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elcome to the third issue of Potential Magazine! If this is your first time reading, we are really proud of what we have put together and hope you enjoy. If you are returning, we can assure you that we have only gotten better. Potential Magazine hopes to be a source of knowledge and inspiration for people who want to venture into the world of private industry after graduation. Our team has gathered some incredible people and stories together for this round and we hope you enjoy! Finding work that you care about with a team that works collaboratively towards the end goal is something that a lot of us hope for when we start our careers. It, however, can be something that is very hard to find. In this issue we are going to talk about how to find a company that will support the way you work and cares diversity and inclusion. Also, Evy has some great tips about what you can do to stand out in an interview without even saying a word. Finally, Maggie presents and interview with someone that successfully navigated through recruiting into a successful internship experience! Our team is really excited to share this issue with you, and we hope you find the same inspiration and drive in it that we did!

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EDITORS’ NOTE

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DID YOU PICK THE RIGHT ONE? PICKING COMPANIES ON CULTURE FIT

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INTERNSHIPS: HOW TO APPROACH THE RECRUITING PROCESS

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THE PORTFOLIO: A NOVEL APPROACH TO STANDING OUT

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MAKE SURE YOUR EMPLOYER CARES ABOUT YOU: DIVERSITY IN RECRUITING

CONNOR GREEN CHRISTIAN AMSTUTZ EVY STEIN CONNOR CURRY MAGGIE REISEL RUBY LE SYLVIA CAMARA

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CO N T R I B U TO RS

RECRUITING

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D I D YO U P I C K T H E RIGHT ONE? 6

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Connor Green

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ecruiting is often seen as a one-sided venture. Students are expected to go to the career fair and compete against their classmates and peers for the most money or the coolest experience. We all want to have the best job. What tends to fly under the radar, however, is the importance of finding a company that you want to work for. It’s not an easy task, but the right experience, the right environment, and the right values can have a huge impact on how well you are able to do, and how happy you are in that team. Understanding why it matters and how to find a great team is

essential in the recruiting process. Fit at a company is something that has been pushed into the realm of recruiting cliche. We can even see it in the movies, for example: The Internship, where the pursuit of “googliness” drives potential interns through a series of challenges in hopes of the dream job. In reality, the question of fit has less to do with hiring people that all have the same hobbies or prefer the color blue, rather a team built around the same values and expectations will go much farther in the long run. In September, Jon Bischke and Forbes talked about culture fit too often turning into a case of who the


recruiter gets along with better. This is the wrong approach. It is good to be friendly at work, but these teams lack the diversity of opinions and thought that lead to successful outcomes. It is more important for a team to have core beliefs regarding things like an openness to new ideas or a commitment to failing fast. As a student, how can you find a team and a company that aligns with what you value? That’s where the recruiting timeline can work to your advantage. Whether at the career fair or in the interview room, it is important to ask questions about where you will be working and what kind of projects you will be on, but don’t be afraid to embrace the interview and ask questions about their experience with a manager, or how much they have been able to learn during their time with the company. Recently, Potential Magazine was fortunate enough to talk to two incredible people, Alexis Glick and Dev Seth. They had

some great insight into what you want to be looking for in a team and in a company. Alexis shared with us she wants to see the team really be, just that, a team. She said, “Success is about building the team that can build the dream”. You should ask a question about exposure to management, “will I be able to interact with just my manager or people at all levels of the organization?” - for example. Dev, who has experienced companies the size of Google and Instagram, as well as startups, commented on how the size of an organization plays a special role. Even companies that pride themselves on innovation and speed, at a certain point have to be very intentional as when they grow. A company with less than a hundred employees can move fast and fail quickly whereas at a place like Facebook a shift in platform or strategy has to be implemented on several levels and take into account the needs of a diverse set of constituents. Try to understand if the company works as you do. It’s important to know that, in addition to free lunch on Fridays, you will be able to be productive in the environment that is set up. It is the later that will have a bigger impact on your career and the path that it takes. It’s hard to find your first job, but the with the right questions and a little work you can find a place that empowers you to kick a career off to a great start!

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ometimes the process is just tough. From freshman to seniors, all college students struggle to determine their paths to their future careers. There are so many questions: Where do I begin? Where do I go? Who should I talk to? What do I want to be? There are also so many things to think about: How do I get a paid internship? How does my major affect my opportunities? Can I get an internship as a freshman? We have all had these thoughts. What I have found is that we can learn from those who came before us: college graduates. The beginning of the entire future employment process begins with our internships. How do you get an internship? What does that mean? All

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Maggie Reisel

of these questions are so important to understanding the next right steps. I decided to take a deeper dive into the future career recruitment process by speaking with Notre Dame Graduate: Meaghan Haley. Meaghan graduated from Notre Dame in 2017 with a double major in political science and economics. She gave me some insight into her internship recruiting process. The first thing I asked Meaghan was how she was able to land her first internship. She replied that she applied to lots of internships on GoIrish. Go IRISH is an online resource provided by the Center for Career Development that provides students access to full-time and internship postings for students. It is the Center for Career Development’s


primary recruiting database. It is encouraged to apply to internships and/or full-time opportunities. Go IRISH can be used in order to view upcoming employer information sessions, pre-nights, and career fair participants. It can also be used as a job search engine for employment seeking ND talent. Go IRISH is a platform where then students can apply to these opportunities. Going back to my conversation with Meaghan, she applied to as many internships as possible on Go IRISH. She was determined to land an internship, therefore she applied to many. The summer prior, Meaghan was an intern for a business at home in Minnesota. She was able to do that on her own through connections. But, this summer of her junior year she was determined to find an internship that would secure her future career. Eventually, she landed an internship with Nomura Security. This process included an application on Go IRISH as well as an in person interview. Meaghan chose this opportunity because she really believed it would be a good experience. Nomura Security writes on their website that they “provide corporate clients with

a wide array of specialized services based on strong research solution-delivering capabilities” and provide “individual clients with wealth-management services meeting their individual long-term needs and risk tolerance.” The most exciting part of Meaghan’s opportunity was that after her junior year summer, Nomura Security offered her a permanent position at the company after her graduation. According to Forbes Article: Odd Are Your Internship Will Get You A Job: “if you are a college graduate and you are working a paid internship, a new study shoes, 60% of the time, that internship with turn into a job offer.” Or in other words, a decent percentage of paid internships turn into a job offer, such as in the case of Meaghan Haley. Overall, the main takeaways from my conversation with Meaghan is the importance of using the opportunities given to us by our Center for Career Development and more specifically Go IRISH. It is a wonderful resource to begin the recruitment process and find an internship that is right for you.

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THE PO RT FO L I O 10

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Evy Stein

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hise month I had the opportunity to sit down with Mendoza professor Chris Stevens to chat about recruiting and hear his advice on this oftenintimidating process. “What do you bring to an interview these days, Evy?” he immediately asked. I hesitantly replied, “my résumé, a pen…”. Stevens has a new idea for all of us: the portfolio. A portfolio approach enables candidates to highlight more of their work in a tangible way for recruiters to peruse at their leisure. Companies see hundreds and hundreds of student résumés every year, and, whether we want to admit it or not, the vast majority are very similar.

White paper, size 11 font, slim margins, and a pending degree. Professor Stevens thinks that a first step to being a standout candidate is breaking this mold. Why simply tell a recruiter what you can do rather than show them? After looking through a few examples and continuing my conversation with Stevens, here is an outline of a basic portfolio: The intro page: contains your basic information (name, major, year, and hometown) and a one- or two-sentence outline of your interests and career goals. The résumé: a self-explanatory but necessary component, as it provides a cheat sheet for recruiters and gives room


“ [ PO RT FO L I OS ] A R E A WAY TO P ROVO K E M O R E T H I N K I N G A BO U T W H AT W E S E E K I N A N E M P LOY E R ”

for your skills and activities that might not be mentioned in depth. Letters of recommendation: employers, professors, and even peers can all provide valuable insight for employers in this section. How does this candidate work in the classroom, the office, or with a team? What is their leadership style and what are their greatest strengths? Project samples: from marketing graphs to Photoshop skills to essay samples, this part is the most important in Stevens’ opinion. With a good deal of flexibility, the project section can incorporate examples of your polished deliverables from a range of settings and materials. The projects can be swapped out depending on the company you are angling for, and color and design elements allow you to “make it pop.”

Company statement: if possible, your portfolio will also include a tailored page for each company about your reasons for wanting to work there. This could be written as a formal cover letter, or in an infographic style. Overall, Stevens encourages us all to consider the portfolio as a way to provoke more thinking about what we seek in an employer and about what skills we each bring to the recruiter. The portfolio approach allows candidates to be creative while showcasing what they are most proud of, from academic work to team deliverables to projects accomplished in an office setting.

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M A K I N G S U R E YO U R E M P LOY E R CA R ES A BO U T YO U Connor Curry

When recruiting season comes around, it is a very hectic time on campus. It feels like people are fighting tooth and nail for these jobs that they may not even want to work for. While all of this is happening, you may forget how to pick the job that best suits you. Whether you are female, LGBTQ+, first generation, or a minority, you have the option to look into diversity and inclusion recruiting. The thing that matters most to you when choosing a job/internship is making sure you will have an enjoyable and beneficial time. This is why it is important to find out if the company cares about its employees. One general list to check is the Fortune Best Places to Work. While this is more about the company as a whole, not just diversity and inclusion, it gives a good sense of if employees feel good about where they work. Some examples

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of companies on this list are BCG, KPMG, Deloitte, and Protiviti. Thomson Reuters creates a yearly Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) Index. On the 2018 list, Accenture took first place. The list is only three years old, following the trend of acceptance of diversity and inclusion of ALL groups. Accenture’s CEO often speaks out in support of diversity and inclusion especially closing the gender disparity at Accenture and diversity and inclusion to Fortune 500 companies. There are many lists and services specifically focused on diversity and inclusion in the workforces. InHerSight allows women to rate companies based on their experience allowing other women to research roles before they apply. Stonewall Star Performers acknowledges companies that focus efforts towards lesbian,


“ CO M PA N I ES I N T H E TO P QUA RT L I E FO R R AC I A L A N D E T H N I C D I V E RS I T Y A R E 35 % M O R E L I K E LY TO H AV E F I N A N C I A L R E T U R N S A BOV E T H E I R I N D UST RY M E D I A N S ” gay, bi and trans staff which include Accenture, Barclays, EY, and Goldman Sachs. The Human Rights Campaign Corporate Equality Index is another great way to see a company’s commitment to the LGBT community. An initiative by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) and Disability:IN, the Disability Equality Index scores companies based on their disability inclusion policies and practices. DiversityINC’s Top 50 assess companies’s initiatives to hire, retain and promote women, minorities, people with disabilities, LGBT and veterans. Check how easy (or hard) it is to find out about diversity and inclusion on their website. See if they are proud of what they have done and find out specific questions you can ask in the interview. Knowing specifics about a company will help you land a job. Avoid applying to places that seem to not want to mention their efforts in diversity and inclusion. Accenture is an exemplar at this. Two great ways to ask about diversity and inclusion and show your interest in the initiative is at recruiting events and in the interview. At recruiting events, you have the chance to be a bit more informal and find out the most information. Ask about philanthropic endeavors, people of different backgrounds and underrepresented minorities in leadership roles, and how your specific group you identify with is represented. In interviews ask what employee resource groups (ERGs) or inclusion councils are in place and how active they are. They are employee-led groups that can support diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Asking something along the lines of, “how are people of different backgrounds and underrepresented minorities empowered in the workplace?” will give you the chance to see if the interviewer and their respective company strive for diversity and inclusion. If they cannot give a straight answer or seem to avoid the question the

organization may not make it a priority. According to the Diversity Matters report by McKinsey, “Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians. Companies in the top quartile for gender diversity are 15 percent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians.” So diversity and inclusion is better for business. Inclusion drives diversity. Ensuring that a business welcomes everyone and people don’t feel like they are the only person of their group will allow diversity recruity to be more successful and retention rates to be higher. Diversity and inclusion are a necessity to all business and working to put what makes you different in a workplace will better the world for all.

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Profile for Potential Magazine Notre Dame

Issue Three - Recruiting