoff CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Jose I. Martin CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Linda Douthat SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLISHING Piero Vitale SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE STRATEGY & FINANCIAL PLANNING Christina Hunting VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL MARKETING Soren Domlesky DIRECTOR OF TECHNOLOGY

©2020 Panoff Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Seabourn Club Herald is published under contract to PPI Group. The contents of this magazine are protected by copyright. Reproduction, either in whole or in part, including but not limited to transmission by any means, in any form — digital, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise — is forbidden without express written permission from the publisher. The magazine assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photography, artwork or other material. Electronic queries only will be acknowledged. Email to publications@ppigroup.com. Commentary and opinions expressed in Seabourn Club Herald are not necessarily those of the publisher, and the Seabourn Cruise Line and PPI Group are not responsible for any claims or offers made in advertisements appearing in Seabourn Club Herald. Seabourn may share some of your profile information with our affiliated companies, which comprise the World’s Leading Cruise Lines. You may limit our affiliated companies from marketing their products to you based on the information that we collect and share with them. Your choice to limit marketing offers from our affiliates will apply until you tell us otherwise. You may request that your information not be used in marketing efforts of our affiliates by contacting us at privacy@seabourn.com or Seabourn Cruise Line, Attn. Affiliate OptOut, 450 Third Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119. For cruise reservations, call your travel advisor or call Seabourn at (800) 929-9391.


If it can survive being ejected from a plane, it can survive near enough anything. Should you treat your Bremont MB watch with respect? Not really. We don’t. We freeze it, we bake it, and we shake it. For hours on end. Then we shoot it out of a plane. Just to make sure it’s as tough as we claim it is. What’s more, it has been assembled and tested at our headquarters in Henley-on-Thames. So don’t worry about looking after a Bremont MB. It can look after itself. MBII-WH/OR

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in this issue

HERALD 30.1

22 FEATURES

16

ALASKA'S SACRED SALMON

By Janet Groene

22

JACK LONDON'S TREASURE

More than a mere meal, this fish is a heroic character in legends and a key player in the circle of life.

A young adventurer struck it rich during Alaska’s Gold Rush of 1897 — not with his pickax, but with his words.

By Kevin Revolinski

28

MIGHTY LAND, MIGHTY NAMES Explorers who gave their names to Pacific Northwest places lived lives as great as the region itself.

By Jack Feerick

34

Icy Strait Point has become a showcase for Tlingit heritage in the 21st century.

34

By John Roberts

16

SEABOURN CRUISE LINE

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Clockwise: Heritage Image Partnership Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo; Design Pics Inc / Alamy Stock Photo; Superstock

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14 10 A LETTER TO CLUB MEMBERS from Josh Leibowitz DEPARTMENTS

12 ON THE HORIZON

The latest news from Seabourn

14 BEHIND THE SHIELD Did you know?

44 RIGHT STUFF

Fine things to want

46 CUISINES OF THE WORLD

HEAVEN ON THE HALF-SHELL Hump Island Oyster Company dishes up the West Coast’s coolest oysters. By Cele & Lynn Seldon

50 GRAPES & GRAINS

NORTHERN SPIRITS Alaska distilleries are opening a wild new frontier. By Susanna Kelly

54 UNCORKED

SPIRITUAL EVOLUTION Sassan Mossanen has grown Denali Brewing into Denali Spirits, and taken the Great Land brand to the big time. By Susanna Kelly

56 MINDFUL LIVING

MY FAVORITE MEDICINAL SPICES: GARLIC AND TURMERIC These two flavorful ingredients turn delicious dishes into medical marvels. By Dr. Andrew Weil

60 SEE/HEAR/DO

Seabourn suggests how to spend your down time.

64 VIEWFINDER

Sea Stacks, Kenai Fjords National Park

Clockwise: Seabourn; 2010 MCT/Getty Images; Superstock

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50


A WORD FROM OUR PRESIDENT

DEAR SEABOURN CLUB MEMBER,

I

hope that you and your family and friends are well. Over the past few weeks since I took on the role to lead the brand, I have embarked on a listening tour. I have had dozens of discussions with shipboard leaders, shoreside leaders, guests and travel advisors. The feedback from everyone has been a clear level of pride about the Seabourn brand and an overwhelming sense of family and community. Everyone is incredibly focused on ensuring well-being during this time period and ultimately something to look forward to in the future. Our highest priorities are compliance, environmental protection, and the health, well-being and safety of our guests, crew and the communities we visit. As COVID-19 is still evolving, we are working closely with global medical and scientific experts to develop best practice public health prevention and control measures based on the latest science available to us. Of course, these measures will be adjusted as new science and social practices emerge. We know our Club Members have lots of questions about upcoming travel or future planning right now and want ultimate flexibility during these uncertain times. With that in mind, we have enhanced our “Book with Confidence” cancellation policy through September 30, 2020, providing you greater flexibility by allowing the option to cancel your booking up to 30 days prior to departure and receive a future cruise credit. The aim of this policy is simply to provide you an extra bit of confidence to select a future vacation and hold a reservation today. We are also proud to include a new “Best Fare Guarantee” benefit. If at any time you see a lower publicly available price on Seabourn.com, just let us know. For more details, contact your travel advisor or visit Seabourn.com. For inspiration, we invite you to peruse this issue. If your travel wish list includes Alaska, you’ll love this issue, which is largely dedicated to the endlessly enchanting coasts and Inside Passage waterways of Alaska and British Columbia. Our articles reflect the history, beauty and diversity of the Great Land’s places, people and breathtaking majesty. Janet Groene investigates the natural phenomenon of Alaska’s salmon, from their ecological role to their spiritual importance to Native Alaskans. Kevin Revolinski reveals the impact of Jack London’s Gold Rush experiences on the literary myth of the Last Frontier. Jack Feerick traces the history of names that dot maps of Alaska, and John Roberts reports on the first modern community created by Native Americans and dedicated to nurturing their traditional culture. As always, Dr. Andrew Weil has some sage advice on two important natural spices to keep us healthy and better able to go out and discover more of our world. We await the day when we can welcome you back on board, with a warm smile and a glass of Champagne. More importantly, we look forward to creating lifelong memories and delivering remarkable Seabourn Moments while visiting our extraordinary worlds.

Sincerely,

Josh Leibowitz President

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EACH DROP IS

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY, Imported Cognac Hennessy® 40% Alc./Vol. (80º), ©2020 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY

AN ODYSSEY

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ON THE HORIZON

SEABOURN JOURNEYS ENHANCE ALASKA & BRITISH COLUMBIA VOYAGES SPECTACULAR MOUNTAIN RESORTS ARE YOURS TO DISCOVER

People travel from all corners of the globe to cruise the breathtaking coasts and Inside Passage of Alaska & British Columbia. But whether you cross the International Dateline, overfly an ocean, or just drop in from the same time zone, it’s worth adding an ultra-luxury Seabourn Journey before or after your voyage to experience even more of North America’s most majestic and memorable destinations. Seabourn has created two brand-new Seabourn Journeys centered on a pair of spectacular mountain resorts near the cities where Seabourn’s Alaska & British Columbia voyages begin and end. Alyeska Chugach Mountain Resort is a four-day pre- or postcruise Seabourn Journey at the Hotel Alyeska located on Turnagain Arm outside Anchorage. It offers guests miles of scenic hiking and biking trails through the world’s northernmost boreal forest, including liftaccessed downhill trails, as well as helicopter glacier hikes sea

and

flightseeing,

kayaking,

wildlife

cruises and a breathtaking aerial tram to the Seven Glaciers Mt.

Restaurant

Alyeska’s

SEABOURN HAS CREATED TWO BRAND-NEW SEABOURN JOURNEYS

Alyeska Resort

on

peak.

It

is available before or after voyages sailing between Whittier (Anchorage) and Juneau. The four-day pre- or post-cruise Majestic Whistler Blackcomb Mountain Resort welcomes guests to the Four Seasons Resort on the slopes of British Columbia’s Fitzsimmons Range, one of North America’s premier ski areas. Summertime activities around the charming Alpine Village community include trout and salmon fishing, bear viewing, mountain biking, hiking, flightseeing and zip-lining. The village itself offers wonderful shops, restaurants and entertainment venues. This Seabourn Journey is available before or after voyages beginning or ending at Vancouver. 12

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Four Seasons Resort Whistler


Rocky Mountaineer

Rocky Mountaineer

Matt Hage / Alyeska Chugach Mountain Resort; Alex Lukey / Four Seasons; Rocky Mountaaineer (2)

Seabourn will still offer classic Seabourn Journeys featuring

wilderness of Denali National Park and North America’s

luxury rail experiences to two of North America’s most

highest peak itself. Along with stays at the McKinley Chalet

unforgettable destinations. UNESCO Banff National Park &

Resort and guided wildlife-spotting tours into the park,

the Rocky Mountaineer is a seven-day pre-cruise Seabourn

this Seabourn Journey includes a thrilling flightseeing

Journey featuring multiple days in the spectacular Canadian

transfer across the mountains between the coast and

Rockies at the Fairmont Banff Springs hotel, extensive guided

Denali, and a scenic journey across rivers and forests in a

sightseeing in the Banff and Yoho National Parks UNESCO

deluxe domed railcar. The Denali Experience is a six-day

World Heritage Site including free time at Lake Louise, as

pre- or post-cruise Seabourn Journey operating between

well as a breathtaking two-day scenic rail journey aboard the

Anchorage and Juneau, or a five-day pre- or post-cruise

world-famous Rocky Mountaineer luxury train. A guest favorite, The Denali Experience is a pre- or post-cruise Seabourn Journey centered on the wildlife-rich

Seabourn Journey operating between Anchorage and Whittier. For detailed, day-by-day itineraries of these and other superb Seabourn Journeys, visit Seabourn.com. SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

13


BEHIND THE SHIELD

ADVENTURE COLLECTION SHORE EXPERIENCES ARE TAILOR-MADE FOR ALASKA FROM WHALE-WATCHING TO PADDLING BY GLACIERS, THESE OUTDOOR ADVENTURES ARE UNFORGETTABLE

We categorize our carefully curated Shore Experiences by Seabourn into seven “collections” according to the general interests they are designed to captivate. The Adventure Collection offers guests active and participatory experiences in ports, many escorted by our expert Ventures by Seabourn® Expedition Team. Our seasonal cruises in Alaska and British Columbia provide a perfect environment for these unforgettable outdoor adventures. At Seabourn, we plan our Adventure Collection tours carefully, with lots of different levels of activity. Whether you want an exhilarating five-mile hike or a more relaxing scenic whalewatching cruise, there’s an amazing Seabourn adventure waiting for you in Alaska.

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New this season are Ventures by Seabourn excursions at Alaska’s Hubbard Glacier, the largest tidewater glacier in North America. Escorted by members of the onboard Expedition Team, optional excursions in Zodiacs®, paddling kayaks or on board a local catamaran offer water-level perspectives of the glacier’s six-mile, 400-foot high face. Hubbard is active, often calving icefalls the size of a 10-story building. The eruption of spray and thunderous splash are among the most memorable thrills of an Alaska cruise. At the port of Sitka, another new Ventures by Seabourn option consists of an invigorating, guided Herring Cove to Beaver Lake Hike of just under five scenic miles, with breathtaking views of mountains, waterfalls and alpine lakes. Several popular Alaska Adventure Collection experiences from past seasons will be offered again. One sure to please is the Whale Watch and Marine Mammal Safari at Icy Strait Point, because the operator offers a refund if you don’t sight a whale on the excursion. Guests cruise to Point Adolphus through nutrientrich waters that attract orcas, Steller sea lions, harbor seals, otters, porpoises and majestic humpback whales, surrounded by bald eagles and seabirds.

Another favorite from our Adventure Collection and Epicurean Collection is the Wilderness Exploration Cruise & Crab Feast from the port of Ketchikan. Guests drive along the coast to a vintage cannery building that has been converted into a charming seaside lodge. Boarding an enclosed 46-foot catamaran, they cruise to the Mahoney Glacial Cirque — a ring of snowcapped peaks tinseled with 2,000-foot waterfalls. The area boasts wildlife including bears and eagles, as well as marine life including orcas, sea lions and seals. In a picturesque estuary, guests pull up a crab pot to learn about the bounty of lively Dungeness crabs that thrive here. After freeing the crabs, guests return to the warm, welcoming lodge for a delicious all-you-can-eat feast featuring freshly cooked Alaska crab.

Seabourn (4)

Adventure Collection Shore Experiences are offered all along the courses of Seabourn’s Alaska & British Columbia voyages. To learn more about them and the Ventures by Seabourn program, or to view applicable sail dates, visit Seabourn.com.

SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

15


ALASKA'S SACRED SALMON

More than a mere meal, this fish is a heroic character in legends and a key player in the circle of life.

Paul Souders | WorldFoto / Getty Images

By Janet Groene

16

SEABOURN CRUISE LINE

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T

o Native Alaskans in the Pacific Northwest, life is sustained by the First Foods: salmon, wild game, roots, berries and fresh water. Honored at tribal ceremonies, woven into folktales and carved into totems, they are a symbol, lifeblood and cultural identity. In tribal celebrations, the annual return of the sacred salmon symbolizes the renewal and eternal sustainability of human life. Chief Weninock of the Yakima people said of the salmon in 1915, “My strength is from the 18

fish; my blood is from the fish, from the roots and berries. The fish and game are the essence of my life.” Many coastal Alaskans are taught that the Creator had a purpose in putting them at a place where salmon return. Some say the word “salmon” comes from the Latin salmo, meaning “leap.” Others relate it to the Hebrew shalom, for peace. The Salmon surname survives today in English, probably as a derivative of Solomon, the wise ruler. Throughout coastal regions of Alaska, salmon play a key role in tribal religion,

culture, the economy and daily sustenance. Commercial fishing is a favored way of life. And in traditional stories, Salmon (with a capital “S”) is a hero who sustains and guides his people. SALMON AS A TRAVEL ATTRACTION Any visitor who has tasted fresh-caught salmon prepared on a cedar plank by experienced native hands knows that it’s truly a gift from the gods. In all of its life cycles, salmon is also a gift to the traveler’s

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Superstock; RGB Ventures / SuperStock / Alamy Stock Photo

ALASKANS HELPING ALASKA SALMON

Various speakers have been credited with the phrase, “Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty.” To Alaskans, that means sustaining the freedoms provided by Salmon, a precious resource as well as a spirit of nature. It begins with salmon habitats and the habitats that sustain those habitats, a network so complex that it spans from the ocean depths to the rain forests, all of them crucial links in salmon’s life cycle.

IN SOME TRADITIONS, DRIED SALMON RETAINS THE SAME PROTECTIVE ESSENCE THAT THE CREATOR ENDOWED IN SALMON THE SPIRIT.

camera and the angler’s fly rod — a singular sportfishing challenge in the water, and a mesmerizing geometry when your lens finds them drying on frail wood racks erected on a rocky shore. Take a selfie when you find a primitive salmon wheel set up in a native village. Salmon as an art form is sold in galleries and studios. Displayed on ice in a local market, salmon flash silver, pink and red for the camera. Spawning salmon, all sparkle and splash, are a challenge for the wildlife photographer as they swim or jump upstream.

FOLKLORE, FAIRY TALES, TRUTHS AND TRADITIONS In some Pacific nations, fish bones and entrails are returned to the water after a feast, assuring return of the sacred fish. The ceremony is often carried out by twins, who are considered to be good luck. This is followed by a traditional Salmon Dance. 
One folktale speaks of a woman who sees salmon ghosts by the shore and asks them why they float in and out of the water. The salmon tell her that they cannot return home because

At the heart of the efforts is The Nature Conservancy, whose projects include continued learning about salmon’s needs. “In one day on the ground, we mapped at least a dozen new major tributaries in the Bristol Bay watershed,” enthused one volunteer. “It was full of spawning sockeye salmon. It’s amazing how much salmon habitat hasn’t even been documented yet!” The Conservancy is active in preserving and restoring habitat such as streams that were harmed by old logging practices and restoring rain forests, whose big trees stabilize river banks, shade pools and provide cover. The group is funding people of the Hoonah Native Forest Partnership to chart the future of the forest. SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

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John Warburton-Lee / AWL Images Ltd

Alaska Sealife Center salmon sculpture, Seward

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WHAT ARE ALASKA SALMON? SuperStock

KING SALMON, also called chinook salmon, are the largest of the species and valued for sportfishing.

Alaska or Pacific salmon (as opposed to Atlantic salmon) come in five varieties, all subtly different depending on fat content (which in turn depends on their genetics and spawning habits) and the waters that nurtured them. Hungry for a salmon feast? Here’s what’s what. humans stopped bringing their bones back to the water. In Japan, speared salmon are given a death blow by a willow stick. Using a stone is considered an insult to the salmon that is giving its life to feed humankind. A similar story among some Alaskan tribes has Raven, the crafty spiritual character, luring Salmon to shore with a green stone. Salmon is then killed with a wooden club. Salmon ceremonies differ from tribe to tribe. The Koyukon people of the Yukon believe that every salmon has a powerful spirit. The first one caught each year is ritually sprinkled with water dipped up with a willow switch. People tell Salmon, the spiritual character, “Pull up your canoe here,” thus inviting more salmon to come to this place. Then the fish are cooked and everyone shares their own first-caught salmon. Before the arrival of European settlers, many indigenous tribal economies were based entirely on salmon, which was their staple food and the currency they traded for other foods such as caribou. In ancient times, when the Haida people had no salmon, they asked Raven to unlock the secret. Raven flew to the place where

COHO SALMON, aka silver salmon, are red-orange in color. They are usually sold canned, smoked or frozen. PINK SALMON or humpback salmon is a common but small variety with very mild flavor. It’s usually used in canning. SOCKEYE SALMON, also known as red salmon, are one of the most abundant in the salmon family. Restaurants favor red salmon for their color and flavor. CHUM SALMON, or keta salmon, are a paler, pinkish orange and best used for smoking or canning.

MANY TRADITIONAL STORYTELLERS HAVE VERSIONS OF A TALE IN WHICH SALMON DISAPPEARS BECAUSE PEOPLE BECAME GREEDY AND CARELESS ABOUT CARING FOR ITS HABITAT. many salmon spawned, captured the Head Salmon’s son in its claws and flew back to the hungry people. A rush of salmon followed in hopes of rescuing the Salmon Prince but they were captured in a net. A great totem was erected featuring the three spiritual characters Thunderbird, Raven and Salmon. Forever after, the salmon followed the same route to that place. Many traditional storytellers have versions of a tale in which Salmon disappears because

people became greedy and careless about caring for its habitat.
 In one story, Old Man Rattlesnake, called Grandfather, is recruited to revive a dead salmon so it will go to his brothers and bring them back. Coyote had pretended to bring the salmon back to life but the people were not fooled. Slowly and painfully, old Grandfather five times passes his hands over the salmon as he promised.
 The magic happens, Grandfather disappears into the dead salmon’s body and the fish comes back to life. Still today, in the spine of salmon you catch, you can find a white membrane that is the spirit of Grandfather, who brought Salmon the spirit back to a repentant people. In some traditions, dried salmon retains the same protective essence that the Creator endowed in Salmon the spirit. In some tribes, a piece of dried salmon is woven into snowshoes. A tiny strip of dried salmon may be nailed inside a home. A vest made of dried fish skin might be worn by children. A folktale about Salmon Boy, a lad who went to live with the Salmon People, is taught to Alaskan school children to explain the balance of nature and the importance of conservation. Humans and fish must learn to live together.

FEATURE EXPERIENCE Seabourn offers Alaska salmon fishing excursions on select sailings, in both Sitka and Ketchikan, which can be further enhanced by "ENJOY YOUR CATCH" DINING EXPERIENCES

featuring your fresh-caught fish masterfully prepared by the ship’s culinary team.

SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

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Image Professionals GmbH / Alamy Stock Photo; Chronicle / Alamy Stock Photo


JACK LONDON'S TREASURE

A young adventurer struck it rich during Alaska’s Gold Rush of 1897 — not with his pickax, but with his words. By Kevin Revolinski


B

Paying with gold dust,1899

Klondikers carrying supplies through Chilkoot Pass, 1898

efore he became a literary legend, Jack London spent a year in search of a fortune in Alaska and the Yukon. During that year, he lost his shirt, his father, some of his teeth and all of his hopes of becoming rich on gold. But his experiences in the Klondike would compel him to write some of his best work and help him become one of the first American writers to turn literature into a lucrative career. The Depression of 1893 was one of the worst in American history. So, when gold was discovered in the Klondike, news sailed south quickly and by July 1897, word was buzzing around the port cities of Seattle and San Francisco. London, living in San Francisco at the time, was only 21, but had already worked in a cannery, a jute mill and a laundry; he’d even spent some time as an oyster pirate and a hobo. By the time news of the gold rush arrived, the best of the claims had already been staked out. Nevertheless, within six months an estimated 100,000 “stampeders” were off to become rich. Less than a third of them even managed to arrive in the Klondike. London, already nearly destitute, desperately tried to raise money for supplies and passage, but it wasn’t until his brotherin-law James Shepard caught the gold-rush fever that London’s dream was converted to a plan. The two of them enthusiastically went about San Francisco gathering mining equipment, furs and supplies weighing in at nearly 2,000 pounds. Finally, on July 25, they sailed through the Golden Gate.

THE SNOW-COVERED PASS — AND THE DISCOURAGING STORIES OF MEN RETURNING THROUGH IT — CONVINCED SHEPARD TO TURN AROUND AND HEAD HOME. JACK PRESSED ON. 24

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NORTH TO FORTUNE Their steamer traveled up the Inside Passage of Alaska to the Lynn Canal, and they disembarked at Dyea with three new partners. They then faced the formidable challenge of hefting their gear through the Chilkoot Pass to arrive at Lindeman Lake. From there, they could navigate the Yukon River toward Dawson City in the Yukon Territory. The snow-covered pass — and the discouraging stories of men returning through it — convinced Shepard to turn around and head home. Jack pressed on. He lugged the lion’s share of the supplies forward in segments, covering the 28-mile hike from Dyea to Lindeman Lake piece by piece. The last segment was three miles and London himself wrote of these supply runs, “I back-tripped it four times a day, and on each forward trip carried one hundred and fifty pounds.” London and his companions bought lumber produced from the surrounding spruce forest and built a flat-bottomed boat they dubbed the Yukon Belle. London himself stitched and rigged a sail to spare them the rowing, and they were off with winter dogging them the whole way.

A blizzard at Lake Laberge threatened to pin them down for the season, but London insisted they push on even as the waters were freezing over behind them. The climax of the journey was yet to come. Box Canyon and White Horse Rapids threw up such torrents of whitewater that most sailors were compelled to go overland to bypass them. London again insisted they push on. He and his men successfully ran the whirlpool at Box Canyon. At White Horse, a sizeable crowd of spectators were on hand as London’s crew shot the rapids amid the remains of less fortunate craft scattered across the rocks. The onlookers were impressed and the men stayed several days more to run a fleet of other vessels through, collecting a total of $3,000 at $25 per boat (that equates to $96,260 in today's U.S. dollars!). In October, London staked a claim “ascending the left fork of Henderson Creek” and days later filed it in Dawson City. The journey, at least, was successful. The saying at the time was “two dollars go into the ground for each dollar that comes out.” The reality is estimated to be much worse:

$60 million was spent by miners while the earth only gave up $10 million in gold. London watched his funds dwindle. The group holed up in an abandoned log cabin to await spring. The harsh winter brought weeklong blizzards and temperatures plummeting below minus 60 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 51 degrees Celsius). He and his companions fought hunger, boredom and the temptation to search for food — everyone told them that those who went out to hunt rarely returned. A SPRING OF HOPE Finally, in mid-May the ice on the Yukon began to break up. London ventured into Dawson but found the cost of supplies so high that he could only survive a few more weeks — and there was no hope of finding gold in that icy ground to reverse his fortune. To compound his troubles, his teeth were loosening and his flesh turning gray; soon he was doubled over with pain. His diet’s lack of vitamins had left him with scurvy and only immediate medical treatment saved his life. He saw no other choice but to head for home.

Opposite: Hulton Archive / Getty Images; FLHC M1 / Alamy Stock Photo, Right: Hulton Archive / Getty Images

“Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will none the less get something that looks remarkably like it.” Jack London

– “Getting Into Print”

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Jennifer Hess / Alamy Stock Photo

HIS OBSERVATIONS OF THE PACK DOGS IN THE KLONDIKE WOULD BECOME THE BASIS FOR THE CALL OF THE WILD.

On June 8, 1898, he and two fellow prospectors set off down the Yukon River on a 21-day journey that would take them 1,800 miles to the Bering Sea at the port of St. Michael. Scurvy plagued him the entire way and eventually he lost his four front teeth. Grateful to have survived, London spent eight days shoveling coal on a steamer to British Columbia, earning enough for a steerage ticket on to Vancouver. From there, he hopped freight trains home to Oakland, California.

He returned to his widowed mother and the same economic hard times he’d tried to leave behind. But overcoming hardship in the north had given him raw material and a commitment to survive. His first publication, a story entitled “To the Man on the Trail,” ran in Overland Monthly, and garnered him a mere $5. But by 1900, McClure’s was paying him $300 for two stories and an article. His observations of the pack dogs in the Klondike would become the basis for The Call of the Wild. “To Build a Fire” — a short story

about a man on the Yukon Trail who fatally ignores warnings about the cold — is still widely anthologized today. Later books, from The Sea-Wolf to Before Adam and The Star Rover to The Iron Heel, built on that early success and brought his reputation to ever-greater heights. Jack London had risked his life in an unprofitable search for gold. But what he managed to find in the attempt proved to be far more valuable, not only to him, but to generations of readers.

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MIGHTY LAND, MIGHTY NAMES The explorers who gave their names to Pacific Northwest places lived lives as great as the region itself. By Jack Feerick


A

s throughout the Americas, the place names of the Northwest are a hodgepodge of borrowings from indigenous languages and memorials to the bold explorers who forged the bonds between the Old World and the New. None were bolder than those who braved the treacherous seas and unforgiving climate to carve out a toehold in this great northern land. Look at a map and you’ll see their names. These are their stories. GEORGE VANCOUVER Of Dutch parentage, George Vancouver (1757–1798) enlisted in the British Royal Navy at 13. As a young midshipman, he accompanied Captain Cook on his final ill-fated voyage to Hawaii. Decades later, Vancouver was given his own ships — Discovery and Chatham — and entrusted with a long-term mission to explore the Pacific. The Vancouver Expedition circled the world, touching land in South Africa, Hawaii and various ports in Oceania before turning north to explore the Pacific Northwest. Vancouver’s charting of the coastline was remarkably accurate — so much so that it remained 30

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the standard for decades. In addition to lending his name to places in North America, Australia and New Zealand, he sent hundreds of scientific specimens home to England and is credited with introducing various species to the New World — including bringing coffee shrubs to Hawaii. Vancouver had a knack for making friends, maintaining cordial relations not only with various indigenous peoples but also with any rival Spanish ships he encountered during the journey. Ironically, though, he was undone by a personal grudge. Among the seamen he commanded was one Thomas Pitt. A disgrace as a sailor, Pitt was flogged on multiple occasions for misconduct, and once clapped in irons. Vancouver eventually dismissed him from the crew entirely. Humiliated, Pitt swore vengeance. When Vancouver retired in 1795, Pitt began a relentless campaign of harassment. Using his wealth and connections — his cousin was incumbent prime minster of Great Britain at the time — Pitt had Vancouver denounced in the press, and even physically attacked him in the street. Vancouver, health ruined by his long service, died just three years after concluding his expedition. He was 40 years old.

Juergen Ritterbach / Alamy Stock Photo

Orcas in Johnstone Strait


SuperStock; Andrew Michaels / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

VANCOUVER’S CHARTING OF THE COASTLINE WAS REMARKABLY ACCURATE — SO MUCH SO THAT IT REMAINED THE STANDARD FOR DECADES.

George Vancouver


Baranof Island

Alexander Baranov

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Vitus Bering

Clockwise: Supertock; SPUTNIK / Alamy Stock Photo; Stock Connection Blue / Alamy Stock Photo

BARANOV HIMSELF SURVIVED SEVERAL ASSASSINATION ATTEMPTS BY HIS HABIT OF WEARING A CHAINMAIL SHIRT BENEATH HIS CLOTHES.


JAMES JOHNSTONE Born in 1759, James Johnstone’s naval career began ingloriously — on the losing side of the Battle of the Chesapeake, which helped decide the American Revolution. Johnstone served as Chatham’s sailing master on the Vancouver Expedition, among a crew filled with names that may sound familiar; Chatham’s first lieutenant was Peter Puget, while Discovery’s sailing master was Joseph Whidbey. Johnstone led numerous surveys to map the channels and inlets of the North American coast. It was dangerous work, conducted from open boats away from the relative safety of Chatham for weeks at a time. Among the dozens of waterways and islands he charted is the Johnstone Strait, a 68-mile channel connecting the Georgia Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound, which George Vancouver named in his honor. After the Vancouver Expedition, Johnstone had a long, distinguished naval career, including a stint protecting British convoys from pirates and privateers. He died in 1823. VITUS BERING Though he sailed in service of Peter the Great, cartographer Vitus Bering (1681–1741) was Danish by birth. Peter had ambitions to make Russia an imperial power, and greatly expanded the country’s navy to that end; Bering was one of many foreign mariners to find a place in the Russian fleet. In 1725, Bering was tapped to lead an expedition into uncharted northern waters to investigate theories of a land bridge between Asia and North America. Taking a small crew, Bering undertook the arduous threeyear voyage — most of which was spent traveling the 6,000 miles from St. Petersburg to the port of Kamchatka in the Russian Far East. Enduring brutal winters and shortages of men and supplies, Bering finally sailed north in 1728; he spent only a few months at sea charting the Russian coastline before determining that there was open water — his namesake sea and strait — between Russia and Alaska. Upon returning, Bering proposed a large-scale exploratory mission of the New World. This voyage, too, was fraught with difficulties even before sailing; funds intended

to improve port facilities along the route were misappropriated, and the operation ran disastrously over budget. After seven years of preparation, the expedition’s three ships took to sea in 1740, making a brief landfall at Mount Saint Elias a year later. Separated by storms during the return journey, the ships charted and explored islands in the Alexander, Kodiak and Aleutian archipelagoes. Bering’s flagship was wrecked on an uninhabited island near Kamchatka, and the crew were stranded for ten months. Scurvy and starvation took a terrible toll, wiping out 31 of the 77 sailors — including Bering himself — before the survivors escaped on a boat built from scavenged wreckage. A memorial marks his gravesite on what is today called Bering Island. ALEXANDER BARANOV Alexander Andreyevich Baranov — who gave his name to Baranof Island, on which the city of Sitka sits — is remembered as “the first governor of the Alaskan territory.” But Baranov (1747–1819) was neither an elected official nor a political appointee. His time as “Chief Manager” (his official title) came during a period when European nations vied for control of the north using corporations as their proxies. Baranov escaped his lower-class upbringing near St. Petersburg to build a career as a trader on the Siberian frontier. When already in his mid-40s, with a wife and children to support, he accepted a five-year contract managing a furtrading concern on Kodiak Island. During the sea voyage from Siberia, he was shipwrecked; he and his crew wintered over on Unalaska Island among the Aleut, arriving at Kodiak the following spring in Aleut-built boats. During his tenure, Baranov built up the outpost’s supply lines and founded several new settlements. In 1799, his employer’s firm was absorbed into the newly established Russian-American Company, a venture sponsored by the imperial crown to pursue trade and colonization; Baranov was appointed the RAC’s first Chief Manager. With a fleet of ships and a paramilitary force at his disposal — and with St. Petersburg half a world away — Baranov held near-absolute authority over Russian America, which encompassed the Alaskan panhandle along with parts of California and Hawaii.

Baranov’s 18-year reign saw the Russian Empire expanding its footprint in the New World. But these years were also marked by violent conflict with his Tlingit neighbors; Baranov himself survived several assassination attempts by his habit of wearing a chainmail shirt beneath his clothes. There were also recurring supply shortages, especially after the Russians lost their Hawaiian outposts. Baranov was recalled to Russia in 1818 but never made it home; he fell ill during the return voyage and died at age 70 on a layover in Indonesia. DIONYSIUS ZAREMBO Few biographical details have come down to us about Lieutenant Dionysius Zarembo, who lent his name to a large island in Alaska’s Alexander Archipelago. A Polish-born employee of the RAC, Zarembo commanded the company’s ship Chicaghof. By the time Zarembo came to the archipelago, 30 years after Baranov’s death, relations with the Tlingit had improved, and treaties with the U.S. and the U.K. had granted the company a monopoly on the fur trade in the unincorporated territories of the Pacific watershed; but the RAC still engaged in territorial disputes with rival corporate interests. In 1834, Zarembo made overtures to the Tlingit to build a fortification near the current site of Wrangell — the first permanent European settlement on that island — as defense against incursions from the British-backed Hudson Bay Company (HBC). He named the fort Redoubt St. Dionysius, after his eponymous saint. Shortly after the fort was established, an HBC party attempted to stake out a trading post on the Stikine River, but was turned back by Zarembo. A standoff developed. With British and Russian ships massing, armed conflict seemed inevitable until the Tlingit intervened to resolve the crisis, proclaiming their ancestral right to the fur trade and reaffirming their alliance with Zarembo. Though it has no permanent population, Zarembo’s namesake island boasts a mineral spring whose waters, bottled and sold, were a popular tonic at the turn of the 20th century — a curious ending for a shadowy figure in the history of the north.

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HUNA BEAUTY

Icy Strait Point has become a showcase for Tlingit heritage in the 21st century. By John Roberts


T

ucked into the northeastern edge of Chichagof Island — about 35 miles west of Juneau, along the inland waterway at Port Frederick — sits serene Icy Strait Point. The picturesque spot possesses a rich heritage as a former fishing cannery, but today it plays an integral role in the way its native Huna Tlingit people can preserve their culture by sharing the destination’s beauty with visitors. Icy Strait Point is located in the village of Hoonah, Alaska, and the former cannery site was purchased in 1996 by the Huna Totem Corporation. The goal of the native-owned organization was to create a cultural and wilderness experience that boosts the economy through tourism opportunities while maintaining the historic character and traditional culture of the village. The Hoonah Packing Company built and operated the cannery in 1912; and the abundant salmon and other natural resources in the greater region helped the people of Hoonah maintain a thriving, sustainable lifestyle, with the facility serving as a significant social and economic backbone. But Alaska’s salmon industry came under pressure because of overfishing and lack of regulation, and the cannery closed in 1953. The loss of industry — both salmon fishing and logging — meant many residents, especially younger people, left Hoonah to seek their livelihoods elsewhere. Prospects for the Tlingit people of Hoonah, who have lived along Icy Strait for thousands of years, turned brighter in 1996, when Huna Totem Corporation bought the old cannery and envisioned its potential for tourism. That potential is being realized with the continuing development of Icy Strait Point, which broke ground as the country’s only private cruise ship destination in 2001. More than a decade later, the effects of this expanding new industry can be seen throughout a revitalized community and in a destination that is distinctly Alaskan. The former cannery facility now houses a museum, retail shops and art gallery — all of which feature items that relate to the story of the site and the people of Hoonah. “Icy Strait Point brought a new breath of sustainable life back to the community of 760 people,” says Mickey Richardson, marketing director for Huna Totem. “In addition to unmeasured benefits like increased transportation and community infrastructure, tourism represents more than 260 jobs.”

WILD ENTERPRISE Cruisers visiting Icy Strait Point can feel just how special this place is as soon as their ship eases into Cross Sound and cruises amid the unspoiled wilderness around Chichagof Island before coming into the quiet bay that is the home of the repurposed cannery facility. Vigilant visitors on the lookout for wildlife might see whales in the waters and bald eagles soaring overhead or perching in the surrounding rain forest. This region is also home to more brown bears than humans. Once across the pier to shore, you can choose from more than 30 tours and activities to immerse yourself in the natural beauty and open your eyes to the fascinating history and culture of the Tlingit people. The signature attraction is the world’s largest ZipRider ®, which gives a unique perspective on the area’s natural beauty. Six 5,330-foot-long (1,625-meter-long) zip lines drop more than 1,300 feet (396 meters) in altitude to send riders zooming at speeds up to 60 mph (97 kph) as they soar 300 feet (92 meters) above the rain forest scenery. A gondola is also set to open this year to take visitors on a high-speed ride from the new Wilderness Landing some 1,600 feet (488 meters) up to the top of Hoonah Mountain to capture the stunning vistas. Closer to earth, immersive activities allow visitors the chance to explore the history and culture of the Huna Tlingit, as well as the food and wildlife of the area. Walk along the beach and learn about the special connection the native people have with marine life and its importance in a sustainable lifestyle. Then, learn to fillet a salmon and find out about the preserving process of smoking and kippering. With a Tlingit guide, you can learn how to select wild leaves and herbs for teas and medicine and pick wild berries to accent your ice cream later that day. Icy Strait Point offers opportunities to go stream fishing or angling for halibut on the open ocean, to watch whales and marine mammals, to partake in a seafood feast or simply enjoy a tribal dance show. With each opportunity, one discovers that Icy Strait Point is meeting its goal: offering rich experiences for travelers while also providing great benefits to the community.

“WE MUST HONOR

OUR HISTORY AND CULTURE. IT’S THE REASON PEOPLE COME. THAT’S WHAT MAKES US ALASKAN.

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Clockwise: Design Pics Inc / Alamy Stock Photo; Superstock (2); Dougall_Photography / Getty Images


Native Dancers at Cannery Hoonah, Icy Strait Point

Carving a Tlingit totem pole

Icy Strait Point

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The cannery

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THIS REGION IS ALSO HOME TO MORE BROWN BEARS THAN HUMANS.

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SUSTAINABLE TOURISM Icy Strait Point has received a number of awards and recognition for its approach to sustainable tourism and preservation of the historical heritage of native Alaskan people. “It’s beyond dollars,” says Russell Dick, the CEO of Huna Totem Corporation. “It’s about creating a future. It’s an economic self-sufficiency for our community, our shareholders and our region. Since Icy Strait Point’s growth, children and residents within our community see opportunities in engineering, construction, hospitality and other industries. They also see a future for our Tlingit way of life.” The cultural interaction is vital, Dick says. “Worldwide visitors create a symbiotic relationship with our heritage,” he says. “Through Icy Strait Point, we share our history and culture daily. When travelers leave, they take our story and respect for the Tlingit with them. Then, with the financial resources generated from their visit, we can maintain and grow our Tlingit language, arts and traditions.” Dick says it’s a simple formula: “We must honor our history and culture. It’s the reason people come. That’s what makes us Alaskan.” And it’s what makes Icy Strait Point a gem of a destination.

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Huna Tlingit natives perform in traditional regalia at the Heritage Center Theater, Icy Strait Point.


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RIGHT STUFF

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TO WANT

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CULINARY ARTS Caribou Crossings, Juneau Caribou Crossings turns to Yupik tradition to offer an ulu, or Eskimo knife, from naturally shed antlers obtained in rural Alaska, and a stainless steel blade forged locally. For over 4,000 years, villagers used tools like these to prepare fish and game brought home by their hunters, and as functional objets d’art. cariboucrossings.com

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CUISINES OF THE WORLD

HEAVEN ON THE HALF-SHELL

HUMP ISLAND OYSTER COMPANY DISHES UP THE WEST COAST’S COOLEST OYSTERS. By Cele & Lynn Seldon

Alaska has long been known for its sustainable seafood, with an abundance of wild-caught

farming, getting in on the seafloor of what is predicted to be a $30 million industry by 2037.

salmon and varied white fish, like halibut, cod and pollock, as well as the infamous Dungeness,

THE BIRTH OF HUMP ISLAND

king and snow crabs. And, now, thanks to

OYSTER COMPANY

legislation passed in the late 1980s allowing for

A civil engineer by day and an oyster farmer

oyster harvesting, these saltwater delicacies are

at heart, Trevor Sande decided to continue a

the new Alaskan seafood darling. Ketchikan’s

maritime tradition started by his great-grandfather

Hump Island Oyster Company is leading the

upon his arrival in Ketchikan in the early 1920s.

briny revolution.

Sande’s grandfather and father both captained for the Alaska Marine Highway system. His

A LITTLE BACKGROUND

46

underlying motivation, however, was the health

With nearly 34,000 miles of coastline, the

and wealth of his home state. According to

waters of Alaska are the perfect temperature for

Sande, “Part of my interest is trying to create a

oysters to mature. This puts Alaska in the unique

more diversified economy for our region and part

position of being able to produce year-round

of it is the farming aspect, where you are creating

oysters, unlike many other oyster-rich regions

a sustainable food source.”

of the United States. However, the water is too

So in 2012, he secured the deed on a 10-

cold for those mature oysters to reproduce as

acre lease site not far from the family home at

they would elsewhere in the wild. Which is why

Hump Island near Ketchikan. Then, a year later,

a crop of hearty, forward-thinking fishermen saw

he bought and set 150,000 oyster seed — and

the opportunity to cultivate the concept of oyster

Hump Island Oyster Company was born. Today,

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Opposite: Jack Andersen / Getty Images Right: Still Images / Getty Images

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CUISINES OF THE WORLD

Hump Island has nearly doubled in size

of the oysters will be ready for market in

Robin Leventhal, former Top Chef Seattle

every year and is the largest oyster farm

12 months, the majority will spend up to

contestant and current instructor at the

in Alaska, setting more than 3.1 million

24 months on the farm before they are

Wine Country Culinary Institute in Walla

oysters annually and housing upwards of

ready to be harvested.

Walla, describes Hump Island Oyster

seven million oysters at any given time in

KETCHIKAN HARVEST

Company’s offerings as “luscious on the TO MARKET

tongue, crisp flesh, with a bright saline

The plump, briny oysters can be found in

finish which transports you immediately

restaurants and grocery stores throughout

to the pristine Alaska waters where they were raised.”

The shoreline is breathtaking, the land

Alaska, as well as in Seattle and Portland.

is mostly uninhabited and, twice daily,

They’re also showing up at many regional

Hump Island Oyster Company has also

the nutrient-rich waters of Clarence

events throughout the Pacific Northwest,

started offering three-hour tours of their

Strait and Behm Canal ebb and flow

including SHUCK Portland and the SLURP

oyster farm, starting at the cruise dock on

with the tide between Hump Island and

oyster festival in Olympia. To top it off,

the Ketchikan waterfront, taking a short

Sande’s floating oyster farm. Purchased

Hump Island Oyster Company will also

drive to their second facility at Clover

as

ship anywhere that Alaska Airlines flies.

Pass, then a boat ride out to the farm

seed

from

Hawaiian

shellfish,

the oysters are typically about three

Chefs and consumers alike praise

on Hump Island. Once there, guests get

millimeters in size when they arrive.

Hump Island’s oysters as ultra-clean,

a lesson on mariculture and watch the

They then spend six to seven months in

velvety, and featuring a crisp, briny finish.

oyster harvesting process in action. There’s

Hump Island’s nursery, floating freely in

an Alaska touch tank to learn more about

controlled tanks out of harm’s way until

Alaska sea life and a tasting room where

they are 18 to 25 millimeters in size and

guests get to sample the oysters and some

able to fend for themselves. While the oysters are in the nursery, they’re typically cleaned weekly to make sure as much water flows through the bins as possible, since the filtering of water is the way oysters grow. Every two weeks, the seed is sorted for size using mesh screens and put back into bins with similar sizes. Once the seed reaches about 18

IN ADDITION TO FARMING OYSTERS, HUMP ISLAND OYSTER COMPANY HAS STARTED FARMING THREE VARIETIES OF KELP

of the kelp products. WITH A LITTLE KELP FROM MY FRIENDS Yes, in addition to farming oysters, Hump Island Oyster Company has started raising three varieties of kelp. An annual seaweed known for its “superfood” nutrients, kelp is being harvested as an ingredient in salads, stir-fries and other

millimeters, the oysters are transferred

foods, as well as being used in toothpastes,

to Hump Island’s oyster farm, which

shampoos and pharmaceutical products.

is comprised of raised trays that are

Kelp can grow from spore to maturity in a

suspended from cedar floats in the water.

year — sometimes as much as 12 inches

The oysters will then feed by filtering the

in a day during March and April.

massive amounts of high-quality plankton

Hump Island has been selling their

that naturally occurs in rivers and seas.

quick-growing, high-quality seaweed to

During the growing season, they are

Juneau-based Barnacle Foods to be made

continually sorted by size and tumbled

into salsas, pickles, relish, hot sauce, jams

to help develop a deep cup which helps

and dried seasonings which can be found

to cultivate plump, rich meat, harden the

throughout Southeast Alaska, the Pacific

shell and create an eye-pleasing exterior

Northwest, California, Maine, New York

appearance. Although a small percentage

and online.

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some state of the maturation process.

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Hump Island Oyster Company

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GRAPES &GRAINS

NORTHERN SPIRITS ALASKA DISTILLERIES ARE OPENING A WILD NEW FRONTIER. By Susanna Kelly

bootleggers dating back to the early days of prospecting. Thankfully the distilling industry has matured since then, but some

things

haven’t

changed.

The

distillers in Alaska are still overcoming a harsh and remote climate while creating dynamic products sourced from the wilderness of Alaska. The modern spirits scene is still relatively new in Alaska with gin and vodka 50

SEABOURN CRUISE LINE

THEIR 50 FATHOMS GIN WAS AWARDED DOUBLE GOLD IN THE SAN FRANCISCO WORLD SPIRITS COMPETITION.

production leading the industry. But it is an exciting time in the state with awardwinning spirits, and an era of refined whiskeys and bourbons is emerging. LOCAL ASSETS Heather Shade and Sean Copeland are the husband and wife duo behind Port Chilkoot Distillery in Haines. Their 50 Fathoms Gin was awarded double gold in the San Francisco World Spirits Competition. Their Boatwright Bourbon,

Courtesy of Andy Hedden / Port Chillkoot Distillery

Spirits are not new to the Last Frontier. Alaska has a long history of


three years and crated in small

five coffees and five batches of whiskey

and unique batches.

in a tasting facilitated by Anchorage’s

The logistics of being in

best mixologists, one finds the result is

a remote location can mean

smooth and easy to drink: a single-origin

limited

Ethiopian cold brew mixed with whiskey

access

to

certain

supplies many distilleries and

and vanilla bean.

crafters take for granted. Denali Brewpub has an innovative cocktail

PROUD HERITAGE

menu, spearheaded by Shawn Standley,

Alaska’s first and only rum may seem to

a product of

featuring Denali Spirits. The bartenders

go against the grain, but it has a piece of

Southeast

Alaska’s

have learned to get creative with their

Alaskan history right in its recipe. Fairbanks

moody weather, is nothing to dismiss

mixing ingredients. Instead of finding

Sourdough Rum by Ursa Major Distilling

either. Once the bourbon goes into barrels

a way to ship in crème de violette for

is fermented using a strain of Alaskan

made from charred Kentucky white

their aviation cocktail, they simply

sourdough yeast more than 60 years old!

oak, the swings in barometric pressure

make their own.

Sourdough is an integral part of Alaskan

common to the area add nuance, depth

This can-do, do-it-yourself attitude

and bold flavors not found anywhere else

has ironically brought the community

in the world.

together. Many of the distillers in Alaska

Many other distilleries across the state

admit to picking up the phone to

incorporate Alaskan history. Fairbanks

Many

enterprising

distillers

are

history, and sipping this rum is a must for anyone looking for a truly unique spirit.

capitalizing on Alaska’s unique climate

Distilling Company recently acquired

and ingredients. Anchorage Distillery is

the Old City Hall in historic downtown

the first distillery to source all their grain from local farms throughout the state. They continue to set the bar high, with Aurora Gin crafted from barley sourced from the fertile alluvial deposits from the Tanana and Delta rivers. Add water sourced from glacial-fed Eklutna Lake and you have a gin bursting with local flavor.

MANY ENTERPRISING DISTILLERS ARE CAPITALIZING ON ALASKA’S UNIQUE CLIMATE AND INGREDIENTS.

Fairbanks.

The

National

Register

of

Historic Places recognized the building as dating back to 1935. Owner Patrick Levy invites you in to try his Yukon Gold potato vodka created with Alaskan spring water. At the same time, walk the halls of Interior Alaskan government during WWII and the Cold War. Back in Haines, the old

MOTHER OF INVENTION

problem-solve, share ideas and ultimately

Army outpost of Fort Seward

presents

collaborate. They’ve come together to

was renovated to

challenges the distillery community comes

form Alaska’s Distillery Guild, founded by

house the stills for

together to solve. The state is home to the

Port Chilkoot’s Heather Shade.

Port Chilkoot.

Alaska’s

location

often

Courtesy Port Chillkoot Distillery

northernmost outdoor fermenting vessels,

The

collaborative

spirit

continues

found at Denali Spirits, which means the

beyond the distillery. Denali Spirits Coffee

distillers have to roll up their sleeves and

Whiskey is the child of small-batch

experiment with recipes — and sometimes

whiskey, coffee from

failing before they get it right. It also means

local coffee-roaster

that we won’t be seeing 15-year-aged

Kaladi Brothers, and

whiskeys coming out of the area any time

the Sawbucks — a

soon. Even with temperature control,

traveling

most Alaskan whiskeys are aged around

based out of Anchorage. After sampling

speakeasy

group

SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

51


Courtesy of Andy Hedden / Port Chillkoot Distillery

GRAPES &GRAINS

Sean Copeland and Heather Shade

Courtesy of Anchorage Distillery

SWINGS IN BAROMETRIC PRESSURE COMMON TO THE AREA ADD NUANCE, DEPTH AND BOLD FLAVORS NOT FOUND ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE WORLD.

At the same time, family-owned Skagway Spirits finds inspiration from the waters outside its door that feed Lynn Canal, the longest fjord in North America and the launching point of the Klondike Gold Rush. Locals tend to take these spirits home as fast as the distilleries can produce them, which makes supplies outside of distilleries limited. Your best bet at finding these all-Alaskan spirits is to

Anchorage Distillery

52

SEABOURN CRUISE LINE

Courtesy of Anchorage Distillery

visit the taprooms on site. Many locations offer free tours and in-house cocktails. At Amalga Distillery in Juneau, you can even sip one of their in-house craft cocktails next to the still where the magic happens. Gone are the days of harsh moonshine to keep you warm against the elements. Alaska is ushering in a new era of smooth spirits, curated for easy drinking with bold flavors.


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Sassan Mossanen (left) confers with mead-maker Mike Kiker.

ZUMA Press Inc / Alamy Stock Photo; Superstock

UNCORKED

SPIRITUAL REVOLUTION

SASSAN MOSSANEN HAS GROWN DENALI BREWING INTO DENALI SPIRITS, AND TAKEN THE GREAT LAND BRAND TO THE BIG TIME. By Susanna Kelly

Denali Brewing is Talkeetna’s largest employer providing more than 50 full-time jobs, with a goal to become 100% employee-owned.

Behind Denali Brewing & Spirits is humble and family-focused Sassan Mossanen. Though quick to share his success with his team, Mossanen always had eyes set on big things for brewing and the small town of Talkeetna. From a young age, Mossanen fell in love with fermenting because he felt a synergy with the process. His passion for fermenting is matched only with his love for the outdoors, which is why he moved to Alaska in 1995 to be close to North America’s largest mountain, Denali. He and his wife built an off-the-grid cabin, 54

accessible only by a flag-stop train, where they lived for 10 years. He divided his time between living off the land and mountaineering, being one of few to have summited Denali. Mossanen returned to civilization with a bang in 2009, opening Denali Brewery in Talkeetna. His company has since grown exponentially to become the state’s second-largest brewery. Just in the last three years, his company expanded into wine, cider and spirits — and sparked a creative renaissance. One result of this is his signature Hopshine spirit, created from aromatic pellets derived from cryo hops, which is perfect for cocktails. Reaching these heights in the most challenging and remote environment in the world has kept him on his toes. Even without access to waste treatment, Mossanen is proud to say that he has worked tirelessly to ensure that everything is recycled or composted, and all water leaving is pH neutral — a feat described by

the Brewers Association as “impossible.” Mossanen is now working with the state of Alaska to create a model that other Alaskan brewers can use. Despite all his success, Mossanen still has a deep sense of community and family values. When asked what he did outside of work, he was quick to respond with “spend time with my family.” He even found a way to bring his family into the business, picking spruce tips with his daughters for the flavorful Spruce Tip Ale and Spruce Tip Gin. His wife’s garden and bee farm produce many ingredients used in their beverage recipes. “The thing I am most proud of — more than the beverages — is our sense of commitment and responsibility that comes with creating year-round jobs in such a small town,” he says. With only 876 people in Talkeetna, Denali Brewing is Talkeetna’s largest employer providing more than 50 full-time jobs, with a goal to become 100 percent employee-owned.

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MINDFUL LIVING

56

SEABOURN CRUISE LINE


MY FAVORITE MEDICINAL SPICES: GARLIC AND TURMERIC THESE TWO FLAVORFUL INGREDIENTS TURN DELICIOUS DISHES INTO MEDICAL MARVELS. By Dr. Andrew Weil

If some herb-phobic dictator ordered physicians to trim the list of medicinal spices they recommend to just two … well, I’d probably refuse and wind up in the gulag. But for less rebellious docs who value their freedom, I’d recommend they stick with two powerful healers: garlic and turmeric. Both have widespread, nonspecific therapeutic actions, are inexpensive, with distinctive flavors that make them the favorite culinary spices in many cultures. Cooking, in fact, is the vehicle through which you should get regular, healthpromoting doses of both. 

SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

57


MINDFUL LIVING

THE STINKING ROSE  

arthritis, anxiety and muscle soreness. Most of these benefits

The more familiar of the two is garlic (Allium sativum L.).

appear to stem from turmeric and curcumin’s anti-inflammatory

It’s a member of the same family that includes onions, chives,

effects. Because research has shown that depression often has

shallots and leeks. Easy to grow, it thrives in both warm and

an inflammatory component, I recommend experimenting

cool climates. Chopping or crushing a bulb to expose it to

with turmeric to address mood disorders as well.

oxygen produces a compound, allicin, that’s thought to be

But ingesting turmeric or curcumin alone probably is of little benefit, as these are poorly absorbed. Look for turmeric

responsible for many of garlic’s beneficial effects. Known as “the poor man’s penicillin,” garlic has a long and

supplements that also contain piperine, a component of black

illustrious history as a healing agent. Zoroastrian writings from

pepper, which has been shown to increase bioavailability up

the 6th century BCE attest to its therapeutic power, and both

to 2,000 percent. I also recommend turmeric over curcumin,

ancient Chinese and Indian medicine recommended it to

as turmeric has other active compounds that are left behind

help expel parasites and aid in breathing and digestion.

when curcumin is extracted and purified.

Recent research has shown that compounds in garlic appear

When buying supplements, look for products standardized

to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease, have anti-cancer

to 95 percent curcuminoids. Adults can take 400 to 600 mg

and anti-microbial effects, and can lower high blood sugar.

of turmeric extract three times per day or as directed on the

Eating garlic may also reduce the frequency

product label. For cooking, choose brightly

and number of colds. There’s even evidence

colored and aromatic turmeric powder, or

that supports the topical use of garlic for fungal infections like ringworm and athlete’s foot. One excellent use for garlic is to take two raw cloves at the first sign of a cold. Mash them to create more surface area than slicing

TAKE TWO RAW CLOVES AT THE FIRST SIGN OF A COLD.

grate or chop peeled whole roots.

TWO GREAT TASTES Finally, given that both garlic and turmeric have powerful therapeutic effects, it’s

and allow at least 10 minutes for the allicin

unsurprising that they form a potent

to form. Mix the mashed garlic with some

healing duo when taken together. A study

food to avoid mouth irritation, and swallow it

of 35 diabetes patients, randomized into

down. You can also do this to boost immune

two groups for 14 weeks, found that those

function generally.

who took capsules taking 200 mg turmeric and 200 mg garlic extract per day showed

Garlic is quite safe, but large amounts can thin the blood. Those on blood-thinning medication such as

a significant decrease in blood glucose compared to those

Coumadin should consult with a physician to discover if, and

taking glibenclamide, a standard pharmaceutical drug used

how much, garlic is safe to consume.

to treat diabetes. The best way to get more of both spices into your life is to

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is the more “exotic” of these

10 minutes before adding to a dish.) In my kitchen, virtually

spices, but I’ve noticed it has gone more mainstream in many

the only time I don’t use one or both of these delicious spices

countries in the last 10 years. When I began speaking and

is in sweet dishes.

writing about its virtues three decades ago, many Westerners

Soups, stews, marinades and brush-on sauces for grilled fish

had never heard of it. Today, virtually everyone knows

all profit from some turmeric or garlic. Be sure to add some

turmeric as a healthful spice, and many natural food stores sell

black pepper to your dishes when cooking with turmeric to

prepared drinks and foods that feature it.  

increase its absorption.

Research has shown turmeric — and its major active constituent, curcumin — can alleviate inflammatory conditions,

58

use them frequently in cooking. (For garlic, mash and let sit for

SEABOURN CRUISE LINE

I wish you delicious, healthy adventures with these two delightful spices.

Ingram Image

LIVELY YELLOW


SEABOURN CLUB HERALD

59

Richard Taylor / Sime / eStock Photo


SEE/HEAR/DO

SEABOURN RECOMMENDS: FOR YOUR DOWN TIME...

TOKYO TRAVEL SKETCHBOOK, AMAIA ARRAZOLA

Spanish illustrator Amaia Arrazola succeeds in an impossible task in her first book, summing up the entirety of Japanese culture from ancient traditions to 21st-century technology. Of course, she couldn’t cover everything during her month-long residency, but her quirky pictures and brief, often-hilarious notes convey a whirlwind of impressions: a cartoon rendition of Utagawa Hiroshige’s The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō gives way to a colorful report on the Kabukicho, Tokyo’s red-light district, which in turn leads to a discussion of the untranslatable concept of ikigai, a lifelong search for a reason for living, encompassing a person’s passion, profession, vocation and mission. She has created a remarkable encapsulation of a timeless city.

SEE

DO BUTZE RAPIDS, PRINCE RUPERT, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

When most people hear “rain forest,” they think of steamy tropical jungles in places like Brazil or Borneo. In British Columbia, the rain forest is something else entirely — cool and stately, with towering evergreens shading fern bracken, aromatic cedars, the “wild bonsai” of stunted shore pine and the tumbling waters of snowmelt streams. At the Butze Rapids Trail, a brisk walk into the rain forest on Kaien Island leads to the spectacular phenomenon of Fern Passage. The whitewater rapids here change direction with the tides. The Tsimshian First Nations named the island “Kaien,” or “foaming waters” after the turbulence on display during peak flows, which can reach more than 20 feet (6 meters) in height. 60

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All Canada Photos / Alamy Stock Photo

HEAVY WEATHER: HEAR WIND CONCERTOS, HARTT WIND ENSEMBLE

Contemporary American composers, with all their angularity and raw expression, are the stars of this Naxos release. Conductor Glen Adsit leads the soaring saxophones of Susan Botti’s “Sull’ala,” the thrumming bassoon and chamber winds of Stephen Michael Gryc’s commedia dell’arte -inspired “Guignol,” and the lyrical (would you believe it?) tuba and wind concerto of Jess Turner’s “Heavy Weather” — an effective evocation of a languid, high-pressure heat wave followed by the turbulence and hurtling hail of a supercell thunderstorm. The recording is an emotional voyage in itself.


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SEA STACKS, KENAI FJORDS NATIONAL PARK

More than 400 miles (650 km) of Alaska’s coastline has been carved out by churning ice and implacable waves to create a steep, rocky and ever-changing coastline. Fingers of water protrude far inland as bays, sea caves and fjords. And the land, as a result, protrudes into the ocean as well, in the form of headlands, arches and the rising pinnacles of sea stacks. These spires may be formed by erosion, but the process takes thousands of years, leaving ample time for life to take root and flourish on what amounts to very narrow, very tall islets dotting the Alaskan coast. They reach into the sky like church steeples or skyscrapers, and provide towering homes for colonies of puffins, guillemots, plovers and cormorants nesting in the branches of expansive evergreens. 64

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Seabourn Club Herald Issue 30.1  

In this issue: - Explore the Icy Strait Point - Discover Jack London's Treasure - Dive into Alaska's Sacred Salmon And More!

Seabourn Club Herald Issue 30.1  

In this issue: - Explore the Icy Strait Point - Discover Jack London's Treasure - Dive into Alaska's Sacred Salmon And More!

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