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LINDSEY ANN MILLER PORTFOLIO


Copyright 2012 by the author of this book Lindsey Ann Miller. The book author retains sole copyright to her contributions to this book.


IF IT WERE ALL UP TO ME We live in a “now” society. Everything needs to be done faster and more seamless than ever before. Society has become obsessed with instant gratification. Therefore, the primary responsibility of the architect moving forward is to make the future design of buildings more efficient, convenient and functional. When I look at existing buildings, such as a hospital or an airport, I often think, “How can I make this building or collection of buildings function better?” Many times there is no logic or organization behind how people and equipment circulate through space. Consequently, energy, resources, and most importantly time are wasted. Many building types display thoughtless, poor and dysfunctional design. Therefore, my ambition is to use architecture as a catalyst for behavioral change and improved spatial performance. After studying architecture and gaining professional experience at several firms, it has become apparent to me that the design process does not pay near enough attention to the experience of the user as a whole. A building should not just be ornamental or structural, but should serve as a facilitator for the user’s primary needs. To this end, I have decided that I want to dedicate my career to changing the way we approach design. To enhance the user’s experience with a design focused on their necessity and to create a more harmonious and user inspired environment. This means asking the right questions at the right time. Alvar Aalto once said, “Rationalist analysis was valid as far as it went, but that its scope should be extended to cover not only the practical use of buildings and furnishings, but also the psychological reactions of their users”. How should architecture serve the human body and its needs? So many architects overlook the combination of practicality and comfort during the design process instead focusing on aesthetic and structural complexity. Humanity is the counterpoint to efficiency, making humanism an integral part of design. You shouldn’t have to work around the design of your environment to function at its best. Your environment should be designed around you and your response. It’s the way you approach a problem and how you incorporate logic, rationale and creativity into the solution that makes a good architect. I don’t feel that architects necessarily need a specialty. Rather, they should be a master of all things. They are the ultimate professional, with knowledge of mathematics, building materials, engineering and physics they have the ability to add in creativity and adaptability in order to create the ultimate in human endeavors. I want to be an architect that does all of these things. I want to influence the people around me and make them realize that it isn’t just how green you can make a building that makes it great. I want them to see there is another way, a different approach. I want to take a step back and observe. Many people think they know what they want, however, in reality as designers we must observe their distinct behavioral patterns before we can tell them what the really need. Only then can a truly great design be created. I have developed this ideology throughout my academic and professional training. I haven’t just observed the information given in each class and applied it for the final. I have made an effort to stop and think about what I’ve learned as it pertains to my future as an architect and the state of design as a whole. I believe it to be a gift to be able to recognize this symbiosis. We know more than we think. We just have to apply ourselves to excel.

__________________________________ LINDSEY ANN MILLER

WINTER 2012


CONTENTS FANTASY

the escape

8 Take Me to Wonderland 20 Disney

LUXURY

the lifestyle

28 32

St Regis Al Maabar The Grappa Bar

40

The Gallery at 450 K

MOMENT

the experience

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Mining Museum

58 66

Monterrey Medical Center Champions Square New Orleans Saints


FANTASY

the experience

TAKE ME TO WONDERLAND DISNEY


T A K E M E T O WONDERLAND AUTUMN 2011

In Aaron Betsky’s collage studio we were given the prompt: design a space in an abandoned super market entirely made out of recycled materials that houses a Montessori School, open art storage and artist studios that draws the community into a shared civic center. My first thought? Miniature golf sculpture garden. Miniature golf is age appropriate for children, yet remains an attraction for adults of all ages. The course can act as the circulatory datum that guides the user through the art installation landmarks. It is the antithesis of the museum’s white cube paradigm. It is fun, loud and outdoors. The concept is not only content and age appropriate, but most significantly, it encourages an interactive community. If you do not have an interest in art or a child in grade school you probably would not travel out to Kennedy Heights for any old game of puttputt. It had to be extraordinary. The whimsical course is designed like no other course one has ever seen. Inspired by Disney’s Alice in Wonderland, the design is a play on scale. The greens soar up and over buildings, loop-de-loops twist and turn around iconic artistic obstacles all the while you feel as big as an ant in a giant’s world. As you cross the building threshold there is a shift in scale. You are no longer an ant, but a giant. The shift in scale initiates a moment of illusion. The interior is designed to the scale of a six year old. The space heightens your senses and perception to a new level of reality. One can only experience this overwhelming sensation at wonderland. It is a must see attraction that showcases the art, appeals to the young and draws in the community. PROJECT TYPE MONTESSORI + OPEN ART STORAGE + COMMUNITY CENTER + INTERACTIVE MINIATURE GOLF SCULPTURE GARDEN LOCATION KENNEDY HEIGHTS OHIO DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER SIZE 11 000 SQUARE FEET


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Site plan of the playful miniature golf course twisting and turning up and above and around the built structures.

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WALT DISNEY STORE TIMES SQUARE WINTER 2011

Only after three short months after the grand opening, Disney was unsatisfied with the marketing and branding strategies exhibited in the design. Gilmore Group developed a design solution that not only satisfied Disney’s marketing team, but provided each guest a personable and unique experience. My vast knowledge and passion for everything and anything Disney played a vital role in the conceptual design process. The overall goal was to develop a design solution for the new store that balanced both marketing standards and economic feasibility without compromising the magic behind the brand. The primary objective that drove our concept was to bring the magical phenomenon you experience at the parks into the store. By implementing interactive strategies that engage children and adults throughout the store gives each guest an opportunity to have a unique and memorable experience. PROJECT TYPE RETAIL LOCATION NEW YORK NY DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER + ENA YANG + GILMORE MEDIA SIZE 20 000 SQUARE FEET


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4 Consumers are greeted by an interactive way-finding character. The latest technology has screens that read the height and sex of the consumer. It approximates the appropriate age bracket and displays one of Disney’s most popular characters. The LED screen includes thermal sensors to read the child’s hand movement and the character has both visual and auditory responses. The simple integration of LED screens transformed a once mundane experience into a unique, memorable and exciting moment.


Mirror, Mirror, on the Wall, Who’s your favorite one ofall

The existing magic mirror display did not suggest the consumer to wave the magic wand in front of the mirror to reveal their reflection as a princess. In order to for the display to operate properly, I designed a motion sensor to trigger a display to engage the present consumer. Snow White’s Evil Queen then appears prompting the consumer to wave their wand and asks then, “Who is your favorite one of all?” In just moments the Queen vanishes and the reflection of the consumer as their selected wands’ princess is revealed.

?

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LUXURY

the lifestyle

ST REGIS GRAPPA BAR 450 K


ST REGIS AL MAABAR SUMMER 2011

The St Regis Amman and the Residences at St Regis Amman will become a landmark in the city’s affluent Abdoun district. Scheduled to open in 2014, the new St Regis will provide guests flawless service delivered by the brand’s legendary butler service, elegant modern decor and an array of luxurious amenities which will set the standard for luxury in the Middle Eastern region. Forrest Perkins, responsible for interior design, is partnered with Perkins Eastman International completing the base. The St Regis Amman will feature 270 luxuriously appointed guest rooms, including 91 suites, four restaurants, a cafe, destination bar, pool and pool bar, fitness center and signature spa. The hotel will also comprise more than 30,000 square feet of ultra-modern meeting and event space, as well as a business center. The Residences at St. Regis Amman will include approximately 80 branded luxurious residences feature two-, three-, four- and fivebedrooms as well as a dedicated lobby, pool, fitness center and lounge. Coupled with the grand residences is St Regis Amman is poised to become the premier destination for sophisticated, global travellers and further establishes the St Regis dedication to providing unrivalled accommodations and exceptional service and amenities for the brand’s discerning guests. The challenge of our project is threefold: to create the best new hotel and serviced residences in the Middle East; to meet an aggressive schedule; and, to work within the shifting design of a structural platform that presents planning challenges at every level. PROJECT TYPE INTERIOR HOSPITALITY LOCATION AMMAN JORDAN DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER + JOHN CARHART + KETAN DIOPHODE + FORREST PERKINS DALLAS DESIGN TEAM + PARTNERED PEI SIZE 930 000 SQUARE FEET


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T H E G R A P PA B A R SPRING 2007

Boulder Colorado is a city recognized for it’s green and sustainable practices. The Grappa Bar is located downtown Boulder, CO on the west end of Pearl Street Walking Mall. We were required to design around and existing brick building with a gabled roof using only orthogonal lines and right angles. The design offers an innovative culinary experience that reminisce the importance of retrofitting and re-purposing existing architecture. The primary concept of the 13,500 square foot Grappa Bar was reduce, reuse, and recycle. We were required to harvest one ingredient for the menu on site. I wanted to create an intimate, hip wine bar that attracted young, cutting edge professionals. Harvesting grapes was the obvious choice, but I wanted to take it a step further. When the grapes used to make wine are pressed their ‘waste’ produced from the seeds, stems and skin called pomace. This is not waste at all. As they say, “one man’s waste is another man’s treasure.” The pomace can be fermented into a strong, little, brandy liquor I like to call grappa. PROJECT TYPE RESTAURANT + ADAPTIVE REUSE LOCATION

BOULDER COLORADO DESIGN

LINDSEY MILLER SIZE

13 500 SQUARE FEET


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Waste Receptacle 22"D 22"W 48"H

1CS36-4

Waste Receptacle 22"D 22"W 48"H

36" X 24"

1CS36-4

OPEN DOOR

Castle 14HF

36" X 24"

OPEN DOOR

15"W 21-3/4"D 43-1/2"H

Castle 14HF

29-7/8 W 34-15/16 D 83-1/4 H

58 W 34-15/16 D 83-1/4 H

Reach-In Refrigerator 15"W 21-3/4"D 43-1/2"H

Reach-In Refrigerator

29-7/8 W 34-15/16 D 83-1/4 H

Reach-In Refrigerator

Castle 14HF 15"W 21-3/4"D 43-1/2"H

Castle 14HF 15"W 21-3/4"D 43-1/2"H

UP

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First Floor

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Second Floor

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Every element is design to maximize efficiency. The columns are not only structural, but provide a backdrop for high top bar tables and pedestal for outdoor ambient lighting on the second story rooftop. Incandescent lighting eyelits are nested within the floor system illuminates the bar above and the intimate dining room below cutting energy costs in half. The existing building doubles as the main kitchen. It is centralized within the site making it easy to access from all directions. The program has been strategically designed in such a way that the back of house and front of house coexist, yet never intersect.

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THE GALLERY AT 450 K SUMMER 2011

In the District of Columbia, living within the beltway is a luxury all in itself. However, in the wake of the multifamily residential high-rise craze, how do you design beyond luxury and make the property marketable? The answer is lifestyle. In order to compete in this highly aggressive market, you have to design the property that emanates an affluent way of life that sells. And above all, offer these residents amenities they can find no where else. At The Gallery, a blend of Art, Fashion, and Design create modern luxury that will transport the residents beyond the frenzied city streets to their own downtown sanctuary. Typically, one of the negative aspects associated with high-rise living is trading proximity and convenience for space. At 450 K we took advantage of the property and designed modern amenities include a sculpture garden with an outdoor movie theater, community lecture area, and numerous areas for group entertaining throughout the building. The rooftop creates a retreat from the chaos of urban life that delivers the unexpected. The ultra lounge pool is highlighted by a communal bar and lounging area with opium beds and private cabanas, and a hot tub for year round enjoyment. Dining options include private banquettes with fire pits and the best views of the city. A dog run provides a convenient area for residents’ pets without leaving the property. A Sky Lounge features a billiards tables, a demonstration hibachi kitchen, and a retractable glass façade that creates more premier dining setting with views of the city beyond year round. PROJECT TYPE MULTIFAMILY RESIDENTIAL + RETAIL + GALLERY MIXED USE COMPLEX LOCATION WASHINGTON DC DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER + FIDEL ORTEGA + CHARLIER TURNER + FORREST PERKINS SIZE 22 000 SQUARE FEET


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MOMENT

the experience

MINING MUSEUM MONTERREY MEDICAL CENTER NEW ORLEANS SAINTS


MINING MUSEUM SPRING 2006

Coal Creek Mining Museum rests at the foothills of the Flatiron Mountain Range and is nested beneath the intersection of I-36 and McCaslin Boulevard, just South of Boulder, Colorado. The design presents a successful interrelationship between architecture and context. The primary concept behind the museum is to implement thematic design in order to create a fabricated reality of Coal Creek Mine. The architecture takes the patron on a step-by-step journey through a day in the life of a miner. The ambience delineates the apprehension and discomfort miners face everyday. A series of walls are articulated by the purpose for which they serve and characterize the space. The interior of the exhibition is dark and cold, only lit by the slits of skylight from above. The apertures drift further and further away as one descends through the ‘mine’. The forceful shifts around tight turns keep one guessing what’s around every corner. The exhibit takes the patron psychologically, physiologically, and physically into the life of a miner. There is a ceremonial finale as the exhibit concludes with a replica of Coal Creek Mine. Released from the darkness to find light - breathing again. The atrium is an exaggeration of light and air to resemble the relief of reaching the surface. PROJECT TYPE MUSEUM LOCATION SUPERIOR COLORADO DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER SIZE 10 000 SQUARE FEET


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Iteration 1

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Iteration 2

Iteration 3


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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

2 DN

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The Wall of Light exists between two distinct territories; Light and Shadow. The wall is manipulated to transform the condition of light and the relationship of exposure and view. A slivered, ray of light is washed down the wall of the surveyor. Opacity, translucency, transparency, and porosity are the characteristic of the conditioning. It wraps the diaphragm and structures the roof. 52

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Public Lobby Auditorium Archives Rest Rooms Offices Exhibit Authentic Mine Atrium


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The Wall of the Surveyor is characterized and ordered through rhythm, repetition, meter and proportion. It is also related to the repetitive nature of structure or organization. As an archival wall it supports display, exhibit, cataloging and accessible storage. The accessible character of this wall system is such that it supports a secondary “wall� that of the corridor or hall. The Wall of Knowledge is constituted of mass and volume and it contains the elements of knowledge, memory and reference. It is repetitive interlocking with the Wall of the Surveyor. It is generally characterized by density and thickness. It is a space to view, physically reach and retrieve the knowledge, memory or reference.

text

images

video projection model

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MONTERREY MEDICAL CENTER SPRING 2009

Monterrey Medical Center is a, private polyclinic for the rising middle class in the third largest city in Mexico. Despite its large and diverse population, Monterrey’s society is strongly influenced by its culture and traditions. The prominent spiritual and recreational pursuits regulate behavior and develop social relationships with others. Monterrey Medical Center provides care in a luxurious, residential environment that encourages social networking with strong connections to family, culture, and fellow patients during the healing process. Patients in a hospital typically experience loss of control. In order to ease these feelings the room is designed to allow the patient as much control over their environment as possible. This gives them a psychological feeling of control and peace of mind. The furniture is not fixed and can be rearranged. The vanishing facade allows the patient to privatize their space with several filters for light and air. Strong connections to nature and human interaction during recovery has been proven to expedite the healing process. Light is a phenomenon that is a necessity to the human body . Many studies have showed a patients exposure to light has expedited their recovery. Each quad of patient rooms is adjacent to a communal living/kitchenette space. The interior floor is flush with the balcony so that patients can wheel their beds or their chairs out onto the balcony without assistance. PROJECT TYPE HEALTHCARE LOCATION MONTERREY MEXICO DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER SIZE 270 000 SQUARE FEET


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Staff Facilities

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Patient Rooms

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Patient Floor

Nurse Station

Service Core

Rose Garden Chapel

Third Floor Service Core

Food Services

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Pharmacy

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Lower Level Central Plant Service Core


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The Universal

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Family

Patient

Nurse


Patient Room

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CHAMPIONS SQUARE THE NEW ORLEANS SAINTS WINTER 2011 Gilmore Group presented Lisa Benson, owner of the New Orleans Saints, Champions Square and Fox 8, with multiple conceptual designs varying in media displays. As a team, we developed the project to make Champions Square not only a plaza to house concerts and events, but as an experiential, must-see destination. We compete with existing sports arenas throughout the country such as, Patriots Place and LA Live. The branding and marketing philosophy behind our design was to provide a balance between hi-resolution and low-resolution screens, LED displays, scrims, banners and projection displays. My primary role on the creative conceptual team was to developed ideas including 3D aquatic projection displays, media content, champions ambiance achieved through graphics, and marketing strategies.

PROJECT TYPE EVENT CENTER LOCATION NEW ORLEANS LOUISIANA DESIGN LINDSEY MILLER + GILMORE GROUP GRAPHIC DESIGN TEAM SIZE 121 000 SQUARE FEET


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TOWA R D S AFFECTIVE ARCHITECTURE

The Luxury Boutique Hotel

The evolution of the luxury boutique hotel and the social, economic and cultural history that inspired the styles and trends that define hospitality design in South Florida and around the World.

By Lindsey Miller

L I G H TS — C A M E R A—AC T I O N E D I T E D BY L I N D S E Y M I L L E R

This book takes you on a journey through filmmakers emulating reality and designers generating fantasy. The art of storytelling comes in various mediums. Whether on a screen, a stage, in a book or in a room, the audience embarks on a sensational journey to a simulated world. However, only the sensory conditions experienced with live-action film and highly invasive interior environments have the power to truly transport perception to illusion and reality to fantasy. Ironically, in all mediums the play on scale is the most powerful strategy artists use to communicate changes in perception. Dedicated filmmakers along with talented architects attempt to bring fantasy, dreams, desires and memories into being, which at the same time remain open to the viewers or users own experiences and imaginations. It is a shared, creative process. Architects measure their success by the degree in which the design consciously perceived space versus unconsciously experienced environments. Architecture, like a stage or a set, is designed as an adventure for the senses. The design methodology between the mediums is inherently similar in deriving these adventures. Film and theater set the stage by incorporating strategies of light and shadow, composition, atmosphere, contrast, visual pattern, repetition etc… These are the same spatial strategies architects apply to buildings. Great architecture, like great film or theater, captures the user or ‘audience’ and takes them on a journey that is a fantasy, dream or desire. This journey becomes the plot, or the function of the space. The architect acts as director. Every element in the space must support the experience. The backdrop is the

site and the signature environment is the program. Unlike live-action film, architecture exists in reality. In building design, the spectator becomes part of a larger, carefully articulated spatial configuration. Architecture has the capacity to completely captivate their audience on entirely new level – a full body sensory experience of their own in an unquestionable tangible environment. Therefore, architecture has more control over the audience and the experience than any other medium. Architecture is the most powerful medium because it eliminates all disconnect – audience and character become one. However, architecture is only successful if it generates interior landscapes that blur the boundaries between image and space, between theater and life. The focus is no longer on the static innovation of image and space. The creative interest is now focused on giving a dynamic momentum to interior design, adding an emotional dimension. Therefore, architects take reality and simulate a fantastical environment in order to grab the attention of the user and transport them to a new world. Intentional internal dramatic tension and deliberate dissolution forces one to question your perception of reality. Spatial designers create highly invasive environments that heighten sensory experience. By implementing these strategies and recalibrating reality designers acquire an opportunity to regain the user’s trust. The spatial configuration stages the user experience by generating clearly articulated gestures that guide the user through the space communicating the message set by fantastical reality.

At the turn of the 20th century, Miami Beach was nothing more than a desolate island floating amid a jungle of mangrove trees. However, within a decade many enterprising businessmen from New York City began migrating south to capitalize on the vast, undeveloped oceanfront land. Within a year construction of the Collins Bridge, today it is known as the Venetian Causeway, was well underway. This paved the way for mass development of the uninhabited tropical oasis and set the stage for the largest real estate booms Florida would see. With the Twenties, Miami Beach put itself on the map as a flourishing playground for millionaires. It was only a matter of time before Hollywood celebrities also discovered Miami and it soon became a resort and nightlife destination to rival Las Vegas and Palm Springs. Leonard Schultze and S. Fullerton Weaver in just under a decade built fourteen of the grandest hotels that today remain some of the most iconic historic landmarks in South Florida - Miami-Biltmore, The Breakers, The Nautilus and Roney Plaza set the bar for great hotels that Miami Beach would continue to produce. Nevertheless, with skyrocketing growth and fortune, and the rise of prohibition, the Miami “boom” also attracted big time crime, activities like gambling and prostitution, defined the darker side of the city’s influx of new money. The 1940s proved to be a ominous decade for Miami Beach and all of America. The attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941 brought the U.S. into World War II. Because of Miami’s prominent oceanfront location,

the Army Air Corps took command of Miami Beach. It’s location was also an important site in the battle against the German submarines. As a result, American soldiers by the thousand were stationed along Miami’s beaches. Miami experienced a large infiltration of military personnel for either a stopover or duration. The sunshine lured many back for more following the end of the war. The area remained one of America’s most popular entertainment destinations with hundreds of nightclubs, restaurants and hotels. Finally, in 1954, Morris Lapidus brought Miami back to life by introducing a new ideology to hospitality design. Lapidus was originally known for his achievements in retail design, and his ability to spatially stage a space with purpose - to sell. When it came to designing hotels, he simple asked himself - ‘What am I selling now? You’re selling a good time.’ This new ideology was a depiction of the American Dream, a direct reflection of the extreme height of excess that defined the 50s and 60s exuberant mentality. His passion for over-the-top design and radical imagination earned him the greatest commission on the beach - the Fontainbleau. Despite the initial negative criticism, the Fontainbleau consistently sold out and filled with star-studed guest lists and outrageous soirees. It was the beginning of empire. The Fontainbleau quickly became and remains today the most iconic hotel on Miami Beach.


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LINDSEY ANN MILLER

09.10 - 04.13

08.05 - 05.09

Education

University of Cincinnati DAAP Master of Architecture II Class of 2013 University of Colorado Boulder Bachelor of Environmental Design Class of 2009

High honors

Experience

References Josh Rider Associate jrider@studios.com 212.402.3369

Intern STUDIOS architecture Bridgewater Design Team

Intern Forrest Perkins Washington DC St. Regis Design Team

Stephen Perkins Principal & Founder sperkins@forrestperkins.com 202.478.8810

Intern Gilmore Group New York NY Conceptual Creative Team Marketing & Branding

Arthur Gilmore President & CEO ahgilmore@gilmoregroup.com 212.675.5122

Intern Kukk Architecture & Design High-end residential Seasonal

Jon Kukk Principal & Founder jkrooster@embarqmail.com 239.263.9996

04.12 - 08.12

06.11 - 09.11

01.11 - 04.11

08.08 - 12.08

New York NY

Naples FL

Skills Software Proficient with PC & Mac Microsoft Office AutoCAD Adobe CS Autodesk 3ds Max Sketch Up Autodesk Revit VectorWorks Rhino

Watercolor Gauche Marker 3D modeling

Graphic Design Website Design Marketing & Branding

Honors & Interests

Christopher Earls Family Endowment Recipient Golden Key International Honor Society Nation Collegiate Honors Society Dean’s List University of Cincinnati Graduate School Alliance President Midwest Schoolgirl Lacrosse Champions District State Champions Women’s Tennis University of Colorado Student Union Senator park shore

naples fl 34103

CU Architecture & Planning Student Government Treasurer & Vice President American Institute of Architecture Students University of Colorado Collegiate Women’s Lacrosse Stern’s West Dormitory President Barron Collier High School (BCHS) Executive Student Government Senator BCHS Varsity Tennis Captain Hathaway Brown School Bon Appetite Founder & President

tel 239 438 6463

millerla6@me.com


PORTFOLIO  

A selection of my creative work