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Reach the most influential leaders in America’s largest churches and mega churches

Church Executive readers:

As the industry’s most reliable source for management-based articles, strategies and resources — all compiled with large-church leaders in mind — Church Executive Magazine features exclusive research, analysis and insightful editorial contributions by some of today’s most trusted church management thought leaders. Church Executive reaches more than 45,410 of the most influential church leaders in the country. It is considered the go-to business resource for senior pastors, executive pastors and business administrators at the largest churches and megachurches in America. A strategic mix of targeted topics, special series and customized departments drill down on the detailed, “how-to” information church leaders need most, including:

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• Risk management • Cyber liability / cyber risks •S  ecurity & surveillance • Pastor-friendly A/V • Youth & children’s ministry • Commercial kitchens • Accessibility • Transportation • Generosity • Multi-site development • Construction / Renovation • Food service • Stewardship • Capital campaigns • Fund raising • Continuing education

• Insurance • Church management software (ChMS) • Safety & security • Human resources & benefits • Legal • Marketing & PR • Volunteer management • Foreign missions & travel • Leadership • Outreach • Taxes • Next-generation giving tools • Cafes and coffee shops • Interior elements • Acoustical design

• Technology • Non-profit governance • Church travel • Financial management • Worship center design • Accounting • Business management • Church management • Financial management • Stewardship • Governance • Lending & loans • Multi-site management • Worship & music

In addition to a bimonthly print and digital magazine, Church Executive publishes the twice-monthly Church Executive eNewsletter. Church Executive also hosts webinars on compelling topics, while churchexecutive.com offers an online library of informative eBooks and digital supplements. The innovative Church Executive TV features product and service offerings. Our mission is to help church leaders become better stewards.

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54% Executive Pastor 27% Senior Pastor 19% Business Administrator

92% Children’s ministry 90% Youth ministry programs 59% VBS Programs 56% Playgrounds 43% Transportation: buses & vans

28% Schools 25% Cafés / coffee shops 22% Daycare centers 20% Summer camps

Percentages of Church Executive readers likely to purchase the following products in the next 18 months: 82% Leadership books / training 69% Signage 66% Music / musical equipment 65% Marketing & promotion 65% Microphones 63% Security & surveillance 56% Internet / web-hosting services 56% Projection equipment 53% Lighting equipment / consulting

53% Video equipment / consulting 52% Legal services 49% Printers / copiers 29% Vehicles (buses, vans) 27% Insurance / risk management resources 27% Lending / loans 26% Staffing services 24% Playground equipment 22% Multisite planning services 58% of Church Executive readers command annual budgets of $1 million to $5 million+. And, 100% of Church Executive print issue recipients represent churches with weekend attendance of 1,000 worshipers or more!


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Church Executive 2017 In-Demand Topics Each year, Church Executive Magazine conducts a comprehensive Reader Survey in order to determine what is working well — and what is not — among large churches. Every issue of Church Executive features series installments on subjects that are considered top-of-mind with the highly-targeted senior pastor, executive pastor and business administrator Church Executive audience.

Topics important to % of churches • Accounting / Financial Management (98 %) • Leadership (98%) • Financial Management / Financial Stewardship (97%) • Business Management (97%) • Legal (93%) • Technology (93%) • Volunteer Management (93%) • Church Management Software (ChMS) (93%) • Risk Management (91%) • Payroll / HR Benefits (91%)

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• Insurance (91%) • Governance / Board Oversight (90%) • Security & Surveillance (90%) • Generosity / Fundraising (90%) • Information on New Products / Services (88%) • Worship & Music (88%) • Marketing (87%) • Cyber Liability / Cyber Risks (86%) • Tax Issues (84%) • Construction / Renovation (80%)

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% of churches that will invest in these products / services: • VBS Curricula (81%) • Children’s educational products (73%) • Audio (69%) • Lighting equipment (69%) • Video (69%)

• Acoustics (66%) • eGiving tools (66%) • Safety / Security systems (63%) • ChMS (55%) • Capital campaign / fundraising (39%)

% of churches that offer: • Children’s ministry (92%) • VBS (66%) • Youth ministry programs (59%) • Summer Camps (20%)


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Catapulting past critical mass Clifton Guy, Director of Information Technology at The United Methodist Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, KS — the largest UMC in the nation — is a preacher’s kid. Two of his siblings are also pastors, as is his wife. “So, it’s kind of the ‘family business,’” he says. But, Clifton himself is a self-professed “technical guy,” with a real interest in computers since childhood. He earned his degree in computer engineering and embarked on a 10-year career in IT software development. He’s also an entrepreneur, having started two tech companies and served on the management team of two other startups. Coming from a family of pastors, Guy once considered himself the proverbial black sheep. Yet, it’s exactly this passion and experience that made him uniquely prepared to be the IT director at a very entrepreneurial, large and fast-growing church: Resurrection. Guy — who also has been part of the leadership team of The Church IT Network, with participants from many of the largest churches around the country — believes ChMS is a true ministry tool … and a major one, at that. “The church management system is where the real value-add is — that’s where the opportunity to really make an impact on ministry resides,” he emphasizes. “There’s this real opportunity to make ministry better by using software to either automate something, or to do something you can’t do with any amount of labor. The really exciting stuff is when we’re applying technology to the unique issues of the church.” So, Resurrection was in very good hands when it was time to upgrade its church management software platform. Here’s how Guy orchestrated an intensive, intelligent selection process … and what you need to know before making a similar investment at your own church. I understand Resurrection outgrew its existing ChMS, prompting leaders to look for a new option. What challenges were you encountering, specifically? Our previous ChMS was implemented in 1998, and I came on staff in 2003. In 2007, we determined that we needed to replace that system. I was involved in evaluating lots of options. A lot of the issues with previous ChMS had to do with the user interface; it didn’t really follow any of the traditional Microsoft user interface guidelines about how to use various kinds of controls on the screen. So, people who knew how to use Microsoft software had issues navigating the ChMS. It didn’t follow the paradigms they were used to. 6

CHURCH EXECUTIVE • July / August 2016

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The United Methodist Church of the Resurrection / Leawood, Kansas

In general, it wasn’t designed to handle the hundreds of thousands — and in some aspects, millions — of records in our church database. It wasn’t efficient in running certain kinds of reports. With these challenges at the forefront, we did a very extensive, thorough and careful evaluation of alternatives. It took about three months and involved two things. First, we did extensive requirements-gathering. We developed a questionnaire and had meetings with staff throughout the organization, asking them all the same set of questions. This helped us to document, in detail, our requirements. The second aspect was networking with lots of vendors. We connected with their salespeople. Additionally, we established a set of five criteria by which we would judge the finalists. We invited those vendors to give extensive, in-person demos of their products for a small group of church staff we called “super-users.” Through that process, we narrowed down the list of choices to eight products. From there, we were able to narrow it to three, and then did some gap analysis on the functionalities those products delivered relative to our requirements. It was quite an extensive, thorough and careful evaluation. Ultimately, we settled on the Shelby Arena Premium product [ shelbysystems. com/products/arena ]. churchexecutive.com

What functionalities made Arena the right choice for Resurrection? For us, one of the key issues was the architectural differences in the products. At the time, the business model of one of our three finalists was to host the system on their servers. So, any access to our data would be mediated by whatever reporting they provided, or by whatever APIs they might publish that we could then connect to in order to access the data. But, we knew we wanted to be able to run a Microsoft SQL Server in our own data center at the church. This would allow us to have the data present onsite, as well as the ability to use the entire range of powerful tools the SQL Server provides to drive insights out of that data. We just didn’t really want somebody else’s product to mediate our access to our own data. I’m told your team at Resurrection considered customized reports (driven by customized dashboards) another key functionality. Can you tell us what those look like — and what these tools can tell you about the church’s ministry efforts? We do some pretty cool stuff, and I could talk about it for hours. But, I’ll just give you a few examples. Some of these happen weekly; others happen annually or at different intervals. When we wanted to know if there’s a correlation between the duration of a household’s membership and their giving habits, we found out. This was because we can drill into the data. And, as it turns out, at Resurrection there isn’t a correlation! What we did find was a correlation between age and giving habits — specifically, the older people are, the more they give. And then, as they approach a certain age, their giving declines (somewhere around the upper 70’s, if I remember correctly). So, if somebody just joined our church recently, but they’re in their 60’s, they’re likely to give more than someone who’s been a member for 15 years and is in their 40’s. That’s just one example of the sort of thing we’re able to do because we can use all the software’s analytical tools directly against that data set.

Does Resurrection’s multisite model make ChMS data accessibility a priority? If so, did it ultimately affect your selection? We’ve adopted a basic approach to multisite data that’s pretty similar to what lots of other large churches do: basically, we consider ourselves to be one church in multiple locations. Because of the data at hand, we can allocate giving by campus. We can get idea of whether the folks attending a particular campus are giving enough money to support the cost of that campus. We can also tell if one person, or a family, is consistently attending a particular campus — or a particular worship service, even, because we go all the way down to that level in our attendance tracking. And then, we can tell if they’ve actually changed campuses. That last part is really interesting to our executive management, especially if it seems like we’ve had dip in attendance. We want to know what’s driving that. We might drill into the data and discover we’ve got a new pastor at a particular campus. Then, over the course of the next several months, we see families shifting to that location. That stuff is fascinating to the executive management team when they’re trying to determine: Is there a problem at a particular location? Or, is it just that our people are choosing to attend a location that’s closer to their house? We’ve done that, too — looked at the people who move from one campus to another in relation to where they live. We just grab their addresses and put a bunch of push pins on a Google map. That ability is extremely helpful in interpreting the macro-data, which is just the head count and worship figures each week. Now, we have this much finer-grain data that helps us interpret it.

We also do some really interesting work around membership attendance data. It’s quite unusual for a church of our size to take worship attendance. In fact — though I’m not 100-percent sure — it’s possible that nobody as big as Resurrection does it. We use paper forms and an army of volunteers. For most churches, just the thought of the effort required to collect that data is so daunting that they dismiss it altogether. But, for us, attendance data is something we’ve always placed a high priority on, primarily because we can do lots of really interesting things with it. For example, if your family is a member, and you or someone else in the family doesn’t attend worship service for four weeks, we have a report that will inform our discipleship team. If we have your phone number, a volunteer will call and ask if everything is OK — ifMIS youSION or your family So, if you see that a family doesn’t necessarily live closer to their new ACCOMP needs pastoral care. Frequently, we find there’s a new baby in the:family, or chosen campus, you know something else is driving them there — and it LISHED gives you an opportunity to ask about it. people are just on vacation. That’s exactly right. They might prefer the campus pastor, or they If we can’t call, then we send an email. Failing that, we’ll send a paper might enjoy the worship bands better. They might like the children’s letter to check in. That’s a good example of a ministry effort you can’t do without ministry. They might like the fact that it’s a smaller church. Or, it might be something else, stylistically or culturally. attendance data. Once a year (around August), we take a look at anybody we haven’t seen in worship for 13 weeks. These are the individuals who’ve basically dropped out for the summer. Then, we make a special effort to invite them to all our ministry offerings that kick off as the school year begins — activities for adults, kids and youth, special sermons series, and so on. All these are possible because, first, we have the data. Second, we have the powerful reporting capabilities to define exactly the set of people we’re interested in talking to, define the process, and then perform it.

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Your ChMS platform has even helped the church drive generosity and fundraising, right? Yeah. Again, we do some pretty amazing stuff in this regard. In fact, I’ve given a class on it at our annual leadership institute. I call it “the nerdy side” of financial stewardship. [laughs] At Resurrection, we conduct an annual fundraising pledge campaign for our yearly operating budget, as well as pledge campaigns for capital needs at various campuses. We start with what we call “the target” — we determine who we’re going to ask to make a pledge. We have a set of criteria: members who are 23 and up, who live in the Kansas City Metro area, and are active — in other words, they’ve attended worship at least July / August 2016 • CHURCH EXECUTIVE

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once in the past identify year. We all the pull all peop the matc Next, we ident le who fit one givin these crite hing data ify “givi from our ria. giving g unit. For exam ng units.” database, sepa Some and hous contribut rately. Each ple, spouses Will there mak sometime eholds have ions. So, be othe software Then, more even thou es a separate s r syste that’ than incom choose to man could gh it’s ms that have some s the list e, and be built one hous But, beca of folks are more each mak age their or integ attrit use our set the we’re goin ehold, it’s it reall list and ion due to death software rated? Mayb flexible in two givin es separate y isn’t g to ask terms limited e. Prob platform than it , reloc Througho don’t add g units to mak of how ably. in any ation, anyo is, . is based new ut the ne to it. marr iage e a pledge. doing. quantity and this platf way. Our on camp Once the We and so of data, orm woul church could a Microsoft hasn’t. pledge aign, we have on. Then do Certa SQL but also Then d cards come inly, a basel , we reporting be capable grow to be much Server, ine supportin the softw Now, this , we can follo in, we of not are against bigger w up. can see for tracking is a take it it, all with only housing like we g a very large and SQL Serv who has how we’re farther fairly traditiona have — er church pledged reasonable that because the past l approach or with milliwe have in and even we 12 who speed. more. segm place that lots put them months — ons of Is there is capa records of chur How muchent the targe anything ble of can actua in different ches take. in the t do diffe about database, segments. money has by giving level rentl lly We the tell imple y? people this givin . We look if, for Now mentation I in our at Like do wish we top segm example, we , when we get g unit given or train Then , coul haven’t ing proce the pledg ? — and ent. ever y grow ing d prov ide heard pledge we do even ss es cons you back from 25 more tantly versus more would ongoing com ing orga nizat ion, percent , we self-e data by their pledg analysis on the xpla of the train ing whet her on the e for the staff. Fortuwe have turn made pledg and mayb natory. Even or not as a chur a pledg prior over; this is so, nately, year. We es. We look ch. e befor new renewing a new bit bette e show them I wish we Arena e — or at their also brea pledge coul is fairly people are r. some if they money? , is it for less k down intui capabiliti d accelerate It’s just ’re rene — if these money, This is their unde tive and the folks es that wing and our poss for prior itized that there wou ld rstanding SQL Serv ible because the same amo a pledge. And have never are make implemen ongoing train only so man er. of the unt of if they their lives analytica money, y hour are ing the tation. As the a s in the or l tools We way we For any churc inherent for more day, did church really had a with you? h continues as an to Aren very smoo when we first and we have leader, to grow a we’v integral part I woul n’t did the th trans , is your I don’t d high of a majo e been software ition ChMS thin ly weak to Aren k any sure we platform , as a chur r technology recommen church a. don’t, equipped d inclu impl ch, is in uses its here. So, things ding to grow we ongoing ementatio software the n. The training analytics really need autom question train to its part wher ing, not is more full capa ated? : Does initial can answ that we need biliti training. e to do? Beca And also: Does the softw — Repo er are autom es. I’m rting by use of it allow In the ‘yes’ to both QUICK ate the RaeAnn a very . features future, will careful us to do the Slaybaugh FACTS kinds Year there selection we have be othe n’t cons process, of Loca Established: ABOUT r prod idered RESURR 1990 we tion ucts that CHUR or want CH EXECU ECTION Number of main camp poten ed befor TIVE us: Leaw of locat • July e? Mayb tially offer / August Number ions: 4 ood, KS new e. Prob 2016 of ably. Combine staff (fulland part2016 budgd weekend attendanc time): 220 et: $22 e: 11,30 million 0

An Official Church Executive Field Test offers a unique opportunity to present a comprehensive case study of your House of Worship customer. In addition, Church Executive Field Tests provide a robust platform for presenting new product solutions, demonstrating training protocols, testing innovative features, analyzing applications, probing new concepts and documenting best practices. Field Test results are transformed into a dynamic 4-page editorial section in Church Executive. Field Tests can also be printed on heavy coverweight stock and glued inside Church Executive for added impact! 8

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utive.c

Church Executive Roundtable Discussions focus on hot-button issues and best practices for the large churches, multi-site churches and megachurches throughout the U.S. Participants include key industry thought leaders who share their industry expertise, as well as their predictions on future trends. Roundtable results are featured in the print edition of Church Executive; as a Digital Supplement that accompanies Church Executive Digital; and in an educational, lead-generating eBook that is hosted on www.ChurchExecutive.com/ebooks. This is an outstanding way to position your company as a respected thought leader on topics that church leaders find most challenging. So, I think one of the variables here is that people are just so busy. If there’s an emphasis only on communicating from the pulpit or platform, we’re going to miss them.

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Ben: I don’t think it’s about the tools themselves; it’s about how they can remove the distance between the times when we can be together, in-person. We’re able to interact with the people who are part of our community and our lives in an infinite number of ways. Some of us might use Snapchat or Facebook Messenger, or a combination of tools. I think people bring that level of expectation to the church. There can’t be boundaries. This makes me think about my 5-year-old son. He’ll never know a world where he can’t press on a piece of glass and talk to my brother in Thailand. For him, distance isn’t something that would prohibit him from engaging with someone around the world. So, I think it’s really odd to expect that a 75-minute chunk every seven days is going to create lasting engagement or movement.

Bridge the gap between

SUNDAYS A Remote Roundtable discussion about how to engage — and inspire — in a decentralized world

Our Panelists:

Curt Swindoll, Executive Vice President, Pursuant

Derek Hazelet, Senior Vice President, RSI Stewardship

Attend the “Bridge the Gap Between Sundays” Webinar! On Tuesday, 18 October at 11 a.m. ET, join all these panelists — and the Church Executive staff — for a FREE webinar. In this 60-minute event, we’ll “deepdive” on strategies for keeping people connected to your church all week long. Register now at: tinyurl.com/BetweenSundays

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CHURCH EXECUTIVE • September / October 2016

Ben Stroup, Senior Vice President, Fundraising Communications, Pursuant

Joel Mikell, President, RSI Stewardship

Kem Meyer, Communications Director, Granger Community Church

Most church leaders would agree that discipleship and spiritual growth happens best in a personal way, and that every person who walks through the door deserves to be noticed and engaged in a personalized experience to help them grow in their faith and commitment. What are some reasons that has become more difficult in today’s world? Ben: We’ve really moved towards a decentralized model of engagement. It used to be restricted to everyone showing up to the same geographic location, at the same agreed-upon time, at the same frequency. So, churches created great efficiency around communicating from the platform and through bulletins, inserts and posters … because everyone was there. Today, we experience church — and have community with one another — whether we’re all at the same place at the same time, or not. I could be in another country, but checking out the live stream. I could be participating the next week by listening to a podcast on my run. That changes the dynamics. Plus, even if everybody’s showing up at the same place at the same time, there are six days between Sundays. That’s a long time. A lot of life happens. If we don’t have a clear line of sight for how we bridge that gap, then we really limit our potential to create lasting relationships and develop engagement across the community. Joel: I’m thinking about my youngest daughter and her family. Just about every night of the week, they have some kind of activity — soccer, dance, ballet, cheerleading. Sunday has become a catch-up day. They stay home to get the wind back in their sails so they can start over again on Monday. Sometimes our daughter says, ‘Dad, I’ll try to go to church at least two Sundays this month. On those other two Sundays, when I’m not there, I’ll watch somebody on TV.’ churchexecutive.com

“You can’t use technology to replace the human interaction, but you can use it to enrich it. For example, don’t say, ‘Complete that info card so we can update our database and stay in touch with you.’ Instead, say, ‘We don’t want to bombard you with information you don’t care about. When you update your contact information and profile, it helps us do a better job making sure our programs meet your life stage and needs. We want to pay attention to the things that have your attention. The information you share on that little info card help us do a better job.’” — Kem Meyer Curt: My wife Skypes daily with my daughter and our grandkids. We live in Dallas, and we’ve got family that are in Southern California. It really does close the distance. So, that’s one use of technology. And yet, a different use of technology runs the risk of putting people into broad, fairly faceless groups that have some general characteristics, but lack any real personalization. So, if we use technology that way, then it adds to the distance versus reducing it. It’s not necessarily the presence or absence of technology that makes the difference; it’s how we deploy it. Kem: The first step in overcoming some of the external challenges we’re facing is overcoming our own internal challenges. A few instantly come to mind. The first is that we tend to overcomplicate, or make next steps hard to find. Second, we communicate in ways that sound like it’s ‘all about us.’ For example, we talk about our discipleship environments like, ‘We believe you should sign up for our program’ rather than inviting people to take ownership of their journey by sharing ‘a few next steps to explore.’ While we might have organized, branded environments for the institutional discipleship path we provide, that’s not the single, linear line each person follows. So, why do we communicate like it is?

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I think a simple shift goes a long way; think more about how to help people find ways to take steps on their journey with Jesus inside the church, not how they can take steps in the church in hopes they grow closer to Jesus. That means we’ve got to release a little bit of control and think about ‘self-serve’ options people can grab onto, inside and outside the organized discipleship path defined in our church. Sometimes, in our noble efforts to professionalize our communication about the discipleship journey, we tend to sterilize it. When we champion simple, big-picture values — make one friend, read one new book, try one new class, etc. — we’re not making it all about us and our programs. Then, we leave room for God to move in an individual’s life. How can churches create personal experiences without the cost of such a strategy overwhelming the budget? Ben: The only way this works is if it becomes part of how the church operates. This isn’t a task that the communications director does. This isn’t an assignment to give to assimilation pastor. Rather, it has to be a thread that runs throughout the organization: ‘Everyone who walks through our doors, deserves a personal encounter of some.’ We have to allow people to interact with us in ways that actually move them to whatever that next step is which we’ve defined for them. When you begin to think about it like that, it becomes less of a project and more a mode of operation. An outlet. A vehicle that helps to accomplish the overall discipleship goal of the church. One of the most powerful things about technology is that it generally democratizes the process. At one point, the process we’re talking about would have taken many individuals to accomplish — to figure out who to send a message to, to set up the emails, to design the copy, to get it all ready to send, and then to physically send it out. With technology, once you’ve defined the triggers — and define the journey — you’re able to implement the process so that it happens whether you’re physically touching the “send” button or not.

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Derek: I would add that churches tend to default to hiring more staff to try to keep up. Another approach really is more about defining what the process looks like for your church, what the steps are (and how they relate across the demographics), and then leveraging all resources at your disposal to support that – including technologies and information — and if necessary, by hiring strategically around those desired outcomes, you can do a lot more with a lot less. This also lets me target my existing staff around the needs that require specific ministry engagement, because that’s what ministers want to do anyway. They’re called. They want to help. And, as Ben mentioned, the bigger your church gets, the more challenging that personal interaction becomes. Curt: I’ve worked with a lot of leaders. I’ve been to a ton of conferences where leaders are present. Here’s what I know: Capable people are busy people. So, to Derek’s point, finding people to do journey mapping isn’t a matter of finding staff who have time on their hands; it’s an issue of prioritization. I would encourage church leaders to realize that part of their responsibility is to proactively define the relationship the church wants to have with its people, especially the key steps, and then to start thinking about everything the church is doing to take people on that journey. What is the role of technology in relationships? And just as importantly, how can churches know when technology is overstepping its place and actually eroding (versus enhancing) the relational qualities of a church? Kem: Many church leaders approach technology as a silver bullet;

September / October 2016 • CHURCH EXECUTIVE

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If your company has webinars, tutorials, interviews or any video content that you want to gain exposure for, ChurchExecutiveTV provides the opportunity to air your material to a wider audience. Your memorable footage will be streamed on ChurchExecutive.com — and it can be transferred to your own website for your customers to view!

Fundraisers

Need the expertise of a fundraiser? Want to plan that next church trip? From accountants to lawyers, painters, carpenters, risk managers, fundraisers, travel options and more, find them on the Church Executive Marketplace.

The Church Executive Learning Library To provide in-depth information on the topics that are most important to Church Executive readers, Church Executive has created the “Learning Library.” Filled with eBooks on topics that range from capital campaigns to risk management, pastor-friendly A / V, finances, HR, administration and more, the Church Executive Learning Library is the go-to resource for senior church leaders.

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C H U RC H E X ECU T I VE M AG AZINE | I NTEGRATED M EDI A PORT FO L IO 2017

Education

Look here for updates on continuing education opportunities, distance learning and more.


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2017 Advertising Specifications PRINT SPECIFICATIONS • High–resolution PDF files preferred; we also accept: EPS, PSD, PNG and high-resolution JPG files. Note: Only high-resolution, press-ready PDFs created in a full version of Adobe Acrobat 6.0 & higher can be accepted, CMYK format and color images: Bicubic Down Sampling to 600 pixels per inch. • Type/Fonts must be converted to outlines when exporting from Illustrator as an EPS OR the fonts should be provided with your submission. (We cannot accept PC fonts.) If fonts cannot be outlined, original fonts should be provided. Note: If fonts are not compatible, we reserve the right to replace fonts as needed. • Resolution of all files should be a minimum of 266 dpi (including imported files). 300 dpi at 100% is the preferred resolution. • Color ads (and imported files) must be in CMYK, not RGB.

CONTRACT AND COPY REGULATIONS The advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims or expenses resulting from the unauthorized use of name, photograph, sketch or words protected by the copyright or registered trademarks, label and others in connection with his or her advertising. CANCELLATIONS All cancellations must be made in writing and must be received 60 days prior to cover date. Cancellations may be subject to a short rate. We cannot guarantee correctness without a hard proof. We will uphold the industry standard of a maximum of 10% variance of color, provided a color correct-proof is provided. DIGITAL SPECIFICATIONS

SUBMISSION of your ads can be supplied in the following ways: • E-mail your files (only if under 25 MB — Note: Files can be stuffed or zipped for e-mail transfer, which usually decreases files by half the size) to: jvfly@churchexecutive.com. AD SIZES (in inches)

2-page spread

(bleed) (trim) (live area)

16.5 x 11.125 16.25 x 10.875 0.375 from trim

Full page

(bleed) (trim) (live area)

8.375 x 11.125 8.125 x 10.875 0.375 from trim

1/2-page spread 1/2 page 1/2 page 1/4 page

(bleed) (trim) (non-bleed) (live area) (vertical) (horizontal) (vertical)

16.5 x 5.5 16.25 x 5.375 15.25 x 4.75 0.375 from trim 3.5 x 10 7.25 x 4.75 3.5 x 4.75

AD PRODUCTION Church Executive will produce / design ads for advertisers at a rate of $125 / hour if requested. Components to produce ad should be submitted at the same time as space commitment. Should production charges be waived, artwork will remain the property of Church Executive Magazine.

churchexecutive.com Leaderboard Top Banner (728 X 90 pixels) Medium Rectangle (300 X 250 pixels) 3:1 Rectangle (300 X 100 pixels) The Church Executive eNewsletter Top Banner (600 X 80 pixels) Sponsored Top Banner (60 x 35 pixels) includes small logo and direct link to your website Middle Banner (600 X 80 pixels) Product Spotlight (170 X 42 pixels) includes a photo, link and up to 50 words of copy Bottom Banner (600 X 80 pixels) Bottom Rectangle Button Banner (125 X 125 pixels) Send Digital ads to: digitalads@churchexecutive.com • 72 dpi •.jpg or .png only • RGB no CMYK • No animated .gifs or flash files

COPY ACCEPTANCE Church Executive reserves the right to refuse advertising that it considers detrimental to the church industry or contrary to the policies of its parent company, The Producers, Inc. INTEGRATED MEDIA PORTFOLI O 2017 | CHURCH EXECUTIVE MAGAZ IN E

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Contacts Advertising Judi Victor CEO / Advertising Sales Director 602-264-7100 X 125 jvfly@churchexecutive.com

Joyce Guzowski Assistant Editor 602-264-7100 X 210 jguzowski@churchexecutive.com Graphic Design

Blair McCarty Senior Sales and Marketing Coordinator 602-264-7100 X 213 bmccarty@churchexecutive.com

Stephen Gamble Senior Art Director 602-264-7100 X 133 sgamble@churchexecutive.com

Editorial

Mitch Larson Business Manager 602-264-7100 X 215 mlarson@churchexecutive.com

RaeAnn Slaybaugh Editor in Chief 602-264-7100 X 202 rslaybaugh@churchexecutive.com

Accounting

4742 N. 24th Street • Suite 340 • Phoenix, AZ 85016 www.churchexecutive.com • 800.541.2670 10

C H U RC H E X ECU T I VE M AGA ZINE | INTEGRATED M EDIA PORTFO L IO 2017

Customer Service Hollie Broadbent Marketing & Sales Associate 602-264-7100 X 208 hbroaddbent@churchexecutive.com

Church Executive media kit 2017  

Church Executive media kit 2017

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