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Cast Marie Desiree Freder Irene Lucy Petrell Alt

Andrea Rankin Georgia Irwin Graham Mothersill Cristina Patalas Mariann Kirby Neil Kuefler Kristian Stec

Creative Team Director Set Designer Costume Designer Lighting Designer Composer and Sound Designer

Kim McCaw Sean McMullen Hannah Matiachuk Lee Livingstone Aaron Macri

Assistant to the Set Designer Assistant to the Costume Designer Assistant to the Lighting Designer

Cheyenne Sykes Alyson Yanota Josée Chartrand

Voice/Speech/Text Coach Movement Coach Fight Director Fight Captain

Betty Moulton Marie Nychka Janine Waddell Hodder IAC FDC Neil Kuefler

Stage Management Stage Manager Assistant Stage Manager Stage Management Advisor

Julie Ferguson Jessica Parr John Raymond

There will be one intermission. Rights to produce this amateur production are courtesy Judy Daish Associates.

CONTENTS 4 Director’s Notes • 5 Abbedam

6 Curious Arts • 8, 9, 12 Dramaturgical Notes • 13 Photos 16 Production Team • 20 Staff / Front of House • 22 Donors


Director’s Notes My friend and former colleague Charlie Tomlinson sent me a copy of Pains of Youth a couple of years ago. He’d seen a production in London and, knowing our BFA Acting program very well, encouraged me to get this exceptional play into our Studio Theatre lineup. After reading it, I became equally enthusiastic about doing this play with our outstanding young acting students. Thankfully, our programming group shared our enthusiasm and now we share the play with you. Pains of Youth was written in the late 1920’s and was a cautionary tale, warning German society of the dark future looming for a generation of young people who saw a future ahead of them that lacked meaning or hope. The playwright seemed deeply troubled by this bleak forecast so chose to tell a story that challenged his community to refuse to pursue this hopeless road and to seek out a more meaningful, productive path to follow. As I prepared for rehearsals, I became more and more aware of the troubling parallels between the world of the young medical students in the play and the world of the thousands of students that surround me every day here on campus. Today’s generation of students face a more uncertain future than any other generation in recent memory. Economic and social prospects are challenging at best. Traditional expectations for jobs or careers may no longer be attainable. Holding on to hope and optimism is increasingly difficult for this talented and highly-trained cohort. I have deep concerns about how we will be able to find ways to give them the opportunities they deserve and to open our world up to travel in the new directions this generation can discover. Doing Pains of Youth with this marvelous team of young theatre artists has been a gift. I have been consistently thrilled by their response to the play and by the exceptional artistic creations they have produced. It’s a wonderfully challenging play, and I hope our work produces an evening of theatre you will enjoy and remember. Thanks for coming. -Kim McCaw

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ABBEDAM 2013 Presents

Angels in America, Part I: Millennium Approaches By Tony Kushner

Directed by Nick Eaton November 12 - 17, 2013 Second Playing Space, Timms Centre What is Abbedam? “Abbedam” is an anagram of the letters BA, BEd and MA. Abbedam Productions is an extra-curricular production company made up of BA, BA Honors, BEd and MA drama students. The goal of the company is to build community among students, provide learning and performance opportunities, and give students exposure in the Department and greater theatre community. Held in November each year, productions are typically large-cast ensemble plays, enabling as many students as possible to be involved in the cast and production crew. They are directed by a BA, BEd or MA student or alumni. Students organize fundraising events and cabarets throughout the year to support Abbedam Productions. About the Play Angels In America, Part I: Millennium Approaches explores the complexities that surround human nature, society, and its interactions. Written by Tony Kushner, it is centred around 1980’s New York in the midst of an AIDS epidemic. Angels in America illustrates how disease, religion, belief, and commitment (or lack there of), can affect our lives, and the relationships we have with others. Abbedam’s 20th Production Abbedam is proud to announce that Angels in America represents our 20th production! We would like to acknowledge the help of our faculty liaisons past and present, Alex Hawkins and Jon Price, for their continued support of Abbedam as an (otherwise) entirely student-run production.

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The Pains of Youth and the Musical Legacy of the Weimar Republic Lucy Collingwood

“Why can’t we go on being children all our lives?” asks Desiree, one of the many despondent and disillusioned characters in Bruckner’s Pains of Youth. “Only childhood is worth living.” The play was written in 1926, when Germany was in the midst of political and social turmoil. The First World War had just ended, and the treaty of Versailles had thrown Germany into an economic recession. The 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic had decimated the population, many of which would have included Desiree’s peers and friends. What kind of a future was there to look forward to? Who would not long for the comforts of childhood?

of musicians in Vienna that studied the use of atonality and dissonance in music to create a whole new approach to composition. This style of music, characteristic of the expressionist movement that was developing in Germany during this period, defied all previous rules of musical structure and composition with the creation of the twelve tone system, which eschewed such concepts as harmony and key signatures in favour of a more chaoticsounding effect.

“We can all look back at Schoenberg as someone who made that initial break with the way that music had been composed before... [he] made the initial statement musically that there are This time of significant unrest cannot help things that music can realize in atonality that it was never allowed to before, it but have an effect on the outlook of the younger generation, and, by extension the never actually told you the whole story of humanity’s suffering.” art that they create. Music, in particular, speaks uniquely to the soul of each In 1920s Vienna, theatre, film, generation. Bruckner uses an onstage and visual art tended to explore gramophone as a central piece in the expressionism, a relatively new play, to invoke the musical legacy that style that portrayed deeply dark and underscores this period. psychological themes from the interior perspective of a character. Freud’s Christina Gier, Associate Professor of Musicology at the University of Alberta, concept of psychoanalysis was fresh in the minds of intellectuals and artists specializes in the music of the early alike, and expressionist artists used 20th century (namely such composers their various media to invoke the as Alban Berg and Arnold Schoenberg) internal psychological struggles of their and the ways in which the ideologies and the culture around them influenced subjects in the minds of their audiences. their work. In music, they did this by entirely “It’s a time period that lasts in people’s reworking the traditional mathematical structures upon which most music is built. imaginations,” Gier says. Arnold Schoenberg and his contemporaries formed what is known as the Second Viennese School, a group 8

“The music that we hear on the radio is all tonal, but [Schoenberg] wanted to create a system that was...free of


tonality but had new rules, and so this system was called the twelve-tone system. It takes the twelve tones of a scale and mathematically arranges them so that there is some fundamental order in the piece of music, even if you don’t hear the tonal order.” The effect of this system was to create a conflicted, discordant sound, which could be used to invoke a dark, twisted inner world in the mind of the listener. “When you’re used to tonality, atonality sounds very painful and dissonant and can sound very nasty,” says Gier. “So it’s a very good musical approach for a very dark story about a lost soul.” Indeed, we find many lost souls in the text of Pains of Youth; from the sadistic Freder to the emotionally cold Irene to the submissive and dependent Lucy, the youth of this world are living in a state of degradation and debauchery. War, pestilence, and social unrest have robbed these young people of hope, and resulted in a range of destructive behaviours. In particular, the relationship between men and women in the play is extremely unhealthy, and constantly mired in issues of domination and submission, violence and violation. The early 20th century was hugely significant for the development of women’s rights in Europe. Women’s suffrage was a hotly debated topic, and with so many young men going off to fight in World War I, women joined the workforce in droves. This extremely quick change caused unrest and discomfort and caused ripples throughout many different facets of the Austro-German culture. Gier notes this conflicted relationship, (known as “Frauenfrage,” or, “The Question of Woman”) often showed up in Continued on pg 12 9


HARCOURT HOUSE ARTIST RUN CENTRE

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Continued from pg 9 Schoenberg and his pupils’ work. Again, opened the way for all sorts of different we see the social conflicts of a generation approaches that came along at different manifesting in its music and art. times along the century.” “The idea of a woman’s soul was a very big focus for artistic men at the turn of the century, particularly in Vienna. [The culture] was conflicted about gender identity and changes in gender identity.”

German expressionism has found its legacy in dozens of art forms, from painting to film to music, none of which would have been possible without the social unrest that surrounded its creation. It is, in some ways, a The musical revolution that resulted testament to the tenacity of human from all this turmoil did not last within ingenuity that from the most hopeless, the mainstream, but the music of this despairing moments of history can period is still a part of a musical heritage come the most groundbreaking and that influences music to this day. influential art. “There were composers who followed that felt that it was liberating to basically not be bound to these older rules... the world of 20th century composition is a long story but it’s very exciting so it also

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Our season opener was a stunner.

All photos by Ed Ellis

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University of Alberta | Department of Music

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Production Team

Production Manager: Technical Director: Assistant Technical Director: Production Administrative Assistant:

Gerry van Hezewyk Larry Clark Mattia Poulin Jonathan Durynek

Wardrobe Manager: Cutter: Stitcher: Wigs: Wardrobe Practicum Students:

Joanna Johnston Ann Salmonson Karen Kucher Hyperion Hair Group Rebecca Antonakis Zoe Rod Liza Xenzova

Head Scenic/Stage Carpenter: Scenic Carpenters:

Darrell Cooksey Barbara Hagensen Jonathan Reid George GriďŹƒths Maria Birkenshaw Chris Chelick Frances Girard Troy Jensen Jules Labots Camille Maltais Rhys Martin Mattia Poulin Cheyenne Sykes

Head Scenic Painter: Scenic Painters:

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Properties Master: Head of Props:

Jane Kline Kim Creller

Lighting Supervisor:

Mel Geary

Lighting Technicians:

Je Osterlin Morgan Graumann Charlie Lynn

Sound Supervisor: Head of Sound:

Matthew Skopyk Jules Labots

Running Crew: Lighting Operator: Sound Operator: Stagehand:

Travis Metzger Jules Labots Mattia Poulin


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Administrative Staff

Kathleen Weiss: Chair, Department of Drama Julie Brown: Assistant Chair Administration David Prestley: Theatre Administrator / Events Coordinator Jonathan Durynek: Box Office Coordinator / Events Assistant Ruth Vander Woude: Graduate Advisor / Chair’s EA Connie Golden: Undergraduate Advisor Helen Baggaley: Administrative Assistant / Office Coordinator With assistance from Faculty of Arts staff: Salena Kitteringham: Fine Arts Communications Lead Terah Jans: Fine Arts Communications Marketing Specialist Joanna Manchur: Fine Arts Recruitment Coordinator

Production Staff

Gerry van Hezewyk: Production Manager / Administrative Professional Officer Larry Clark: Technical Director, Timms Centre for the Arts Darrell Cooksey: Head Carpenter Jonathan Durynek: Production Administrative Assistant Mel Geary: Lighting Supervisor Joanna Johnston: Costume Manager Jane Kline: Property Master Don MacKenzie: Technical Director, Fine Arts Building Ann Salmonson: Cutter Matthew Skopyk: Second Playing Space Technician / Sound Supervisor Karen Kucher: Costumer, Fine Arts Building

Front of House

Staff: Bonita Akai, Danielle Dugan, Al Gadowsky, Becky Gormley, Caitlin Gormley, Tasreen Hudson, Marie-Andrée Lachapelle, Laura Norton, Faye Stollery, Cheryl Vandergraaf, Catherine Vielguth Volunteers: Jessy Ardern, Cristian Badiu, Debbie Beaver, Susan Box, Franco Correa, Sarah Culkin, Alana De Melo, Jonathan Durynek, Mary and Gene Ewanyshyn, Terri Gingras, Ron Gleason, Darcy Hoover-Correa, Marie-Andrée Lachapelle, Don Lavigne, Sareeta Lopez, Tom and Gillian McGovern, Marlene Marlj, Conner Meeker, Jennifer Morely, Carmen Nieuwenhuis, Alice Petruk, David Prestley, Leila Raye-Crofton, Jane Voloboeva

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Donors Heartfelt thanks to the individuals, foundations and organizations listed below for recognizing the importance of the arts by directly investing in the Department of Drama’s innovation and leadership in theatre training and performance. A round of applause to our supporters! Baha & Sharon Abu-Laban Kevin Aichele Janet Allcock Ella May & Leonard Apedaile Douglas & Annalisa Baer Roderick Banks William & Carole Barton Karin Basaraba Jim & Barb Beck Lindsay Bell Joan Bensted William & Kathleen Betteridge Rhoini Bhatia-Singh Alan Bleviss Morley Bleviss Richard Bowes David Brindley & Denise Hemmings Kathryn Buchanan Linda Bumstead Rachel Christopher Brent Christopherson David Cormack Daniel Cunningham Brian Deedrick Lesley Cormack & Andrew Ede W Gifford Edmonds Jim & Sheila Edwards Family Fund Jim & Joan Eliuk Larry & Deborah Ethier Renee Fogel Shirley Gifford Sheila Gooding Bohdan & Elaine Harasymiw Alex & Joan Hawkins Murray & Pauline Hawkins Christopher Head Stephen Heatley Steven Hilton

Philip Jensen & M Kathleen Mitchell-Jensen Azim & Shenaz Jeraj Marco Katz & M. Elizabeth Boone M A Keene Gerald Kendal Jane King Matthew Kloster Patricia Langan Nicole Mallet John & Peggy Marko Gordon & Norma McIntosh Rod & Heleen McLeod Pamela Milne June & Rod Morgan Betty Moulton Peter & Elaine Mueller Philip & Kathleen Mulder Terrance O’Connor Award Fund Dale Olausen Jack & Esther Ondrack Julie Brown & Joseph Piccolo Josephine Pilcher Cormack Ronald Pollock Patricia Rocco Helen Rosta Kenneth & Joan Roy Valerie Sarty Alan & Ramona Sather Peter & Olga Savaryn Alison Scott-Prelorentzos Jan Selman & Curtis Palmer Albin Shanley Sol & Shirley Sigurdson Phillip Silver St. Peter’s Anglican Church ACW Allan Stichbury Richard & Rita Taylor Sheryl Turner

Thomas Usher Gilda Valli Henriette van Hees Sonia Varela Carlye Windsor Jerry & Deborah Yee Stephen Yorke Various Anonymous Donors In Kind Erica Boetcher David Jones Vincent Kadis Rosalind Kerr Ron Lavoie David Lovett Brian & Lorraine McDonald David Prestley Robert Shannon Karen Kucher Kathleen Weiss Various Anonymous Donors

This list includes those who donated to various Drama funds from August 1, 2012 - August 1, 2013. An updated list with donors from August to October 2013 will be included in the next Studio Theatre program. 22


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Studio Theatre Pains Of Youth Playbill