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www.portsofindiana.com

A Ports of Indiana Publication · Fall 2009

LOGISTICS LEADER 2009 Summit & Directory showcase Indiana’s logistics power

2009 INDIANA LOGISTICS DIRECT ORY

iNSiDe tHiS iSSUe:

2009

IN IANA LOGISTICSD DIRECTORY

WWW.INDIANALO GISTICS.COM

INDIANA

A GLOBAL LEADER IN LOGISTICS

Lock failure shows vulnerability of inland waterway system, pg. 4

State earns top 10 ran in 33 logistics categorking ies (Complete list on page 5)

Strategic planning exper t challenges Indiana to think globa lly

Bayer wins international propeller club award, pg. 5

Indiana Secretary of touts state’s speed Commerce to market

Page 14

WWW. INDIAN ALOGISTICS.CO

“Alternative site” distinction creates new opportunities for FTZs, pg. 13

Page 8

Vincennes University supply-chain mana launches new gement program Page 16

M


Tie-in to business resources.

Through October, salt shipments at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville have increased 2.5 times 2008’s year-to-date figures. The salt is used to clear roadways in winter weather.

tABLe oF coNteNtS FROM THE CEO Lock failure shows vulnerability of inland waterway system ..................................... 4

150 W. Market St., Ste. 100, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-9200 / fx (317) 232-0137 / info@portsofindiana.com www.portsofindiana.com www.indianalogistics.com PORTS OF INDIANA CONTACT INFORMATION

Rich Cooper, Chief Executive Officer (317) 232-9200; rcooper@portsofindiana.com Matt Smolek, Port Director - Jeffersonville (812) 283-9662; msmolek@portsofindiana.com Phil Wilzbacher, Port Director - Mount Vernon (812) 833-2166; pwilzbacher@portsofindiana.com Peter Laman, Port Director - Burns Harbor (219) 787-5101; plaman@portsofindiana.com Jody Peacock, Director of Corporate Affairs (317) 233-6225; jpeacock@portsofindiana.com

“1SI helped tie us into the tax credits, tax abatement programs and workforce training grants we needed to expand our business at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville.” on completion of $3 million expansion at the company’s 270,000 square foot riverfront facility in Jeffersonville.

Contact Kathleen Crowley at kathleenc@1si.org or call 812-945-0266

Tony Walker, Controller (317) 233-6227; twalker@portsofindiana.com Liz Folkerts, Communications Specialist (317) 232-9205; lfolkerts@portsofindiana.com John Hughes, Engineering Director (219) 787-8045; jhughes@portsofindiana.com

Chuck Moore, President, Eagle Steel Products, Inc.

Want some help in taking your business to the next level?

David Haniford, General Counsel (317) 232-9204; dhaniford@portsofindiana.com

Warren Fasone, Security Manager (219) 787-5056; wfasone@portsofindiana.com

www.1si.org

SUBSCRIBE TO PORTSIDE!

Sign up now and receive your free copy of Portside Magazine. Register online at www.portsofindiana.com or contact Liz Folkerts (317) 232-9205; lfolkerts@portsofindiana.com

NEWS & NOTES ........................................................................................................ 5 Bayer wins international propeller club award Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon hosts government visitors FEATURE STORY 2009 Summit and Directory showcase Indiana’s logistics power ........................... 6 FROM THE BOARD ROOM .......................................................................................... 8 Commission receives special briefing on Corps lock repairs and river shipments at Jeffersonville meeting Governor reappoints Arredondo, McCauley to ports commission ENVIRO•FOCUS Making lime “green” ...................................................................................................... 9 Carmeuse Lime & Stone leads efforts to reduce green house gases By guest columnist Pedro Maiz, Carmeuse Lime & Stone

PORT REPORTS Burns Harbor: Port handles 220-ton cyclotron for cancer treatment center ....... 10 Mount Vernon: Cimbar Performance Minerals joins Mount Vernon port ..................... 11 Jeffersonville: Waterways play key role in region’s economy ................................. 12 FOREIGN TRADE ZONES “Alternative site” distinction creates new opportunities for FTZs ....................... 13 Ports of Indiana Directory ...................................................................................... 14 www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 3


Tie-in to business resources.

Through October, salt shipments at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville have increased 2.5 times 2008’s year-to-date figures. The salt is used to clear roadways in winter weather.

tABLe oF coNteNtS FROM THE CEO Lock failure shows vulnerability of inland waterway system ..................................... 4

150 W. Market St., Ste. 100, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-9200 / fx (317) 232-0137 / info@portsofindiana.com www.portsofindiana.com www.indianalogistics.com PORTS OF INDIANA CONTACT INFORMATION

Rich Cooper, Chief Executive Officer (317) 232-9200; rcooper@portsofindiana.com Matt Smolek, Port Director - Jeffersonville (812) 283-9662; msmolek@portsofindiana.com Phil Wilzbacher, Port Director - Mount Vernon (812) 833-2166; pwilzbacher@portsofindiana.com Peter Laman, Port Director - Burns Harbor (219) 787-5101; plaman@portsofindiana.com Jody Peacock, Director of Corporate Affairs (317) 233-6225; jpeacock@portsofindiana.com

“1SI helped tie us into the tax credits, tax abatement programs and workforce training grants we needed to expand our business at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville.” on completion of $3 million expansion at the company’s 270,000 square foot riverfront facility in Jeffersonville.

Contact Kathleen Crowley at kathleenc@1si.org or call 812-945-0266

Tony Walker, Controller (317) 233-6227; twalker@portsofindiana.com Liz Folkerts, Communications Specialist (317) 232-9205; lfolkerts@portsofindiana.com John Hughes, Engineering Director (219) 787-8045; jhughes@portsofindiana.com

Chuck Moore, President, Eagle Steel Products, Inc.

Want some help in taking your business to the next level?

David Haniford, General Counsel (317) 232-9204; dhaniford@portsofindiana.com

Warren Fasone, Security Manager (219) 787-5056; wfasone@portsofindiana.com

www.1si.org

SUBSCRIBE TO PORTSIDE!

Sign up now and receive your free copy of Portside Magazine. Register online at www.portsofindiana.com or contact Liz Folkerts (317) 232-9205; lfolkerts@portsofindiana.com

NEWS & NOTES ........................................................................................................ 5 Bayer wins international propeller club award Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon hosts government visitors FEATURE STORY 2009 Summit and Directory showcase Indiana’s logistics power ........................... 6 FROM THE BOARD ROOM .......................................................................................... 8 Commission receives special briefing on Corps lock repairs and river shipments at Jeffersonville meeting Governor reappoints Arredondo, McCauley to ports commission ENVIRO•FOCUS Making lime “green” ...................................................................................................... 9 Carmeuse Lime & Stone leads efforts to reduce green house gases By guest columnist Pedro Maiz, Carmeuse Lime & Stone

PORT REPORTS Burns Harbor: Port handles 220-ton cyclotron for cancer treatment center ....... 10 Mount Vernon: Cimbar Performance Minerals joins Mount Vernon port ..................... 11 Jeffersonville: Waterways play key role in region’s economy ................................. 12 FOREIGN TRADE ZONES “Alternative site” distinction creates new opportunities for FTZs ....................... 13 Ports of Indiana Directory ...................................................................................... 14 www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 3


FROM THE CEO

Lock failure shows vulnerability of inland waterways system

Rich Cooper

Chief Executive Officer, Ports of Indiana

Before the gate failure, the Markland Lock and Dam moved more than 55 million tons of cargo annually.

A sonar image of the lock gate at the bottom of the Ohio River.

4 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

On Sunday, Sept. 27, Markland Locks and Dam on the Ohio River suffered a major gate failure. This couldn’t have come at a worse time with harvest approaching. Taking the lock out of commission a few weeks before its busiest time of year during an already harsh economic environment puts shippers in a tough spot. It is also an indicator of a bigger problem. Our inland river system is in need of infrastructure maintenance and repairs before more failures like this one disrupt our H2O highway. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released the Ohio River Mainstem System Study in 2006, resulting in a plan to modernize and upgrade the Ohio River lock system gradually. Repairs to each lock were prioritized by need so repairs could be made proactively. One part of this massive study found that preventative maintenance is ultimately less expensive – something that shouldn’t come as a surprise to any of us.The Corps looked at the results of scheduled and unscheduled maintenance on the locks. Unscheduled maintenance and repairs, such as this emergency situation, are more costly to government, industry and even consumers. One of the situations studied was the 2004 McAlpine Lock and Dam closure. Advanced lock deterioration required a two-week repair. This was in the middle of an ongoing lock construction project, so the repairs completely closed down the Ohio River near Louisville, Ky. The costs exceeded $9 million, but didn’t stop there. The Waterways Council looked into things a bit deeper by surveying companies affected by the closure. More than 70 percent were negatively impacted. The results were lost sales, production cutbacks, delay costs and employee layoffs. And in this case, the repairs were even completed ahead of schedule. The slowed economy already creates a difficult work environment but setbacks on the river can really add to the difficulty. The Markland lock gates were already scheduled to be replaced in 2011 but the delivery date for new gates has since been moved up to March of 2010. In the meantime, the failed gates are undergoing repair and barge transportation is relegated to the auxiliary 600-foot chamber – roughly half the size of the main chamber. Delays are frequent and extra care must be taken not to damage the smaller chamber. If the auxiliary chamber experiences problems while the main chamber is under repair, the costs to shippers could be devastating. This was just one lock out of many that are at risk. According to the Corps, 25 percent of locks on the Ohio River have already been around longer than their design life. Within the next 10 years, the number of outdated locks jumps to 50 percent. More than half of the nation’s 240 locks are over 50 years old. The entire system is in dire need of additional funding. The inland waterways system moves about 600 million tons of cargo annually, nearly double the tonnage moving through the Panama Canal. About one third of the inland waterways cargo travels on the Ohio River. While highways are becoming increasingly congested, the inland waterways have plenty of remaining capacity. Consider that each 15-barge tow moves the same amount of cargo as 900 trucks. The system is one of this country’s most under-utilized assets. To remain a viable and productive asset, it requires maintenance just like our highways do. The stakeholders of the inland waterways system do have a voice and should communicate the importance of maintaining our inland waterways to our state and federal leaders. Let’s hope this incident is not the beginning of more critical infrastructure failures that might cripple our inland river system.

NeWS & NoteS

Bayer wins international propeller club award SEATTLE – In an organization made up include U.S. Maritime Administrator Sean T. mostly of deep water officials, one lifeConnaughton and Admiral James T. Loy with long river man took the highest honor the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. this year. Art “Junior” Bayer was named “When the state was looking for a location the ‘Maritime Person of the Year’ by the for Indiana’s second port, Art was right there International Propeller Club of the United campaigning for his hometown of Mount States at the organization’s 83rd annual Vernon,” said Ports of Indiana CEO Rich convention held in Seattle on Oct. 6-9. Cooper. “He was our first service tenant in “Art was chosen as the International 1976 and has always been a constant supporter Propeller Club ‘Maritime Person of the for the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon and the Year’ recipient on the basis of his lifetime inland waterways. It is wonderful to see Art achievements working on behalf of the honored for his life-long dedication, passion inland river industry and his role in and respect for the river.” establishing and supporting the propeller For more information about the clubs of Paducah and Evansville,” said John International Propeller Club of the United Angus, executive vice president for the States, visit www.propellerclubhq.com International Propeller Club of the United States. Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon hosts government visitors Bayer, a Mount Vernon, Ind., native, founded Mount Vernon Barge Co. in Port Director Phil Wilzbacher (below, 1962. Originally starting out as a barge Art Bayer of Mount Vernon, Ind., was named left) meets with representatives from the cleaning service, his business expanded ‘Maritime Person of the Year’ by the International Indiana Department of Agriculture to discuss over the years to include tugboats, barge Propeller Club of the United States. agricultural issues at the Port of Indiana-Mount repair and switching, a dry dock, fleeting Vernon this fall. Agriculture is a large part of service, dry bulk cargo stevedoring and 24/7 emergency response the port’s business and roughly 35 percent of its annual tonnage. service. Despite selling the business to TPG Mount Vernon Marine Agricultural businesses at the port include Agrium, Consolidated in 2006, Bayer remains active in the field. Grain and Barge, Consolidated Terminals and Logistics Co. and According to Angus, eight people were nominated for the Tri-County Agronomics. award this year. Bayer was the unanimous choice of the selection committee. The other nominations came from clubs in Florida, Virginia, South Carolina, Washington, California and Maine. “Most of our ports are deep water,” said Jack Cunningham, the regional vice president of the propeller club’s Ohio Valley Region. “The inland waterways are out-numbered, so Junior winning this award is outstanding and important. He has done many things for the riverways.” The International Propeller Club works to promote and support maritime commerce. It began in 1922 in New York City with a group of men who met over lunch to discuss the maritime industry. They began to call themselves the Propeller Club of the Port of New York. The idea spread to ports in Boston and New Orleans, as well as Yale University. In 1927, the groups united to form the Propeller Club of the United States. Today, the International Propeller Club consists of 53 ports in the U.S. and 33 overseas. Reflecting the early involvement of Yale University, the club also includes student Indiana Secretary of State Todd Rokita ports – 16 in the U.S. and five overseas. Total membership exceeds visited the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon 10,000. on Oct. 30 as part of his annual tour of The International Propeller Club began giving out awards in Indiana’s 92 counties. A native of Munster, 1984. In addition to the ‘Maritime Person of the Year,’ the club Ind., Rokita was elected as Indiana’s 59th honors the propeller club ‘Member of the Year’ and propeller Secretary of State in 2002. The Secretary club ‘Port of the Year.’ This year’s ‘Member of the Year’ was Ron of State’s office manages four divisions: Kobosky from the Port of Tampa, Fla., and ‘Port of the Year’ was elections, business services, securities and Todd Rokita the Port of Baltimore. Bayer was nominated by the Propeller Club motorized vehicle dealers. Secretary of State of Evansville, Ind. Prior ‘Maritime Person of the Year’ recipients www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 5


FROM THE CEO

Lock failure shows vulnerability of inland waterways system

Rich Cooper

Chief Executive Officer, Ports of Indiana

Before the gate failure, the Markland Lock and Dam moved more than 55 million tons of cargo annually.

A sonar image of the lock gate at the bottom of the Ohio River.

4 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

On Sunday, Sept. 27, Markland Locks and Dam on the Ohio River suffered a major gate failure. This couldn’t have come at a worse time with harvest approaching. Taking the lock out of commission a few weeks before its busiest time of year during an already harsh economic environment puts shippers in a tough spot. It is also an indicator of a bigger problem. Our inland river system is in need of infrastructure maintenance and repairs before more failures like this one disrupt our H2O highway. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released the Ohio River Mainstem System Study in 2006, resulting in a plan to modernize and upgrade the Ohio River lock system gradually. Repairs to each lock were prioritized by need so repairs could be made proactively. One part of this massive study found that preventative maintenance is ultimately less expensive – something that shouldn’t come as a surprise to any of us.The Corps looked at the results of scheduled and unscheduled maintenance on the locks. Unscheduled maintenance and repairs, such as this emergency situation, are more costly to government, industry and even consumers. One of the situations studied was the 2004 McAlpine Lock and Dam closure. Advanced lock deterioration required a two-week repair. This was in the middle of an ongoing lock construction project, so the repairs completely closed down the Ohio River near Louisville, Ky. The costs exceeded $9 million, but didn’t stop there. The Waterways Council looked into things a bit deeper by surveying companies affected by the closure. More than 70 percent were negatively impacted. The results were lost sales, production cutbacks, delay costs and employee layoffs. And in this case, the repairs were even completed ahead of schedule. The slowed economy already creates a difficult work environment but setbacks on the river can really add to the difficulty. The Markland lock gates were already scheduled to be replaced in 2011 but the delivery date for new gates has since been moved up to March of 2010. In the meantime, the failed gates are undergoing repair and barge transportation is relegated to the auxiliary 600-foot chamber – roughly half the size of the main chamber. Delays are frequent and extra care must be taken not to damage the smaller chamber. If the auxiliary chamber experiences problems while the main chamber is under repair, the costs to shippers could be devastating. This was just one lock out of many that are at risk. According to the Corps, 25 percent of locks on the Ohio River have already been around longer than their design life. Within the next 10 years, the number of outdated locks jumps to 50 percent. More than half of the nation’s 240 locks are over 50 years old. The entire system is in dire need of additional funding. The inland waterways system moves about 600 million tons of cargo annually, nearly double the tonnage moving through the Panama Canal. About one third of the inland waterways cargo travels on the Ohio River. While highways are becoming increasingly congested, the inland waterways have plenty of remaining capacity. Consider that each 15-barge tow moves the same amount of cargo as 900 trucks. The system is one of this country’s most under-utilized assets. To remain a viable and productive asset, it requires maintenance just like our highways do. The stakeholders of the inland waterways system do have a voice and should communicate the importance of maintaining our inland waterways to our state and federal leaders. Let’s hope this incident is not the beginning of more critical infrastructure failures that might cripple our inland river system.

NeWS & NoteS

Bayer wins international propeller club award SEATTLE – In an organization made up include U.S. Maritime Administrator Sean T. mostly of deep water officials, one lifeConnaughton and Admiral James T. Loy with long river man took the highest honor the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. this year. Art “Junior” Bayer was named “When the state was looking for a location the ‘Maritime Person of the Year’ by the for Indiana’s second port, Art was right there International Propeller Club of the United campaigning for his hometown of Mount States at the organization’s 83rd annual Vernon,” said Ports of Indiana CEO Rich convention held in Seattle on Oct. 6-9. Cooper. “He was our first service tenant in “Art was chosen as the International 1976 and has always been a constant supporter Propeller Club ‘Maritime Person of the for the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon and the Year’ recipient on the basis of his lifetime inland waterways. It is wonderful to see Art achievements working on behalf of the honored for his life-long dedication, passion inland river industry and his role in and respect for the river.” establishing and supporting the propeller For more information about the clubs of Paducah and Evansville,” said John International Propeller Club of the United Angus, executive vice president for the States, visit www.propellerclubhq.com International Propeller Club of the United States. Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon hosts government visitors Bayer, a Mount Vernon, Ind., native, founded Mount Vernon Barge Co. in Port Director Phil Wilzbacher (below, 1962. Originally starting out as a barge Art Bayer of Mount Vernon, Ind., was named left) meets with representatives from the cleaning service, his business expanded ‘Maritime Person of the Year’ by the International Indiana Department of Agriculture to discuss over the years to include tugboats, barge Propeller Club of the United States. agricultural issues at the Port of Indiana-Mount repair and switching, a dry dock, fleeting Vernon this fall. Agriculture is a large part of service, dry bulk cargo stevedoring and 24/7 emergency response the port’s business and roughly 35 percent of its annual tonnage. service. Despite selling the business to TPG Mount Vernon Marine Agricultural businesses at the port include Agrium, Consolidated in 2006, Bayer remains active in the field. Grain and Barge, Consolidated Terminals and Logistics Co. and According to Angus, eight people were nominated for the Tri-County Agronomics. award this year. Bayer was the unanimous choice of the selection committee. The other nominations came from clubs in Florida, Virginia, South Carolina, Washington, California and Maine. “Most of our ports are deep water,” said Jack Cunningham, the regional vice president of the propeller club’s Ohio Valley Region. “The inland waterways are out-numbered, so Junior winning this award is outstanding and important. He has done many things for the riverways.” The International Propeller Club works to promote and support maritime commerce. It began in 1922 in New York City with a group of men who met over lunch to discuss the maritime industry. They began to call themselves the Propeller Club of the Port of New York. The idea spread to ports in Boston and New Orleans, as well as Yale University. In 1927, the groups united to form the Propeller Club of the United States. Today, the International Propeller Club consists of 53 ports in the U.S. and 33 overseas. Reflecting the early involvement of Yale University, the club also includes student Indiana Secretary of State Todd Rokita ports – 16 in the U.S. and five overseas. Total membership exceeds visited the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon 10,000. on Oct. 30 as part of his annual tour of The International Propeller Club began giving out awards in Indiana’s 92 counties. A native of Munster, 1984. In addition to the ‘Maritime Person of the Year,’ the club Ind., Rokita was elected as Indiana’s 59th honors the propeller club ‘Member of the Year’ and propeller Secretary of State in 2002. The Secretary club ‘Port of the Year.’ This year’s ‘Member of the Year’ was Ron of State’s office manages four divisions: Kobosky from the Port of Tampa, Fla., and ‘Port of the Year’ was elections, business services, securities and Todd Rokita the Port of Baltimore. Bayer was nominated by the Propeller Club motorized vehicle dealers. Secretary of State of Evansville, Ind. Prior ‘Maritime Person of the Year’ recipients www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 5


2009 INDIANA LOGISTICS DIRECTORY

(Below) Emily Otto-Tice speaks at the 2009 Indiana Logistics Summit.

2009 INDIANA

LOGISTICS DIRECTORY WWW.INDIANALOGISTICS.COM

INDIANA

A GLOBAL LEADER IN LOGISTICS State earns top 10 ranking in 33 logistics categories (Complete list on page 5)

Strategic planning expert challenges Indiana to think globally Page 8

Indiana Secretary of Commerce touts state’s speed to market Page 14

2009 INDIANA LOGISTICS DIRECTORY ANNOUNCES STATE’S LOGISTICS RANKINGS Vincennes University launches new supply-chain management program Page 16

WWW. INDIANALOGISTICS.COM

LOGISTICS LEADER

(Above) Ron Foxcroft, logistics company owner, former NCAA referee and inventor of the Fox 40 whistle, emphasizes the importance of creativity to carry business through rough patches during his keynote address at the 2009 Indiana Logistics Summit.

2009 SUMMIT AND DIRECTORY SHOWCASE INDIANA’S LOGISTICS POWER State ranks in top 10 for over 30 categories of freight logistics The Hoosier state ranks in the top 10 in 33 logistics categories according to the 2009 Indiana Logistics Directory which was unveiled at the state’s September logistics summit. Nearly half of Indiana’s rankings are in the top five and only three other states can claim more than 30 top 10 rankings in these categories. “The numbers give solid evidence to what most of us already know,” said Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper. “Indiana is clearly a logistics leader.” The Indiana Logistics Summit and the Indiana Logistics Directory are a part of an initiative by the Ports of Indiana and its partners to increase awareness of the state’s logistics advantages on a statewide, regional and national level. The summit began in 2003 and the directory was first published the following year. The 2009 summit was again co-hosted by the Ports of Indiana and Purdue University. Now in its seventh year, the event brings together top officials from business, academia and government to discuss how to make Indiana’s transportation, distribution and logistics businesses more competitive and to provide firsthand accounts of how they see the state moving forward in the supply-chain sector. The 2009 event featured industry outlooks from all modes of transportation as well as presentations by Indiana Secretary of Commerce Mitch Roob and keynote speaker Ron Foxcroft, a logistics entrepreneur, an NCAA basketball referee and the inventor, manufacturer and worldwide distributor of the most popular whistle on the planet. Speakers addressed the economic downturn head-on with topics like unlocking supply chain productivity and logistics leadership in a tough economy. Eli Lilly & Co.’s Director of Supply Chain Ron Bohl provided an inside look at the company’s complex global supply chain. Lilly must manage 420 dosage formulations in human and animal health 6 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

(Left) The 2009 Indiana Logistics Summit included a booth area where attendees could network and meet with exhibitors including Indiana Economic Development Corp., Vincennes University, UPS and more. Roughly one-third of 2009 survey respondents cited networking opportunities as the most valuable part of the summit.

products, each with varying technologies, protection measures and lifecycles made by 21 manufacturing sites and 92 contract manufacturers. “In a downturn, it’s easy to forget about the basics in supply chain processes and all of a sudden stop doing them,” said Bohl. “It doesn’t take much to lose credibility, but it does take a heck of a lot to get it back.” Another popular session covered the importance of infrastructure to logistics. Based around a recent study of agriculture logistics, the session looked at how closing one small town bridge can influence a region’s economy. “For Indiana agriculture, transportation infrastructure is vitally important to move our grains and products to market,” said Emily Otto-Tice, director of grain marketing with the Indiana Soybean Alliance and the Indiana Corn Marketing Council. “It also gives us competitive advantage in the global marketplace. We must be able to maintain and upgrade our transportation infrastructure, which includes roads, rail and waterways, to meet the world’s growing demand for food, feed and fiber.”

The summit also introduced a new service for supply-chain professionals to get their resume in front of potential employers in an online searchable database available at www.indianalogistics.com. “Past summits have proven to provide a fertile networking environment,” Cooper said. “That history coupled with recent inquiries from those wishing to attend this year’s event prompted us to create this service. Hopefully this will help put together qualified logistics professionals with companies looking for good employees.” The summit attracted participants from 10 states and 56 different cities – the largest portion from Indianapolis (45 percent). Approximately 67 percent of attendees came from the business sector, while government and university officials each represented about 12 percent and economic development leaders made up 9 percent. The most well-represented sectors of private industry were: ports, logistics, consulting, engineering, railroad, trucking, agricultural, manufacturing, financial, package delivery, legal, retail, real estate, media, security, staffing, packaging and barge shipping. Plans are underway for the eighth annual Indiana Logistics Summit to be held in the fall of 2010. Visit www.indianalogistics.com for updates.

The 2009 Indiana Logistics Directory features perspectives from logistics experts and more than 2,000 business listings in 38 logistics-related categories. Preparations for the 2010 edition are underway now. Visit www.indianalogistics.com for more information and to download or order a copy of the 2009 edition. Some highlights from the Indiana Logistics Directory include: • A complete list of Indiana’s rankings in 33 logistics categories generated from the most recent reports by the Association of American Railroads, Federal Aviation Administration, Federal Highway Administration, Texas Transportation Institute, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce and U.S. Department of Transportation. • A state for all modes: Indiana ranked 1st for number of pass-though interstates, 3rd in number of freight railroads, 7th in domestic waterborne shipping and is one of only eight states with multiple airports in the top 50 for air cargo – the Indianapolis airport comes in 6th ahead of JFK and O’Hare, and Fort Wayne is ranked 32nd. Indianapolis is also home to the world’s second largest FedEx air hub, which recently completed a $300 million expansion. • Infrastructure for miles and miles…: Indiana ranks 5th in local rail miles, 9th in total rail miles, 12th in interstate miles and has 400 miles of navigable waterways on the Ohio River and Lake Michigan. • Home of the logistics experts: Indiana ranks 3rd in freight railroads, 6th in largest airports, 10th in trucking companies and has more than 250,000 Hoosiers employed by logistics firms with another 75,000 working in logistics jobs at manufacturing companies. For logistics employment, Indiana ranks 8th in trucking, 9th in freight rail and 12th in transportation/ warehousing. To view all of Indiana’s top 10 logistics ratings, visit www.indianalogistics.com. www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 7


2009 INDIANA LOGISTICS DIRECTORY

(Below) Emily Otto-Tice speaks at the 2009 Indiana Logistics Summit.

2009 INDIANA

LOGISTICS DIRECTORY WWW.INDIANALOGISTICS.COM

INDIANA

A GLOBAL LEADER IN LOGISTICS State earns top 10 ranking in 33 logistics categories (Complete list on page 5)

Strategic planning expert challenges Indiana to think globally Page 8

Indiana Secretary of Commerce touts state’s speed to market Page 14

2009 INDIANA LOGISTICS DIRECTORY ANNOUNCES STATE’S LOGISTICS RANKINGS Vincennes University launches new supply-chain management program Page 16

WWW. INDIANALOGISTICS.COM

LOGISTICS LEADER

(Above) Ron Foxcroft, logistics company owner, former NCAA referee and inventor of the Fox 40 whistle, emphasizes the importance of creativity to carry business through rough patches during his keynote address at the 2009 Indiana Logistics Summit.

2009 SUMMIT AND DIRECTORY SHOWCASE INDIANA’S LOGISTICS POWER State ranks in top 10 for over 30 categories of freight logistics The Hoosier state ranks in the top 10 in 33 logistics categories according to the 2009 Indiana Logistics Directory which was unveiled at the state’s September logistics summit. Nearly half of Indiana’s rankings are in the top five and only three other states can claim more than 30 top 10 rankings in these categories. “The numbers give solid evidence to what most of us already know,” said Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper. “Indiana is clearly a logistics leader.” The Indiana Logistics Summit and the Indiana Logistics Directory are a part of an initiative by the Ports of Indiana and its partners to increase awareness of the state’s logistics advantages on a statewide, regional and national level. The summit began in 2003 and the directory was first published the following year. The 2009 summit was again co-hosted by the Ports of Indiana and Purdue University. Now in its seventh year, the event brings together top officials from business, academia and government to discuss how to make Indiana’s transportation, distribution and logistics businesses more competitive and to provide firsthand accounts of how they see the state moving forward in the supply-chain sector. The 2009 event featured industry outlooks from all modes of transportation as well as presentations by Indiana Secretary of Commerce Mitch Roob and keynote speaker Ron Foxcroft, a logistics entrepreneur, an NCAA basketball referee and the inventor, manufacturer and worldwide distributor of the most popular whistle on the planet. Speakers addressed the economic downturn head-on with topics like unlocking supply chain productivity and logistics leadership in a tough economy. Eli Lilly & Co.’s Director of Supply Chain Ron Bohl provided an inside look at the company’s complex global supply chain. Lilly must manage 420 dosage formulations in human and animal health 6 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

(Left) The 2009 Indiana Logistics Summit included a booth area where attendees could network and meet with exhibitors including Indiana Economic Development Corp., Vincennes University, UPS and more. Roughly one-third of 2009 survey respondents cited networking opportunities as the most valuable part of the summit.

products, each with varying technologies, protection measures and lifecycles made by 21 manufacturing sites and 92 contract manufacturers. “In a downturn, it’s easy to forget about the basics in supply chain processes and all of a sudden stop doing them,” said Bohl. “It doesn’t take much to lose credibility, but it does take a heck of a lot to get it back.” Another popular session covered the importance of infrastructure to logistics. Based around a recent study of agriculture logistics, the session looked at how closing one small town bridge can influence a region’s economy. “For Indiana agriculture, transportation infrastructure is vitally important to move our grains and products to market,” said Emily Otto-Tice, director of grain marketing with the Indiana Soybean Alliance and the Indiana Corn Marketing Council. “It also gives us competitive advantage in the global marketplace. We must be able to maintain and upgrade our transportation infrastructure, which includes roads, rail and waterways, to meet the world’s growing demand for food, feed and fiber.”

The summit also introduced a new service for supply-chain professionals to get their resume in front of potential employers in an online searchable database available at www.indianalogistics.com. “Past summits have proven to provide a fertile networking environment,” Cooper said. “That history coupled with recent inquiries from those wishing to attend this year’s event prompted us to create this service. Hopefully this will help put together qualified logistics professionals with companies looking for good employees.” The summit attracted participants from 10 states and 56 different cities – the largest portion from Indianapolis (45 percent). Approximately 67 percent of attendees came from the business sector, while government and university officials each represented about 12 percent and economic development leaders made up 9 percent. The most well-represented sectors of private industry were: ports, logistics, consulting, engineering, railroad, trucking, agricultural, manufacturing, financial, package delivery, legal, retail, real estate, media, security, staffing, packaging and barge shipping. Plans are underway for the eighth annual Indiana Logistics Summit to be held in the fall of 2010. Visit www.indianalogistics.com for updates.

The 2009 Indiana Logistics Directory features perspectives from logistics experts and more than 2,000 business listings in 38 logistics-related categories. Preparations for the 2010 edition are underway now. Visit www.indianalogistics.com for more information and to download or order a copy of the 2009 edition. Some highlights from the Indiana Logistics Directory include: • A complete list of Indiana’s rankings in 33 logistics categories generated from the most recent reports by the Association of American Railroads, Federal Aviation Administration, Federal Highway Administration, Texas Transportation Institute, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Department of Commerce and U.S. Department of Transportation. • A state for all modes: Indiana ranked 1st for number of pass-though interstates, 3rd in number of freight railroads, 7th in domestic waterborne shipping and is one of only eight states with multiple airports in the top 50 for air cargo – the Indianapolis airport comes in 6th ahead of JFK and O’Hare, and Fort Wayne is ranked 32nd. Indianapolis is also home to the world’s second largest FedEx air hub, which recently completed a $300 million expansion. • Infrastructure for miles and miles…: Indiana ranks 5th in local rail miles, 9th in total rail miles, 12th in interstate miles and has 400 miles of navigable waterways on the Ohio River and Lake Michigan. • Home of the logistics experts: Indiana ranks 3rd in freight railroads, 6th in largest airports, 10th in trucking companies and has more than 250,000 Hoosiers employed by logistics firms with another 75,000 working in logistics jobs at manufacturing companies. For logistics employment, Indiana ranks 8th in trucking, 9th in freight rail and 12th in transportation/ warehousing. To view all of Indiana’s top 10 logistics ratings, visit www.indianalogistics.com. www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 7


Environmental issues are very important to the Ports of Indiana. As a port authority, the Ports of Indiana has the dual responsibility of protecting and enhancing our environment while building infrastructure that facilitates economic development.

Enviro•Focus

Ken Kaczmarek

Marvin Ferguson Ramon Arredondo

David Fagan

H.C. “Bud” Farmer

Greg Gibson

Phil McCauley

Jay Potesta

Commission receives special briefing on Corps lock repairs and river shipments at Jeffersonville meeting Proposed streamlined FTZ process, warehouse repairs approved for ports JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. – The Ports of Indiana commission heard updates on river shipping and the Markland Locks and Dam repairs at its Oct. 22 meeting in Jeffersonville City Hall. The commission also approved a new Foreign-Trade Zone framework and awarded funds for warehouse repairs at Burns Harbor. Eugene Dowell, operations manager for locks and dams with the Louisville District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, reported that the broken lock gate had been retrieved from the river bottom and was in the process of being repaired, but no timetable has yet been established for getting the main lock working again. New gates were scheduled to be installed in 2011, but that construction process has been accelerated by nine months. Matt Smolek, the new port director at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville, made a presentation to the commission about the economics of the inland waterways system, as well as the environmental and safety benefits of waterborne transportation. In Ports of Indiana business, the commission approved the submittal of an “Alternative Site Framework” application for Foreign-Trade Zone #152 at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor. This new designation, recently created by the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones board, allows zone grantees, such as the Ports of Indiana, to streamline the application process for companies applying for FTZ designation. The commission also awarded $56,604 to Larson Danielson Construction Co. of LaPorte, Ind., for roof repairs to the dry bulk warehouse building at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor. The project will repair steel roof panels that are showing signs of corrosion.

Making lime “green” Carmeuse Lime & Stone leads efforts to reduce green house gases By Pedro A. Maiz, Corporate Process Engineer Carmeuse Lime & Stone

The lime industry, like many others, generates green house gases. But working to reduce those emissions and be environmentally responsible has been part of the Carmeuse culture for years. The company has committed to reduce its energy usage 9 percent by 2012, and a large percentage of Carmeuse’s products are also used to better the environment in other industries, such as flue gas desulphurization for power plants or removing contaminants in water treatment. In September, the EPA issued new regulations that require many industries to start tracking and reporting green house gas emissions. Carmeuse is ahead of the game since it has been voluntarily tracking CO2 emissions since 2002. In order to further reduce emissions, Carmeuse has focused on reducing fossil fuel consumption by using more alternative fuels and making processes more efficient. This requires everyone in the company to be involved and, in many cases, new capital has been invested to make processes more fuel efficient. Carmeuse’s environmental initiatives include: · Alternative fuels that reduce waste going into landfills · Switching processes to natural gas which emits less CO2 than typical fossil fuels

Carmeuse Lime & Stone provides high-quality lime, limestone and industrial sand products for diverse applications in steel manufacturing, utilities, construction, water/waste treatments and other industries throughout the U.S. and Canada. It has a network of 35 plants, including one at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor. www.carmeuse.com

· · ·

Using biomass fuels to reduce our carbon footprint Burning waste fuel that has less CO2 content than coal Burning cocoa shells from chocolate manufacturers, sawdust and oil impregnated filter fluff · Using alternative fuels for driers at quarries/sands plants and biodiesel at underground mines The implementation of alternative fuels can be a challenge but Carmeuse is committed to increase its use at all facilities. The lime industry will not be able to completely eliminate green house gases but Carmeuse is taking responsibility and putting great efforts to reduce them. Another way that Carmeuse has taken environmental responsibility is by creating a team to inform employees about green house gases. The training focuses on reducing emissions at work and home. Carmeuse believes that everyone should be informed about how their actions impact the environment and the future. The culture of the company has always held environmental concerns and safety as its highest priorities.

The broken gate is being lifted off the river bottom for cleaning and repair at the Markland Locks and Dam.

Governor reappoints Arredondo, McCauley to ports commission Gov. Mitch Daniels has reappointed Ports of Indiana commissioners Ramon Arredondo of Crown Point, Ind., and Phil McCauley of Jeffersonville, Ind. Gov. Daniels first appointed Arredondo to serve on the commission in 2006. An East Chicago native, Arredondo was employed by Inland Steel Co. until entering the U.S. Army where he served during the Vietnam conflict. He also served on the East Chicago Police Department. Arredondo earned both his B.A. in Criminal Justice and his master’s degree in Public Policy at University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla. Arredondo has worked in both the business and government sectors, including a stint as district director for Congressman Peter J. Visclosky. Prior to retirement in December 2005, he was employed by NiSource as assistant to the chairman. Arredondo served on the board of directors of the local, state and regional chapters of the American Heart Association, Boy Scouts of America Calumet Council as well as numerous utility related organizations. He and his wife Trisha recently wrote a book, “Maria’s Journey,” which will be published in 2010. He has two children and eight grandchildren. McCauley was first appointed to the Ports of Indiana 8 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

commission by Gov. Mitch Daniels in 2007. Born in Madison, Ind., McCauley has been a Jeffersonville resident since 1966. Named one of Jeffersonville’s most influential people of the last 50 years during the city’s bicentennial, McCauley and his wife Sandy have four children and nine grandchildren. A graduate of St. Joseph’s College in Rensselaer, Ind., McCauley is the former managing partner of the regional accounting firm, McCauley Nicolas and Co., CPAs. After his retirement from public accounting, McCauley was instrumental in building Great Escape Theatres into one of the largest and most successful movie theater chains in the eastern U.S. McCauley has served his Jeffersonville community in several capacities including deputy mayor, director of redevelopment and city councilman. He serves today on the board of directors of Perrin Family Park Foundation and is chairman of the St. ElizabethCatholic Charities Council. “The governor’s reappointment of Ray and Phil to our board is great news for the Ports of Indiana,” says Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper. “Both of these men have a passion for our business and each has made substantial contributions since joining our distinguished group of commissioners.”

Main Terminal & General Office… 4600 East 15th Avenue · Gary, Indiana 46403

219-938-7020 · 800-426-1827 · Fax: 219-938-6866

Lakes and Rivers Transfer, experts withing the entire spectrum of bulk cargo handling. Lakes and Rivers Transfer, a division of Jack Gray Transport, Inc.

115 Steel Dr., Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9280 Fax: 219-787-8511 Located at The Port of Indiana · Burns International Harbor

www.jackgray.com

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 9


Environmental issues are very important to the Ports of Indiana. As a port authority, the Ports of Indiana has the dual responsibility of protecting and enhancing our environment while building infrastructure that facilitates economic development.

Enviro•Focus

Ken Kaczmarek

Marvin Ferguson Ramon Arredondo

David Fagan

H.C. “Bud” Farmer

Greg Gibson

Phil McCauley

Jay Potesta

Commission receives special briefing on Corps lock repairs and river shipments at Jeffersonville meeting Proposed streamlined FTZ process, warehouse repairs approved for ports JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. – The Ports of Indiana commission heard updates on river shipping and the Markland Locks and Dam repairs at its Oct. 22 meeting in Jeffersonville City Hall. The commission also approved a new Foreign-Trade Zone framework and awarded funds for warehouse repairs at Burns Harbor. Eugene Dowell, operations manager for locks and dams with the Louisville District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, reported that the broken lock gate had been retrieved from the river bottom and was in the process of being repaired, but no timetable has yet been established for getting the main lock working again. New gates were scheduled to be installed in 2011, but that construction process has been accelerated by nine months. Matt Smolek, the new port director at the Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville, made a presentation to the commission about the economics of the inland waterways system, as well as the environmental and safety benefits of waterborne transportation. In Ports of Indiana business, the commission approved the submittal of an “Alternative Site Framework” application for Foreign-Trade Zone #152 at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor. This new designation, recently created by the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones board, allows zone grantees, such as the Ports of Indiana, to streamline the application process for companies applying for FTZ designation. The commission also awarded $56,604 to Larson Danielson Construction Co. of LaPorte, Ind., for roof repairs to the dry bulk warehouse building at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor. The project will repair steel roof panels that are showing signs of corrosion.

Making lime “green” Carmeuse Lime & Stone leads efforts to reduce green house gases By Pedro A. Maiz, Corporate Process Engineer Carmeuse Lime & Stone

The lime industry, like many others, generates green house gases. But working to reduce those emissions and be environmentally responsible has been part of the Carmeuse culture for years. The company has committed to reduce its energy usage 9 percent by 2012, and a large percentage of Carmeuse’s products are also used to better the environment in other industries, such as flue gas desulphurization for power plants or removing contaminants in water treatment. In September, the EPA issued new regulations that require many industries to start tracking and reporting green house gas emissions. Carmeuse is ahead of the game since it has been voluntarily tracking CO2 emissions since 2002. In order to further reduce emissions, Carmeuse has focused on reducing fossil fuel consumption by using more alternative fuels and making processes more efficient. This requires everyone in the company to be involved and, in many cases, new capital has been invested to make processes more fuel efficient. Carmeuse’s environmental initiatives include: · Alternative fuels that reduce waste going into landfills · Switching processes to natural gas which emits less CO2 than typical fossil fuels

Carmeuse Lime & Stone provides high-quality lime, limestone and industrial sand products for diverse applications in steel manufacturing, utilities, construction, water/waste treatments and other industries throughout the U.S. and Canada. It has a network of 35 plants, including one at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor. www.carmeuse.com

· · ·

Using biomass fuels to reduce our carbon footprint Burning waste fuel that has less CO2 content than coal Burning cocoa shells from chocolate manufacturers, sawdust and oil impregnated filter fluff · Using alternative fuels for driers at quarries/sands plants and biodiesel at underground mines The implementation of alternative fuels can be a challenge but Carmeuse is committed to increase its use at all facilities. The lime industry will not be able to completely eliminate green house gases but Carmeuse is taking responsibility and putting great efforts to reduce them. Another way that Carmeuse has taken environmental responsibility is by creating a team to inform employees about green house gases. The training focuses on reducing emissions at work and home. Carmeuse believes that everyone should be informed about how their actions impact the environment and the future. The culture of the company has always held environmental concerns and safety as its highest priorities.

The broken gate is being lifted off the river bottom for cleaning and repair at the Markland Locks and Dam.

Governor reappoints Arredondo, McCauley to ports commission Gov. Mitch Daniels has reappointed Ports of Indiana commissioners Ramon Arredondo of Crown Point, Ind., and Phil McCauley of Jeffersonville, Ind. Gov. Daniels first appointed Arredondo to serve on the commission in 2006. An East Chicago native, Arredondo was employed by Inland Steel Co. until entering the U.S. Army where he served during the Vietnam conflict. He also served on the East Chicago Police Department. Arredondo earned both his B.A. in Criminal Justice and his master’s degree in Public Policy at University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla. Arredondo has worked in both the business and government sectors, including a stint as district director for Congressman Peter J. Visclosky. Prior to retirement in December 2005, he was employed by NiSource as assistant to the chairman. Arredondo served on the board of directors of the local, state and regional chapters of the American Heart Association, Boy Scouts of America Calumet Council as well as numerous utility related organizations. He and his wife Trisha recently wrote a book, “Maria’s Journey,” which will be published in 2010. He has two children and eight grandchildren. McCauley was first appointed to the Ports of Indiana 8 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

commission by Gov. Mitch Daniels in 2007. Born in Madison, Ind., McCauley has been a Jeffersonville resident since 1966. Named one of Jeffersonville’s most influential people of the last 50 years during the city’s bicentennial, McCauley and his wife Sandy have four children and nine grandchildren. A graduate of St. Joseph’s College in Rensselaer, Ind., McCauley is the former managing partner of the regional accounting firm, McCauley Nicolas and Co., CPAs. After his retirement from public accounting, McCauley was instrumental in building Great Escape Theatres into one of the largest and most successful movie theater chains in the eastern U.S. McCauley has served his Jeffersonville community in several capacities including deputy mayor, director of redevelopment and city councilman. He serves today on the board of directors of Perrin Family Park Foundation and is chairman of the St. ElizabethCatholic Charities Council. “The governor’s reappointment of Ray and Phil to our board is great news for the Ports of Indiana,” says Ports of Indiana CEO Rich Cooper. “Both of these men have a passion for our business and each has made substantial contributions since joining our distinguished group of commissioners.”

Main Terminal & General Office… 4600 East 15th Avenue · Gary, Indiana 46403

219-938-7020 · 800-426-1827 · Fax: 219-938-6866

Lakes and Rivers Transfer, experts withing the entire spectrum of bulk cargo handling. Lakes and Rivers Transfer, a division of Jack Gray Transport, Inc.

115 Steel Dr., Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9280 Fax: 219-787-8511 Located at The Port of Indiana · Burns International Harbor

www.jackgray.com

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 9


PORT REPORT

PORT REPORT

Peter Laman Port Director

Phil Wilzbacher Port Director

PORT OF INDIANA – BURNS HARBOR

PORT OF INDIANA – MOUNT VERNON

Port handles 220-ton cyclotron for cancer treatment center

Cimbar Perfomance Minerals joins Mount Vernon port

In September, a 220-ton cancer-fighting cyclotron made its way from Belgium to Warrenville, Ill., by way of the Port of IndianaBurns Harbor. Currently, there are only six facilities in the nation using this type of proton therapy equipment. Measuring 8-feet-high and 18-foot in diameter, the cyclotron traveled from Antwerp to the port on a cargo ship operated by Fednav. The port regularly handles unique project cargoes with mobile cranes that have 185-ton lift capacity. The cyclotron was moved in two pieces on 19-axle, 180-foot-long trailers and traveled at a top speed of 40 mph for the 130-mile trip to Illinois. The cyclotron uses proton therapy for cancer treatment as an alternative to traditional radiation. With traditional radiation, healthy tissue near the cancer can be damaged. Proton therapy can be much more specific in delivering treatment. Not only can this beam of treatment be adjusted for a specific depth, it also can be shaped to conform to a tumor’s distinct size and shape, minimizing damage to healthy cells. The cyclotron will be part of the new Central DuPage Hospital Proton Therapy Center, just outside of Naperville, Ill. A partnership between the hospital and ProCure Treatment Centers, the 60,000-square-foot facility is set to open in the spring and the cyclotron should be treating patients by early 2011. The new cancer facility will be capable of treating 1,500 patients a year.

The largest producer of barium sulfate products in the world, Cimbar Performance Minerals, has joined the family of businesses at the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon. In October, the company acquired previous port tenant Barretts Minerals Inc.’s multi-mineral processing plant and all associated business operations. In addition to barium sulfate products, used in the industrial, pharmaceutical and paint industries, Cimbar produces magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, iron oxide and other industrial minerals. With this acquisition, Cimbar has added talc and new calcium carbonate product lines, including Barretts Minerals’ trademarked Ultratalc®, a highly pure form of talc used in food, pharmaceuticals and body powders, as well as Microtuff® and Microtalc®, both used in automotive and appliance parts. According to company officials, no products will be discontinued at this facility but new products from the Cimbar line will be added to production with emphasis on the talc lines. The port location will join Cimbar’s other U.S. production facilities located in Postosi, Mo., Chatsworth, Ga., Houston, Texas, and Cartersville, Ga., also home to the corporate headquarters. With the recent acquisition, Paul Householder was named plant manager of Cimbar Performance Minerals. A native of Reed, Ky., he started at Barretts Minerals in 2003 in automation controls. Most recently, Householder was Barretts’ maintenance manager.

Hoosier Healthcare under new ownership

Port tenant Hoosier Healthcare Northwest is under new ownership. I’d like to welcome new owner Don Kiger, who took over the facility in the spring. Don comes from a diverse business background in sales, management and marketing that includes both the healthcare and automotive industries. He plans on building on Hoosier Healthcare’s reputation of occupational medicine, wellness and urgent care with personalized service. He’s expanded the business to include a new location in Valparaiso and has partnered with Fagan Pharmacy on an in-pharmacy clinic. Hoosier Healthcare has also started a new program called “Health eAccess.” Designed for those with no health insurance or 10 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

Cyclotrons, like the one pictured above, target proton therapy to the specific size and depth of a tumor, minimizing damage to healthy cells. Photos supplied by ProCure Treatment Centers Inc.

those with a high deductible, the program allows unlimited urgent care visits for a monthly fee.

Promotions at Federal Marine Terminals

After 35 years at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor, Vic Klancer has been promoted to general manager of Federal Marine Terminals (FMT) Milwaukee. He has been a fixture here since 1974, working with six different companies, including Tri-State Terminals, Burns Harbor Terminals and Jack Gray Transport. His most recent position was FMT’s operations manager. Ken Peterson has stepped in as FMT’s operations manager at Burns Harbor after serving as vessel superintendent since 2007. A 2000 graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Peterson started with FMT right out of college with positions at the Albany, N.Y., and Milwaukee terminals before coming to Burns Harbor. Contact Peter Laman at (219) 787-5101; plaman@portsofindiana.com

Port shipments ahead of 2008

Through October, year-to-date tonnage at the port is up nearly 23 percent over 2008’s figures. It has been a solid year for steel, with shipments now five times higher than this time last year.

There have also been significant increases in coal (45 percent) and minerals (23 percent). We expect overall tonnage for the year will end up about 18 percent above 2008.

Sally Denning joins port staff

I’d like to introduce a new face in our office. Sally Denning joined the port as administrative assistant in October. She is a familiar face around the area thanks to her work with the Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana-Posey County and the Posey County Economic Development Partnership Inc. Denning graduated Sally Denning from Mount Ports of Indiana Vernon Senior High School and studied economic development at Ball State University. She and her husband Phillip have been married for 25 years and have two sons, Nathanial, 21, and Austin, 13. Denning is an active member of Point Township Church of the Nazarene. Her economic development experience and extensive community knowledge will be a great addition to our team. Contact Phil Wilzbacher at (812) 833-2166; pwilzbacher@portsofindiana.com

(Left) Year-to-date coal tonnage is up 45 percent more than 2008 through October at the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon.

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 11


PORT REPORT

PORT REPORT

Peter Laman Port Director

Phil Wilzbacher Port Director

PORT OF INDIANA – BURNS HARBOR

PORT OF INDIANA – MOUNT VERNON

Port handles 220-ton cyclotron for cancer treatment center

Cimbar Perfomance Minerals joins Mount Vernon port

In September, a 220-ton cancer-fighting cyclotron made its way from Belgium to Warrenville, Ill., by way of the Port of IndianaBurns Harbor. Currently, there are only six facilities in the nation using this type of proton therapy equipment. Measuring 8-feet-high and 18-foot in diameter, the cyclotron traveled from Antwerp to the port on a cargo ship operated by Fednav. The port regularly handles unique project cargoes with mobile cranes that have 185-ton lift capacity. The cyclotron was moved in two pieces on 19-axle, 180-foot-long trailers and traveled at a top speed of 40 mph for the 130-mile trip to Illinois. The cyclotron uses proton therapy for cancer treatment as an alternative to traditional radiation. With traditional radiation, healthy tissue near the cancer can be damaged. Proton therapy can be much more specific in delivering treatment. Not only can this beam of treatment be adjusted for a specific depth, it also can be shaped to conform to a tumor’s distinct size and shape, minimizing damage to healthy cells. The cyclotron will be part of the new Central DuPage Hospital Proton Therapy Center, just outside of Naperville, Ill. A partnership between the hospital and ProCure Treatment Centers, the 60,000-square-foot facility is set to open in the spring and the cyclotron should be treating patients by early 2011. The new cancer facility will be capable of treating 1,500 patients a year.

The largest producer of barium sulfate products in the world, Cimbar Performance Minerals, has joined the family of businesses at the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon. In October, the company acquired previous port tenant Barretts Minerals Inc.’s multi-mineral processing plant and all associated business operations. In addition to barium sulfate products, used in the industrial, pharmaceutical and paint industries, Cimbar produces magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, iron oxide and other industrial minerals. With this acquisition, Cimbar has added talc and new calcium carbonate product lines, including Barretts Minerals’ trademarked Ultratalc®, a highly pure form of talc used in food, pharmaceuticals and body powders, as well as Microtuff® and Microtalc®, both used in automotive and appliance parts. According to company officials, no products will be discontinued at this facility but new products from the Cimbar line will be added to production with emphasis on the talc lines. The port location will join Cimbar’s other U.S. production facilities located in Postosi, Mo., Chatsworth, Ga., Houston, Texas, and Cartersville, Ga., also home to the corporate headquarters. With the recent acquisition, Paul Householder was named plant manager of Cimbar Performance Minerals. A native of Reed, Ky., he started at Barretts Minerals in 2003 in automation controls. Most recently, Householder was Barretts’ maintenance manager.

Hoosier Healthcare under new ownership

Port tenant Hoosier Healthcare Northwest is under new ownership. I’d like to welcome new owner Don Kiger, who took over the facility in the spring. Don comes from a diverse business background in sales, management and marketing that includes both the healthcare and automotive industries. He plans on building on Hoosier Healthcare’s reputation of occupational medicine, wellness and urgent care with personalized service. He’s expanded the business to include a new location in Valparaiso and has partnered with Fagan Pharmacy on an in-pharmacy clinic. Hoosier Healthcare has also started a new program called “Health eAccess.” Designed for those with no health insurance or 10 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

Cyclotrons, like the one pictured above, target proton therapy to the specific size and depth of a tumor, minimizing damage to healthy cells. Photos supplied by ProCure Treatment Centers Inc.

those with a high deductible, the program allows unlimited urgent care visits for a monthly fee.

Promotions at Federal Marine Terminals

After 35 years at the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor, Vic Klancer has been promoted to general manager of Federal Marine Terminals (FMT) Milwaukee. He has been a fixture here since 1974, working with six different companies, including Tri-State Terminals, Burns Harbor Terminals and Jack Gray Transport. His most recent position was FMT’s operations manager. Ken Peterson has stepped in as FMT’s operations manager at Burns Harbor after serving as vessel superintendent since 2007. A 2000 graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, Peterson started with FMT right out of college with positions at the Albany, N.Y., and Milwaukee terminals before coming to Burns Harbor. Contact Peter Laman at (219) 787-5101; plaman@portsofindiana.com

Port shipments ahead of 2008

Through October, year-to-date tonnage at the port is up nearly 23 percent over 2008’s figures. It has been a solid year for steel, with shipments now five times higher than this time last year.

There have also been significant increases in coal (45 percent) and minerals (23 percent). We expect overall tonnage for the year will end up about 18 percent above 2008.

Sally Denning joins port staff

I’d like to introduce a new face in our office. Sally Denning joined the port as administrative assistant in October. She is a familiar face around the area thanks to her work with the Chamber of Commerce of Southwest Indiana-Posey County and the Posey County Economic Development Partnership Inc. Denning graduated Sally Denning from Mount Ports of Indiana Vernon Senior High School and studied economic development at Ball State University. She and her husband Phillip have been married for 25 years and have two sons, Nathanial, 21, and Austin, 13. Denning is an active member of Point Township Church of the Nazarene. Her economic development experience and extensive community knowledge will be a great addition to our team. Contact Phil Wilzbacher at (812) 833-2166; pwilzbacher@portsofindiana.com

(Left) Year-to-date coal tonnage is up 45 percent more than 2008 through October at the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon.

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 11


(Right) Under the new “Alternative Site Framework” designation, manufacturing plants within an FTZ’s service area can use a streamlined application process to become a zone site.

PORT REPORT Matt Smolek Port Director

PORT OF INDIANA – JEFFERSONVILLE

David Haniford General Counsel

Jody Peacock Director of Corporate Affairs

Waterways play key role in region’s economy

“Alternative site” distinction creates new opportunities for FTZs

When goods are moving smoothly The effects of the recent failure at the on the riverways, it is easy to overlook the Markland Locks and Dam illustrate the significance of the inland waterways system. importance of our inland waterways. These Yet when infrastructure breakdowns happen, 12,000 miles of commercially navigable it becomes clear that the impact reaches far channels and 240 locks serve 38 of the 48 beyond the maritime industry – it also affects mainland states. Barges serve not only the business, the environment and society. industrial and agricultural centers within the nation’s borders, but also distribute imports and exports from gateway ports on the Gulf New face at Idemitsu Coast and the Great Lakes. Port tenant Idemitsu has a new More than 584 million tons are shipped vice president and general manager of annually on the inland waterways. Coal is the administration. Nobuyuki Onishi is largest commodity on the riverways, making charged with overseeing the lubricant up 33 percent of the tonnage followed by processing plant and business at the Port petroleum (27 percent), crude materials of Indiana-Jeffersonville. Onishi has been (19 percent) and agriculture (12 percent). with Idemitsu for nearly 25 years. Prior to Chemicals and manufactured goods each The inland waterways system ships more than accepting this assignment, he was senior 584 million tons annually to 38 states. comprise less than 10 percent of cargoes. manager of planning and coordination of Within the inland waterways, the overseas operations. He arrived from Tokyo Mississippi River moves 40 percent of in July to assume his new role. all cargoes while the Ohio River is nearly as busy with about 32 Onishi said his plans are to double the percent. The Gulf Intracoastal handles 16 percent and the Tennessee production and sales of the Jeffersonville and Illinois Rivers move 7 and 5 percent, respectively. facility within the next five years. Idemitsu The benefits of moving cargoes on the inland waterways go is a world leader in lubricants, petroleum beyond economic. Transporting freight by water is the most energyand energy production and is working to efficient method. Barges can move one ton of cargo 576 miles per enhance its presence in North America. gallon of fuel. A rail car would move the same ton of cargo 413 When not working, Onishi enjoys miles and a truck only 155 miles. Another environmental benefit cooking traditional Japanese food, reading of water transportation is the reduction of highway congestion. A and playing golf. His wife, Ikuko, and single 15-barge tow can move the equivalent of 900 truckloads and twin 13-year-old sons, Naoto and Takuma, Nobuyuki Onishi unlike current highways, our inland rivers have much capacity for continue to reside in Tokyo while he is here Idemitsu Lubricants growth. Inland waterways transportation is also the least dangerous building the Idemitsu business. mode by injury record when compared to rail or truck. For each injury involving barge transportation, there are 125 injuries related Contact Matt Smolek at (812) 283-9662; msmolek@portsofindiana.com to rail and 2,172 truck-related injuries.

In January, the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones Board introduced a new designation available to grantee’s, such as the Ports of Indiana. The “Alternative Site Framework” (ASF) designation makes the application for expansion of FTZ sites much easier. As you may know, foreign-trade zones are restricted-access areas that are considered outside of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol territory. Companies within FTZ sites may be entitled to reduce or delay the payment of customs duties on foreign products brought into a zone, thus making the company more cost-competitive with overseas facilities. As grantee for three FTZs – #152, #170 and #177 – Ports of Indiana will have greater flexibility in adding new companies to each of its zones using the ASF. Once an ASF application is approved, companies within the multi-county service area may take advantage of the ASF designation. Previously, this was regulated to areas within the port or a few select areas nearby. With the establishment of each zone’s service areas, the ASF designation and its streamlined application requirements, companies can be added to an FTZ within approximately 30 days. Previously, the application process for the expansion of a zone took about a year from start to finish. One of the first steps required for application of the ASF designation is the establishment of the zone’s service area. A requirement for inclusion in the service area is adjacency to a customs port of entry. Through the customs ports of entry, U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforce import and export laws, federal government regulations and immigration policy. The adjacency requirement is defined as being a site within 60 miles or 90-minutes drive time from the port of entry. The Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor’s customs port of entry is located at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. The Port of IndianaJeffersonville and the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon ports of entry are Louisville and Owensboro, KY-Evansville, Ind., respectively. The service areas will be made up of individual counties that meet the adjacency requirements and each of these counties must approve its inclusion in a zone’s service area.

12 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

One of the new changes the ASF designation brings is time limits for activation of a zone site. Before, there were no time limits. For existing zone sites, there is a five year limit on magnet sites if no portion is activated. For new individual expanded sites, the time limit for activation and utilization of the zone site is three years. If these deadlines are not met, the site will lose zone status. However, the ASF designation provides that a site’s zone status may be reinstated within 30 days. Currently, the Ports of Indiana is in the process of filing an ASF application with the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones Board for Burns Harbor. Applications for Mount Vernon and Jeffersonville ports will soon follow. Contact Jody Peacock at (317) 233-6225; jpeacock@portsofindiana.com Contact David Haniford (317) 232-9204; dhaniford@portsofindiana.com

Foreign-Trade Zone #152

Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor 6625 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 (219) 787-8636

Foreign-Trade Zone #170 Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville 5100 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 283-9662

Foreign-Trade Zone #177

Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon 2751 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 (812) 838-4382

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 13


(Right) Under the new “Alternative Site Framework” designation, manufacturing plants within an FTZ’s service area can use a streamlined application process to become a zone site.

PORT REPORT Matt Smolek Port Director

PORT OF INDIANA – JEFFERSONVILLE

David Haniford General Counsel

Jody Peacock Director of Corporate Affairs

Waterways play key role in region’s economy

“Alternative site” distinction creates new opportunities for FTZs

When goods are moving smoothly The effects of the recent failure at the on the riverways, it is easy to overlook the Markland Locks and Dam illustrate the significance of the inland waterways system. importance of our inland waterways. These Yet when infrastructure breakdowns happen, 12,000 miles of commercially navigable it becomes clear that the impact reaches far channels and 240 locks serve 38 of the 48 beyond the maritime industry – it also affects mainland states. Barges serve not only the business, the environment and society. industrial and agricultural centers within the nation’s borders, but also distribute imports and exports from gateway ports on the Gulf New face at Idemitsu Coast and the Great Lakes. Port tenant Idemitsu has a new More than 584 million tons are shipped vice president and general manager of annually on the inland waterways. Coal is the administration. Nobuyuki Onishi is largest commodity on the riverways, making charged with overseeing the lubricant up 33 percent of the tonnage followed by processing plant and business at the Port petroleum (27 percent), crude materials of Indiana-Jeffersonville. Onishi has been (19 percent) and agriculture (12 percent). with Idemitsu for nearly 25 years. Prior to Chemicals and manufactured goods each The inland waterways system ships more than accepting this assignment, he was senior 584 million tons annually to 38 states. comprise less than 10 percent of cargoes. manager of planning and coordination of Within the inland waterways, the overseas operations. He arrived from Tokyo Mississippi River moves 40 percent of in July to assume his new role. all cargoes while the Ohio River is nearly as busy with about 32 Onishi said his plans are to double the percent. The Gulf Intracoastal handles 16 percent and the Tennessee production and sales of the Jeffersonville and Illinois Rivers move 7 and 5 percent, respectively. facility within the next five years. Idemitsu The benefits of moving cargoes on the inland waterways go is a world leader in lubricants, petroleum beyond economic. Transporting freight by water is the most energyand energy production and is working to efficient method. Barges can move one ton of cargo 576 miles per enhance its presence in North America. gallon of fuel. A rail car would move the same ton of cargo 413 When not working, Onishi enjoys miles and a truck only 155 miles. Another environmental benefit cooking traditional Japanese food, reading of water transportation is the reduction of highway congestion. A and playing golf. His wife, Ikuko, and single 15-barge tow can move the equivalent of 900 truckloads and twin 13-year-old sons, Naoto and Takuma, Nobuyuki Onishi unlike current highways, our inland rivers have much capacity for continue to reside in Tokyo while he is here Idemitsu Lubricants growth. Inland waterways transportation is also the least dangerous building the Idemitsu business. mode by injury record when compared to rail or truck. For each injury involving barge transportation, there are 125 injuries related Contact Matt Smolek at (812) 283-9662; msmolek@portsofindiana.com to rail and 2,172 truck-related injuries.

In January, the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones Board introduced a new designation available to grantee’s, such as the Ports of Indiana. The “Alternative Site Framework” (ASF) designation makes the application for expansion of FTZ sites much easier. As you may know, foreign-trade zones are restricted-access areas that are considered outside of U.S. Customs and Border Patrol territory. Companies within FTZ sites may be entitled to reduce or delay the payment of customs duties on foreign products brought into a zone, thus making the company more cost-competitive with overseas facilities. As grantee for three FTZs – #152, #170 and #177 – Ports of Indiana will have greater flexibility in adding new companies to each of its zones using the ASF. Once an ASF application is approved, companies within the multi-county service area may take advantage of the ASF designation. Previously, this was regulated to areas within the port or a few select areas nearby. With the establishment of each zone’s service areas, the ASF designation and its streamlined application requirements, companies can be added to an FTZ within approximately 30 days. Previously, the application process for the expansion of a zone took about a year from start to finish. One of the first steps required for application of the ASF designation is the establishment of the zone’s service area. A requirement for inclusion in the service area is adjacency to a customs port of entry. Through the customs ports of entry, U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforce import and export laws, federal government regulations and immigration policy. The adjacency requirement is defined as being a site within 60 miles or 90-minutes drive time from the port of entry. The Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor’s customs port of entry is located at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. The Port of IndianaJeffersonville and the Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon ports of entry are Louisville and Owensboro, KY-Evansville, Ind., respectively. The service areas will be made up of individual counties that meet the adjacency requirements and each of these counties must approve its inclusion in a zone’s service area.

12 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

One of the new changes the ASF designation brings is time limits for activation of a zone site. Before, there were no time limits. For existing zone sites, there is a five year limit on magnet sites if no portion is activated. For new individual expanded sites, the time limit for activation and utilization of the zone site is three years. If these deadlines are not met, the site will lose zone status. However, the ASF designation provides that a site’s zone status may be reinstated within 30 days. Currently, the Ports of Indiana is in the process of filing an ASF application with the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones Board for Burns Harbor. Applications for Mount Vernon and Jeffersonville ports will soon follow. Contact Jody Peacock at (317) 233-6225; jpeacock@portsofindiana.com Contact David Haniford (317) 232-9204; dhaniford@portsofindiana.com

Foreign-Trade Zone #152

Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor 6625 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 (219) 787-8636

Foreign-Trade Zone #170 Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville 5100 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 283-9662

Foreign-Trade Zone #177

Port of Indiana-Mount Vernon 2751 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 (812) 838-4382

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 13


150 W. Market St., Suite 100, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-9200 / fx (317) 232-0137 / info@portsofindiana.com www.portsofindiana.com www.indianalogistics.com PORT OF INDIANA BURNS HARBOR 6625 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8638 ADS Logistics Roll & Hold Division 725 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-5015 Transportation, warehousing, inventory mgmt.

Great Lakes Towing Co. 1800 Terminal Tower, 50 Public Sq. Cleveland, OH 44113 216-621-4854 Tugboat, towing, barge services

ArcelorMittal Burns Harbor 250 W. U.S. Highway 12 Burns Harbor, IN 46304 219-787-2120 Steel mill

Hoosier Healthcare Northwest 6615 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8662 Occupational healthcare facility

Aqua-Land Communications Inc. 60 Stagecoach Road Portage, IN 46368 219-762-1541 Communications provider Behr Iron & Steel 6735 Waterway Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-1020 Scrap bailing operation Beta Steel Corp. 6500 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8200 Hot-rolled steel processing Calumite Co. 900 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-5045 Calumite processing Cargill Inc. 6640 Ship Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9461 Grain handling and ag products Carmeuse Lime and Stone 165 Steel Road Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9190 Limestone processing Central Coil Processing 501 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-5000 Steel processing Consolidated Terminals & Logistics Co. 6625 South Boundary Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-8000 Federal Marine Terminals Inc. 415 Salmon Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-1017 Stevedoring and trucking Feralloy Midwest Portage 6755 Waterway Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9698 Steel processing Feralloy Processing Co. 600 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8773 Steel processing Frick Services 800 Sun Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9475 Dry/liquid bulk storage/distribution

Directory

Listed below are all companies located at Indiana’s three ports PORT OF INDIANA MOUNT VERNON 2751 Bluff Road, Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-4382

PORT OF INDIANA JEFFERSONVILLE 5100 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-9662

Agrium U.S. Inc. 2501 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-9779 Fertilizer distribution

Airgas Specialty Products 5142 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-6932 Chemical mfg. and distribution

Metals USA 702 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-288-8906 Metals processing, distribution

Bristol-Myers Squibb/KENCO 3101 Highway 62 East Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-833-3416 Distribution and warehousing

Chemtrusion Inc. 1403 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-2910 Plastic resin processing

MG Rail 5130 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-288-8906 Rail services

Indiana Pickling & Processing 6650 Nautical Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8889 Steel pickling

CEMEX/Kosmos Cement 3301 Port East-West Road 570 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-3465 Cement distribution

Mytex Polymers Inc. 1403 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-2900 Plastic resin distribution

International Longshoremen’s Assoc. Local 1969 6031 Melton Road U.S. Highway 20 Portage, IN 46368 219-764-9715

Cimbar Performance Minerals 2700 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-5236 Minerals processing

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. 5143 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-9500 Grain terminal, bulk stevedore, logistical services

Lakes and Rivers Transfer 4600 E. 15th Ave. Gary, IN 46403 219-787-9280 Bulk stevedoring, trucking Leeco Steel 1000 E. Boundary Road Portage, IN 46368 800-621-4366 Steel plate service center Levy Co. 900 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8666 Aggregate processing Metro International Trade Services LLC 345 Salmon Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8690 Metals distribution and storage Mid-Continent Coal & Coke Co. 915 W. 175th St. Homewood, IL 60430 708-798-1110 Steel processing and distributor Precision Strip Inc. 6720 Waterway Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-1602 S&L Great Lakes Transportation 1175 George Nelson Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-764-3700 Steel Warehouse Co. Inc. 6780 Waterway Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8887 Liquid storage, handling Tanco Terminals Inc. 400 E Boundary Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-8159 Tube City IMS Division by Beta Steel 6500 S. Boundary Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-0004 Walsh & Kelly 24358 State Road 23 South Bend, IN 46614 574-288-4811 Asphalt processing

14 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. Merchandising Division 2801 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-833-3214 Grain terminal Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. Soybean Processing Division P.O. Box 547 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-3214 Consolidated Terminals & Logistics Co. P.O. Box 547 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-833-3208 General cargo stevedoring and logistics

Consolidated Terminals & Logistics Co. 5143 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-9500 General cargo stevedoring and logistics Cylicron Engineered Cylinders 5171 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-4600 Industrial cylinder mfg. Eagle Steel Products Inc. 5150 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-4770 Steel processing and distributor FedEx Ground 5153 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-218-0781 Parcel distribution logistics

Mount Vernon Transfer Terminal 3300 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-5532 Coal transloading to barge

Flexible Materials Inc. 1202 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-7000 Wood-panel processing

TPG Mount Vernon Marine Mount Vernon Barge Service P.O. Box 607 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-4889 Towing, fleeting, barge cleaning/ repair, stevedoring

Idemitsu Lubricants America Corp. 701 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-3300 Lubrication for auto industry

Tri-County Agronomics 1711 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-1755 Liquid fertilizer, pesticide and herbicide distribution

Interstate Structures A division of Mid-Park Inc. 1302 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-6430 Steel fabrication Jeffersonville River Terminal 5130 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-0471 Steel galvanizing Kasle Metal Processing 5146 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-0471 Metal Processing Kinder Morgan 5146 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-4938 Warehousing, stevedoring, logistics

Moving more freight per capita than any state with at least 3 million in population

Namasco 5150 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-4141 Steel warehousing and distribution Nova Tube Indiana 1195 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-285-9796 Steel tube mfg. Roll Forming Corp. Indiana 1205 N. Access Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-0650 Roll-forming of steel components, structural tubes Steel Dynamics Inc. 5134 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-218-1490 Steel coils galvanizing Tanco Clark Maritime 5144 Utica Pike Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-7300 Liquid storage, handling TMSi 1251 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-5850 Distribution and warehousing Valmont Industries Inc. 1117 Brown Forman Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-5241 Steel galvanizing

INDIANA RANKS…

· · · · · · ·

1st in pass-through interstates 1st in movement of primary metals 3rd in number of railroads 5th in truck tonnage 5th in rail carloads 7th in U.S. waterborne shipping 15th in foreign and domestic waterborne shipping

Vitran Express 1402 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-7211 Freight services ,distributions Voss/Clark Industries 701 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-7700 Steel processing and distributor

Burns Harbor | Jeffersonville | Mount Vernon www.portsofindiana.com | 800.232.PORT [7678]

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 15


150 W. Market St., Suite 100, Indianapolis, IN 46204 (317) 232-9200 / fx (317) 232-0137 / info@portsofindiana.com www.portsofindiana.com www.indianalogistics.com PORT OF INDIANA BURNS HARBOR 6625 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8638 ADS Logistics Roll & Hold Division 725 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-5015 Transportation, warehousing, inventory mgmt.

Great Lakes Towing Co. 1800 Terminal Tower, 50 Public Sq. Cleveland, OH 44113 216-621-4854 Tugboat, towing, barge services

ArcelorMittal Burns Harbor 250 W. U.S. Highway 12 Burns Harbor, IN 46304 219-787-2120 Steel mill

Hoosier Healthcare Northwest 6615 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8662 Occupational healthcare facility

Aqua-Land Communications Inc. 60 Stagecoach Road Portage, IN 46368 219-762-1541 Communications provider Behr Iron & Steel 6735 Waterway Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-1020 Scrap bailing operation Beta Steel Corp. 6500 S. Boundary Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8200 Hot-rolled steel processing Calumite Co. 900 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-5045 Calumite processing Cargill Inc. 6640 Ship Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9461 Grain handling and ag products Carmeuse Lime and Stone 165 Steel Road Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9190 Limestone processing Central Coil Processing 501 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-5000 Steel processing Consolidated Terminals & Logistics Co. 6625 South Boundary Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-8000 Federal Marine Terminals Inc. 415 Salmon Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-1017 Stevedoring and trucking Feralloy Midwest Portage 6755 Waterway Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9698 Steel processing Feralloy Processing Co. 600 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8773 Steel processing Frick Services 800 Sun Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-9475 Dry/liquid bulk storage/distribution

Directory

Listed below are all companies located at Indiana’s three ports PORT OF INDIANA MOUNT VERNON 2751 Bluff Road, Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-4382

PORT OF INDIANA JEFFERSONVILLE 5100 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-9662

Agrium U.S. Inc. 2501 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-9779 Fertilizer distribution

Airgas Specialty Products 5142 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-6932 Chemical mfg. and distribution

Metals USA 702 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-288-8906 Metals processing, distribution

Bristol-Myers Squibb/KENCO 3101 Highway 62 East Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-833-3416 Distribution and warehousing

Chemtrusion Inc. 1403 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-2910 Plastic resin processing

MG Rail 5130 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-288-8906 Rail services

Indiana Pickling & Processing 6650 Nautical Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8889 Steel pickling

CEMEX/Kosmos Cement 3301 Port East-West Road 570 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-3465 Cement distribution

Mytex Polymers Inc. 1403 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-2900 Plastic resin distribution

International Longshoremen’s Assoc. Local 1969 6031 Melton Road U.S. Highway 20 Portage, IN 46368 219-764-9715

Cimbar Performance Minerals 2700 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-5236 Minerals processing

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. 5143 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-9500 Grain terminal, bulk stevedore, logistical services

Lakes and Rivers Transfer 4600 E. 15th Ave. Gary, IN 46403 219-787-9280 Bulk stevedoring, trucking Leeco Steel 1000 E. Boundary Road Portage, IN 46368 800-621-4366 Steel plate service center Levy Co. 900 George Nelson Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8666 Aggregate processing Metro International Trade Services LLC 345 Salmon Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8690 Metals distribution and storage Mid-Continent Coal & Coke Co. 915 W. 175th St. Homewood, IL 60430 708-798-1110 Steel processing and distributor Precision Strip Inc. 6720 Waterway Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-1602 S&L Great Lakes Transportation 1175 George Nelson Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-764-3700 Steel Warehouse Co. Inc. 6780 Waterway Drive Portage, IN 46368 219-787-8887 Liquid storage, handling Tanco Terminals Inc. 400 E Boundary Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-8159 Tube City IMS Division by Beta Steel 6500 S. Boundary Drive Portage, Indiana 46368 219-787-0004 Walsh & Kelly 24358 State Road 23 South Bend, IN 46614 574-288-4811 Asphalt processing

14 · Fall 2009 PORTSIDE MAGAZINE

Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. Merchandising Division 2801 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-833-3214 Grain terminal Consolidated Grain & Barge Co. Soybean Processing Division P.O. Box 547 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-3214 Consolidated Terminals & Logistics Co. P.O. Box 547 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-833-3208 General cargo stevedoring and logistics

Consolidated Terminals & Logistics Co. 5143 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-9500 General cargo stevedoring and logistics Cylicron Engineered Cylinders 5171 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-4600 Industrial cylinder mfg. Eagle Steel Products Inc. 5150 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-4770 Steel processing and distributor FedEx Ground 5153 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-218-0781 Parcel distribution logistics

Mount Vernon Transfer Terminal 3300 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-5532 Coal transloading to barge

Flexible Materials Inc. 1202 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-7000 Wood-panel processing

TPG Mount Vernon Marine Mount Vernon Barge Service P.O. Box 607 Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-4889 Towing, fleeting, barge cleaning/ repair, stevedoring

Idemitsu Lubricants America Corp. 701 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-3300 Lubrication for auto industry

Tri-County Agronomics 1711 Bluff Road Mount Vernon, IN 47620 812-838-1755 Liquid fertilizer, pesticide and herbicide distribution

Interstate Structures A division of Mid-Park Inc. 1302 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-6430 Steel fabrication Jeffersonville River Terminal 5130 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-0471 Steel galvanizing Kasle Metal Processing 5146 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-0471 Metal Processing Kinder Morgan 5146 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-282-4938 Warehousing, stevedoring, logistics

Moving more freight per capita than any state with at least 3 million in population

Namasco 5150 Maritime Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-4141 Steel warehousing and distribution Nova Tube Indiana 1195 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-285-9796 Steel tube mfg. Roll Forming Corp. Indiana 1205 N. Access Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-0650 Roll-forming of steel components, structural tubes Steel Dynamics Inc. 5134 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-218-1490 Steel coils galvanizing Tanco Clark Maritime 5144 Utica Pike Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-7300 Liquid storage, handling TMSi 1251 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-5850 Distribution and warehousing Valmont Industries Inc. 1117 Brown Forman Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-284-5241 Steel galvanizing

INDIANA RANKS…

· · · · · · ·

1st in pass-through interstates 1st in movement of primary metals 3rd in number of railroads 5th in truck tonnage 5th in rail carloads 7th in U.S. waterborne shipping 15th in foreign and domestic waterborne shipping

Vitran Express 1402 Port Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-280-7211 Freight services ,distributions Voss/Clark Industries 701 Loop Road Jeffersonville, IN 47130 812-283-7700 Steel processing and distributor

Burns Harbor | Jeffersonville | Mount Vernon www.portsofindiana.com | 800.232.PORT [7678]

www.portsofindiana.com · Fall 2009 15


PORTS OF INDIANA 150 W. Market St., Ste. 100 Indianapolis, IN 46204

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PD MUNCIE, IN PERMIT 860

Portside Magazine - Fall 2009  

Portside is an award-winning magazine published by the Ports of Indiana covering a broad range of topics related to the state's unique port...

Portside Magazine - Fall 2009  

Portside is an award-winning magazine published by the Ports of Indiana covering a broad range of topics related to the state's unique port...

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