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The power of collaboration [

THE FACT THAT the World Demolition Awards has dedicated a trophy to reward collaboration says much about the importance of teamwork in the modern construction sphere. The fact that this award was won in 2015 by C&D Consultancy – who have since been shortlisted twice in the 2016 awards – speaks volumes for that company’s collaborative approach. In truth, collaboration is very much the theme of modern construction. Although the sector still relies upon multiple layers of contractors, subcontractors and specialist contractors, the dawning of the BIM age has required these multiple layers to communicate more effectively and more transparently than ever before. But, according to C&D Consultancy’s Mike Kehoe, there is more to collaboration than merely satisfying the requirements of BIM. “There are genuine cost savings to be made when companies collaborate effectively,” he asserts. “With close collaboration comes an effective allocation of work. There is less chance of miscommunication. Project management is just so much more straightforward if everyone is working to a unified plan rather than attempting to work in silos.” Kehoe, who regularly acts as a conduit between client, contractor and local authority, further believes that potential cost savings do not end there. “Demolition contractors are generally the first contractor on site. As a result, they are often required to put in place and create resources that could be

useful to specialist contractors following on behind,” he says. “The most obvious example of this is the fact that most demolition creates a valuable recycled material that can be used in foundations, piling mats and road sub-bases. “But there are also less obvious examples. Demolition contractors hire in dust, noise and vibration monitoring equipment. It would be far less expensive for the main contractor to merely take over the hire of that equipment. This would save all the hassle of removing and replacing systems and devices that all elements of the build will require. It would also ensure a consistency of information through all aspects of the project.” Mike Kehoe believes that the key to collaboration rests in a dedicated and centralised project management approach that takes into account the needs and specialities of all the various stakeholders. “In the past, demolition and construction projects were run on an every-man-for-himself basis with individual sub-contractors merely looking after their own portion of the works. Today, with the advent of electronic communications and BIM that need no longer be the case,” he concludes. “As we have seen with major civil engineering projects such as HS2 and the Thames Tideway, collaborations and joint ventures bring together the very best skills, experience and expertise. I firmly believe that collaboration will be the key to the success of demolition and construction companies in the future.” q

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1CHK 2016 mag p1 108 online  

Construction London Build 2016 Scotland Build 2016 Zoos Land of the Lions London Zoo Brexit Working at Height NASC CISRS PASMA CPD MEWPs Roo...

1CHK 2016 mag p1 108 online  

Construction London Build 2016 Scotland Build 2016 Zoos Land of the Lions London Zoo Brexit Working at Height NASC CISRS PASMA CPD MEWPs Roo...