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Entitle, the electronic magazine Of Faculty of Creative Multimedia Multimedia University No. 03, Vol. 01, August 2010

American cartoonists Phil Yeah

Ask a lot of questions The First Major Photography Event In MMU “Memoirs”

A walk through time Research Creation Exhibition 2

Proscenium of Art, Humanities and Technology / Part Two

Interview with Dr. Andra McCartney

“Please Listen”

Entitle; The e-magazine of FCM / August 2010

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CONTENTS Entitle, the electronic magazine Of Faculty of Creative Multimedia Multimedia University No. 03, Vol. 01, August 2010

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Entitle Bulletin Board To: My dear assignments Page 5 Web Surfer (DR2002) Photo.net DPReveiw.com Page 6 FCM Theater The Return (2003) Page 7 American cartoonists Phil Yeah Ask a lot of questions Philip Yeh is one of the greatest known American cartoonists. He was invited to Malaysia to give a great lecture to FCM’s students, especially Film and Animation students. Page 8 Research Creation Exhibition 2 Proscenium of Art, Humanities and Technology / Part Two Page 10

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Front cover photo by Pouyan Mohseninia Andra McCartney at the Masjid Jamek Downtown soundwalk in Kuala Lumpur Back cover Photo by Film and photography society of Multimedia University, Cyberjaya campus The First Major Photography Event In MMU “Memoirs” “A Walk Through The Time”

CREDITS: Pouyan Mohseninia Bahare Darvish Talkhouncheh Syafiqah Alyani Shamsudin Mohd Hadiy Syakir Ahmad Edrees Nor Nazri Mohamed Shauqie Ahmad Aziz Seyed Reza Shojaei Mohammad Shirani Noor Izzati Rahim Eddy Izuwan Bin Musa Kourosh Ghahremani Ehsan Mirhosseini ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Zhi Kun Wan (Film and photography society of MMU, Cyberjaya campus) Salman Alirezaei (BAX group, Students of FCM, MMU) Fajrul Norman Rashid (FCM Specialist) and to all whom made efforts through publishing this issue. ADVISORS: Dr. Lim Yang Ping (Forest) Munawarruzzaman Mokhtar

Interview with Dr. Andra McCartney “Please Listen” My name is Andra McCartney; I’m an associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies in Concordia University which is in Montreal, Canada. I’ve been teaching there for 10 years. I’ve been working as a Sound-Walk artist for 20 years. Page 12 Masjid Jamek downtown soundwalk in Kuala Lumpur In late January of 2010, Multimedia University sound students accompanied me on a soundwalk through downtown Kuala Lumpur, in the vicinity of the Masjid Jamek train station. Page 16 Putrajaya International Hot Air Balloon Fiestal Untethered manned Flight The hot air balloon is without doubt the oldest successful human-carrying flight technology and is a subset of balloon aircraft. Page 18

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FCM Specialist The oldest successful human-carrying flight technology Explore Malaysia more Page 20 The First Major Photography Event In MMU “Memoirs” A Walk Through The Time The Memoirs Photography Event is actually a follow-up of a photography competition conducted in February 2010 to showcase the photos by the winners and participants. Page 22

Next Issue

Google Day at MMU 2010 The 4th Creative Multimedia Awards

The Fabulous Night Out The city’s all day Creative art festivals

Urban Scape 2010

An education research by DM

Orang Asli Settlement

Malaysian Book of records The longest live painting

Contact

for any future information and feedbacks please contact us by entitlemagazine@gmail.com

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The Big Picture

Sound through the centuries By Fajrul Norman Rashid fajrul.norman@mmu.edu.my This article is a summary from a bigger essay. Its a historical review of role of sound in the progress of civilization and the human historical experience. We know that there is an intricate pattern woven into the fabric of human civilization between sound and human progress. We see its as the engine of progress of human intelligence. Lets break the role of sound in human culture into 2 basics: The Spoken Word and Music. Through the perspective of a sound engineer, lets divide human civilization, into periods: 1) the Acoustic Period 2) the Electrical/Electronic Period and of course 3) the Digital period. Due to the limitation of time and space, we will just discuss the Acoustics Period in this installment. The Acoustic Period This period spans Prehistory through the Industrial Revolution. The Spoken Word; From the very beginning, when humans was able to create sounds using their vocal cords, they begin to understand the importance of manipulating sounds as a communication tool. Stemming from this, probably their greatest achievement; the invention of language. This new tool, enables man to communicate with his fellow man for not just mundane daily requirements of survival; pertaining to things tangible, such as the whereabouts of food and water or presence of danger. But also intangibles for example ideas, such as religion and the arts. The spoken word, through language, is the impetus to the many achievements of human civilization. From the tradition of story telling. It lead to the need for enclosed spaces. These spaces enhance the clarity of the spoken word. We then see creation of temples and places of worship where the sound of the spoken word is amplified to allow for a larger audience. Whilst probably going back much further, the recorded history of acoustic design of buildings seems to begin with the construction of pyramids, amphitheatres and temples by the ancients.

Entitle; The e-magazine of FCM / August 2010


Entitle Bulletin Board

Definitely the human being is neither completely correct nor perfect as Friedrich Nietzsche quotes “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.� We would like to bring this page to all FCM students and staffs whom are willing to share a note to the readers. For more information please email to: entitlemagazine@gmail.com

To: My dear assignments While I was on my way to class, I passed by the corridor of the first floor of FCM building. Exactly in front of the administration office of the faculty, I saw you. You were on a scale, getting weighted and being sold. The assignment on which I spent a trimester doing was about to be sold. To whom or for what purposes I still do not know, but the only option I have is to wish you get recycled. Unfortunately, I did not know anything about it beforehand; otherwise I would have collected you. Wish all the best for the future of the assignments after they are submitted.

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We believe Paper recycling is the process of recovering waste paper and remaking it into new paper products. But, would not it be better, if we inform for collecting our works before any other action?


Web Surfer; Lab 2007

Starting from this issue, we have started surfing through the net to introduce websites and weblogs with the theme of art, therefore if you were interested to introduce your website or weblog to our reader this is the place. For more information please email to: entitlemagazine@gmail.com By Seyed Reza Shojaei 1081106446 Media Innovation, Beta sre.shojaei@gmail.com PHOTO.NET Are you interested in capturing the beauty of nature, precious moments or even the ugly things in life? Photography will give you this chance to record whatever you want. There is no easier way to stay on top of photography except exploring useful professional photography websites. Here we try to introduce some of the top photography websites. This section includes two sites which review equipments as well as offer tips for having better experiences: Photo.net is an online community with thousands of active members and many viewers.

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http://photo.net

http://dpreview.com

DPREVIEW.COM This website is highly educational and one of the best peer-topeer environments for those who wish to become better photographers. The audience of this website ranges from newcomers to experienced and professional. This website is a comprehensive learning source covering various topics in photography. Its growing library of photos is a worthy archive for anyone who is interested in photography art. DPReview (Digital Photography Review) is an independent resource which focuses on news, reviews and information about Digital Photography and Digital Imaging. This site is also one of the best guides for choosing a suitable camera, This site helps you to get familiar with the latest cameras and their specifications as well as giving the option of comparing different cameras and accessories from different brands. You will find more in these sites that will amaze you, so do not hesitate.

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FCM Theatre

In this current issue we have opened a new page which tries to expand the varieties of the magazine coverage. In this page we will try to practice our sharing knowledge on movie reviews for the readers, basically our talent will be mixed though the academic knowledge which we earn in our classes at FCM, MMU. Therefore if you were interested to write, please send your article to: entitlemagazine@gmail.com By Ehsan Mirhosseini 1092700770 Foundation of FCM, Study leave Afshin911215@yahoo.com THE RETURN (2003) The Return was created in 2003 by Andrei Petrovich Zvyagintsev. Even though he has just directed two movies, we can name him one of youngest and greatest directors in the world. He was born in 1964 in Russia. The Return has received several awards, including a Golden Lion at Venice Film Festival. Plot: Two young brothers, Ivan and Andrei, have grown a deep attachment to each other to make up for their fatherlessness childhood. They live with their mother and grandmother. One day they come back home and are shocked to discover that their father has returned after 12 years of ab-

Photos are from internet: http://www.offoffoff.com/ film/2004/return.php

Entitle; The e-magazine of FCM / August 2010

sence. At first they cannot accept it because they only know him from a faded photograph. The father decides to go for a vacation with his boys. This is difficult for them as they will be with their stranger father but finally they go on this trip. During the vacation, the father seems very mysterious. Despite this, Andrei slowly gets more familiar with his father. In contrast, Ivan cannot believe his father. He gets into a fight with him and challenges him deeply. The story comes to a tragic ending when the father is killed. Direction: The form and theme in The Return are combined very well. The screenplay’s structure is based on a classical model of screenplays. We can sense several elements of Alfred Hitchcock’s movies in the story; however this screenplay and its theme are attached with a modern atmosphere. It also reminds the viewers of Andrei Tarkovsky’s movies, another Great Russian director. The movie points out a serious fact in the Russian society. The father is a symbol for communism and old beliefs in Russia. In contrast, Ivan is portions of the new generation in Russia, where old beliefs must be disappear for new thoughts to live on. Symbolically, the father is killed so that the new generation could stand on their own feet and live in a liberal society.

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American cartoonists Phil Yeah

Ask a lot of questions some movies and cartoons which have violence are popular, it does not mean that it is good. There should be creativity in books and animations not violence.

Photos by Anuar Hassan

According to his official website, Philip Yeh began his professional career in 1970 in Southern California where he grew up. In 1973, he created Uncle Jam, a wonderful free newspaper covering the arts, which he published for the next 19 years. In 1977 he wrote, illustrated and published one of the first modern American graphic novels, Even Cazco Gets the Blues. He followed up this first book with at least one brand new graphic novel each year for the next 15 years. To date, Phil has written and illustrated over 80 published books. Phil founded Cartoonists Across America & the World in 1985 after being inspired by Wally Amos to do something about the literacy crisis on the planet. His band of artists have promised to tour the world for 25 years until 2010. They have painted more than 1700 murals in 49 states in the United States as well as more than a dozen countries working with some of the most talented artists on the planet. Phil’s 2007 graphic novel, Dinosaurs Across America has been colored by copper lace artist Lieve Jerger and published by NBM in New York. In March of 2008, Dinosaurs Across America was named one of the best 25 graphic novels by the School Library Journal. Lieve and Phil are currently creating new artwork for their bestselling book, The Winged Tiger & The Lace Princess. 2009 marks the debut of Steve the Dog & the Winged Tiger with Chicago-based artist Geoff Bevington and Lieve’s colors. Phil plans to film and tour much of the world for the last two years of his Cartoonists Across the World campaign until 2010. A documentary film Planet Literacy is in the works and will cover much of their 25 year global tour promoting literacy and the arts.

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Entitle; The e-magazine of FCM / August 2010


By Bahare Darvish Talkhouncheh 1081108022 Film & Animation, Beta bahar.darvish@gmail.com Philip Yeh is one of the greatest known American cartoonists. He was invited to Malaysia to give a great lecture to FCM’s students, especially Film and Animation students. The conference was held at E-Theatre in 12th of March. He shares some of his experiences and things that he has been through to become a great cartoonist. Philip Yeh was born in a poor neighbourhood in Los Angeles. His father was a Chinese engineer who immigrated to America and married an Irish woman. He believes that his father is his greatest supporter. He has been a very special kid because he used to ask a lot of questions. He started to ask questions at the first San Diego Comic books in 1970s. One of the interesting things that he mentioned was that he owned a newspaper when he was just 19. Philip Yeh pointed out that as a kid, he wanted to become a cartoonist but he did not know how. His family and friends did not have any idea about cartooning, and it seemed to him that he was not in an artistic environment. So, he decided to ask the experts, people who have experience in the cartooning world themselves. He said he is very thankful because of his friends as they really helped him to become a cartoon-

Nobody can take ideas from watching Television, playing games or such activities. scientifically nobody’s brain thinks while watching Television or playing games, as the brain only reacts to those activities. Therefore, the brain feels idle.

Entitle; The e-magazine of FCM / August 2010

ist. He thinks that students who want to become great cartoonists should meet with experienced cartoonists and learn from their thoughts and ways. Another thing that he mentioned was violence in movies. He said that he does not use violence in any way for his books. He said that even though some movies and cartoons which have violence are popular, it does not mean that it is good. Philip Yeh believes there should be creativity in books and animations not violence. He also believes that everyone should learn to act professionally. The first thing needed is everyone should own their rights. He said that he is not going to tell someone how to be one of the thousand names at the end of a movie, but instead a person should learn how to be the star of the movie. Another important thing that he emphasized was that nobody can take ideas from watching TV, playing games or such activities. He mentioned that scientifically nobody’s brain thinks while watching TV or playing games, as the brain only reacts to those activities. Therefore, the brain feels idle. He said that watching TV will not help a person think creatively. Before wrapping up, he showed some of his works and bestselling books such as The Winged Tiger.

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Research Creation Exhibition 2 Proscenium of Art, Humanities and Technology / Part Two

Photo by Eddy Izuwan Bin Musa

Photo by Shauqie Ahmad Aziz

Photo by Nor Nazri bin Mohamed

Photo by Eddy Izuwan Bin Musa

Photo by Eddy Izuwan Bin Musa

Photo by Shauqie Ahmad Aziz

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Entitle; The e-magazine of FCM / August 2010


20:20 Speech by President of Multimedia University Prof. Dr. Zaharin bin Yusoff 20:30 Official speech and launch by YBhg. Tan Sri Dato’ Ir. Md. Radzi Mansor Pro-Chancellor of Multimedia University. 21:00 Exhibition tour and Dinner 23:00 End of event

Photo by Pouyan Mohseninia

Photo by Nor Nazri bin Mohamed

Photo by Shauqie Ahmad Aziz

Photo by Pouyan Mohseninia

Photo by Nor Nazri bin Mohamed

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Interview with Dr. Andra McCartney

“Please Listen”

I was listening to a show that was all about experimental music, and allot of it was you know noise bands and electroacoustic music and then there was one piece that was a SoundWalk and I was immediately taken.

Photo by Pouyan Mohseninia

My name is Andra McCartney; I’m an associate professor in the Department of Communication Studies in Concordia University which is in Montreal, Canada. I’ve been teaching there for 10 years. I’ve been working as a Sound-Walk artist for 20 years. And I do Sound-Walks that I record, and then they get into radio programs and gallery installations, and other pieces go up on the Internet, the most recent ones you could find on YouTube. Is that enough? It was 20 years ago I think it was 1987 or 1990 I was listening to the radio and I was always very interested in experimental music and so it was a radio show, a community radio station. Community radio is a radio where most of work is done by volunteers, they might have two, three paid workers but the rest are volunteers. And there are allot of it in Canada, and because it’s there it gives people a chance to do programs that are really out of the main stream. So I was listening to a show that was all about experimental music, and allot of it was you know noise bands and electro-acoustic music and then there was one piece that was a Sound-Walk and I was immediately taken with it and I thought how interesting to use recording not to make music but to record environmental and work with them. It really attracted me right away. Within two weeks I bought a recorder and I started doing Sound-Walks, I also started doing research on this composer and then that led to do a research on the whole area of Sounds-Cape record, but until that time I’ve had heard the word but I didn’t really know what it was and how people did it. So this really opened my ears to this new way of thinking and I just started listening and doing walks sometimes. And you know from that point on it was hearing and operating.

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How can this technique, art be used for therapeutic purposes? It’s interesting that one day I did a Google search on Sound-Walking and I discovered that there are some counselors in England who have discover Sound-walking. Their clients are adolescents and they found that when they speak to them in an office they just clam up, they don’t want to talk about their lives, they feel shy but if they take them on a Sound-walk in a neighborhood that is familiar to them without even forcing a conversation to them but just walking around and then, eventually talking as they are walking around. People will start talking because they are in that familiar environment; they start remembering things and start a conversation. So it kind of opens people up to the possibility of conversation so I think that’s a kind of therapy, and then recently when I did some Sound-walks in Montreal the people asked me that they felt like doing a walk in a group. People are walking without speaking and walking in a group while they are listening as a group. And several people recently said that it’s a kind of a meditation because there is this kind of group dynamic.

why sound art but in an engineering terms, usually we see people carrying a camera and whatever they see or a trip they go they take out their camera and take a shot and further on it will be like a memory but in a artistic way we carry different cameras with different lenses, so for a sound artist, would be those stuff that would be carried? And what would be the difficulties the obstacles they would be facing? One thing is that I was at the bird park yesterday because I Photo by Pouyan Mohseninia

so it likes people contemplating, walking and listening... It allows them to, I mean if you can manage it things do come up you can stop you mind from chattering away, you will start making lists of things you have to do during the day but if you keep returning to the listening, it really acts like a kind of a meditation and I find it very calming. Particularly if am in a new place or if I had a hard day you know I go out and do a sound walk and I just listen I just let other things go.

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Particularly if am in a new place or if I had a hard day you know I go out and do a sound walk and I just listen I just let other things go.

Photo by Shauqie Ahmad Aziz

Photo by Shauqie Ahmad Aziz

had originally intended to do a sound walk at the bird park and I decided it wasn’t the best space but while I was there I was doing a sound recording and I was also taking photographs still photographs and I found that when I was doing this sound recording you know I had the mic at my ear I had my sound recorder. It didn’t really feel like it was interfering with my experience of that place. I know somebody who takes photographs, I go well on holidays and

I come back with no photographs at all because I don’t think of it all the time but then I had to because I was documenting and I want to have a few photographs to go with what sound recording, and every time I took a picture it took me away from the walk you know because I would stop and I had to frame it, you don’t have to do this with sound and I mean suppose if I had a hand held mic I would be focusing you know because it has more control on the sound where as with binaural you just put them in your ears and listen you don’t really worry about it.

Photo by Pouyan Mohseninia

The equipments you know could do this work with, could be heavy equipment and there are some people that have large mics and they have the big zeppelin for wind protection with wind protection with booms and a large recorder but I go for the smallest recorder, my mic are really small so my whole recording kit goes in my bag so it encourages me to take it everywhere were as with a heavy equipment I would kind of

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plan my excursions in a different way I would have to say ok am I going to take a taxi to go there or can somebody get me a ride, so am not going to make it a long walk, so I would try to make it a very light walk. As a professor I have to get ethical clearance for a new project so that means if am recording peoples voice, I need to take their permission, fill out forms it’s a really pain. So you really can’t go like “excuse me can you just fill out these two page form...” Before I go any further, but if I use things anonymously then I don’t need permission, and in public spaces when am doing recording people often don’t know am recording so it’s like am listening rather than recording so as am moving through a space if people are having a privet conversation I will edited that part out because I don’t want to disturb people privacy. And that not a part of the university that requires me, but it’s just something I believe. But if I go into some places like children playgrounds and it’s full of scream and it’s not articulate then I can use that because it’s not really connected to any person, but if people are talking about their love life or something and that is a different thing and am not going to use that in the recording. I know sound artists who do exactly the opposite, they go out and look for privet conversation in their work but there are not associated with universities.

Photo by Pouyan Mohseninia

Students tend to be shy and they wouldn’t ask question and you know I try to listen as much as you can in your daily life and ask questions about sound, about the sounds that you hear, about what they mean in your culture, what kinds of sounds you like or don’t like or if you had an ideal sound world, what would it contain? Would you rather not have it in your life? And what does that mean? And thinking about the relationship of sound, by listening. So, if I have one thing to say to people it would be to “Please listen”. Okay thank you for the time, we really appreciate it, the lack of time we had. It’s a pleasure.

What would be the statement to wake other students up to get them interested in soundwalking? I don’t know how much are you familiar with the culture in Malaysia?

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I go for the smallest recorder, my mic are really small so my whole recording kit goes in my bag so it encourages me to take it everywhere.


Masjid Jamek downtown soundwalk in Kuala Lumpur By Andra McCartney Concordia University In late January of 2010, Multimedia University sound students accompanied me on a soundwalk through downtown Kuala Lumpur, in the vicinity of the Masjid Jamek train station. We met there, just outside the train station, a location chosen because it is very central and easy to access. It was only after we arrived that day, that I was told of its historical importance. Sau Bin Yap, who agreed to use his local mapping knowledge to lead us through the area, told me that Kuala Lumpur was founded at the confluence of two rivers, a spot just a few hundred meters from where we were standing at the beginning of the soundwalk. People were using all kinds of recording equipment for this walk. I was wearing my binaural in-ear microphones and using a flash audio recorder. Students had another kind of flash recorder with stereo mics. Many people were carrying cameras and some were using cellphones to record images or sound. Everyone was asked to refrain from speaking to each other during the walk, so that we could concentrate more on listening. The walk began with some suggestions about ways to listen (for more on listening and structures of soundwalking, read this new article on soundwalking and improvisation published on the Improvisation, Community

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and Social Practice website). The Masjid Jamek downtown KL soundwalk (http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=WPpJ0RBHcYE here is a youtube video) led through the area surrounding the mosque, Little India and Chinatown, a sonic trace of our passage through the multicultural arteries of downtown Kuala Lumpur. In the discussion at the end of the walk, several of the students remarked particularly on their enjoyment of the Little India section of the walk, and how the shops sounded like Radio India, with each shop defining its space through the playing of recorded popular Indian music. This reminded me of an article by Kreutzfeld (2006), in which he discusses Jane Jacobs’ idea of urban vitality as an important value. Everyone noticed the ubiquity of the traffic noise, and how it often masked other sounds. The heavy

Photo by Kourosh Ghaharemani

Photo by Mohammad Shirani

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traffic became a determinant of the pace and phrasing of the walk as well (see Augoyard 2007 for an analysis of the rhetoric of walking), as the large group would wait for the lights to change, then hurry to cross each street and wait at the other side for everyone to catch up before continuing. Meanwhile, our leader was eager for us to experience all three cultural microclimates within the time-frame of the walk, so had to be reminded sometimes to wait! As we walked into Chinatown, the group became separated into two parts on different trajectories but, by using cellphones to communicate, we met up again at a central crossroads in the Chinatown market, and continued along to finally walk the waterside footpath by where the two rivers join, one of the few places on the walk that we could clearly hear bird song. At the end of the walk, we returned to our starting point and had a discussion about what we had heard, and what that listening reveals about cultural values and the sonic environment of the city at this moment: vital-

ity, noise, traffic, marketplaces, circulation; still a swirling confluence. References: Augoyard, Jean Francois. Step by Step: everyday walks in a French urban housing project. Foreword by Francoise Choay; translated and with an afterword by David Ames Curtis. Minneapolis, MN: 2007. Originally published as Pas a Pas: Essaie surle cheminement quotidien en milieu urbain, Editions du Seuil, 1979. Kreutzfeld, Jacob. “Ishibashi Soundscape: Investigating the Soundscape of Urban Japan.� Studies in Urban Cultures Vol. 8, pp.88-99. 2006.

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several of the students remarked particularly on their enjoyment of the Little India section of the walk, and how the shops sounded like Radio India, with each shop defining its space through the playing of recorded popular Indian music.

Photo by Mohammad Shirani

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Putrajaya International Hot Air Balloon Fiesta

Untethered manned Flight By Mohd Hadiy Syakir 1081105685 Digital Media, Gamma sharkcr7_90@yahoo.com

Photos by Noor Izzati Rahim

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The hot air balloon is without doubt the oldest successful human-carrying flight technology and is a subset of balloon aircraft. A hot air balloon consists of a bag called the envelope with an opening at the bottom called the mouth or throat, a basket or a gondola, and a “burner”. On Nov 21 1783, in Paris, France, the first untethered manned flight was made by Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier and François Laurent d’Arlandes in a hot air balloon created on Dec 14, 1782 by the Montgolfier brothers. Nowadays, balloon envelopes have been made in all kinds of shapes that we can imagine of, from hot dogs, rocket ships, until the shapes of commercial products. Hot air balloons that can be propelled through the air rather than just being pushed along by the wind menawhile are known as airships or, more specifically, thermal airships. A hot air balloon for manned flight uses a single-layered, fabric gas bag (lifting “envelope”), with an opening at the bottom called the mouth or throat. Attached beneath is a gondola or wicker basket (in some long-distance or high-altitude balloons, a capsule), which carries passengers and (usually) a source of heat,

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in most cases an open flame. Mounted above the basket and centered in the mouth is the “burner,” which injects flame into the envelope, heating the air within. The heater or burner is fueled by propane, a liquefied gas stored in pressure vessels, similar to high pressure forklift cylinders. The heated air inside the envelope makes it buoyant since it has a lower density than the relatively cold air outside the envelope. Unlike gas balloons, the envelope does not have to be sealed at the bottom since the air near the bottom of the envelope is at the same pressure as the surrounding air. In today’s sport balloons the envelope is generally made from nylon fabric and the mouth of the balloon (closest to the burner flame) is made from fire resistant material such as Nomex. In this country, hot air balloon too has become one of the major activities in the tourism calendar – there is the one and only Putrajaya International Hot Air Balloon Fiesta. It was first held on the 19th until the 22nd of March, 2009. The event was held for the second time this year. It was a major success in attracting spectators accumulating to more than approximately 100,000 visitors throughout the 4-day fiesta. Pilots from Japan, Switzerland, USA, Belgium, New Zealand, France and the Netherlands who participated in the inaugural event were intrigued by the beauty of Malaysia and vowed to

return to explore Malaysia more. Their experiences and photographs taken during the fiesta are proudly posted in their respective websites and blogs that would indirectly promote Malaysia globally. It shows how this hot air balloon festival has a lot of benefits, for the nation and for the people involved as well.

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It was first held on the 19th until the 22nd of March, 2009. The event was held for the second time this year.


The oldest successful human-carrying flight technology

Explore Malaysia more Photos by BAX group Students of FCM, MMU

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The First Major Photography Event In MMU “Memoirs�

A walk through the time By Film and photography society of Multimedia University, Cyberjaya campus

Photos by Film and photography society of Multimedia University, Cyberjaya campus

The Memoirs Photography Event is actually a follow-up of a photography competition conducted in February 2010 to showcase the photos by the winners and participants. It was held from 1st until 3rd of April 2010 at Multimedia University Grand Hall. This first ever photography exhibition which was organized by Film and Photography Society (FPS) of Multimedia University Cyberjaya acted as an effort to instill interest in photography. Memoirs brought out the notion of thought of every photographer - the memories behind each and every photo. Initially, the main objective of the

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Memoirs photography competition was to create a platform for fellow photographers to express and convey their creativity and ideas through photography based on the themes and categories set. Memoirs strived to reach back to the community to revive the true definition of photography, which is to capture and preserve the memories of the photographs taken. The Memoirs photography event was proudly sponsored by Nikon Malaysia, Photobook Malaysia, CIMB Bank and other participating vendors. The Memoirs competition attracted more than 300 enthusiastic participants and received more than 400 amazing photos. The judges (Mr. Steven Leong, Mr. Nick Ng, Mr. Jason Goh,

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Mr. Albert and Mr. Clive) were overwhelmed by the number of entries. None of them were surprised by the good quality and creativity shown by the participants as it fulfilled their expectations. The competition result was announced during the Memoirs Photography Exhibition, which attracted more than 1200 visitors during its 3-day period. During the exhibition period, the organizer conducted a series of programs such as talks and seminars, photos critic session by the judging team, a fashion show in collaboration with Malaysia Institute of Art (MIA) and many more. Among invited speakers were two renown professional photographers, Mr. Ricky Liew from Photix Production who specializes in commercial photography and Mr. Edwin Tan, a well-known modern lifestyle and wedding photographer. The talk conducted by these well-known photographers gained positive feedback as most visitors said

they enjoyed the session and learned a lot of tips and tricks. The Memoirs fashion show, “A Walk Through The Time” was also a great success. It was conducted on the evening of the last exhibition day. The costumes were designed by students from MIA while the models were from MMU. The show created a platform for amateur photographers to take a shot and test their skills in fashion photography. The theme set for the exhibition hall is a railway station, as it reflects the memories that lie within each of us. We have our own cherished moments in life which define different points of our lives, much like the journey of a train, stopping at railway stations along its way. Along the Memoirs railway, the exhibition hall is separated into the exhibition area, the memoirs corner, the experimental area as well as the vendors’ area.

“I would like to thank you all, the participants, the event committees as well as all the visitors who joined us during the whole event, together we will have a walk through time!” Ms. Lai Siau Ching, Memoirs Event Director

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The First Major Photography Event In MMU “Memoirs”

“A Walk Through The Time”


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