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FRUIT PURSES ARE HOT! HOP ON THE TREND P. 56

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The Trusted Sewing Source

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JUNE/JULY 2018

Flowy Dress Pattern Inside P. 60

cork fabric Fun Bag Patterns, Sewing Tips & More Up Your Hem Game Finish projects like a pro

10 Tank Tops to Make this Summer

Create a Breezy Skirt 2 designs, 2 ways

Love Your Body in

DIY Swimwear P. 44

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Tuscan y 9-DAY

fashion tour in

September 16 - 24, 2018

Enjoy the company of fellow fashion lovers as you explore our handmade world!

Package Includes: » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » »

Round-trip airfare from New York to Milan. Private deluxe motor coach and driver the entire time. A professional Cratours escort the entire time. Professional and experienced tour guides. First-class hotel accommodations in Milan and Tuscany. An authentic Tuscan cooking lesson in a family owned winery. Inspirational visit to a master mosaic artisan workshop. A visit to a Italian leather school in Florence. Sights and shopping in Florence, San Gimignano, Pisa & Milan. A tour of the Auriil Thread Factory. A visit to the legendary Pino Grasso Embroidery Studio. Special presentation from Milan Fashion experts. A tour of the Ferragamo Museum and the Gucci Museum. Visit fashion artisans at the Antico Setificio silk weaving factory. A special Tuscan lunch in a winery. Train ride through the beautiful Cinque Terre. Italian paper marbling with a master artisan. Daily breakfast, some lunches and dinners. Commemorative totebag filled with gits. And much more!

he entire cost of this 9-day tour is

$3,943

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(per person based on double occupancy)

PRICING, ITINERARY, & ESCORTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE, TRAVEL INSURANCE IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR THIS TOUR. PLEASE CONSULT OUR WEBSITE FOR TERMS & CONDITIONS. PRICES ARE BASED ON DOUBLE OCCUPANCY AND SPACE IS AVAILABLE ON A FIRST COME-FIRST SERVED BASIS. GRATUITIES ARE ADDITIONAL AND WILL BE COLLECTED WITH THE FINAL PAYMENT. LAND ONLY RATES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

Contact: Info@Craftours.com

877-887-1188 CRAFTOURS.com


DESTINY II JOURNEY

#2

Lindsay Shoots for the Moon Lindsay Wilkes decided to challenge her love of sewing when we sent her a Destiny II. She tapped into her creativity and created a charming embroidered pillow that doubles as an unforgettable keepsake. The project incorporates handwriting, so Lindsay used the Destiny IIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s IQ designer to scan hers and then convert it to machine embroidery for the perfect finishing touch.

Embroidered Pillow Visit babylock.com/destinycreative for videos and notes about Lindsayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s project, as well as other sewlebrity projects on the Destiny II. Designed by Lindsay Wilkes from The Cottage Mama

Ba byLock. co m/50Y ea rs

l retailer Find your loca te! on our websi


CONTENTS

FEATURES 30 CLOTHES MINDED: WARDROBE BUILDING BLOCKS Sew a balanced wardrobe you love with Rachel Pinheiro.

34 CORK COUTURE Learn everything you need to know about sewing with cork fabric.

38 SHIRTTAIL SHOWDOWN Stitch one skirt two ways with menswear-inspired hems.

44 SUIT YOURSELF Considerations, musings & pattern picks for swimwear.

48 EASY SQUEEZY Paper-piece a scrappy table runner with sweet lemon slices.

52 PRETTY IN PINTUCKS Create a cute collared tank with perfect pintucks.

56 ONE IN A MELON Sew a fun, fruit-themed purse for summer.

60 DAY DATE DRESS Stitch a flowy, flirty dress.

64 PATTERN REVIEW: TANK TOP EDITION Find your perfect knit & woven tanks with Sew News staff pattern reviews.

70 MASTERCLASS: THE ART OF HEMMING Level up with these couture hemming techniques.

76 THE COMMON THREAD: SEW BIZ The pros and cons of turning your hobby into a business.

JUNE/JULY 2018 ISSUE 365

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sewnews.com email: sewnews@sewnews.com

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EDITORIAL Community Content Director Ellen March Senior Editor Amanda Carestio Creative Editor Kate Zaynard Online Editor Jill Case Assistant Editor Jessica Ziebarth Technical Editor Kim Saba ART Kerry Jackson Ashley Navarre Jessica Grenier, Matt Graves Illustrator Melinda Bylow Photo Stylist Tina Gill Hair & Makeup Artist Beauty on Location Studio MARKETING & ADVERTISING Marketing Manager, eCommerce Shannon Manley Ad Trafficker Lori Hauser Advertising Managers Nancy Mayhall, Mary-Evelyn Dalton BUSINESS Director of Content Strategy Stephen Koenig Director of Media Sales Julie Macdonald

F+W, A CONTEN Chief Executive Officer Chief Financial Officer SVP, General Manager, F+W Craft Group Managing Director, F+W International VP, General Counsel VP, Human Resources VP, Manufacturing & Logistics Newsstand Sales

ERCE COMPANY Greg Osberg Jennifer Graham John Bolton

ON THE COVER

Senior Designer Graphic Designer Photography

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James Woollam Robert Sporn Gigi Healy Phil Graham Scott T. Hill Scott.hill@procirc.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS: To subscribe to Sew News magazine or change the address of your current subscription, visit Subscriber Services online at: sewnews.com. You may also call or write: Phone: (800) 289-6397, International: (386) 597-4387 E-mail: sewnews@emailcustomerservice.com Subscriber Services: Sew News, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235 Subscription rates for the United States and possessions: $23.98 for one year (six issues). Canadian subscriptions add $6 per year (includes GST and postage). Elsewhere outside the U.S., add $12 per year postage. Payment in U.S. funds must accompany all orders outside the U.S. Major credit cards accepted. Some back issues of Sew News magazine are available for $5.99, payable in advance.

48 COLUMNS

IN EVERY ISSUE

TO ORDER BACK ISSUES: Call (800) 590-3465; or go to shopsewitall.com.

14 BASIC SKILLS: Tube Turning

6

Editor’s Letter

REPRINTS: Contact Wright’s Reprints to purchase quality custom reprints or e-prints of articles appearing in this publication at (877) 652-5295 or (281) 419-5725 outside the U.S. and Canada.

18 PATTERN PLAY: Beach Bound

8

Experts

22 CURVE APPEAL: Swimsuit Shape-Up

9

Reader Tips

26 SERGER SCHOOL: Beyond Seam Finishing

10 Staff Picks

80 SEW ALONG: BurdaStyle Wrap Blouse #124

84 Off the Shelf

RETAILERS: If you are interested in carrying this magazine in your store, please contact us: Toll Free (800) 289-0963; or e-mail sales@ fwcommunity.com Occasionally, our subscriber list is made available to reputable firms offering goods and services that we believe would be of interest to our readers. If you prefer to be excluded, please send your current address label and a note requesting to be excluded from these promotions to: SEW NEWS, a division of F+W, A Content + eCommerce Company, 741 Corporate Circle, Ste. A, Golden, CO, 80401, Attn.: Privacy Coordinator. Sew News June/July 2018 • No. 3 Copyright ©2018 by F+W, a content + ecommerce company. All rights reserved. Nothing may be printed in whole or in part without permission from the publisher. Single-copy rate U.S. $5.99; Canada $6.99. Subscriptions are $23.98 for one year (6 issues). Canadian subscriptions add $6 per year (includes GST and postage). Elsewhere outside the U.S., add $12 per year postage. Payment in U.S. funds must accompany all orders outside the U.S. For subscriptions, address changes or adjustments, write to SEW NEWS, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142. Eight weeks are required for a change of address. Please give both new and old addresses and, if possible, the mailing label of the old address. The information in this publication is presented in good faith, but no warranty is given nor results guaranteed. Since SEW NEWS has no control over your choice of materials or procedures, neither SEW NEWS nor the various manufacturers assume any responsibility for the use of this data.

82 HOME COUTURE: 70’s Craft Revival

12 Meet the Maker 88 All Sewn Up

83 GET THE LOOK: Endless Summer 86 HIGH-END HACK: Light as a Feather

PRINTED IN THE USA

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EDITOR DEAR READERS, Have you ever sewn your own swimwear? Over the years we’ve presented many swimwear patterns and technique articles for working with swimwear fabrics. But I’m curious to know how many of you have actually taken the plunge. I truly believe that sewing up a suit yourself is less daunting and cringeworthy than buying one. Shopping for a pattern is a lot more fun than shopping for a suit, that’s for sure. Think about it: You have to try on numerous styles and sizes under fluorescent lighting while wearing undergarments and trying not to judge yourself for not working out enough, eating that second piece of pie or having hairy legs. You settle for a suit that may or may not make you feel great, just to get it over with.

Cork Couture p. 34

We asked our community of sewing experts how sewing their own suit changed the way they feel about swimwear. Most said that the process of making the suit was relatively easy, depending on the pattern. And that wearing the suit is a real confidence booster. See page 44 for the real story, and peruse current patterns that will work with your figure. While you’re compiling your list of must-have patterns for summer makes, check out our super-fun tank top pattern review. We had a great time making all kinds of tank tops and grabbing friends, moms and co-workers to model the different styles and fabric substrates. The great thing about tank tops is that you can wear them beyond summer, paired with a cardigan, blazer or long-sleeve shirt underneath if room allows. Choose from a knit or woven pattern and stitch one up in an hour (or less in some cases!). A big bag for summer is also an absolute must, and we have a few inspirations that feature cork fabric—the new craze that’s taking over the sewing world. It’s a supple and pliable fabric and almost looks like leather. But it’s best used as an accent, and we’ll give you more tips for working with it to ensure success.

One in a Melon

p. 56

Whatever you decide to make this summer, I hope the sewing process is empowering and gives you confidence to go out in the world wearing beautiful things that fit and feel great. That’s what it’s all about, after all.

Ellen March Community Content Director

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WHAT’S NEXT? HAVE FUN PLAYING WITH TEXTILES WITH VARIOUS TECHNIQUES USING COMMON HOUSEHOLD ITEMS. UPCYCLE DENIM INTO FABULOUS FALL WEARABLES. PLUS, FIND OUR WORKWEAR PATTERN REVIEW AND LEARN THE FIRST STEPS TO MAKING YOUR OWN BRA. PICK UP THE AUG/SEPT SEW NEWS ON NEWSSTANDS JULY 17, 2018.


3 Full Days â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LIVE! Arlington, TX | Atlanta, GA | Cincinnati, OH | Cleveland, OH Fredericksburg, VA | Lakeland, FL | Novi, MI | Raleigh, NC

What will you

today?

Workshops Classes Shopping Fashion Shows and More!

SH P SAV R! An Extraordinary Retreat Experience! â&#x20AC;˘ Timeless Sewing Techniques: Modern Methods and Classic Heirloom Touches Raleigh, NC | July 22-27, 2018 Enjoy a unique retreat-style experience that blends the love of sewing, serging, friendships, skill-building and business opportunity into one spectacular experience at Martha Pullen Teacher Licensing Retreats.

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EXPERTS

Find out about the talented experts featured in this issue, and visit their websites to learn even more!

What’s your must-have

SUMMER PATTERN PICK? Rachel Pinheiro’s Eliane Jumpsuit from Style Arc

RAE CUMBIE

NICKI LAFOILLE

Curve Appeal: Swimsuit Shape-Up — page 22

Shirttail Showdown — page 38 Pretty in Pintucks — page 52 meetthegofamily.blogspot.com

My summer pattern pick is the Tabula Rasa Knit Tee and Tunic. It fits like a dream and is so easy and quick to stitch up a new one in washable knit jersey for a great summer look with linen pants.

AMY FRIEND

MICHELLE MORRIS

Easy Squeezy — page 48

One in a Melon — page 56

My summer pattern pick is a Dropcloth embroidery sampler. It’s a great project to bring along on road trips or to work on in the evenings on the porch with a glass of wine. whileshenaps.com

MEG HEALY Pattern Play: Beach Bound — page 18

This summer is going to be all about the romper and jumpsuit. I'm using BurdaStyle pattern #115 from the 03/2015 issue to make a couple variations with long and cropped legs. burdastyle.com/profiles/megh/ my_studio

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ADDIE MARTINDALE Day Date Dress — page 60

The Common Thread: Sew Biz — page 76

Abby Glassenberg’s Dropcloth Embroidery Sampler

Cork Couture — page 34 sewsweetness.com

fitforartpatterns.com

ABBY GLASSENBERG

Meg Healy’s BurdaSty and Jumpsuit Patter le Romper n

SARA LAWSON

I just purchased the McCall's 7728 Jumpsuit, and I’m in love with view C. I can't wait to make this in an Ankara print, which is 100% cotton and perfect for the summer. thatblackchic.com

RACHEL PINHEIRO Clothes Minded — page 30

My summer must-have pattern is the Eliane jumpsuit from Style Arc. Jumpsuits are super elegant while keeping you comfortable and cool. You can take this pattern from day to night. Sew it in crepe or cupro in bright colors and wear statement earrings. houseofpinheiro.com

LINDA REYNOLDS Masterclass: The Art of Hemming — page 70 simplysewingstudio.com


Featured readers received a gift for submitting a tip. Send your tips to sewnews@sewnews.com or post them at facebook.com/sewnews.

1. GOOD VIBRATIONS Place a large 13" square mouse pad under your serger to prevent it from “walking” as you sew.

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Jill C., letter 2. FOREVER LABELED After purchasing a new spool of thread, super glue around the label edges to keep it from falling off.

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Mindy S., email 3. THE GREAT DRAPE Apply a 4"-long boning strip to the back of a tape measure to use when you need a straight edge. Drape the rest of the tape measure around your neck for easy accessibility. Nancy Y., letter

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4. GATHER ’ROUND Use hand-quilting thread in the bobbin when sewing gathering stitches. Loosen the upper thread tension slightly and use the largest stitch possible. Cheryl B., letter 5. WATCH & SEW Purchase a tablet that has Internet capabilities and a standing case for your sewing room. Not only can you watch online video tutorials but you can also access movies to watch as you sew for long periods of time.

HIDE & SEEK

Sandra B., email

4 5

Play & Win!

Congratulations

What is it? Pictured at left is part of a photo from this issue. When you find it, enter online at sewnews.com or send a postcard with the page you found it on to Sew News, Hide & Seek, 741 Corporate Circle, Ste. A, Golden, CO 80401.

to the Apr/May ’18 Hide & Seek winners! We randomly selected five winners.

Responses are due June 30, 2018. From the correct responses, we’ll randomly draw five winners, one of which could be you.

Nancy G., Wenatchee, WA Marlene K., Nowata, OK Zepherine K., Ames, IA Gertrude M., Farmington, MN Vicky C., Muscoda, WI

The June/July ’18 winners will receive a pack of accessory patterns.

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STAFF PICKS 1. Take a sewing vacation to Hong Kong with the AMERICAN SEWING GUILD. Hosted by former Sew News editor Linda Griepentrog and writer Pauline Richards, Sew Much Fun Hong Kong will share some of d shopping closes

1 2. There’s nothing more nostalgic than a tomato pincushion. Keep it classic with the PINCUSHION NEEDLE MINDER. Not only is this retro design a great tool to hold your pins, but the magnetic back allows you to wear it on a garment or accessory. pinpeddlers.com

3. The fabric collection SOW & SEW BY ELOISE RENOUF is full of fun foliage and calming colors. Each pattern features an illustration of a garden herb or vegetable, paired with geometric shapes and/or colorblocking to create a unique combination. Prints are available in canvas and quilting cotton. cloud9fabrics.com

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4. Condition your thread to prevent tangling and fraying with the THREAD MAGIC CUBE. It easily attaches to your machine and leaves no residue, making it safe for all thread and fabric types. taylorseville.com

5 5. Make yourself the bralette of your dreams with the BARRETT BRALETTE KIT FROM MADALYNNE INTIMATES. Luxe mesh and elastic are hard to come by, especially in small quantities. This kit comes with ½ yard each of blush pink glitter and nude stretch mesh, 2½ yards of picot plush elastic in both 3⁄8" and ¾" widths, 1½ yards of 3⁄8"-width shoulder strap elastic, 3⁄8" hardware rings and sliders for shoulder straps and a PDF Barrett Bralette pattern, all packaged in a beautiful reusable box. madalynne.com

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MEET THE MAKER Hi, I’m

SN: Describe your perfect day. EB: An unrealistically perfect day would be working out with an in-home personal trainer. If I didn’t have to actually leave the house, I’d work out a lot more! Then eating a perfectly healthy after-workout meal — already prepared, of course. And sewing for the rest of the day.

SN: What’s the last hobby you picked up? EB: Amateur gardening. I became the Mother of Plants. And luckily, quite a few survived! This year, I’m venturing into starting an herb and vegetable garden. I’m feeling really ambitious these days.

SN: What’s your spirit animal? EB: A mother grizzly. I’m all about my solitude. This is why sewing is the most perfect hobby for me. It centers me. Plus, I’m fiercelyy protective of my family.

SN: What’s your best way to decompress?

ERICA BUNKER is a fashion sewing blogger who inspires the average home sewist to look beyond outdated commercial pattern instructions, select fine fabrics and cultivate a luxurious home-sewn wardrobe inspired by luxury brands. EricaBunker.com

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EB: I’m a textbook introvert. So, decompression is kind of my thing. Sewing is my number one outlet. I work out while plugged into my favorite playlist. And other times, I enjoy a glass of wine (or two) while scrolling fashion and sewing inspiration on the web.


Having the ability to sew anything I could possibly imagine wearing allows me to live an unlimited fashion life. SN: What is your greatest extravagance?

SN: When did you learn to sew?

EB: Getting dressed, on a daily basis. Even though I haven’t worked outside of my home in many years, I’ve always made an effort to put forth a good fashion foot. Having the ability to sew anything I could possibly imagine wearing allows me to live an unlimited fashion life. So, I don’t limit myself to yoga pants or jeans and t-shirts.

EB: I learned to sew like a lot of others my age — in home economics. I was in the 8th grade, and it was taught as an elective back in the day. I didn’t really develop a love for sewing until around 13 years ago.

SN: Where do you find inspiration? SN: What is your most treasured possession? EB: Square footage! I love having a sewing space that’s all mine. I don’t have to share one single spot with my husband. I get to walk in and walk out and leave everything in that room any way I like.

SN: What do you consider your greatest achievement?

EB: Instagram is my favorite. I love real everyday style. I love people watching. A trip out to places that stylish women frequent serves as great inspiration.

SN: If you were a sewing superhero, what would your name be? EB: Sewing Vixen. Super powers: The ability to modify and cut out any pattern at warp speed and transform any fabric into a couture garment in record time.

EB: Raising three incredible human beings. SN: What is your must-have tool in your studio? SN: Who is your dream client and what would you want to create for them? EB: I’m completely a selfish sewer. Other than my daughters, I’ve never enjoyed sewing for others. So, I am my dream client. My dream sewing situation would be a big red carpet moment. I’ve never had an opportunity to create an extravagant evening gown and that’s on my ssewing bucket list.

EB: A great iron. I could have a low-end sewing machine, but a great steam iron is a must. I use a Sapporo Gravity Feed Iron, and I can’t live without it.

SN: What is your favorite fabric to work with? EB: Any natural fiber that presses well. As long as it’s not resistant to heat, I love it!

SN: What is your motto? EB: “Why buy it when you can make it?”

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BASIC SKILLS

Getty Images/Biscuit Eight LLC/Corbis/VCG

TUBE TURNING A variety of projects, such as narrow dress straps and wide purse handles, require fabric tubes for both functionality and embellishment. Learn eight stress-free tube turning techniques using common sewing room supplies and specialty tools.

TUBE ANATOMY Create a tube from a fabric strip that’s twice the desired finished tube width plus the seam allowance. The wider the tube, the easier it is to turn right side out. Cut fabric strips on the lengthwise, crosswise or bias grain to accommodate different tube widths and stretch amounts. Most tubes are created with woven fabric, however knit fabric is also suitable. • Lengthwise grain fabric strips are stable, have the least amount of stretch and are best for straight tubes. Don’t cut narrow tubes 14

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on the lengthwise grain because there’s not enough stretch to facilitate turning. • Crosswise grain fabric strips have slightly more stretch and are best for straight tubes and gentle curves. • Bias fabric strips have the most stretch and are best for curved and narrow tubes because the stretch makes turning and shaping the tube easier. • Knit fabric strips have a lot of stretch and are best for making waistline drawstrings or jewelry.

Select an open or closed tube based on the chosen project. Fold a fabric strip in half lengthwise with right sides together. To create an open tube, stitch the long edge. To create a closed tube, stitch the long edge and one short end. Insert cording into a tube for definition and stability. Or increase the fabric-strip seam allowance to match the tube width. The seam allowance acts as a lightweight filler for added stability when the tube is turned right side out.


TUBE TURNING METHODS To turn a tube, a tool of some kind is generally required. This can be as simple as a safety pin or pencil, but there are also several tools on the market specifically designed for easily turning tubes. Each is effective in its own way, though some may work better for certain sizes and types of tubes than others. Which you choose really comes down to individual preference.

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SAFETY PIN Using a safety pin to turn a tube is the most basic method. However, a safety pin is often difficult to push through narrow tubes and can open before the tube is completely turned, causing a finger prick and/or the inability to finish turning the tube. Select a safety pin that’s slightly narrower than the tube width. Attach the safety pin to one tube short end, and then push the safety pin head into the tube.

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Push the safety pin through the tube toward the open short end while pulling the fabric in the opposite direction to turn the tube right side out (1). Remove the safety pin.

PENCIL OR CHOPSTICK Use a pencil or chopstick for turning closed tubes. Place the pencil eraser or chopstick blunt end into the closed tube short end, and then pull ½" of the fabric over the pencil or chopstick end. Push the pencil or chopstick through the tube toward the open short end, while pulling the fabric in the opposite direction to turn the tube right side out (2). Remove the pencil or chopstick.

RIBBON OR YARN Using ribbon or yarn to turn a tube provides a secure “handle” to easily turn the tube right side out.

Cut a length of stable ribbon or yarn several inches longer than the fabric strip length.

end in the stitching. Stitch the strip long edge, making sure not to catch the ribbon or yarn in the stitching.

Fold the fabric strip with right sides together, centering the ribbon or yarn between the two layers and extending the ribbon or yarn short ends just beyond each strip short end.

Gently pull the ribbon or yarn unstitched end while pulling the fabric in the opposite direction to turn the tube right side out (3). For an open tube, remove the basting stitches and ribbon or yarn. For a closed tube, carefully trim the ribbon or yarn.

To create an open tube, baste one strip short end, securing the ribbon or yarn in the stitching. To create a closed tube, stitch one strip short end, securing the ribbon or yarn

SERGER THREAD CHAIN Use a serger to create a thread chain for turning the tube, and then stitch a closed tube. S E W N E W S.CO M

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4 Set the serger for a 3-thread or 4-thread overlock stitch. Serge a thread chain several inches longer than the fabric strip length. Don’t cut the thread chain. Fold the fabric strip in half lengthwise with right sides together, centering the thread chain between the two layers and extending the thread chain ends just beyond each strip short end. Serge the tube short end and long edge, making sure not to catch the thread chain in the stitching. Trim the thread chain and remove the tube from the serger.

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Gently pull the thread chain open end while pulling the fabric in the opposite direction to turn the tube right side out (4). Apply seam sealant to each serged seam end; let dry. Trim the thread chain.

LOOP TURNER A loop turner is roughly 10½" long with a ring on one end and a hook on the opposite end. A loop turner turns 1⁄8"-wide or wider tubes.

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Cut one tube short end at an angle. Insert the loop turner hook end into the opposite tube end, gathering the fabric onto the loop turner until the hook and angled fabric end align. Attach the hook into the tube 1⁄4" from the short end. Hold the ring and gently pull the loop turner through the tube while pulling the fabric in the opposite direction to turn the tube right side out (5). Remove the fabric from the hook end.

FLAT TUBE TURNER TOOL A flat tube turner works well for delicate or slippery fabrics, such as chiffon or satin, and is usually available in a small size for 3⁄8"- to 1"-wide tubes and a large size for 3⁄4"-wide or wider tubes.

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Insert the flat tube turner pointed end into the tube, sliding the clip over the tube short end; close the clip (6). Push and gather the fabric onto the turner. Hold the turner pointed end while pulling the fabric in the opposite direction to turn the tube right side out (7). Remove the fabric from the clip.

CYLINDER & ROD TURNER TOOL A cylinder and rod turner tool comes in various sizes, including a 3⁄16"diameter cylinder for 3⁄8"- to 5⁄8"-wide tubes, a 3⁄8"-diameter cylinder for 3⁄4"to 1"-wide tubes and a 1⁄2"-diameter cylinder for 1"-wide or wider tubes. Each cylinder has a corresponding metal or wooden rod. Select the cylinder and rod that corresponds to the tube width. For

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a closed tube, insert the cylinder into the open short end, gathering the fabric onto the cylinder until the cylinder and opposite short end align. For an open tube, insert the cylinder into one open short end, gathering the fabric onto the cylinder until the cylinder is 1" from the opposite open short end. Push the closed or open short end into the cylinder using the round rod end while sliding the tube over the cylinder. Pull the tube end from the cylinder, turning the tube right side out (8). Use the rod end to push out the tube corners. Remove the rod.

CYLINDER & HOOK TURNER TOOL A cylinder and hook turning tool is the fastest method to turn tubes and works for the widest range of fabric types. The tool also offers a quick and easy way to fill fabric tubes with

cording. Each cylinder has a corresponding wire hook with a “pigtail” end. The tool comes in a six sizes for 1⁄8"- to 3⁄4"-wide tubes for light- to mediumweight fabric and three sizes ranging from 1”- to 11⁄2"-wide tubes for heavyweight fabric. Select the cylinder and hook that corresponds to the tube width. Insert the cylinder into the open short end, gathering the fabric onto the cylinder until the cylinder and opposite short end align. Insert the hook into the cylinder. Turn the hook clockwise to attach the pigtail end to the tube short end. Gently push the short end into the cylinder and pull the hook from the cylinder, turning the tube right side out (9). Turn the hook counter clockwise to remove the pigtail end from the tube short end. To fill a tube with cording or yarn, follow the previous instructions but after the pigtail end is attached to the tube short end, place the cording or yarn end into the cylinder end. Gently pull the hook from the cylinder, simultaneously turning the tube right side out and covering the cording or yarn.

TIP: Easily press tubes flat by inserting a cardboard strip that’s slightly narrower than the finished tube width.

9 SOURCES Dritz makes the Loop Turner, Clip ’N Turn flat tube turner tool and Quick Turn cylinder and rod turner tool: dritz.com. Fasturn makes the cylinder and hook turner tool: fasturn.net.

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PATTERN PLAY

BEACH BOUND BY MEG HEALY

Alter a slip dress pattern to include side slits and a choker neckline for a cool cover up to wear to the beach or pool.

BurdaStyle #104 07/2016

GET 20% OFF THE FEATURED PATTERN! PURCHASE THE SLIP DRESS PATTERN FROM BURDASTYLE.COM AND ENTER CODE COVERUP20 AT CHECKOUT.

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A MESSAGE FROM MEG, ONLINE EDITOR FOR BURDASTYLE If you’re like me, a stylish cover up is just as important as a swimsuit! Whether you’re attending a beach bash or a posh pool party, this maxi-length cover up with slit alteration is the perfect choice. Opt for an open or sheer fabric to achieve this poolside look and to show off your handmade swimsuit underneath.

SUPPLIES

PREPARE

ALTER

• Slip dress sewing pattern (such as BurdaStyle #104 07/2016)

If using a digital pattern, print, tile and tape together the pattern pieces. You’ll need the front, back and front yoke.

To reduce the number of seams, eliminate the front yoke and flounce, if applicable. Begin by cutting out the front yoke directly on the size line.

Choose the pattern size based on the bust measurement. Mark the appropriate size line on all pieces for easy reference.

On the front, extend the center-front line up about 8" (1). Place the front yoke over the front, aligning the center fronts at the base of the seam. Tape the yoke in place. On the featured pattern, the curved seams won’t completely match up due to shaping in the seam (2).

• 3 yards of 59"-wide open knit, crochet, lace or chiffon fabric • 1 yard of matching 1"-wide elastic • 1" wide G-hook • Matching all-purpose thread • 80/12 ballpoint sewing machine needle

TIP: If your fabric has a nice-looking selvage, omit the hem allowance and use the selvage as the hem.

• Clear gridded ruler • French curve • Tape • Pattern paper

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Extend the armhole up 2" (3). Measure up 5" from the neckline at center front 5"; mark. Using a French curve, connect the two markings to create a smooth curve for a new, higher neckline. The curve should intersect the center-front line at a 90° angle (4). Tape pattern paper to the hem and extend the side and center-front lines 14" (or to the desired length). Draw a curve parallel to the original hem to connect the extended lines. To mark the slit, measure down 6" from the waistline as indicated on the side seam. Repeat to lengthen the back pattern piece and mark the slit, making no changes to the pattern upper edge. Add 1⁄2" seam allowances to the side seams and armholes. Don’t add seam allowance to the center-front and center-back edges, as they’re cut on fold. Add 1⁄2" to the front and back neckline edges. Add 3⁄4" hem allowance to the lower edge. Cut out the paper pattern pieces along the seam allowance lines.

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TIP: To create an open back, alter the back pattern piece so it runs straight across to center back from the underarm point. Omit the back elastic pieces.

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CUT From the fabric, cut one front on the fold and one back on the fold. The front and back pieces may look quite similar, so mark either the front or back with a sticky note or pin.

CONSTRUCT Serge-finish, zigzag-finish or bind each side edge on the front and back pieces. Align the side seams with right sides together; stitch from the underarm to the slit upper edge, backstitching at each end. If the fabric allows, press open the seams. If not, open the seam allowances and pin to either side of the seam. Continue pressing or pinning past the end of the seam all the way to the hem. Beginning at one hem edge and working from the right side, stitch the slit seam allowance 1⁄4" from the fabric edge. Stitch up to the slit, and then continue to stitch the seam allowance up the side seam, pivoting at the underarm point and stitching down the opposite side in one continuous seam. Repeat to stitch the remaining side seam. To finish the hem, fold the edge to the wrong side according to the desired hem allowance; stitch close to the fold.

DARING DRAWSTRING For a different look, tie the cover up closed with a drawstring. Make the following changes to the cover-up instructions. Omit the elastic from the supplies. Instead, use 1 yard of ½" drawstring or cording. When adding seam allowance to  the front and back neckline, add 1" instead of ½". Follow the construction instructions until the front and back necklines are finished. Fold the front and back neckline allowances 1" toward the wrong side. Topstitch close to the fold to create a casing. Thread the drawstring through the front and back casings to the desired fit, trim the string if desired and tie the ends in a bow over one shoulder. To create a bow on each shoulder, cut the drawstring in half. Knot the ends to prevent unraveling.


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Finish the armhole edges from back to front, passing over the underarm point. Fold the seam allowance to the wrong side; topstitch.

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For a variation, try this cute cropped style!

Serge- or zigzag-finish the front and back neckline edges. Roll the finished edge of the front neckline to the wrong side, and then pin to the lower edge of the elastic. Topstitch the neckline to the elastic (5). Measure the neck circumference and add 21⁄2", or wrap the elastic around the neck until comfortable and pin-mark. Trim the elastic to the recorded measurement. Attach the G-hook on one end, folding the elastic 11⁄4" around it. Pin a loop on the opposite side, folding the elastic 11⁄4"; stitch (6). Fold the back neckline seam allowance to the wrong side; topstitch. Pin one end of one remaining elastic piece to the back neckline/armhole edge and the opposite end to the front where the neck elastic is attached to the front neckline; stitch (7). Repeat to attach the remaining elastic piece. SOURCE BurdaStyle provided the Slip Dress #104 07/2016 pattern: burdastyle.com.

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BY RAE CUMBIE

SWIMSUIT SHAPE-UP From swimsuits to surplice tops, learn how to make summer’s top looks work for your curves.

There’s so much information available online about collecting materials and sewing swimwear, but how do I choose a style that its and latters? 22

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If you’re not sure what style and shape is best for your handmade swimwear, consider these questions to make informed style choices. Have you had a swimsuit that you felt comfortable wearing? What were the design details, fabrication and color? What will you do in your swimsuit? Are you planning to lounge poolside, swim laps, chase a toddler around the kiddy pool or snorkel in the ocean?


Is a fashionable style or athletic function more important to you? What’s your body shape? Be honest here, because there’s a style to flatter any body shape. The same guidelines for flattering garment fit apply to swimwear: Identify your favorite figure features and accentuate them with your choice of suit. Pick a suit with details and colors that draw the eye to curves. Choose darker colors to minimize attention for specific areas. Add flounces strategically to add volume. Choose slanted lines rather than straight lines to nuance fullness.

Opposite page: Getty Images/Echo. This page: Getty Images/Carol Yepes.

What are the styling factors that inform your wardrobe? You’ll be more comfortable in a suit that reflects your sense of style, whether it’s minimalist, retro, bold, colorful, bohemian or tailored. How confident are you about your body? Swimwear ranges from very revealing to full coverage. In some aspects, this question is more important than your body shape. You can wear any suit style as long as you wear it with confidence. If you’re full of confidence and daring, choose designs with two pieces or one-piece designs featuring cut-out sections between the bust and hips, a low-cut neckline or a plunging back. To keep a low-cut or open suit in place, consider adding a strap or ties to anchor the suit when active. Now that you’ve reflected on these questions, consider a number of styles, keeping in mind your lifestyle needs, body shape, style essence and confidence level. Sketch your ideas on a personal croquis if you are still unsure.

I have a hard time buying a swimsuit that its my full hips, small bust and narrow shoulders. Do you have any suggestions for how to purchase a suit that can be altered easily, or should I make one from scratch? Our unique figures sometimes make swimsuit purchases complicated. There are many choices available these days, such as tankinis, skirtinis and shortinis. Buy each piece to fit the fullest curve because there’s no fabric to release in a ready-to-wear swimsuit. Or consider buying two pieces that coordinate but fit your body shape. Alter the suit following steps and techniques used to alter performance wear. Add darts or reduce interior seams to shape the suit so it closely covers the body. If the seams are industrial flatlock, add a dart-like seam next to the unalterable seam to add shaping. If making a suit, buy enough fabric to make a mock-up and a finished suit. Each swimwear knit moves differently with 2or 4-way stretch and varying percentages of spandex. Each of these affects the amount of negative ease to add into the pattern. By testing the suit shape and fit with a mock-up, you will gain confidence in your choice of style and master the order of construction. Then you can sew your suit knowing it will fit and flatter. S E W N E W S.CO M

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I love surplice-style tops, dresses and swimwear for summer, but when I try to make one, the crisscross is always too loose and gaping. How can I adjust my pattern so it crosses snugly across my chest? Surplice styles are fun and flattering when they fit well. Diagnosing problems and solutions are easiest if you have a mockup made from the pattern. If not, try tissue fitting the pattern for similar results.

Transfer these pinches and the bust point on your paper pattern. Then draw a line through the center of each pinched dart ending at the bust point (1).

Pattern images from BurdaStyle.com.

If the crisscross gaps open, put on the top and pin out the extra fabric so the top lays smoothly across your body. These adjustments should look like small darts that resolve just before the bust point. If there’s a lot of gaping, reduce the curve in more than one place to create a smooth line. While you have the top on, pin or mark the bust point as well.

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Consider the styling to decide where to transfer the adjustments, usually either into a dart or into tucks on the short side seam under the bust.

TO ADD A DART: • Measure down 2" to 3" from the armhole and draw a line to intersect with the bust point (2). • Cut along all the lines leaving a hinge in the paper at the bust point. • Shift the paper to close the adjustments along the surplice curve and allow the side seam to spread open into a dart (3). • Tape the adjustments closed and fill in the dart with paper. • Back off the bust point at least ½" to create the end point of the new dart. Then draw the new dart legs to line up with the paper addition at the seam allowance (4).

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For more fit alterations, check out Rae’s course Altering Ready to Wear for Fit & Style at academy. burdastyle.com.

TO ADD A TUCK: • Identify where you want the tuck or tucks to fall below the surplice curve at the side seam.

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• Draw a line from this location to the bust point (5). • Cut along the lines, leaving a hinge in the paper at the bust point. • Shift the paper to close the adjustments along the surplice curve and allow the tuck lines to spread (6). • Tape in the adjustments, filling in the pattern where the tuck lines have spread open. • Create tuck markings that are parallel to the hemline and incorporate the paper addition created for the tuck (7). If the front does not cross gracefully because it’s too small in the bustline (even though the rest of the top fits fine), add a full bust adjustment to the pattern front. Put on the top. • Observe the amount of extra fabric that’s needed to create a graceful crisscross. • Mark the bust point on the pattern and draw a line from the curve of the armhole to the bust point. • Draw a line from the bust point to the hemline (8). • Cut along these lines, leaving a hinge at the armhole seamline. • Spread the pattern to add the necessary amount of extra bust width (9). • Fill in the pattern with paper and add extra paper at the bottom to equalize the hem (10). • If the pattern is now too wide at the waistline, reduce it along the side seam.

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SERGER SCHOOL

BEYOND SEAM A serger is a great pick for seaming knits and finishing the edges of ravel-prone fabrics and seams, but there’s so much more it can do to simplify (and in some cases, speed up) the garment construction process. Read on to learn how to take your serger skills to the next level.

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Getty Images/ballyscanlon

FINISHING


QUICK BANDED PLACKETS When making a cuffed shirt or blouse, adapt the instructions to create a simple banded placket. Cut a 1"-wide on-grain strip of matching or coordinating fabric the length of the entire slit opening for the band. Fold the band in half lengthwise, wrong sides together. With right sides together and raw edges matching, position the band on the slit opening.

Serge-seam the raw edges together, pushing the fabric toward the needle at the corner point so the stitches evenly catch the edge (1). Press the band away from the sleeve and reinforce the point by straight stitching diagonally across the folded end (2). If wearing the sleeve rolled up, consider serging the band in place with a satinlength decorative stitch. For lightweight fabrics, use a rolled-edge stitch, and for heavyweight fabrics, adjust for a narrow balanced 3-thread stitch.

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Fold

MOCK TAILORED PLACKET

Corner Point

Use the banded placket technique plus topstitching to replicate a tailored shirt opening. Using a 2"-wide self-fabric strip, repeat the steps at left to figure 1. Press the band toward the sleeve wrong side, opening out the placket flat.

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Corner Point

Working from the sleeve right side, straight stitch two parallel rows on the side of the placket closest to the sleeve center, catching the band in the stitching and ending even with the corner point (3). Pull the thread tails though the underside, knotting them and clipping the excess. Press the placket into place and topstitch across the placket upper edge through all layers, connecting the parallel rows of stitching. Topstitch a pointed-end box above the placket upper edge (4).

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FRONT HIP POCKETS Serge trouser or skirt front-hip pockets quickly with no trimming, clipping or other finishing needed.

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6 Fusible Interfacing

Pocket Facings

Fuse a strip of interfacing to the wrong side of each pocket facing along the pocket opening edge. Right sides together and curved edges aligned, serge-seam the pocket facing to the garment front. Turn the facings to the wrong side and edgestitch (5). Right sides together, serge-seam each pocket to its respective facing, then press the pockets into position and machine baste them along the side and waistline seams (6).

Getty Images/Schafer & Hill

Finish the garment per the pattern instructions.

GARMENT SERGING SUCCESS Use these tips to make the most of your serger for garment construction. • Make a plan. Serge-seam or serge-finish as many pieces as possible at one sitting, creating a chain between garment pieces, then clipping them apart to proceed with construction. • If possible, opt for 2-thread overlock to finish raw edges. This results in a softer, less bulky finish and helps conserve thread.

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• Always reserve matching thread for the needle(s) and limit non-matching threads to the loopers only, as the needle thread might show from the garment right side. • If you have a 5-thread machine, use it to its fullest potential. The chainstitch, combined with a 3-thread overlock, results in a very sturdy and permanent seam, even on wovens. The wider stitch also provides insurance for fitting or later alterations.


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SPEEDY SERGED VENTS Serging helps finish a lapped vent quickly and easily on a fitted skirt.

Clip

Serge-finish the hem edge and the center-back seam allowances, trimming off the upper corners of the extension. Straight stitch the center-back seam to the dot at the vent upper edge. Press open the seam. To release the underlap, clip the left seam allowance to the dot, then press under the serging on the left vent extension and edgestitch (7). Press the vent extension on top of the right vent extension, creating the underlap.

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Topstitch from the skirt right side, catching all the layers (8). Begin at the dot and end at the extension edge, backstitching at each end or pulling the threads through to the underside and knotting them.

Lightweight Fabric

Press up and stitch the vent.

Heavier Fabric

¼"

On lightweight fabric, stitch the entire hem edge, then turn the vent edge back over it and hand tack the vent edge to the hem. On heavyweight fabric, cut away the hem allowance on the vent underside (right extension) to within 1⁄4” of the hemline, and then stitch the hem and hand tack the vent in place (9).

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CLOTHES MINDED BY RACHEL PINHEIRO OF HOUSE OF PINHEIRO

wardrobe BUILDING BLOCKS

When I started sewing, most of my plans were techniquebased. I’d see each new project as an opportunity to learn or improve a skill. For my second handmade dress, I managed to pick a pattern with sleeves, Peter Pan collar, exposed zipper, baby hem and (the cherry on top) hand-sewn beaded trim on the waistband. The result wasn’t great. I completely ignored the end result of what that pattern style was going to do with my figure. And let’s not even talk about my crazy choice of cushion fabric. Although the dress was terrible, I learned two very valuable lessons: Keep aiming high and don’t be afraid to learn something new or to sew something unwearable. The second lesson was to be more thoughtful when picking complementary fabrics and patterns.

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Many years of experience have helped me define my fabric and pattern choices. During the last three years, I feel I’ve attained the handmade closet of my dreams. However, I believe it’s important to celebrate every stage of sewing accomplishments. Don’t look at experienced makers like myself and feel that you haven’t got a plan together because you’ve only made a handful of handmade garments. Every sewist should enjoy their journey at their own pace. Every new seam will be just a bit better than the last. No one can build an amazing handmade closet without failures. And believe me, I’ve made (and will make) some really bad stuff.


STEP 1 DEVELOPING YOUR PERSONAL STYLE Going down the rabbit hole of personal style has been a fun journey. I love thinking about fabrics, shapes, moods. I’m a visual person. I need to draw, collect fabric, create inspirational boards and test ideas on a daily basis. When asked how I have created a body of work with such a strong sense of personal style, I tend to say that I pick things that I love. Instead of categorizing what I wear on a recognizable formula, such as classic, modern, etc., I follow three directives. Does it make me feel powerful in my own skin? Is it comfortable to wear? Do I know where I’m going when wearing it? My own definition doesn’t fit one traditional fashion-style concept. My clothes could be categorized as gamine one day and girly on the next, but still strongly representative of me. By taking control and sewing my own clothes, I can challenge preconceived concepts and categories and explore my creativity in a structured way. Now I don’t need to sew as much as when I started sewing. It may be a week or more before I jump from one project to another. In the meantime, I’ll be thinking about construction methods, folding and unfolding fabrics, prewashing and adjusting the fit on the flat patterns in preparation.

ready-to-wear inspiration, my own closet favorites and wardrobe gaps. All that information then gets vetted and edited using my style directives. I like to plan my sewing projects by seasons, based on current color palette obsessions, cuts, prints, places I want to visit, and the like. For each season, I plan a capsule wardrobe concept and a mood board with four to six garments. Sometimes the mood board is full of only inspirational photos, and other times I add specific patterns and fabrics. Having a “collection” gives me focus without restricting my creativity. I allow myself to sew a wild card project every month, if I’m inclined. My plans are always kept handy on my phone for quick reference when I’m out fabric shopping. If I find fabrics in my stash that match a concept, I stack them together and take a picture as reference. I think my phone and my sewing machine are best friends. So many times in the past, I’d go to a fabric store, get overly excited about the fabric choices, and get home with the wrong yardage or fabrics I found pretty at the store but wouldn’t wear. Having your own personal guidelines built into a project plan is a most useful tool when planning a successful handmade collection.

STEP 3

CATEGORIZING YOUR WARDROBE

DEVELOPING A PROCESS

Another useful tool is categorizing my whole wardrobe, including my sewing plans and what I buy (new or vintage), as individual functioning elements. Everything in my wardrobe is categorized as either a foundation, key or statement piece.

My sewing plan isn’t just an endless list. Having a really long list just makes me feel inadequate to my own high standards. Lists are only to brainstorm ideas: techniques I’m interested in, new patterns that caught my eye, fashion trends I’d like to try, fabrics and books to review,

Foundations are the clothes I pair with my key pieces when I want to look more casual. These garments are usually a bit more generic and offer a starting point, functioning as an outfit basic. Use this type of clothing to introduce new color

STEP 2

palettes, trends, seasonal fabrics or specific trend details. For example, I love wearing turtlenecks during autumn and winter, so I continually introduce new fabric textures and colors, in addition to trying different sewing patterns. Sometimes I will have a turtleneck substitute project, such as a sweater pattern. I usually know how and when I will wear each item. The key pieces are the workhorses of my wardrobe. I try to keep the fabric choices of the highest quality as those garments are meant for longevity, worn over and over again. For key pieces, I try to stay within my favorite neutral colors for maximum wearability. I will often sew key shapes and lengths that cannot be dated easily, such as a pair of tailored S E W N E W S.CO M

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wool trousers or leather circle skirt. For these items, avoid using trends as inspiration. Statement pieces are one-off items with wow factor. These pieces allow me to explore design concepts and interesting construction methods or use really precious fabric. Or make a labor-intensive couture dress using traditional chita (cheap folk fabric from Brazil) just because I felt this was the perfect birthday party outfit. My statement pieces usually incorporate trends and unusual fabrics.

Keep aiming high and don’t be afraid to learn something new or sew something unwearable.

I don’t know anyone that doesn’t have a few uniforms, or tried and tested matches. I navigate my different outfit formulas by toning it down (foundation + key piece) or toning it up (key piece + statement). My personal goal is to balance those three elements well to fit within my lifestyle and my desire to create. Using this system, the same sewing pattern is easily adapted to any of the three categories depending of my most immediate needs. I satisfy my creative side by infusing my sewing with a directive to maintain a good wearable closet. I don’t intend to only wear handmade. Sewing a really standard basic white knit tee will rarely be on my plans, but identifying where my wardrobe is lacking makes me a conscientious buyer.

STEP 4

PLAYING FAVORITES Figuring out what suits your body shape or what colors suit you best is an effort of trial and error. I personally think everyone can wear everything as long as it fits well. Lengthening or shortening a hem can also make a world of difference. It’s all about a balance of lines. Sewing can be a huge commitment of time and money, so begin by examining favorite outfits. Write down why you love wearing them. Visit your favorite stores

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and try different shapes. Make notes of what you like most. If you’re feeling more invested, try something I did when looking to identify what readyto-wear pieces to substitute for handmade. Either take a photograph or sketch each outfit (with shoes and accessories) you wear during two weeks. If you pick a period that represents the majority of your lifestyle, you’ll find the results really enlightening.


EMBRACE THE SEWFIE I’m not one for selfies but I cannot reco mend “sewfies” enough — taking a picture of fabric swatches near your face. It’s a bi bi t awkward, but this experiment was part of my research to pick coat fabric last fall. expression aside, what a revelation! Som fabrics will make your eyes really bright an n well-rested while other fabrics will make you look dull, resulting in a final outfit th looks a bit “meh”. Make sure you take the e picture using natural light.

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CORK COUTURE

An eco-friendly alternative to leattther, cork fabric is a perfect pick for bag making or for any project whe e structure is needed. Read on ere to take the fear out of sewing with this unique material.

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Swatches supplied by FabricFunhouse.com.

BY SARA LAWSON


Samples by Sara Lawson & Kate Zaynard.

ABOUT CORK From Portugal, cork is harvested from the cork oak tree using a process that allows the tree to continue to flourish. Cork can actually be harvested from the same tree for hundreds of years. The cork is first stripped from the tree using a machete, boiled, shaved into sheets and bonded to a cotton/polyesterblend fabric. This cotton/poly blend is what makes cork so easy to sew. At a thickness of 0.8mm, the final product is both flexible and easy to stitch through with a basic home sewing machine. Cork fabric is usually treated with a form of

Scotch Guard and UV protectant to help the quality and colors last for a very long time. It truly is an ecofriendly and vegan alternative to leather. Available in over 80 prints and colors, cork fabric is not a frugal purchase, so make a little go a long way. Because of its durability, cork is a great pick for embroidery, appliqué, home décor and more. Cork is perfect for bag making: Use it for straps and bag accents, paired with coordinating quilting cotton. Small pouches are also another favorite use for cork. S E W N E W S.CO M

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SPECIAL TOOLS & TECHNIQUES When sewing with cork, use either a PTFE foot or a walking foot, though consider experimenting with a standard presser foot as well. Thread the machine with a strong 40-wt thread and use a microtex or 90/14 needle. To avoid creating unnecessary permanent holes in cork, have a set of fabric clips, such as Wonder Clips, on hand, as well as fabric glue and basting spray to secure layers during assembly. Cutting cork is easy. Use fabric scissors or a rotary cutter to cut out the needed pattern pieces. For pattern pieces that are cut on the fold, instead of actually folding the cork in half (which creates a permanent crease), trace the pattern piece on the wrong side of the cork, and then flip the pattern piece over to trace the mirror image. For marking cork, use chalk to trace on the cork wrong side. Since it can be used raw, avoid using fabric markers or pens; the coloring from the pen can show on the cork raw edge, whereas the white chalk just brushes off. Cork is a great canvas for installing rivets and hardware. Rivets in cork install the same way they would in any other fabric: by making a hole through the fabric at a chosen position, and then using a hand press or tabletop press to install the rivets.

ASSEMBLY & CARE For basic assembly steps, utilize a 2.5mm stitch length, but switch to a longer stitch length for any topstitching. Keep in mind that as with vinyl and leather, needle holes in cork are usually permanent. However, in the case of accidental stitching, first remove the thread, cover the area with a press cloth, spritz with some water and steam. When using cork for straps or accents, leave the cork cut raw to take advantage of the fact that cork fabric doesn’t fray. Simply omit the seam allowance on straps and any accent pattern pieces that would be sewn wrong sides together and then turned right side out. Where straps made from cotton fabric are usually cut four times the width of the finished strap and assembled using steps similar to double-fold bias tape, cork straps can instead be cut two times the width and finished with wrong sides together. Use fabric glue or basting tape to hold the cork strap together while topstitching. Cork should generally not be ironed. A finished bag should either be finger-pressed or molded into shape by using a generous number of fabric clips on all the seams and leaving them in place for an hour or two. Cork fabric is treated with Scotch Guard from the manufacturer and it’s naturally water-resistant, so spotclean the finished bag or project with a damp cloth rather than putting it through the washer and dryer. Store cork fabric rolled instead of folded to prevent permanent creases. 

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PATTERN PERFECT Here are a few pattern picks that lend themselvves well to cork fabric accents.

Magnolia Bucket Bag by Sallie Tomato

Hold It Bins by Made Everyday

Faux Crocodile Purse by BurdaStyle

Available at shopsewitall.com! Also featured in this article: • Sublime Bag, Cumberland Backpack, Box Pouch & Coalition Bag by Sew Sweetness • Abstract Tote by Little Moo Designs

Nora Doctor Bag by Swoon

Fabric in Focus Bag by Sew News

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BY NICKI LAFOILLE

Hack a commercial pencil skirt pattern to create two distinct styles that mimic menswear shirt hems, plus learn to create a unique in-seam buttonhole placket. Burd yle Burd e 12/2013 3 6,, Modif ed d

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A SHIRT THING

• A-line skirt pattern (such as BurdaStyle 12/2013 #126) • 11⁄2 yards of rayon or cotton lawn • Featherweight fusible interfacing (amount according to waistband measurements)

For the waistband, measure the skirt upper edges at the seamlines, ending at the center front; add 2". Draw a rectangle measuring 31⁄4” × the waistline measurement.

2½"

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Right Front Skirt Cutting Line Left Front Skirt Cutting Line

Center Front

SUPPLIES

Fabric swatches supplied by RobertKaufman.com.

Inspired by shirting trends, these skirts sew up beautifully in drapey rayons and fashion prints. For a classic look that’s more closely tied to its inspiration, stitch a skirt in standard stripes, linen, handwovens and chambrays for lightweight texture that’s great for warmer months.

Designate the pattern pieces as the shirttail hem pattern.

• Ten 5⁄8"-diameter buttons • Matching all-purpose thread • Pattern paper & tracing wheel

Trace a copy of the skirt pattern. Designate as the split hem pattern; set aside.

5/8"

• Hand-sewing needle • Buttonhole foot • 1⁄4 yard coordinating rayon or cotton lawn (optional)

ALTER Remove the seam allowances from the center-back opening, if applicable. Mark the center back to cut on the fold. Add 21⁄2" to the center front. Designate as the right-front pattern. Draw a line 5⁄8" from the original center front. Designate as the cutting line for the left-front skirt pattern (1). For the button placket, draw a rectangle measuring 21⁄2" × the skirt center-front length, including seam and hem allowances.

For the shirttail hem, mark 10” from the hemline along each side seam. Mark 51⁄2" from the center front along the hemline. Connect the marks using a gentle S curve on the skirt front (2).

2

Add 5⁄8" hem allowance to the hemline. 10"

Flip over the skirt back pattern. Place the skirt front right side up over it, aligning the side seams and hems. Trace the S curve onto the back pattern. Set aside the pattern.

5½"

On the split-hem pattern, remove 5" from the skirt-front lower edge. Mark 5" from the lower edge along the side seam; label as the split. Add 5⁄8" seam allowances to the hemline. Trim off 5" from the button-placket short edge. S E W N E W S.CO M

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3

4

5

2¼" Button Length 2" Buttonhole Center 2" 2"

SHIRTTAIL HEM Cut one skirt back on the fold, one button placket and one waistband. If desired, cut the button placket and waistband from a coordinating fabric. Cut one front right and front left, ensuring the fronts are mirror images and are cut with the correct side facing out. From the interfacing, cut one waistband. Center the interfacing waistband over the fabric waistband wrong side; fuse. Stitch each front and back dart from the raw edge toward the point; don’t backstitch. Tie off the threads; trim. Fold the right-front lower edges 5⁄8" toward the wrong side, easing in the excess; press, and then unfold. Fold the raw edge into the pressed crease, easing in the excess. Press, and then refold along the first foldline to encase the raw edges; pin. Edgestitch the first fold. Double-fold the skirt right-front long edge 1" toward the wrong side, encasing the raw edge and creating the button underlap. Edgestitch the first fold.

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Fold one button-placket long edge 5⁄8" toward the wrong side; press. Align the button-placket long raw edge and the skirt left-front long edge with right sides together; pin. Along the seamline, mark 21⁄4" from the upper edge, and then every 2" from the first mark until you reach nine marks; designate as the buttonhole centers. Mark the button length centered over each mark. Beginning at the upper edge, stitch between the button markings along the seamline and backstitch at the beginning and end (3). Press open the seam. Fold the button placket in half lengthwise, aligning the fold just shy of the seamline; press. Fold the remaining seam allowance toward the wrong side. Trim bulk out of the seam allowances at the lower edge (4). Stitch 1⁄4" on each side of the seam. Fold the remaining skirt lower edges 5⁄8" toward the wrong side, easing in the excess; press, and then unfold. At the side-seam curve, clip a scant 5⁄8" from the raw edge to allow the hem allowance to fold under smoothly. Fold the raw edge into the pressed crease, easing in the excess. Press, and then refold along the first


foldline to encase the raw edges; pin. Edgestitch the first fold. With wrong sides together, align the skirt back and front along one side seam. Stitch using a 3⁄8" seam allowance. Press toward the back, and then trim to 1⁄8". Fold the side seam with right sides together; press, ensuring the seam is centered. Stitch again using a 1⁄4" seam allowance. Repeat to stitch the opposite side seam. Fold one waistband long edge 5⁄8" toward the wrong side; press. With right sides together, align the unfolded waistband edge with the skirt upper edge, beginning at the center back and working toward the center fronts; stitch. Press the seam allowances toward the waistband. Trim the excess waistband at the center fronts to measure 5⁄8". Fold the waistband short ends toward the wrong side, encasing the center front edge; press (5). Grade the seams to reduce bulk, if necessary. Fold the waistband in half, aligning the fold just over the waistband stitching line; press. Using a hand sewing needle and thread, stitch the waistband fold just over the stitching line. Mark a 5⁄8" horizontal buttonhole centered on the waistband and aligned with the center-front seam. Attach a buttonhole foot onto the machine and stitch a buttonhole over the mark. Cut open the buttonhole. Lay the skirt flat, centering the left front over the right front. Mark button placements through the buttonholes using a removable fabric marker. Hand or machine stitch a button centered over each mark. S E W N E W S.CO M

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SPLIT HEM Cut one skirt back on the fold, one button placket and one waistband. Cut one front right and front left, ensuring the fronts are mirror images and are cut with the correct side facing out. Stitch each front and back dart from the raw edge toward the point; don’t backstitch. Tie off the threads; trim. Fold the right-front lower edges 5⁄8" toward the wrong side; press, and then unfold. Fold the raw edge into the pressed crease. Press, and then refold along the first foldline to encase the raw edges; pin. Edgestitch the first fold. Double-fold the right-skirt front 1" toward the wrong side, encasing the raw edge and creating the button underlap. Edgestitch the first fold. Fold one button-placket long edge 5⁄8" toward the wrong side; press. Align the button placket unfolded edge with the skirt left front with right sides together; pin. Along the seamline, mark 3" from the upper edge, and then every 3" from the first mark the entire length or until you reach six marks; designate as the buttonhole centers. Mark the button length centered over each mark. Beginning at the upper edge, stitch between the button markings along the seamline and backstitch at the beginning and end. Press open the seam. Fold the button placket in half lengthwise, aligning the fold just shy of the seamline; press. Fold the remaining seam allowance toward the wrong side. Trim bulk out of the seam allowances at the lower edge. Stitch 1⁄4" on each side of the seam. 42

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Fold the skirt-back lower edges 5⁄8" toward the wrong side; press, andthen unfold. Fold the raw edge into the pressed crease. Press, and then refold along the first foldline to encase the raw edges; pin. Edgestitch the first fold.

allowance toward the wrong side intothe seamline; press, and then edgestitch 1⁄4" from the seam, ending at the hem.

With right sides together, align the skirt back and skirt front along one side seam; stitch, ending at the split marking. Press open. Fold each seam

SOURCES BurdaStyle provided the skirt pattern: burdastyle.com. Cotton + Steel provided the Jardin de Paris Mint 8037-15 and Navy 8037-25 rayon: cottonandsteelfabrics.com. Pfaff provided the Passport 2.0 sewing machine: pfaff.com.

Attach the waistband and buttons per the shirttail-hem skirt instructions.


2018 ASG CONFERENCE Westgate Las Vegas Resort Las Vegas, NV

Sew Much Fun Hong Kong November 27-December 5, 2018

July 12-15, 2018 The ASG annual Conference is a once-a-year opportunity for sewing enthusiasts to gather to celebrate all things sewing, quilting and embroidery. • Shopping: Vendors in the Exhibit Hall will sell fabric, notions, patterns, sewing furniture, machines, threads, projects, DVDs, books and more. • Education: The conference offers daily workshops, seminars and lectures. Classes for every sewing interest and every level of sewing skill. • Fellowship: Tours, get-togethers, lunches, the annual Fashion Show and more!

Enter the Design Through the Decades Fashion show! For more information and to download the registration form, visit www.asg.org

4 WAY STRETCH FABRICS Spandex prints Sparkle Velvets Hologram Spandex Ponte...and more

www.fabricsinmotion.com arlene@fabricsinmotion.com

Share Hong Kong’s fabric and sewing-related shopping and learning opportunities with tour hosts, Linda Griepentrog and Pauline Richards. • • • • • • •

Explore Hong Kong’s shopping areas Shop for fabrics, notions, jewelry, laces and beads Visit designer outlets and find clothing bargains Share a half-day sightseeing tour Take a Tai Chi lesson Get a behind-the-scenes look at a costume shop Enjoy a farewell dinner cruise

For more information and to download the registration form, visit www.asg.org


SUIT YOURSELF BY AMANDA CARESTIO

No matter where you stand on the swimwear question—to sew or not to sew—it’s apparent that the experience can be transformative and educational, given you have a sense of adventure. We spoke to several members of the online sewing community to get their take on the experience, pros and cons and if they’ll sew a swimsuit again.

Soma Swimsuit, Papercut Patterns for SproutPatterns.com

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KARRY BROOK @karry.brook & goodsdetroit.com

Sewing my own swimsuit was so transformational! I’d have never had the courage to buy a suit like I made if I hadn’t sewn it myself. There’s something in the actual construction of sewing that just gives you the confidence to own it. I’d absolutely sew another swimsuit. Like most sewing, once you make one, the rush to make more just happens!

TRACY MCELFRESH @tracysews & tracyssewingstudio.com

I own a sewing service business and teach, and I knew sewing swimwear would be a great skill to have. Before I started, I researched online and everywhere I looked people said to buy the book Kwik-Sew’s Swim & Action Wear. The book appears seriously dated although all of the information inside is very valuable. For my first suit I used one of their master patterns. It was the first time I’ve ever sewn a crotch inserted with the burrito roll method. Making my own suit gave me additional insight into the definition of my body in a way that other outfits have not. I’m more comfortable with my curves and have a confident relationship with both the swimwear and my body. Also, when I wear my swimwear so many people ask me about it, and I get to talk about sewing and educate people. Creating swimwear has been a wonderful experience, and I already have plans to make two more suits. I've made eight already.

EMILY STONE @replicatethendeviate

One of my sewing friends put out a call for testing her swimsuit pattern. I’d never sewn a swimsuit for myself but enjoy the testing process (and the deadlines that come with it). I also didn’t have any swimsuits that fit! I’d never sewn a shelf bra before but the instructions were clear. Sourcing swim bra cups was challenging. I also could only find one width of swimwear elastic in my local fabric store. But it all turned out, and I have a comfy swimsuit.

ALEXANDRA HERRMANN @sailorgirlalex

Sewing my own swimwear makes me feel comfortable and confident with my body because it fits! I'm 6'3" tall and curvy and clothes off the rack hardly ever fit me. It’s always been a pain to buy a bikini because the tops were way too big in the cup and the bottoms were too small for my full hips. And one-piece swimsuits were usually too short. I'm not only proud that I can make my own swimwear with my own two hands but I'm also proud and satisfied how good I look in my me-mades. It's all about selflove, and I believe you need good fitting clothes for that.

MOLLY CALLISTER @mollysewist

I made the Hello Sailor Bottoms and Siren Swim Top from Patterns for Pirates. I made wider straps for more support and was able to make different sizes for the bottoms and the top, which is something you can’t always do with store-bought suits. The whole thing was actually easier than I expected. I was nervous that the material and lining would be difficult to work with, but I didn’t have any trouble! The experience was empowering. Not only with my body image but I feel like a swimsuit is one of those milestone sewing projects, similar to jeans or a formal dress, that really boost your sewing confidence and mojo that you can do anything!

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SARAH KIRSTEN @sarkirsten

Sewing a swimsuit helps me separate my perception of my body from how it fits into swimsuits. A swimsuit is just fabric cut and sewn together. If it doesn't fit, it doesn't mean my body isn't beautiful. The cut of the fabric should change to fit me. Not me to fit the cut of the fabric.

NORI LIMING @onepatternatatime

I was looking for a suit that was more tank-top-and-skirt style, and I wasn’t finding anything that appealed to me in style or color in the stores. Since I mainly self-drafted the pattern, it helped me to expand on my pattern drafting skills and gave me the chance to work with fabrics that I hadn’t used in my previous makes. I en n oyyed process so much with the first one that I made another in a different print fabric.

KATY SCHLUGE @threadandstrings1

I needed a swimsuit and the ones like tend to be more expensive than I can afford, so I decided to try making one. The challenging part was realizing that there's no real way to make a muslin with a swimsuit because swimsuit fabrics are all very different from one another. The part that surprised me was how fast a basic suit is to sew up once you have a shape you’re happy with and have a feel for correct tension of the elastic. If I'd found a pattern with more thorough directions and was closer to the vision I had for a suit, I wouldn't have needed so many versions. As it was, struggling to get a fit I was semi-happy with, it was hard to not look at both the suit and my body critically when I looked in the mirror.

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TERRI STEELE snipsewrepeat.com @snipsewrepeat

MALLORY DONOHUE sewhere.com @theselfsewnwardrobe

My mom and I started sewing rash guards and bottoms after falling in love with the comfort and UV protection they provide. After my mom’s skin cancer diagnosis, it seemed like the only option for enjoying the sun and water was to wear more protective clothing. We used a combo of self-drafted raglan shirts and some patterns from a KwikSew swim and activewear book. It was empowering to make something that fit and that helped me be physically comfortable and more healthy.

After getting into apparel sewing, I started making a mental "sewing bucket list": projects that felt really adventurous to sew. A swimsuit was right at the top. After giving it a try one summer, I was hooked, and the following summer I decided to take what I had learned and improve upon it. Now it has become a fun challenge for me to continue developing my sewing skills each year and top the previous suit. It's very empowering to take on a project that feels challenging and see it through to the end. Other projects that seemed too hard suddenly feel more doable. Over the last few years, I've really started to value slow fashion and the process that goes into making the garment just as much as the finished garment itself.


ASHLEY MARCOVITZ @layer_make

Wearing this suit makes me feel like a boss. I always feel more confident in items I have made, and this suit was a major accomplishment, so I feel extra good in it. It was definitely a positive experience. I grew my sewing skills a lot with this make. Sewing a swimsuit is one of those projects when once you're done, you think "I can make anything!" There are a few spots where I didn’t do the cleanest job but I’m so proud of the suit. I would really encourage anyone who is on the fence about it to give it a go, especially if swimsuits are an area that make you self-conscious. If you sew, you understand the power of a wellfitting garment that is custom-tailored to your body and your preferences.

PATTERN PICKS Here are some our favorite patterns to consider when you’re ready to give swimsuit sewing a go.

The Swimwear Style pattern by Michelle Lesniak features a low-cut tie front and a dramatic low back for a carefree, throwback vibe. Available in sizes small, medium and large, the pattern is perfect for beginners. AVAILABLE IN SHOPSEWITALL.COM

BurdaStyle’s Alison Swimsuit offers vintage flavor in sizes small, medium and large. With a halter neckline and a cute tie at the mid-back, this suit offers flattering and stylish coverage.

Tuesday Stitches Nautilus Swimsuit features a flattering twist in the bodice with standard or halter-style straps. The pattern includes 4 cup sizes (up to DD+) and multiple versions: a bikini and onepiece, with a cute peek-a-boo. “Sewing for yourself is a powerful act of self love. By making clothes to fit your body instead of trying to fit your body into readymade clothes, you learn to let go of thinking of your body as a series of flaws. You may not fit the pattern straight out of the envelope but you're just a series of pattern adjustments away and there's no value judgment in that. Swimsuit sewing is a powerful tool in our self-love arsenal since there's so much emotional weight for so many women in swimsuit shopping. We can let that go when we make a swimsuit in fabric we love in a style we love that can perfectly fit the body we now love.” —Nautilus Swimsuit designer Erin Weisbart of Tuesday Stitches

A fan favorite, the Sophie Swimsuit by Closet Case Patterns offers one and two-piece options for classic styling in sizes 0-20 with 5 cup size options. The bikini features a bra-style halter tied at the top and high-waisted briefs. Both versions offer fun options for color blocking. “If you've ever tried swimsuits on at the store, you know how dispiriting it can make you feel. Challenging yourself to sew your own swimwear is the best remedy to that problem. Sewing something made just for you will make you love and appreciate your body in a way that readymade never will, and all those new skills and techniques will supersize your sewing confidence. Instead of being a place of stress or anxiety, the beach and pool become a runway for your talent and self-love when you're wearing me-made swimwear.” —Sophie Swimsuit designer Heather Lou of Closet Case Patterns

Available in sizes XXS through XL, the Soma Swimsuit by Papercut Patterns offers three variations, including a modern one piece and two different bikini tops with either a high or mid-rise brief. Two versions feature comfortable cross-over front and back straps while the third is suitable for cups. AVAILABLE IN SHOPSEWITALL.COM.

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EASY SQUEEZY BY AMY FRIEND

Freshen up your table this summer with a paper-pieced table runner featuring festive lemon slices. Change the fabric colors to easily create a lime- or watermelon-slice table runner, depending on preference.

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PAPER PIECING Courtesy of The Quilting Company, by Mary Kate Petras: quiltingcompany.com

READY FOR THE NEXT LEVEL? FIND THE ICE CRYSTALS PATTERN AT QUILTING COMPANY.COM.

Paper foundation piecing is a technique for creating patterns and achieving shapes that are difficult to do via traditional piecing. With this technique, the fabric is stitched onto the paper pattern itself, and then each patch is flipped and pressed before stitching the next one. The important thing to remember is that the patterns are printed in reverse and the fabric is stitched to the wrong side, meaning you’re essentially working in reverse.

SUPPLIES

CUT

Supplies listed are enough to make one 18"×30" table runner using fifteen 6"-square blocks.

Download the templates from sewnews.com/web_extras until July 31, 2018. Print 15 copies of the template page on plain computer or foundation paper. Cut out each A, B, C, D and E templates and one F1 template.

• Assorted scraps of light & dark yellow print cotton fabric • 11⁄4 yards of coordinating solid or low-volume cotton fabric (background) • 2⁄3 yard of backing fabric • 1⁄8 yard of binding fabric • 20"×32" rectangle of batting • 50-wt. quilting thread • Size 90/14 universal needle • Tweezers • Foundation paper (optional; see “Source”)

TIP: When paper piecing, make sure the section numbers are visible on the template wrong side and the fabric is visible on the template right side.

From the dark yellow scraps, cut seventy-five 1"×21⁄2" rectangles for sections A1, B1, C1, D1 and E1. From the light yellow scraps, cut seventy-five 21⁄2"×31⁄2" rectangles for sections A2, B2, C2, D2 and E2. From the background fabric, cut forty-five 31⁄2"×41⁄2" rectangles for sections A3, B3 and D3, thirty 3"×31⁄2" rectangles for sections C3 and E3, and three strips measuring 5" × the fabric width. Cut the three long strips into 15 pieces using the F1 template. From the binding fabric, cut three strips measuring 21⁄2" × the fabric width.

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1

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6

CONSTRUCT Install a size 90/14 universal needle into the machine. Thread the bobbin and needle with 50-wt. quilting thread. Select a 1.7mm stitch length. Position template B wrong side up on a flat work surface. Center one dark-yellow strip right side up over section B1 (1). Position one light-yellow rectangle wrong side up over section B3, aligning one rectangle short end with the dark-yellow strip lower long edge (2). Stitch along the line between section B1 and B2 (3). Trim the seam allowance to 1⁄4". Press open the seam. Insert a long pin through all layers at the line between section B2 and B3, creating a visual guide for the seamline (4). 50

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Center one large-background rectangle right side up over section B3. Fold the long edge to follow the angle of the seamline, using the pin as a guide (5). Carefully flip the fabric to the wrong side. Stitch along the line between section B1 and B3 (6). Trim the seam allowance to 1⁄4". Press the open the seam. Using a ruler, trim along the B template outer perimeter line (7). Repeat to construct the remaining B, C, D and E sections using the corresponding fabric pieces. With right sides together, position one section A and B along the corresponding edges. To make sure the seamlines are aligned before stitching, finger-press along the seamline and turn back one panel (8).

Stitch, and then press the seam allowances toward section B (9). Repeat to stitch section B and C. Tear away some paper at the section tips where the seams overlap for easier stitching. Press the seam allowances toward section C (10). Repeat to stitch section C to D. Press the seam allowances toward section D. Repeat to stitch section D to E. Press the seam allowances toward section E. Designate as the pieced panel. With right sides together, stitch section F1 to the pieced panel along the corresponding edges (11). If needed, refer to the block diagram on page 51. Repeat to create the remaining blocks. Position the blocks right side up on a flat work surface following the diagram on page 51.


Stitch each block together along one row, and then stitch the rows together along the long edges. Press the seam allowances in alternating directions in every other row to allow them to nest into each other.

over the batting. Hand- or pin-baste the layers. Quilt the runner top as desired. Evenly trim the excess batting and backing fabric from the runner perimeter.

Remove all the paper using tweezers.

QUILT & BIND Position the backing fabric wrong side up on a flat work surface. Position the batting over the backing, and then center the top right side up

Piece together the binding strips along the short edges with right sides together, forming one continuous strip. Join each strip using a 45˚ seam to reduce bulk; press open each seam.

Fold the binding strip in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press. With right sides together, position the binding along the runner perimeter, aligning the raw edges and mitering each corner; pin, and then stitch. Fold the binding toward the quilt back, enclosing the raw edges. Slipstitch the binding fold to the runner back. SOURCE Missouri Star Quilt Co. carries Carol Doak’s Foundation Paper: missouriquiltco.com.

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Block Diagram

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PRETTY IN PINTUCKS BY NICKI LAFOILLE

Stitch a flirty and fun tank that’s easily made to dress up or down, depending on fabric choice. With pintuck details and shoulder insets, you’ll want to stitch one in every color.

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SUPPLIES • 2 yards of rayon fabric (see “Sources”) • Scraps of coordinating fabric (see “Sources”) & featherweight fusible interfacing • Needles: 2mm twin, hand sewing & universal • Matching all-purpose thread • Removable fabric marker

PREPARE Download the Pretty in Pintucks pattern from sewnews.com/web_extras until July 31, 2018. Purchase the pattern at shopsewitall.com after the expiration date. Print, assemble and cut out the pattern pieces according to your measurements. From the main fabric, cut one front and back on the fold, two collar bands and collars on the fold, two plackets and two armscye facings.

TOPS FOR TUCKS Pintucks are a great way to add dimension, detail and subtle shaping to a garment, particularly with lightweight fabrics, but it’s important that they’re done well and placed accurately. While there are special feet that can help with the creation of perfect pintucks, in this project, you’ll learn a unique process using a twin needle.

CONSTRUCT Transfer all the pattern markings onto the fabric wrong side. Use a removable fabric marker to transfer the pintuck markings onto the fabric right side. From the coordinating fabric, cut one inset pair. From the interfacing, cut one collar band, one collar on the fold and two plackets. Fuse each interfacing piece to the corresponding piece wrong side, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Use 5⁄8" seam allowances unless otherwise noted. Install a twin needle onto the machine. Thread the needles and bobbin according to the machine manual. Test stitch on a rayon fabric scrap. Increase the needle tension to 8.5 or until the thread pulls the fabric between the needles into a small tuck as desired.

TIP: Use a contrasting thread when stitching the pintucks for an added embellishment.

Stitch the first pintuck closest to the center front on each side of the placket, making sure the tuck markings are centered under the presser foot during stitching. Alternate stitching tucks on either side of the center-front tucks, spacing each tuck 3⁄8" apart. Stitch a total of 12 pintucks, or until the shoulder seam matches the shoulder-inset seam and ensuring the pintucks end at least 1" from the armscye edge. If the shoulder seam is still longer than the inset length, baste along the edge using a 5⁄8" seam allowance.

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1

Install a universal needle onto the machine.

Baste the shirt back between the dots using a 1⁄2" seam allowance.

Staystitch the corners of the center-front opening. Cut along the centerline up to 1⁄4" from the lower edge. Clip diagonally into the corners (1).

With right sides together, align the back shoulders with the corresponding inset edge; stitch. Press toward the inset, and then finish the seam allowances.

Fold each placket in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press, and then unfold. Fold each unnotched placket edge 5⁄8" toward the wrong side; press, and then trim to 3⁄8".

Align the collars with right sides together; stitch the sides and long edge, leaving the notched edge open. Clip the corners and turn right side out; press.

With right sides together, align the notched placket edge with the opening edge, aligning the upper edges, upper marks and notches. The placket lower edge will extend beyond the opening lower edge. Stitch from the upper edge, ending at the opening lower edge.

2

Repeat to attach the opposite placket. Press the seam allowances toward the placket, and then grade them. Fold each placket along the centerline, lapping the folded edge over the stitching lines. Slipstitch the fold to the shirt wrong side. Pin the placket closed. Tuck the placket lower edges toward the shirt wrong side. Fold the shirt down to expose only the placket lower edges and the triangle created from clipping the center front. Stitch across the previous stitching line to secure placket (2).

3

With right sides together, align the inset with the front shoulder, pulling the basting thread to match the seam if necessary; pin (3). Press toward the inset, and then finish the seam allowances. Repeat to stitch the opposite inset.

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Press the neck edge of the uninterfaced collar band 5⁄8" toward the wrong side, easing in the excess. Align the uninterfaced collar with the interfaced collar band with right sides together. Place the uninterfaced collar band over the interfaced collar with right sides together; pin (4). Stitch all layers beginning and ending 5⁄8" from the edge. Notch the seam allowances along the curves and trim out any excess bulk. Turn right side out; press. With right sides together, align the interfaced collar band with the neckline edge. Pull the gathering threads along the shirt back to match the length; pin, and then stitch. Trim the seam allowances, and then press toward the collar band. Tuck the seam allowances into the collar band at the center front and lap the fold over the stitching line. Slipstitch the fold just over the stitching line. Fold the front hem 5⁄8" toward the wrong side, easing in the excess. Press, and then unfold. Fold the raw edge into the crease; press, and then fold along the 5⁄8" crease to create a narrow double-fold hem. Stitch 1⁄4" from the lower fold. Repeat to hem the shirt back.


With right sides together, align the side seams, matching the notches; stitch. Press open, and then finish the seam allowances. Fold the armscye facings in half widthwise with right sides together; stitch the short ends. Press open the seams, and then fold the facings in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. Baste the raw edges to secure. Align the facing with the armscye raw edges, matching the seam and notches. Gently pull the basting thread to ease in excess between notches; pin (5). Stitch, and then trim the seam allowances to 1⁄4". Turn the facing toward the wrong side, favoring the seam toward the wrong side; press. Stitch 1⁄4" from the armscye edge. REFERENCE Cotton + Steel provided the main fabric (#5022-35 from the Frock 2015 Collection): cottonandsteelfabrics.com. Pfaff provided the Passport 2.0 machine used to create the tank: pfaff.com. Windham fabrics provided the inset fabric (#40171-24 from the Artisan Cotton collection by Another Point of View): windhamfabrics.net.

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ONE IN A MELON BY MICHELLE MORRIS

Stitch a whimsical purse that mimics a watermelon slice, complete with seed appliqués.

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HIGH-FASHION FRUIT Fruit-shaped clutches and bags have been making an appearance at fashion week and on the red carpet. Summer, when fruit is in-season literally and fashionwise, is the perfect time to jump on this trend and have fun with your handbag. The construction of this bag isn’t complicated, but the result has a real wow factor. If watermelon isn’t your thing, it’s easy to make this pattern as a citrus fruit instead. Change the fabric colors accordingly and adjust the topstitching to outline the fruit sections. Add larger white seeds, or omit the seeds entirely. Top to Bottom: Getty Images/Michael Tullberg; Getty Images/Mauricio Santana; Getty Images/Steve Granitz; Getty Images/Samuel de Roman

SUPPLIES • 1⁄2 yard each of red & dark green heavyweight fabric (such as canvas, denim or faux leather), white faux leather or vinyl & cotton print (lining)

From the red fabric, cut two front panels on the fold and two handle tabs. From the white and green fabric, cut two rinds each on the fold.

• 20" square of black faux leather

From the black fabric, cut seeds in the desired quantity.

• 1 yard each of double-sided lightweight fusible foam interfacing & double-sided fusible web (See “Sources.”)

From the lining and foam interfacing, cut two front panels each on the fold.

• Thread: all-purpose black, dark green, red & white

From the fusible web, cut two green rinds and two handle tabs.

• Fabric glue stick • Two 4" × 81⁄8" wood purse handles

TIP: Choose any purse handle that’s at least 4" long.

Adhere the fusible web to each green rind and handle tab wrong side according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

CONSTRUCT Change thread colors to match fabric throughout construction.

PREPARE Download and print the One in a Melon pattern from sewnews.com/ web_extras until July 31, 2018. Find the pattern at shopsewitall.com after the expiration date.

Position one green rind over one front panel with the right sides facing up and aligning the lower edges; fuse.

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Apply glue stick to one white-rind wrong side. Position the white rind over the front panel with the right sides facing up, aligning the lower edge 1⁄4" over the green rind upper edge; finger-press (1).

Getty Images/Arthur S. Aubry

Zigzag stitch the white-rind upper and lower edges.

VINYL VARIABLES Sewing vinyl is easy if you know the best tools and techniques. • Use a PTFE presser foot because it easily glides over the sticky surface. If a PTFE foot isn’t available, substitute a walking or roller foot. • Use a 90/14 or 100/16 leather needle, which has a point designed to penetrate slick, heavy material. • Pins cause permanent holes in vinyl, so use pattern weights or trace the patterns onto the fabric wrong side when cutting. During construction, pin only within the seam allowance or use binder or paper clips to hold fabric layers together.

Topstitch three parallel rows of stitching spaced 1⁄4" apart and beginning 1⁄4" from the white-rind upper edge on the front panel. Topstitch three parallel rows of stitching spaced 1⁄4" apart and beginning 1⁄4" from the white-rind lower edge on the green rind. Arrange the seeds over the front panel with the right sides facing up as desired. Once satisfied with the placement, apply glue stick to each seed wrong side; finger-press in place. Topstitch along each seed lengthwise center to secure (2).

• Increase the stitch length to 3mm or 3.5mm. This prevents the fabric from becoming too perforated, which can cause tearing.

Repeat to construct the remaining front panel.

• Stitch carefully, as any ripped out stitches leave behind permanent holes. If you must rip out stitches, stitch back over the area to hide the original needle holes.

With right sides together, stitch the two front panels together along the curved edge using a 1⁄2" seam allowance. Trim the seam allowance to 1⁄4".

• When pressing, use a dry iron at a low setting and a press cloth, or finger press. • Before beginning a vinyl project, test-stitch on vinyl scraps to determine the best tension and settings for the machine.

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Adhere the foam interfacing to the front-panel wrong side following the manufacturer’s instructions.

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4

Seedy does it!

Turn the purse right side out; press using a press cloth. Repeat to stitch the lining panels.

FINISH Fold each handle-tab short end 1" toward the wrong side; press. Insert one handle-tab long edge into the purse handle, and then align the tab long edges; pin. Stitch as close to the purse handle as possible (3). Repeat to construct the second handle. Center one handle tab over one front-panel upper edge, aligning the raw edges; pin (4). Repeat to pin the remaining handle to the opposite front panel. Insert the purse exterior into the lining with right sides together, aligning the seamlines and upper edges; pin. Stitch the upper edges, leaving an opening large enough to turn the purse right side out.

TIP: Experiment with different fabric colors and prints for the watermelon slice, or add sew-on jewels or buttons for the seeds.

Turn the purse right side out through the opening; press flat using a press cloth. Edgestitch the purse upper edge only along each red section. Slipstitch the opening closed if needed. SOURCE Pellon carries 807 Wonder-Web and FF79F2 Flex-Foam 2-Sided Fusible: pellonprojects.com.

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DAY DATE DRESS BY ADDIE MARTINDALE

Looking for the perfect breezy dress? With sweet ties, cuffs and a loose-fitting silhouette great for a variety of body types, this playful design is the ultimate summer wardrobe must-have.

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Art Gallery Fabrics: artgalleryfabrics.com.

DRAPE ON Do you love rayon yet? Providing the perfect amount of drape and structure, it’s the perfect pick for this lightweight dress. Rayon is a natural-based material made from the cellulose of wood pulp or cotton. Dry-clean or hand wash in cold water with mild detergent, and then let air-dry.

SUPPLIES • 21⁄2 yards of lightweight dress fabric (such as rayon challis, seersucker, chambray, double gauze or voile) • Matching all-purpose thread • Pinking shears (optional)

PREPARE Download the Day Date Dress pattern at sewnews.com/web_extras until July 31, 2018. Find the pattern at shopsewitall.com after the expiration date. From the fabric, cut one front and back on the fold, two front yokes on the fold, two back yokes on the fold, two cuffs on the fold and two front ties on the bias.

CONSTRUCT Use 1⁄2" seam allowances unless otherwise noted and serge-finish or pink seam allowances.

Fold each front-tie long edge 1⁄2" toward the wrong side; press. Fold one short edge 1⁄2" toward the wrong side; press. Fold the tie in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press. Edgestitch the folded short and long edge (1).

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Repeat to construct the remaining tie. Position one tie short end and one front yoke with right sides together at the pattern marking, aligning the raw edges; pin. Stitch using a 1⁄4" seam allowance (2).

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Repeat to attach the remaining tie to the opposite front yoke. Stitch the yoke and yoke facing with right sides together along the neckline and center front (3). Press open each center-front seam allowance. Turn the yoke right side out.

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Align the yoke center-front seamlines with right sides together. Stitch in the ditch along the seamline, beginning at the pattern marking and ending at the yoke lower edge (4). Turn the yoke right side out; press. Select a 5mm stitch length. Stitch the dress-front upper edge using a 1⁄4" seam allowance. Pull the bobbin threads to evenly gather the upper edge until it matches the front-yoke lower edge (5). Stitch the dress upper edge to the front-yoke lower edge (6). Press open the seam allowances. Repeat to stitch the dress back to the back-yoke lower edge. Stitch the side seams with right sides together; press open. If the fabric is sheer, create French seams if desired. Fold the dress lower edge 1⁄4" toward the wrong side; press. Fold again 7⁄8" 62

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toward the wrong side; press. Topstitch close to the first fold. Fold one cuff in half widthwise with right sides together; pin. Stitch the short edge; press open. Fold the cuff in half lengthwise with wrong sides together, aligning the seamline (7). Repeat to stitch the remaining cuff. Position the cuff over one armscye with right sides together and aligning the raw edges; stitch (8). Press seam allowances toward the dress.

Repeat to attach the remaining cuff to the opposite armscye. Fold each cuff lower edge toward the sleeve right side.


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PATTERN REVIEW

THE

TANK TOP EDITION

BY THE SEW NEWS STAFF

Tank tops are a summer staple and one of our favorite things to sew when the weather turns warm. Whether you’re looking for a swingy k it tank, a boxy woven tank, a tank with added design features or a great everyday basic, we’ve done the

KNIT & WOVEN

Jessica Ziebarth ASSISTANT EDITOR PATTERN:

DURANGO TANK HEY JUNE HANDMADE FIGURE TYPE: ALL, ESPECIALLY HOURGLASS FABRIC: 1017-03 DOTS | BLACK, CLOUD9 KNITS REVIEW: This pattern gives instructions to alter the two back pieces to better accommodate a swoop back, so the knit fabric doesn’t get bunched up around the hips. By far the easiest knit neckband instructions to follow, which can be used on other patterns.

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pattern research for you.


Ginger Tatic ONLINE EDUCATION MANAGER PATTERN:

GEMMA TANK MADE BY RAE FIGURE TYPE: ANY FABRIC: PIN PRICK, SEWING CIRCLE COLLECTION, MICHAEL MILLER FABRICS REVIEW: Designed for a woven fabric, this pattern features two neckline styles and a curved hem. The style is good for any figure, with extra wearing ease at the tummy and hips. Choose a lightweight fabric, such as voile or sateen, for the best drape.

Vanessa Lyman MAGAZINE CONTENT DIRECTOR PATTERN:

RUMI TANK CHRISTINE HAYNES PATTERNS FIGURE TYPE: RECTANGLE OR HOURGLASS FABRIC: 1020-02 CROSS | GRAY, CLOUD9 KNITS REVIEW: This is a simple casual tank pattern that makes for great workout wear when made from sport lycra or other breathable fabric. A good amount of ease is included in the pattern, so the sizing is forgiving. If in doubt or between sizes, go with the smaller size.

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Ashley Navarre GRAPHIC DESIGNER PATTERN:

COWL TANK 06/2013, #101A BURDASTYLE FIGURE TYPE: RECTANGLE OR HOURGLASS FABRIC: KNIT JERSEY, JOANN FABRIC & CRAFTS BLACK AND WHITE SPLATTER REVIEW: This pattern is a bit tricky to construct; the front pattern piece includes a self facing for the cowl so make sure to mark the shoulder seams before stitching the front lining to the cowl edge. Surprisingly, the top has a snug fit, particularly in the hips, despite the gathers along the side seams, but they do a good job of hiding tummy lumps and bumps. The tank is fully lined and all seams are hidden once constructed, so using a lightweight, even somewhat transparent, jersey is suitable.

Kelly Eisinger EDITORIAL ASSISTANT PATTERN:

WILLOW TANK GRAINLINE STUDIO FIGURE TYPE: RECTANGLE OR HOURGLASS FABRIC: ROBERT KAUFMAN ESSEX LINEN REVIEW: This pattern creates a modern, boxy silhouette. It’s easily cropped for high-waist pants and skirts, and includes pattern pieces for a tank dress version. The deep hem gives the finished tank added structure and shape.

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Kerry Jackson SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER PATTERN:

EVIE KNIT TOP STYLE ARC FIGURE TYPE: ANY FABRIC: 1022-02 COLORFUL STRIPE | PIN NK, CLOUD9 KNITS REVIEW: This great wardrobe basic features a subtle high-low hem and classic tank lines. The pattern sews up nicely in a variety of knit fabrics and works well for stripes, as the pattern eces are w , not cut on the fold.

Geneevieve Hook NI

GRAPHIC DESIGNER N:

ELL TOP LIOL PATTERNS FI

TYPE: HT OR INVERTED TRIANGLE

FABR : HASH OT | MICHAEL MILLER FA ABRICS : This pattern features a slight racer r RE back, allowing more room for wider should rs, but is a little narrow through the tentially requiring an adjustment for a hips, curvier figure. The tank is extremely simple to construct and a great beginner project.

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Carol Cox-Willms RETIRED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER PATTERN:

VIENNA TANK ITCH TO STITCH FIGURE TYPE: RECTANGLE OR HOURGLASS FABRIC: SNIPS ’N SPOOLS FUCHSIA, SEWING SICRCLE COLLECTION, MICHAEL MILLER FABRICS REVIEW: The neck tie and gathering into a contrast yoke give this tank a distinctive flair. The main body is suitable for a knit or woven. The construction is clever and effective.

Kate Zaynard CREATIVE EDITOR PATTERN:

PONY TANK CHALK & NOTCH FIGURE TYPE: PEAR FABRIC: TRIANGLES MAGENTA, CLOUD 9 KNITS REVIEW: This easy A-line tank pattern also includes a knee-length dress option. Clear instructions make the distinctive V neck a breeze, even on knit. The instructions include great information about small pattern adjustments based on the fabric stretch and recovery.

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Meg Healy ONLINE EDITOR PATTERN:

JERSEY TOP 02/2013 #10 09 BURDASTYLE FIGURE TYPE: HOURGLASS FABRIC: BLACK STRETCH COTTON/SPANDEX BLEND REVIEW: This tank pattern flatters a fuller arm due to the pleats and gathers that sligh htly overhang the upper arm. The gathers and a pleats create visual interest and bring attention a to the neckline without the need for jewelry. The asymmetrical hem suits tight-fitting skinny jeans or a pencil skirt.

TANK-A-PALOOZA Choose from one of these tank patterns or another of you ur liking and join us for tank month in July, e’ll be sharing more reviews, sewing tips when we and fabric picks on the blog.

WAYS S TO T PLAY: • Sew w a tank top in July and share a pic of your ed creation to Facebook or Instagram, tagging finishe with #tankmonth. Follow the hashtag you ur post p to see other people’s makes. he blog and comment on our tank posts for • Vissit th nce to win a copy of Sew it All Volume 12, ac chan wsstands August 28, 2018. on n new ews.com/blogs/sewing se ewne • Su ubmit your own tank pattern review in July to ews@sewnews.com for a chance to win se ewne ern kit from BurdaStyle.com. a patte

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MASTERCLASS THE ART OF BY LINDA REYNOLDS

Whether finishing a home-sewn garment or altering a store-bought one, knowing how to hem is a life skill and, if done well, an art. Learn tips and techniques to take your hemming skills to the next level.

HEMLINE The first and most important task is to figure out where the hemline should fall on the garment. Personal preference is the guiding principle here. If determining this on oneself, the best method is to try on the garment and have someone else fold up the fabric to find the right hemline. Teach your child, friend, husband or significant other to help you, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re set for life when it comes to hemming. If that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an option, replicate the hem length of a similar garment in your closet. Measure the inseam

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of a favorite pair of pants, the underarm sleeve length of a wellfitting sleeve or the waist-to-hem measurement of a comfortable skirt, and use those measurements to determine the new hemline. Another method is the trial-anderror approach. Pin up the hem to an estimated length and then try on the garment. Repeat until the desired hemline location is achieved. While not easy to do on oneself and a bit time-consuming, one or two attempts will result in a desired hemline length.


START SIMPLE The most complicated part of any hemming task is all the extra design elements, such as linings, kick pleats and cuffs. These elements often require a bit more knowledge and a few additional sewing techniques. Before undertaking more complicated hems, it’s vital to master the simple or plain hem that has no such interruptions. In a plain hem, the lower edge is simply turned to the wrong side and stitched in place around the circumference of the garment. While simple, there are still some important considerations to make when stitching this hem type. Aside from figuring out where to stitch the hemline, it’s necessary to finish the cut or hem allowance raw edge to produce a clean appearance on the garment wrong side and contain any possible fraying, as well as ensure there is no bleed or bump on the garment right side. The fabric type and, in some cases, the garment type, determines how to finish the edge.

Opposite page: Getty Images/Todd Pearson. This page: Getty Images/Westhoff.

HEM PREP Once the location of the hemline is determined, mark the hem allowance and cut away any excess fabric length. The hem allowance, also referred to as the hem depth, is the distance from the hemline to the cut edge. It’s this amount that’s folded to the garment wrong side and stitched in place. Fold the excess fabric and pin it in place around the entire garment circumference. Try on the garment. Confirm the hemline is in the desired location and is an equal distance from the floor at all points. There are exceptions for women’s dress pants or any hem that’s intended to be at different lengths from the floor. Some women prefer the back to be a bit longer to accommodate wearing high heels. If that’s the case, adjust accordingly.

Hand-baste the hem, stitching ½" from the fold. This secures the hem and allows for easy pin removal while completing the hemming process. Hand basting also provides a rounded, rather than crisp, hem edge. For more casual or simple cotton projects, press the hem in place instead of hand basting so a pressed crease is visible.

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Mark the desired hem allowance around the entire circumference. This determines where to cut away any excess length. A 1¼" to 1½" hem allowance is typical for pants, while dress or skirt hems are around 1½" to 2". Whichever hem width is chosen, trim away the excess fabric (1).

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TIP TOP TAPE Use hem tape when finishing hems on heavyweight fabrics, fabrics that fray excessively or fabrics that are too bulky to handle a folded edge. Hem tape produces the most professional-looking hems, especially for garments that aren’t lined. Apply hem tape to the raw hem edge to keep fabric from fraying, conceal an otherwise unattractive edge and most importantly, prevent a bulky hem edge from showing through to the garment right side. Hem tape is available in three types. One is a lace tape that has some stretch to it so it conforms well to both curved and straight edges while producing a decorative finish to the hem edge. Another is a ½"-wide polyester tape that is also used to finish seams or to stay seams. As an added bonus, the tape features easy sewing guidelines to make attaching the tape fast and even. These types come in packaged form in select colors sold in three-yard lengths. Fine fabric shops may also offer hem/seam tape available by the yard in a broader selection of colors. Choose the color that best matches the fabric, as it’s intended to blend inconspicuously to the garment wrong side. There is also a fusible type of hem tape, which is used the same way, but is fused in place instead of sewn. To apply hem tape, machine stitch or fuse the tape to the hem allowance edge, making sure the tape upper edge sits 1⁄8" to ¼" above the hem allowance edge (A). This allows the hem edge to transition smoothly onto the garment fabric, preventing any bump or bleed to the right side. Use either a straight or small zigzag stitch to sew the tape in place.

A

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EDGE FINISHES All garments should look as clean and finished on the wrong side as they do on the right side, so some careful finishing of the hem edge is necessary. There are essentially three ways to finish a plain hem. The type of fabric and style of garment determines the appropriate approach. The objective is to secure a hem so it’s as close to invisible from the garment right side and no visible bleed or bump from the hem edge shows through. Serge the edge to produce a clean finish when working with almost any type of fabric. The overlock stitching prevents raw edges from fraying and provides a medium from which the final hem stitching takes place. Serging is by far the easiest and fastest way to finish a hem edge for both knit and woven fabrics. For a lined garment, serging the fashion fabric hem produces a clean finish that is then covered and concealed by the lining. A turned and stitched hem edge looks especially clean and finished on lightweight to mediumweight fabrics. Make certain the double layer of fabric at the turned edge isn’t so bulky that it bleeds or is visible from the garment right side when pressed.


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Create a turned edge by folding the upper hem ¼" toward the wrong side; press. Stitch approximately 1⁄16" to 1⁄8" from the fold, and then fold the hem allowance toward the wrong side before hand stitching to the garment (2).

stitching to both the garment wrong and right side. The key to hand hemming is learning to take the smallest stitch, literally just one thread when possible, with the needle and to exercise patience and precision.

Machine stitch the folded hem to secure, as an alternative. After folding the upper hem edge ¼", fold the remaining hem allowance and machine stitch 1⁄16" to 1⁄8" from the first fold. Attach an edgestitch/joining presser foot or a zipper foot for better accuracy, or use a steady hand with a universal foot.

There are variety of hand-stitching options to use for any hemming project. The choice depends on the fabric, the project and personal preference.

For very sheer fabrics, a doublefold hem is best. This type of hem ensures the raw edge won’t show through sheer fabric and adds just enough weight so the hem hangs firmly in place. Fold half the hem allowance toward the wrong side; press. Fold the remaining half toward the wrong side; press. Hand or machine stitch the hem in place.

STITCH OPTIONS Stitching hems by hand or with a sewing machine. Both ways offer options that are nearly invisible on the right side. Hand stitching the hem achieves a more refined finish and produces nearly invisible

CATCHSTITCH The catchstitch is a complex hand stitch that incorporates flexibility and stretch into the stitching and is therefore a good option for hemming knit fabrics. Serge the hem edge first, and then catchstitch the hem in place, working left to right. Position the garment so the hem is folded toward the wrong side and facing up. Thread a needle with a 20" length of thread. To strengthen it and prevent it from knotting up, run the thread through some beeswax and then iron it. Knot one end of a single thread. Draw the thread through the hem edge at the starting point.

Angle the needle to the right and take a tiny right-to-left horizontal stitch from the garment. Move the needle 3⁄8" to ½" to the right and take a small right-toleft horizontal stitch through the hem edge. Repeat to complete the hem (3).

SLIPSTITCH The slipstitch is one of the most frequently used hand stitches for hemming, and with good reason. The stitch, when done carefully, is virtually invisible from both the right and wrong sides of the garment. Position the garment so the hem is folded toward the wrong side and facing up. Thread and prepare a single strand of thread as outlined at left. Insert the needle into the hem upper edge, beginning from the wrong side through the hem upper edge. Take a tiny stitch (ideally a single thread) directly above and into the garment. The resulting stitch should be quite small and perfectly vertical.

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4

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Hem allowance edge turned ¼" and stitched.

Garment Wrong Side

TWO IN ONE For knit fabrics, a coverstitch hem is the optimal choice. This stitch produces an edge that’s totally concealed by a double row of stitching on the garment right side and an overcast stitch on the underside. The prime advantage of this stitch is it stretches with the fabric. In addition, it’s a twoin-one technique that secures and finishes the hem edge in one step. The drawback is it requires a separate coverstitch sewing machine or a serger with a coverstitch stitch option. This technique can’t be accomplished with a standard sewing machine. As an alternative, use a twin needle to produce the same effect, but be aware that this method doesn’t stretch with the fabric as much.

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Insert the needle into the hem edge, front to back, and angle it up and to the left 3⁄8" to 1⁄3". Repeat until the hem is fully stitched, making sure only a thread or two of the garment fabric is captured with each stitch. Keep the spacing between each stitch consistent and even. On the garment right side, only small, evenly spaced pick stitches should be visible. If applying on lofty or dense fabrics, the stitches may not be visible at all (4).

select a blind-hem stitch. Some machines offer two blind hem options: one for woven fabrics and another for knit fabric that allows for stretch. Whether stitched by machine or hand, when done right, just a row of small pick-like stitches will be visible on the garment right side.

BLIND HEM

To blind hem by hand, serge, trim with pinking shears or fold the hem edge. If the edge is folded, be sure the fold is at least ¼" wide so the raw edge is contained and concealed by the blind hemming.

Stitch a blind hem either by hand or sewing machine. If using a machine, install a blind-hem presser foot and

Secure the hem in place with pins or a good pressing.


Opposite page: Getty Images/Miriam Rodrguez Domingo/EyeEm. This page: Getty Images/Schafer & Hill.

Working from the wrong side, turn the hem allowance down, exposing just slightly less than ¼" of the hem allowance. This creates a folded edge on the fabric wrong side. Pin the fold to secure (5). Thread a needle with a single strand of thread and knot the end. Working from either right to left or left to right, start by securing the thread to the exposed hem allowance. Move 3⁄8" to ½" to the side and pick a tiny, one-thread vertical stitch from the fold. The smaller the stitch, the less visible the stitching will appear on the garment’s right side. Move another 3⁄8" to ½" and take a small stitch from the hem allowance edge.

Repeat to complete the blind hem. The finished result is a hem that’s almost invisible from both the garment’s right and wrong side.

6

To blind hem by machine, finish the hem edge as desired and fold the hem per the instructions for hand hemming. Set the sewing machine to the blind-hem stitch option, either woven or knit, and attach the blind-hem presser foot (6). Test-stitch on a scrap to determine the correct stitch width and length. The stitch width option adjusts the amount of the fold that’s captured so the pick stitch can be made smaller and less conspicuous.

Position the hem under the presser foot so the fold rests against the foot blade. Machine stitch the hem. When complete, press open the folded portion.

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THE COMMON THREAD BY ABBY GLASSENBERG

SEW BIZ

Getty Images/Eva-Katalin

Money Maker or Hobby Breaker?

Soon after I learned to sew, I made a rag doll for an auction at my daughter’s school. It had bright yellow pigtails, a green gingham dress and matching green felt Mary Jane-style shoes. During the auction, a group of moms came up to tell me how much they loved the doll. “You should sell them,” they said. “Yes,” they all seemed to agree. “You have to start selling these!” They spoke with such enthusiasm. It was really flattering. Perhaps something similar has happened to you? Maybe you’ve shown someone something you’ve made and they’ve encouraged you to go into business? 76

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“As crafters and artists, not only have we heard from well-meaning family members or friends that ‘you should sell those,’ but we also have a tendency to look at our peers who have made a business out of their creative pursuits and assume that this is the next step we must take as well,” says Kristin LaFlamme, an artist and quilter from Charlottesville, Virginia. Although starting a handmade business is certainly one option, I don’t actually think it’s the


Se Sewing and entrepreneurship are entirely different skill sets. Just because you can do one doesn’t mean you should jump into doing the other. best option for everyone or even for most people. After all, sewing and entrepreneurship are entirely different skill sets. Just because you can do one doesn’t mean you should jump into doing the other. Avid knitter, sewer and quilter Hiral Patel has struggled with this choice. Last year a friend commissioned her to make a flower girl dress for her daughter to wear to an upcoming wedding. “In the hopes of starting a business and getting my name out there, I charged only a little more than my costs,” she says. Although her friend was happy with the final product, the exchange didn’t lead anywhere, and Patel ended up feeling let down. A few months later, a family friend asked her to make a king-sized double wedding ring quilt with hand embroidered details. Again, she quoted a low price hoping that word of mouth would help her get new clients. “After all the materials and getting the quilt quilted, I made a little over $500 which is really nothing compared to the labor that went in the quilt,” she says. “Nothing further has happened on the quilt-making business front either.”

Commissioned flower girl dress sewn by Hiral Patel

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Taken together these two experiences left her feeling that building a business selling her handmade work may not be feasible or even desirable. She’d have to charge more for a custom dress or quilt than most customers are willing to pay, and she’d have to devote more time and energy to marketing her services than she was ready to take on. At first glance, it seems easy to begin selling the things you sew. Online marketplaces like Etsy make it possible to set up an ecommerce shop in just a few minutes and with very little financial investment. Actually building a profitable business there takes a lot more work than that, though. Ask anyone who’s tried to find success on Etsy. Pricing a handmade product for profit isn’t always possible. LaFlamme advises, “It’s incredibly important to ask those well-meaning friends what they'd pay for your work. As much as they might like it, you’re not going to have a viable business if customers are only willing to pay Target prices for your unique handmade items.” You’ll likely also need to finetune your product in response to customer demand. “The pressure to monetize my creative output feels huge, and I often hear ‘You should sell that!’” says Beth Fink, a sewist living in Southern California. “I know people mean it in the nicest way. It’s hard to explain quickly why I don’t, and I’m not sure they understand.” For a few months, Beth tried selling some of her 78

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handmade potholders at a local shop but realized that it wasn’t what she truly wanted. “I have no desire to tailor my creative output towards what will sell. I’d much rather sew for fun.” Being in business also means tackling many other time-consuming tasks including marketing, branding, customer service, bookkeeping, web development, managing contractors and more.

If you’re weighing your options and considering creating a business around your passion for sewing, thinking through a few key factors may help you decide if it’s the right path for you in the long run. First find out if people are willing to pay you for your work, and pay you a lot. Your product needs to be financially viable, meaning you can consistently make it fast enough while keeping costs down so your prices will fit what consumers are willing to pay.

I still s enjoy sewing, but it’s no longer relaxing or a mental turn off from work. rk. —Jenny Rushmore of Cashmerette

And yet, “do what you love” has become a sort of mantra of our time. Steve Jobs popularized this idea in his 2005 Stanford commencement speech. “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work,” he told us. “And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking.” I fully embrace the idea that you should love your work. You’ll enjoy it more and become better at it if you truly enjoy what you do every day. But I also know it’s okay to protect some of our passions, keeping them for ourselves. Just because you’re a talented seamstress doesn’t mean you need a business sewing clothes.

Next, get comfortable marketing your work. As hobbyists, we’re often humble about our skill level and our output. Once you turn that craft into a business, though, you’ve got to confidently put yourself and your work forward. How will you feel about promoting yourself and your work to the public?

Marketing a creative business can easily turn into a full-time job in and of itself. When Janet Lutz opened Calico Gals, her quilt shop in Syracuse, New York, over a decade ago, she thought she’d made a job for herself doing what she loved: sewing. In reality, her days quickly became absorbed by other tasks. “Sewing was my creative outlet in my ‘Before-Quilt-Shop’ life,” Janet recalls. “I envisioned that owning such a store would give me many opportunities to sew and quilt. I found the opposite to be true if I wanted to focus on the growth of my business. The marketing of Calico Gals became my creative outlet! Now when I feel the need to make something, I often turn to crafting and painting and leave the sewing to others who work with me.”


Drawing by Jenny Rushmore of Cashmerette

And finally, consider what will happen once sewing is tied to tight deadlines and your financial well being. Most of us begin sewing as a hobby, something we enjoy doing in our free time for pleasure. Sewing is the opposite of work; sewing is joy and escape. That relationship will likely change once you begin sewing for customers rather than sewing for yourself. What was once an entirely personal, meditative act will become public and driven by motives that aren’t entirely our own.

This was true for pattern designer Jenny Rushmore, whose business, Cashmerette, is focused on providing stylish sewing patterns for plussized women. “I still enjoy sewing,” she says, “but it’s no longer relaxing or a mental turn off from work.” Rushmore now draws and paints with watercolors as her creative escape, a new hobby she’s taken on and consciously kept separate from her business. All of this isn’t to discourage you from diving in if you want to. After

the school auction, I did go on to start a sewing business selling patterns for dolls and it’s been successful and joyful for me, but I’ll admit I’m lucky if I get a half an hour to sew on any given work day. The other tasks of running a business demand nearly all of my attention. LaFlamme has made a different choice. “Ultimately the best path for me has been to forgo the validation of ‘professionalizing’ my work,” she says, “and just to try to enjoy the process of creating the best artwork I can without further expectations.” S E W N E W S.CO M

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JUNE

WR P LOUS # BY B RDASTYLE

4

Grab the pa at rn r at BurdaStyle.co and join BurdaStyle Online e Editor Meg He e ly for the following pec l t pics on the w New blog: J ne n 12: Fabric Se el ne 19:

June Ju e 26: St in ing g

Wrap Blouse (Plus Size) 07/2016 #124

FIND THE WRAP BLOUSE PATTERN AT BURDASTYLE.COM OR GET IT PRINTED DIRECTLY ONTO FABRIC AT SPROUTPATTERNS.COM.

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tion

tructtion Details ptions


What makes this pattern special?

THE PATTERN Beginner- and figure-friendly, BurdaStyle Wrap Blouse features a crossover bodice and tying bands to softly define the waist. Extended shoulders and attached shaping bands are wonderfully complementary and add visual balance. The digital pattern is available in European sizes 44–52 (US sizes 18–26). Visit burdastyle.com for full size charts. Recommended fabrics include softly draping fabrics of all kinds, such as rayon, silk and silk blends, challis, viscose and more.

This pattern is very transformative, versatile and universally flattering. Because it’s a wrap top, it’s easily tied to custom fit the wearer and really cinch the waist. There are also lots of opportunities for customizing. With the tie straps and front bands, you can have fun with contrasting colors and prints. Omit the cap sleeve if a sleeveless style is desired, as this pattern also includes pieces for an armhole facing.

WITH THE BAND Create interest and definition with bands and tie in a contrast solid or coordinating print. Or keep the look modern and sleek with self fabric bands.

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HOME COUTURE BY JESSICA ZIEBARTH

70s Craft Revival The American 1970s décor was flooded with earth tones and home accessories that looked (and in many cases were) homemade. Macramé, string art, embroidered wall hangings, and afghan blankets were sprinkled throughout the entire home. Walls weren’t only decorated with items, but also wallpapered in bold floral or geometric prints. Carpet was wall-to-wall and the longer the shag, the better. This décor style is a champion for anyone who loves the rust, orange, brick, sand, avocado green and gold color scheme of yesteryear.

From top: Getty Images/Lena Koller; Getty Images/cscredon; Getty Images/ Chad Baker; Getty Images/Steven Errico

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GET THE LOOK BY JESSICA ZIEBARTH

Vierig Getty Images/Christian

STYLE inspiration

ENDLESS summer Re-create this easy-breezy summertime look by pairing lightweight fabrics with versatile sewing patterns. Simple halter tops change dramatically when made from large-scale patterned fabrics. Button-down skirts are easily styled for different looks by the number of buttons you choose to button or unbutton. Modifying patterns to wear them different ways is essential to compiling a great summer wardrobe. HALTER TOP PATTERNS Look for a pattern that fits closer to the body without much drape.

Available at shopsewitall.com! TIP Choose a large-scale r printed fabric fo a bold look.

One Hour Halter by Sew News

FABRIC COLOR PALETTE

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Be Trendy Halter Top by Ellie and Mac

Scarf Halter Top 07/2012 by BurdaStyle

SKIRT PATTERNS Look for an A-line style skirt, preferably midi- to maxi-length, that features a button-down front.

Snow White

Slate Green

Rust

Cream

Black

FINAL TOUCHES Take this look from day to night by switching up accessories. Create a daytime look with a straw bag, oversized brim hat and flats or wedge espadrilles. Pull your hair into a top knot, add a wide belt, clutch and block heels for a nighttime look.

Kelly Skirt by Megan Nielsen

Chelsea Skirt by Pattern Emporium

Rosari Skirt by Pauline Alice

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OFF THE SHELF

Stock your sewing library and increase your know-how with the latest & greatest books.

FAT QUARTER HOME by Amanda Russell & Juliet Bawden Brighten your home with things youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll love to make. This crafty collection is packed with great ideas for turning precut pieces or fabric remnants into something new, from a humble potholder to a snazzy shoe-cleaning kit. Colorful and imaginative projects with easy-to-follow instructions and illustrative photography show you how to mix and match designs to make 25 useful and attractive items.

WIN A COPY! ENTER TO WIN

A COPY OF FAT QUARTER HOME ON THE SEW NEW S BLOG ON JULY 5, 2018!

gmcbooks.com

COMPLETE BOOK OF SEWING TECHNIQUES by Wendy Gardiner

THE AMERICAN DUCHESS GUIDE TO 18TH CENTURY DRESSMAKING

Sewing is a creative and rewarding skill that allows you to express yourself through fabric. Packed full of information on basic sewing techniques for clothing and more, this book provides an ideal introduction for beginning sewists as well as a useful reference for those who already sew. Learning how to sew has never been simpler, with step-by-step illustrations and friendly advice from internationally accredited sewing expert Wendy Gardiner.

by Laurell Stowell & Abby Cox

foxchapelpublishing.com

pagestreetpublishing.com

Whether you wish you could time travel to the court of Versailles or the Scottish Highlands, this comprehensive guide will walk you through how to make and wear your own 18th century dream gown. Learn how to make four of the most iconic silhouettes of the era using the same hand-sewing techniques as historic dressmakers. Bring history to life with projects suited for every level of historical sewing enthusiast.

HOOP DREAMS by Cristin Morgan Author Cristin Morgan outlines the basics of 10 classic embroidery stitches and then teaches you how to use them to create 20 beautiful and practical projects for hoops, for the home and to wear. New and experienced embroiderers alike will be delighted by the fresh motifs and bold color palettes and inspired by a glossary of more than 50 additional patterns and motifs. As an added bonus, the book includes an envelope with 10 carbon transfer papers for quickly transferring patterns to fabric. abramsbooks.com

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Make your own luxurious leather accessories with this collection of 20 leatherwork projects Create beautiful leather craft items with just a few basic tools Step-by-step illustrations and techniques Includes full-size templates for all the patterns

Available At ShopSewItAll.com


HIGH END HACK BY JESSICA ZIEBARTH

LIGHT AS A FEATHER Feathers aren’t just for the runway. Ostrich feathers turn a basic silhouette into an upscale garment. Create feather trim from luxe plumes and add them to a readymade silk camisole for a standout piece. SUPPLIES • Silk camisole

• Precision knife

• Ostrich plumes (See “Source.”)

• Interfacing • 7⁄8"-wide ribbon

Check out the Sew News blog at sewnews.com/blogs/ sewing for step-by-step photo instructions, camisole pattern options and styling tips.

Purchase a readymade silk camisole and coordinating ostrich plumes. The size of the camisole determines the number of ostrich plumes needed and ribbon length. Using a precision knife, slice down the rachis (the center shaft) of the ostrich plume, leaving enough room to keep the feather together but cutting off the bulky stiffness of the rachis. Trim the uneven edges from the feather.

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Cut a ¾"-wide strip of interfacing long enough to wrap around the camisole hem with a 1" overlap. Pin the trimmed ostrich feathers to the center of the interfacing strip along the entire length, overlapping the feather ends ½". Using a wide zigzag stitch, stitch down the feather-strip length, making sure the zigzag stitch extends over both sides of the cut rachis.

Fold the ribbon around the stitched interfacing strip to encase it. Using a 1⁄8" seam allowance, straight stitch the folded ribbon edge. Pin the feather trim to the wrong side of the camisole hem, beginning at a side seam. Stitch along the presewn hemstitch. Overlap the feather trim edge slightly and trim away any remaining bulk. SOURCE The Feather Place: L.A. Showroom provided the amethyst ostrich plumes: featherplace.com.


The E6000 family of adhesives are renowned for exceptional strength, flexibility and toughness. Original E6000’s versatility and extreme holding power adhere most anything! E6000 Spray Adhesive is REVOLUTIONARY with no harsh smells or toxic chemicals and no fear of serious accidents like when using other spray adhesives. Fabri Fuse’s premium bond and extreme flexibility allow fabric to move and stretch without breaking or bubbling – EVEN AFTER WASHING!

& Designed y b t taugh le & top BurdaSy experts industry

Straight Off the Runway Innovative Courses for the Stylish START courses anytime you want

SHARE photos and tips with other students

GET interactive help from the instructor

DOWNLOAD and keep all videos, handouts and patterns forever!

See what we have to offer! academy.burdastyle.com

MADE IN USA by Eclectic Products

eclecticproducts.com © Eclectic Products Inc 2018


ALL SEWN UP

TOP 12 SEWING MOVIES of all time

4. HOW TO MAKE AN AMERICAN QUILT Mother (and grandmother and aunts) always know best.

5. THE INCREDIBLES No capes!

1. GONE WITH THE WIND You’ll never look at drapery fabric the same way again.

2. BRIGHT STAR Arrogant poet meets sexy sewist.

3. REAL WOMEN HAVE CURVES The bigger the bump, the deeper the dart.

6. SEWING HOPE One machine can change the lives of so many people.

7. PRETTY IN PINK Witness the worst design job since Project Runway’s Rainbow Torture.

8. THE DRESSMAKER Dashing Australian hunk meets deadly dressmaker.

9. THE TIME IN BETWEEN Seamstress-turned-spy takes out the Nazis.

10. 11. PHANTOM THREAD Moody fashion designer + timid but beautiful model.

12. CINDERELLA We all need a fairy godmother.

Issue 365. Sew News (ISSN 0273-8120) is published 6 times a year in Feb/March, April/May, June/July, Aug/Sept, Oct/Nov, Dec/Jan by F+W Media, 741 Corporate Circle, Suite A, Golden, CO 80401. Periodicals postage paid at Golden, CO 80401 and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Sew News, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Bluechip International, PO Box 25542 London, ON N6C 6B2 Canada.

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Art adapted from illustrations courtesy of Getty Images/Anne Rasilainen and Getty Images/NataliaZelenova

DIOR AND I Sewing skills to die for.


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