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ALISON BAKER GRADUATE PORTFOLIO

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ABOUT ME ALISON BAKER

Raised in Christchurch before moving up to Wellington to undertake tertiary study, design and the outdoors has always been a passion. What began as a creative outlet through childhood sketching and drawing soon flourished into a budding career choice when I began to take a real interest in the design and creation of exterior space. Studying in the field of Landscape Architecture has nurtured an interest and passion in outdoor space design and development, a passion I endeavour to pursue to a career. In my downtime, I like to read and draw, and find great satisfaction in the outdoors. A strong advocate for public transport, walking and cycling as a means of getting around, to tasks I bring passion, a strong work ethic and a commitment to teamwork - an ethic forged following five years in an intense and focused university environment. Relaxed and unassuming, I’m known to keep a cool head in a crisis and persevere positively when the going gets tough. Following study, I hope to advance in a career in the urban design and creative outdoor space field, as well as travel as much, and as often as I can.

http://cargocollective.com/alisonbaker 3


CURRICULUM VITAE

AlisonBaker

027 338 5585 | alison_baker@hotmail.co.nz

BAS (Landscape Architecture), MLA Student - http://cargocollective.com/alisonbaker

EDUCATION 2015 – 2016 (concurrent)

M AS T E R S O F L A ND S CA P E AR CH I T E CT U R E – Victoria University of Wellington ൅

Currently pursuing a 5th year Masters-by-Thesis investigation Research aims to explore how landscape architecture can fuse farmland and river land realities to restructure identities and therefore promote a re-emergence of place 027 338to5585 | alison_baker@hotmail.co.nz and placement in South Wairarapa. It endeavors re-‘place’ Wairarapa’s

AlisonBaker

Ruamahanga River back into the regional dynamic and nurture cultural interrelatedness and interconnectedness between humans and their ecosystems.

EDUCATION 2012 – 2014 2015 – 2016 (concurrent) E M P L O Y M1999 E N T- 2011 2016 - present

B AC H E L O R O F AR C H I T E C T U R AL S T U D I E S - Victoria University of Wellington M AS T E R S O F L A ND S CA P E AR CH I T E CT U R E – Victoria University of Wellington ൅ Specialisation in Landscape Architecture ൅ Currently pursuing a 5th year Masters-by-Thesis investigation

൅ Research aims to explore how landscape architecture can fuse farmland and river SCHOOLING land realities to restructure identities and therefore promote a re-emergence of place +R –and Burnside High School placement in South Wairarapa. It endeavors to re-‘place’ Wairarapa’s TUTO Victoria University of Wellington + Ruamahanga Casebrook Intermediate School River back into the regional dynamic and nurture cultural inter൅ LAND 221 – Landscape Architecture Sites and Systems + Redwood Primary School and interconnectedness between humans and their ecosystems. ൅ relatedness LAND 312 – Landscape Architecture Design Integration ൅

2012 – 2014 4

Supervisor: Bruno Marques - Director of Postgraduate Programmes, School of BAS (Landscape Architecture), MLA Student - http://cargocollective.com/alisonbaker Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington

Supervisor: Bruno Marques - Director of Postgraduate Programmes, School of Lecturer: Bruno Marques Architecture, Victoria University of assignments Wellington and presentation; assisting in lectures Preparing, marking and critiquing and tutorials; teaching software (GIS, Adobe, Rhino); one-on-one tutoring

independent in groups B AC൅H E LSupervising O R O F ARand C H I instructing T E C T U R ALstudent S T U D I Eprojects, S - Victoria University and of Wellington ൅

Specialisation in Landscape Architecture


൅ 2012 – 2014

2016 - present

LAND 221 – Landscape Architecture Sites and Systems LAND 312 – Landscape Architecture Design Integration Lecturer: Bruno Marques Preparing, marking and critiquing assignments and presentation; assisting in lectures and tutorials; teaching software (GIS, Adobe, Rhino); one-on-one tutoring Supervising and instructing student projects, independent and in groups

S AL E S A S S I S T A NT – Palmers Garden Centre ൅

AWARDS

Specialisation in Landscape Architecture

T U T O R – Victoria University of Wellington ൅

2013 - present

Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington

B AC H E L O R O F AR C H I T E C T U R AL S T U D I E S - Victoria University of Wellington ൅

EMPLOYMENT

Supervisor: Bruno Marques - Director of Postgraduate Programmes, School of

Acquired first-hand knowledge of plant classification and usage, and plant care schemes and compositions Assisted with client, council and independent contractor plant selection and care Till operation; working stock; stock reception and distribution; customer service; sales Supervising indoor store and handling customer inquiries

2014

D E A N’ S L I S T AW AR D 2 0 1 4 Victoria University of Wellington

2012

F I R S T Y E AR E X CE L L E N C E S C H O L AR S H I P Victoria University of Wellington

REFEREES LI S A L E AS K

S E N I O R S T A F F M E M B E R – Palmers Garden Centre Work Number: (04) 388 8435

B R U NO M AR Q U E S

Mobile Number: 027 845 8493

D I R E CT O R O F P O S T G R A D U AT E P R O G R AM M E S – School of Architecture, VUW Work Number: (04) 463 4718

Email: bruno.marques@vuw.ac.nz

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CONTENTS

THESIS - River. Land. Place

STREET

TRESPASS

Page 8

Page 14

Page 20

ANALYSIS + PROCESS

DETAIL DESIGN

MODELLING

Page 22

Page 24

Page 28

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RIVER. LAND. PLACE. DESIGN RESEARCH THESIS

Edges

Edges and water interfaces are accessible, vegetated, and offer a variety of materials/interfaces/interactions

synthesis

separation

River space is natural habitat for vegetation of ecologically diverse historic Wairarapa, and of riparian system

Vegetation

fusion

farm fusion

range

range

range

range

river

river

river

river

farm

farm

farm

blend edge

vegetation water

vegetation

disorganised

perpendicular

parallel

synthesis

water

water

unchangeable object in time

Heritage landscape is disconnect

landscape is moving through time

landscape is becoming over time

Heritage sites are identified through built intervention, form a rope oflandscape heritage through Wairarapa landscape landscape is space is placed

landscape is separate

landscape is connecting

River

landscape is placed

landscape is absent

landscape is connecting

landscape is connecting

landscape is placed

landscape is placed

Ruamahanga recognised as a prominent landscape feature and location, is public

farm

riverplain river

two

one

two one

three disconnect

two

farm

one three

creation

farm three

establishment

landscape is separate

landscape is forming

landscape is connected

landscape is unacknowledged

landscape is growing

landscape is place

landscape is posessed

landscape is flowing

landscape is space

landscape is placed

The current thesis endeavours to answer the overarching question, Can rural land be river land? This has been further refined into three site-specific questions, How can the development of the rural landscape arrangement promote waterway acknowledgement in Wairarapa? Can the discussion and integration of indigenous landscape values and philosophies influence this development? And, how can this be implemented at various scales?

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Water

Water is safe, clean and swimmable, usable for recreation, cultural interaction etc.

water

Flood

Flood limit promotes and is recognised as a prosperous natural process edge organised floodplain

developing floodplain

floodplain

organised floodplain

water

wet boundary edge

water

wet boundary

wet land

unbound

farm

farm farm

water

farm

landscape is land

water vegetation

landscape is ecology

Passage

landscape is protecting

two

one

landscape is flooding landscape is placed

landscape is activated

landscape is growing

landscape is returning

landscape is connecting

landscape is placed

Releases segregation from lake, land, and river systems, creating a network of interaction

farm

Landscape becomes connected through traversion and passage

landscape is space

landscape is river

landscape is misplaced

Wetland

edge

water

access

lake

lake

lake

wetland stopbank farm

intervention

wetland stopbank

wetland stopbank farm

farm

two

two

landscape Land is wetland landscape is space

one one

landscape is allowing is habited Adjacent land remains operative for economic, culturallandscape purposes, responds to the needs of the watercourse landscape is placing

landscape wetland is placed

wetland farm

landscape is scattered

landscape is designed

landscape is passaged

landscape is space

landscape is placing

landscape is placed

run-off

farm

wetland

wetland

landscape is farm

landscape is filtering

land and river

landscape is space

landscape is placing

landscape is placed

Defining the design scope, and creating a methodology that can be tested at three scales of interaction - regional, river, site - formed the initial phase of this design investigation.

Through experience and interaction at all scales, the placing of waterways back into their regional contexts through landscape architectural thinking could perhaps rescue and revive these fading signatures. At Wairarapa’s Ruamahanga River, it could deliver new life to a region, revive cultural connections, link and bind people with the processes of their landscape, and re-establish the flourishing ecosystems and environments of old. The water, and the waterways, can be acknowledged and promoted once again.

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Heritage

Land

Passage

Vegetation

River

Water

Wetland

Flood

Edges

Design conceptualisation at a regional catchment scale


Carterton Settlement Pond Wetland enhanced/enlarged

Te Ore Ore Water races regulatory revegetated

Heritage identification and acknowledgement

Valley revegetation Edge revegetation

Featherston

Wetlands introduced at river-stream convergences

Featherston Settlement Pond Wetland enhanced

Paths introduced/ traversion encouraged Effluent Pond to Wetland conversion encouraged

Valley revegetation

Edge Revegetation

Huangarua River

Persistent lake edge revegetation

Martinborough

Tauherenikau River

Martinborough Settlement Pond Wetland enhanced

Rimutaka Forest Park Path stopbank development Path stopbank development Edge revegetation

Heritage identification and acknowledgement Stream Revegetation

Lake Wairarapa

Effluent Pond to Wetland conversion encouraged

Paths introduced/ traversion encouraged

Path stopbank development Path stopbank development Valley revegetation

Wetlands introduced at river-stream convergences Stream Revegetation

Stopbank removal and reconstruction Stream Revegetation

Allsops Bay

Path stopbank development

Wairarapa Lake edge revegetated

Path stopbank development

Stream Revegetation

Heritage identification and acknowledgement

Aorangi Forest Park

Diversion partially re-naturalised

Path stopbank development

Cavity Expansion at Lower Ruamahanga

Stopbank removal and reconstruction

Scale 1:75,000

Onoke Gravel Bar

Masterplanning

0

1000

2000

LEGEND Turanganui River Wetland Expansion Upstream

Path stopbank development

Lake Onoke

500

New Wetland Space Ruamahanga Water Cavity Vegetated Edge - Rivers

New Settlement Opportunities at Onoke

Vegetated Edge - Streams Vegetated Edge - Water Races Vegetated Edge - Lake Oxidation Pond Wetland Stopbank Intervention

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Experience Design and Rendering at Martinborough site


Experience Design and Rendering at Onoke site

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STREET

TE ARO, WELLINGTON LAND 412 + 421 - ALISON BAKER - 300255806

How can a re-design of Te Aro redefine a city street?

S

RR

EE T

RAIN GARDENS WETLAND CYCLEWAYS

SLOW ZONE - 30kmh

40% from Vivian converge onto Adelaide Road

NT

KE

Vehicular Network

ES

AC

RR

TE

ID

BR

AM

+C

GE

COURTEN

ET

50% from Adelaide Road into Arras Tunnel

100 metres

PEDESTRIAN STREET

RE

BUS LANEWAYS

Mt VIctoria Tunnel 38,694 cars

ST

24658 cars

T

ALL

TR EE

SM

IS

NER

EE T

MAN

50% from Adelaide Road onto Cambridge Terrace 60% from Vivian converge into Mt Victoria Tunnel

TA RA NA K

20252 cars

ST R

ET RE ST

PLACE

TO RY

BA ST R

COURTENAY

TO RY

N

KE

CU

TE

TA RA NA KI ST RE ET

GE

ID

BR

AM

C T+

E AC

CU

BA

AY PLACE

14 buses to Lambton Quay One every minute

MAN

NER

New Transport Matrix

SM

ALL

One every minute 15 buses along

Unviversity

SLOW ZONE - 30kmh

One every Two minutes

BUS PRIORITY VEHICULAR PRIORITY PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY

Aro Valley

100 metres

5 buses along

8 buses along

One every Three minutes

One every Two minutes

Taranaki Street

Adelaide Road

SHARED STREET SLOW ZONE - 30kmh

Bus Network PARTED KERBS TWO TRAFFIC LANES

100 metres

Parking Network

Courtenay Place

TWO TRAFFIC LANES

SHARED STREET

CYCLEWAY RAIN GARDEN FILTRATION

EXISTING KERB ORIGINAL PATHWAY WIDTH MAINTAINED

New Transport Matrix

The transit oriented pathway at the centre of Te Aro removes private vehicles , thus increasing pedestrian and bioremediation spaces and streamlining the movement of public transport and pedestrians across site.

This assignment, based in central Wellington, concluded a research investigation which resulted in the re-development of the wider Wellington transport and streetscape matrix. The designed site, at Kent and Cambridge Terraces, and the introduction of new street typologies in other sites, promotes a sustainable water management and filtration strategy, and redefines the discussion of ‘street.’ The new Kent and Cambridge Terraces is joined to form a directional and efficient vehicular pathway. With an introduced wetland to mitigate the stormwater toxicity that currently flows underground, the design connects the waterfront and city edge to the Wellington Green Belt in both visual aesthetic and ecology.

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BUS LANEWAYS PEDESTRIAN STREET

Mt Victoria Tunnel

1 bus to Brooklyn One every Fifteen minutes

CYCLEWAYS

7 buses through

1 bus to

One every Fifteen minutes

WETLAND

Courtenay Place

2 buses to One every Fifteen minutes

RAIN GARDENS


BUS S RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

Site Plan Schematic Business Office Frontage

10 metres

ay Place

Courten

LANE BUS

Rain Garden

LANE BUS

Bus Priority Laneway - tiled surface treatment

College Street

OFFICES

The new Kent and Cambridge Terraces is not really two separate streets at all, but is instead joined to form a directional and efficient vehicular pathway. With an introduced wetland to mitigate the stormwater toxicity that currently flows underground. This further connects the waterfront and city edge to the Wellington Green Belt in both visual aesthetic and ecology. Opportunity exists for land use changes to occur and further the creation of new dynamics, both physical and social.

BUS STOP

Whereas office space served as a barrier to street interaction, the new designed environment allows for the introduction of new vertical surfaces at street frontages, and large balcony spaces within the buildings. At these points the business textures and surfaces are integrated with the street, providing a new dynamic, and a form of interest for pedestrians and commuters.

Two-way Cycleway Separation Planting

Restaurant Appropriation Area Bus Lane Removed - merges with exising street layout RESTAURANTS

RESTAURANTS

Vivian Street

Pirie Street

RESTAURANT

RESTAURANTS

LANE BUS

RESIDENTIAL

BACKPACKERS - BARS

COMMERCIAL

OFFICES

Bar Appropriation Area

Alpha Street

CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

Bar Appropriation Area

Road Frontage

BAR + RESTAURANT

Changing land usages and the increase of available space allows for existing (and new) restaurants at the Northern end of site to appropriate the exterior environment for outdoor dining/performance etc, thus making the site an ‘activated’ space. The water’s edge provides an interesting condition for subtle and changeable restaurant activities. The Courtenay Place milieu further extends onto and into the edge street.

COMMERCIAL

Restaurant Frontage

Fifeshire Street

CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

HOTEL

The commuters are treated to a vegetated environment alongside the existing roadway, which in a central city, is itself unusual. The separation between road and building through a vegetated space provides a visual interest, as well as serving acoustic mitigation purposes. The wetland creates a vegetated ‘room’ where people can exist without the intrusion of cars, or indeed other people.

CAR REPAIR

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

Tennyson Street LANE BUS

COMMERCIAL

RESTAURANT

Elizabeth Street CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

Residence Appropriation Area

Barker Street

Residence Appropriation Area Residence Appropriation Area

LANE BUS Home Street

Church Appropriation Area

BUS STOP

CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

Lorne Street

BUS STOP

CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

CHURCH

BUS STOP

CAR RETAIL

RESIDENTIAL

LANE BUS CAR RETAIL

COMMERCIAL

Business Office Frontage

College Street

BUS STOP

Whereas office space served as a barrier to street interaction, the new designed environment allows for the introduction of new vertical surfaces at street frontages, and large balcony spaces within the buildings. At these points the business textures and surfaces are integrated with the street, providing a new dynamic, and a form of interest for pedestrians and commuters.

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL

Residential Frontage At the southern end of site, with changes to land use and social necessity, the new structures will serve a residential purpose, with the potential for ground floor residential being preferred, thus providing ground floor visual amenity to residents, and a new mentality to the space. Residents will be elevated above the pedestrians, but not obviously separated. The potential for parking on a ‘basement’ floor (accessed from a shared street) exists as a form of structured elevation.

LANE BUS

Tree Grove - replanted trees for reuse

LANE BUS

Bus Lane Introduced - surface treatment corresponding to NZ standards OFFICES

Buckle Street

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GRAVEL PATH

Changing land usages and the increase of available space allows for existing (and new) ROCK SEATS restaurants at the Northern end of site to appropriate the exterior environment for outdoor dining/performance etc, thus making the site an ‘activated’ space. The water’s edge provides an interesting condition for subtle and changeable restaurant activities. The Courtenay Place milieu further extends onto and into the edge street. ROCK PATH

ROCK SEATS

STONE SEATING

GRASS

STEPPING STONES

PAVING

WOODEN BUS DECK DEPOT

Section A-B

WETLAND VEGETATION DAMP MULCH -to naturally be replaced with organic sediment sludge WET MULCH -to naturally be replaced with organic sediment sludge ORGANIC SOIL SUBSTRATE SAND CLAY MIX GRAVEL BASE

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WATERTIGHT MEMBRANE OR CLAY LINING COMPACTED EARTH

Section A-B

WOODEN WOODEN

WOODEN


5.6m

LEGEND

- impounds water and releases in a controlled way - stabalises water flow through wetland - sediment settling function - UV filtration and evaporation

MAIN CHANNEL - saturated VEGETATED LAND - wet soil - damp soil - marshland soil - inland island - steep bank - riparian soil

The commuters are treated to a vegetated environment alongside the existing roadway, RIPARIAN EDGE through a which in a central city, is itself unusual. The separation between road and building - predator protection RAIN GARDEN soils vegetated space provides a visual interest, as well as serving acoustic-- moisten mitigation purposes. elemental protection (shade GRASS wind/sun etc)attempts to Previously Hauwai, a wetland space utilised by traditional Maori, thefromdesign 0.1m CONTOURS return the lost ecology to the Kent and Cambridge site. The wetland creates a vegetated 1.0m CONTOURS ‘room’ where people can exist without the intrusion of cars, or indeed other people. Typha orientalis

5.7m

MOVED VEGETATION PARTED KERB 5.8m

INUNDATED RIDGE x

Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani Myriophyllum propinquum Isolepsis prolifer Eleochanis sphacelata Baumea articulata

‘WET’ VEGETATION

SPOT LEVEL

FOREBAY - artificial pool of water - used in flood control to act as a buffer during flooding or storm surges - impounds water and releases in a controlled way into the larger waterbody - used upstream to trap sediment and debris

BASE COURSE SUB-BASE COURSE SUBGRADE COMPACTED EARTH

PERFORATED PIPE (UNDERDRAIN) WATERTIGHT MEMBRANE

Section A-B

TRANSITION LAYER composed of poorly graded sand BASE OR DRAINAGE LAYER poorly-graded gravel of between 2 mm and 10 mm diameter, encasing the perforated drainage pipes.

INCREASED RESIDENTIAL

PARTED RAIN GARDEN KERB

N WALKING STRUCTURE

KENT TERRACE

CAMBRIDE TERRACE

BUS PRIORITY LANE

N FOOTING N LATERAL SUPPORT STRUCTURE

FILTRATION LAYER supports vegetation growth and provide hydraulic conductivity (approximately 36-150mm/hr).

ASPHALT SURFACE COURSE

PREPARED SOIL MIXTURE 60% sand 30% compost 30% topsoil mulch

CONCRETE KERBING ASPHALT SURFACE COURSE

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The introduction of a bus/taxi only passage along Wellington’s Courtenay Place and further along the ‘golden mile,’ promotes public transport as the central movement matrix. The transit oriented pathway at the centre of Te Aro removes private vehicles, thus increasing pedestrian and bioremediation spaces and promotes the streamlining the movement of public transport and pedestrians across site. The prominent Taranaki Street North-South axis adjoins pedestrian, cyclist and vehicular movements across site. In separating these pathways, safety is increased and the opportunity to create a central Te Aro boulevard is optimised.

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These streets between streets create spaces for residential development and passive movements of almost suburban mentalities. Surfaces are altered to slow vehicles and increase pedestrian awareness and create outdoor green spaces for residents to appropriate. Removing vehicles from Tory Street to create a pedestrianised pathway from the Wellington Waterfront to Pukeahu removes a highly intrusive pathway, removes parking, and creates spaces for pedestrian activation and user influenced environments.

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TRESPASS

MIRAMAR, WELLINGTON

Upon arrival on a barren or disused landscape, one is inclined to explore, to traverse, and to trespass on otherwise forbidden, or even fenced-off spaces. Miramar, upon initial and subsequent site visits, was no exception. This assignment on the Miramar peninsula, concluded a research investigation which aimed to inject the idea of passage and traversion on foot into the Miramar landscape, and thus make the unobtainable or difficult to reach areas attainable and experiencable. Through a series of park spaces, which utilise the views, topography and natural features, the site is opened for exploration, with housing development embedded within the landscape around it.

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Centred predominantly at the top of Miramar in the centre of the peninsula, these park spaces gradually move outwards towards Fort Balance, a historic site, and connect the centre of the peninsula with it’s coastal edge on both sides. The pine forest on the western side is left in it’s original state, with new passages being forged into the landscape, and interventions being employed to allow easy pedestrian access from one side of the coast, up to the top, and back down again. The urban development is restricted to housing in individual dwellings, much like most hillside settlements in New Zealand, and a serpentine roadway. In this design, the possibility for an individual without a vehicle, who wishes to explore a newly available part of the Wellington landscape, a landscape previously considered dangerous, treacherous or fencedoff, is realised, and encourages site exploration in a more visceral and instinctual way.

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DESIGN DRAWING ANALYSIS + PROCESS

Analysis and rigorous diagramming and study forms a large component of the Landscape Architectural field. It serves as a tool for investigation, rationalisation and design iteration., and has formed a large part of the design process. These images represent a sample of the techniques used and utilised in establishing project scope and design.

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DESIGN DRAWING DETAILING

This assignment provided the construction and detail component which ran in tandem to the Trespass project. Miramar and its coastal environment is a dramatic and evocative landscape. However, the immediate coast is not safely accessible to a variety of users. Shelly Bay Road provides for little to no pedestrian usage. The 670 metre long walk that cantilevers directly over the shoreline and comprises two ‘floating paths’ and an in-ground walkway encompasses 46 cantilevered ‘cranes’, allowing users to safely traverse this terrain in an unusual and unique way. 24


G.R.

G.R. G.R.

1

SECTION OF CRANE ONE

2

SECTION OF CRANE TWO

3

SECTION OF CRANE THREE

5

SCALE 1:100

5

SCALE 1:100

5

SCALE 1:100

3 6 2

G.R.

9

G.R.

G.R.

1 6

4

SECTION OF CRANE TWENTY SIX

5

SECTION OF CRANE TWENTY SEVEN

6

SECTION OF CRANE TWENTY EIGHT

5

SCALE 1:100

5

SCALE 1:100

5

SCALE 1:100

G.R.

G.R.

G.R.

7

SECTION OF CRANE TWENTY NINE

8

SECTION OF CRANE FOURTEEN

9

SECTION OF CRANE FIFTEEN

5

SCALE 1:100

5

SCALE 1:100

5

SCALE 1:100

CRANE STRUCTURE (RHS)

COASTLINE

BOLT COVERLET TIMBER SLATTING TIMBER PATH MOUNT BOLTING SYSTEM

RHS BEAM

STEEL C-BEAM STEEL I-BEAM

2

SECTION OF CRANE PLATFORM AT CRANE JOIN

9

SCALE 1:20

STEEL C-BEAM BELOW TIMBE RPATH MOUNT

BOLT STEEL BASE PLATE

TIMBER SLAT PATH BOLT COVERLET

STEEL I-BEAM

G.R COMPRESSIVE CONCRETE BOLTING SYSTEM

TIMBER SLATTING - ALONG GRAIN TIMBER PATH MOUNT - CROSS GRAIN BOLTING SYSTEM

TIMBER SLATTING

STEEL C-BEAM STEEL I-BEAM

STEEL C-BEAM ROCKY SHORE LINE

3 7

CONNECTIVE CLEAT SYSTEM BOLTING SYSTEM

STEEL I-BEAM STEEL I-BEAM

2

STEEL I-BEAM

7

N CONCRETE FOOTING

1

PLAN OF FLOATING PATH ONE AND COASTLINE WITH CUTAWAY

7

SCALE 1:50

4 9

1

CUTAWAY PLAN OF PLATFORM

9

SCALE 1:50

2

3

SECTION OF PLATFORM BOLTING

9

SCALE 1:10

COMPRESSED EARTH

9

BOLT COVERLET 3 9

TIMBER SLATTING

4 7

BOLT COVERLET TIMBER PATH MOUNT TIMBER SLATTING - ALONG GRAIN STEEL C-BEAM TIMBER PATH MOUNT - CROSS GRAIN BOLTING SYSTEM STEEL C-BEAM BOLTING SYSTEM STEEL I-BEAM

4

SECTION OF CRANE PLATFORM AT EDGES

9

SCALE 1:20

RHS BEAM

3

SECTION OF PATH FINISH FOOTING

7

SCALE 1:10

BOLT COVERLET CONCRETE FOOTING

BOLTING SYSTEM

G.R.

TIMBER SLATTING - ALONG GRAIN TIMBER PATH MOUNT - CROSS GRAIN STEEL C-BEAM

2

ELEVATION OF CONNECTION OF FLOATING PATH ONE AND COASTLINE

7

SCALE 1:50

STEEL I-BEAM

4

STANDARD SECTION OF PATH SCALE 1:20

25


PLANTING PLANS

VEGETATION SELECTION + LAYOUTS

26


GRADING PLANS

LAND MANIPULATION + DRAINAGE

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DESIGN DRAWING MODELLING

From abstraction to actuality, modelling at various stages of the design process, from sketch models to final models, forms a component of design investigation. Encouraged to think abstractly and to diagram or draw in three dimensions promotes a tactile response to space and design investigation. These images represent a selection of the process models created and utilised throughout the course of my academic study.

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Alison Baker Portfolio