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Portage College 2014 -2015 Annual Report

ANNUAL REPORT

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OUR MISSION: Portage College provides education, training and services to facilitate learning and development of knowledgeable, skilled citizens in a caring, supportive and dynamic college environment.

OUR VISION: Building success by delivering exceptional learning experiences.

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PORTAGE COLLEGE


ANNUAL REPORT

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PORTAGE COLLEGE


TABLE OF CONTENTS Mission Statement 2 Vision Statement 2 Executive Summary

ANNUAL REPORT

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Board of Governors

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Board of Governors’ Message

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Accountability Statement

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Executive Committee

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President’s Message

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Our Mandate

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We Are Voyageurs - Portage By Numbers 2014-2015

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Operational Overview

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Goals, Priority Initiatives, Expected Outcomes and Performance Measures

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Our Valued Partners

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2014-2015 Supporters and Friends of Portage College

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Internationalization

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Information Technology

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Capital Plan

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Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Statements

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Portage College Consolidated Financial Statements

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Auditor’s Report

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Portage College is a public, board-governed college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under the authority of the Post-secondary Learning Act of Alberta. The College operated eight campuses in 2014-2015. Our mission statement highlights that the College “provides education, training and services to facilitate learning and development of knowledgeable, skilled citizens in a caring, supportive and dynamic college environment.” Our vision statement is “building success by delivering exceptional learning experiences.” Portage provided continuing education training, certificate, diploma and degree opportunities to 4,525 students in 2014-2015, 32% of them Aboriginal. We added Aboriginal Arts Certificate, Baking Certificate, Culinary Arts Diploma, and SAGD De-Oiling and Water Treatment Operator Certificate to our suite of programs and developed two others – Artisan Entrepreneurship Diploma and a re-designed Natural Resources Technology program – to be offered in 2015-2016. The College completed renovations on the new Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul in 2014-2015 and continued to develop our Boyle Campus, site of our Heavy Equipment Operator program and future proposed site of a pipeline processing loop. We continued to partner and consult with industry, municipalities, students and our Aboriginal populations to ensure that our programs and services are meeting the needs of our region and the province. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015, the College incurred a one-time operating deficit of $442,000, due to unbudgeted settlements with the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees (AUPE) and our Faculty Association. The deficit is funded out of an $881,000 (July 1, 2014) internally restricted operating contingency fund in net assets. In anticipation of a funding reduction early in 2015, College management took proactive measures to reduce operating costs and find further operating efficiencies. As a result, the College eliminated 11 positions in January 2015 and closed our lease space at the Bonnyville Centennial Centre on June 30, 2015. The College relocated programming to the Cold Lake Campus. In May 2015, the newly-elected NDP government announced that it would restore the funding cuts announced by the former Conservative government in its March 2015 budget. The government also announced a further increase of 2% to our Campus Alberta operating grant over the next two years to provide predictable and sustainable funding to the post-secondary sector in Alberta. This promise of predictable funding has set contract negotiation expectations for both AUPE and the Faculty Association in 2016. Student satisfaction remained high in 2014-2015, with 88% of our students indicating that they would recommend Portage College to others. Graduates continue to find employment as well, with 88% of the Class of 2013-2014 working. This is the highest number recorded since 2006-2007 and particularly impressive considering the downturn in the Alberta economy.

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ANNUAL REPORT

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BOARD OF GOVERNORS’ MESSAGE On behalf of my colleagues on the Portage College Board of Governors, it is my pleasure to present our institution’s 2014-2015 Annual Report. The document highlights the many accomplishments of our administration, faculty, staff, students and partners during the past academic year. Despite operating in challenging times, Portage College is still meeting the commitments we outlined in our 2014-2017 Comprehensive Institutional Plan. We developed new programs, opened new centres of excellence, rebranded our institution and provided our students with the education and support they required to achieve their goals. The Board of Governors represents the Portage Service Region as a whole. We have the responsibility to balance community-based or personal interests with institutional goals and objectives meant to serve the entire region. We strive for accountability, transparency and sound businessdecision processes. Our philosophy of providing provincial access to high quality education and workforce training serves our diverse population of more than 85,000 people and continues to reap rewards for our students and the communities and province we serve. Our graduate and employer results continue to be impressive, with 88% of the Class of 2013-2014 working six months after convocation, the highest employment level of any graduating class since 2006-2007. Additionally, 100% of employers surveyed indicated they would hire another Portage graduate. 90% believe that Portage graduates are on equal or better footing than graduates from other post-secondary institutions. We also continue to be a financially well-managed institution, submitting balanced budgets while pursuing partnerships to help fund new programs and capital projects. On behalf of the Board of Governors, I would like to acknowledge the dedication of our administration, faculty and staff in providing exceptional service to our students while remaining fiscally responsible. I would also like to thank our valued donors and partners for their ongoing support. It is an honour and a privilege to work with the dedicated members of the Portage College Board of Governors. They take time out of their busy lives to help ensure that our College continues to thrive in challenging economic times. They are open to community engagement and collaborative partnerships in the strategic governance of the College. It is through that engagement that we will achieve the full potential of our service region and province and provide our students with the exceptional learning experience that they so richly deserve.

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

(July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015)

PUBLIC MEMBERS 1. Ray Danyluk Board Chair 2. Danny Smaiel Deputy Chair 3. Roy Ripkens Deputy Chair 4. Dr. Richard Coleman (term ended August 26, 2014) 5. Stan Delorme 6. Leighton Grey, Q.C. 7. Gayle Desmeules (effective July 23, 2014) 8. Darryl Shott 9. Darrell Younghans 10. Michelle Wright (effective September 4, 2014)

PORTAGE MEMBERS 11. Fran Stewart Faculty Member 12. Darren Pratch Staff Member (effective Jan. 30, 2014) 13. Jennine Fayad Student Member (resigned Nov. 5, 2014) 14. Meghan Eigler Student Member (effective March 16, 2015 ) 15. Dr. Trent Keough President and CEO

Sincerely yours,

Ray Danyluk Chair, Board of Governors, Portage College 8

PORTAGE COLLEGE


BOARD OF GOVERNORS JULY 1, 2014 - JUNE 30, 2015

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Accountability Statement

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The Portage College Annual Report for the year ended June 30, 2015 was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with the Fiscal Management Act and ministerial guidelines established pursuant to the Post-Secondary Learning Act. All material economic, environmental or fiscal implications of which we are aware have been considered in the preparation of this report.

Ray Danyluk Chair, Board of Governors, Portage College

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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE JULY 1, 2014 - JUNE 30, 2015 Dr. Trent Keough, President & CEO Mardere Birkill, Vice President – Academic Tracy Boyde, Vice President - Infrastructure & Information Technology Dale Mountain – Chief Financial Officer Bev Moghrabi, Associate Vice President – Student Services and Registrar Carrie Froehler, Director – Human Resources Stuart Leitch, Director – Community and Industry Training Initiatives * *resigned April 7, 2015

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Welcome to the Portage College 2014-2015 Annual Report. This document highlights the excellent work of our College faculty, staff and administration during the past twelve months. It also celebrates the support of our partners, donors, and community stakeholders. I invite you to peruse its pages and learn more about the amazing accomplishments of our students, faculty, staff and partners. This past academic year was a challenging but ultimately successful one for Portage College. While reduced government funding forced the College to close our leased space in Bonnyville and to reduce the size of our workforce, new and successful programs were developed including the Culinary Arts Diploma. Renovations to the new Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul were completed by year’s end. Funding announced by the newlyelected Government of Alberta in May helped the College balance the budget for 2015-2016. We also continued to advocate for and develop Canada’s first Pipeline Training Centre in Boyle. We completed a successful Open Campus pilot project in Whitefish Lake First Nation #128. We continued to expand our suite of programs while remaining fiscally responsible. We initiated an extensive corporate re-branding exercise which continues to the present day and will for some time. We are sincerely grateful to our many donors and partners for all of their support in 2014-2015: • • • •

Cenovus Energy, MEG Energy and Imperial Oil once again provided seconded employees to teach Power Engineering students. TransCanada Corporation, Lac La Biche Transport and Calnash Trucking all donated materials for the College’s proposed Pipeline Processing Loop and our Heavy Equipment Operator program at our Boyle Campus. Main fundraisers such as the annual Sports and Education Dinner in Lac La Biche, the Spring Gala in St. Paul and the new Building Futures Gala in Cold Lake which raised much-needed funds for future campus expansion and student scholarships. A total of $358,000 was paid in scholarships and bursaries to Portage students in 2014-2015. College employees also started a self-funded Spirit of Portage Award, to be awarded to students who work to build a positive atmosphere of trust and mutual respect with classmates, help others to achieve results and serve as models for collaboration and enthusiasm. Our Natural Resources Technology program received a three-year accreditation from the North American Wildlife Technology Association (NAWTA) in June 2015. Ours is one of only two NAWTA-certified programs in the province.

Our students continued to achieve new milestones in 2014-2015: • • • • •

100% of our 3rd Period Welding students passed their journeyman exam. 98% of our 4th Class Power Engineering students passed their Part A provincial exam while 87% passed their Part B exam. 92% of our Practical Nurse graduates passed the national LPN exam. College Preparation student Cherina Quinney received the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award, given to Canadians who volunteer to help others and to build a more caring country. 214 graduates officially joined our newly-formed Portage College Alumni Association.

Congratulations and a heartfelt thank you to Portage College personnel, our Board of Governors, and to our industry and community stakeholders for their continued contributions to our students’ success. To our students, thank you for giving us the opportunity to serve your education and training needs – you will always be a part of the Portage College family. Best wishes as you begin the next phase of your journey. Sincerely yours, Dr. Trent Keough President & CEO, Portage College ANNUAL REPORT

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OUR MANDATE APPROVED BY MINISTER OF INNOVATION AND ADVANCED EDUCATION JUNE 12, 2014 Portage College is a public, board-governed college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under the authority of the PSLA of Alberta. Portage College has campus locations in Lac La Biche, Cold Lake, St. Paul, Bonnyville, Frog Lake, Saddle Lake, Boyle, and Whitefish Lake. In addition to delivering Apprenticeable Trades Training, Portage College offers certificate and diploma programs in diverse areas, including Forestry, Natural Resources, Business, Pre-Hospital Care, Health and Wellness, Culinary Arts, Human Services, Native Arts and Culture, University Studies, and Power Engineering. The College also offers academic upgrading, pre-employment trades training, continuing education credit and non-credit courses, and cost recovery customized training programs. Portage College encourages applied research focusing on improvement of rural education and supports scholarly activity strengthening our understanding of rural communities. College personnel model established ethical principles guiding all research involving human subjects. College students’ community-based and applied research practices adhere to the same code of respectful engagement. Portage College embraces every opportunity to collaborate with communities when conducting research identifying economic development and learning needs. As a member of Campus Alberta, Portage College works with eCampusAlberta, and Community Adult Learning Councils to make the broadest selection of education and training available in the region. Portage College expands its program offerings through articulation and transfer agreements, program delivery collaborations, brokering arrangements, and strategic partnerships. As a Comprehensive Community Institution, Portage College stewards adult education and training offerings in its geographic service region in alignment with the strategic planning initiatives of the Government of Alberta. Portage College undertakes in-depth consultation with all of its community stakeholders, including community adult learning providers, school districts, current and past students, service and industry employers, Program Content Advisory Committees, and municipal and Aboriginal leaders. Portage College excels in designing and delivering programs responding to the learning needs of students and local employers. Portage programs utilize leading-edge learning technologies and are offered in multiple instructional modalities, including traditional face-to-face, off-site video-conferencing, and distributed selfpaced learning. The College’s blended learning offerings, mobile trades training units, outreach programming, and service to small cohorts demonstrate its ability to make both instruction and learning supports readily available to students at times and places convenient to them. The College offers learning assistance programs and dedicated learner support services addressing the needs of disadvantaged learners. Portage College works to maximize learning opportunities that support the economic growth and human development needs of diverse northeast communities. A focus on community-based learning enables the College to partner with municipalities, First Nations Reserves, MÊtis Settlements, and school divisions for the provision of access to learning and recreation facilities, counseling, and library services. Portage College values collaboration and community-based volunteerism supporting quality learning and life opportunities in rural Alberta. Portage College provides education and employment training programs that instill a passion for lifelong learning, promote personal wellness, develop appreciation for cultural diversity, and inspire social engagement.

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WE ARE VOYAGEURS PAINTING PORTAGE BY NUMBERS 2014 - 2015

STUDENT SUCCESS 100% of 3rd Period Welding students passed their journeyman exam. 98% of 4th Class Power Engineering students passed their Part A Exam. 88% of Portage College grads found employment within 6 months after graduation.

OPERATIONS 79 industry, municipal,

post-secondary and governmental partnerships formed.

28 Alberta communities where Portage College provided Continuing Education.

ENROLMENTS 1,360 students registered in credit programs. 3,165 students registered in non-credit programs. 1,434 Aboriginal students served on and off reserve in 2014-15 (this represents 32% of all students).

8 communities where Portage College operated a campus.

67% (3,041 students) attended parttime.

33% (1,484 students) attended fulltime.

MARKET SHARE 1,648 fall applications to

Portage College in 2014-2015 (credit programs).

43% Portage College’s market share in its service region in 2014-15.

35.6 million Portage College 2014-2015 operating expenditures. $358,000 in scholarship and bursary money awarded to Portage College students in 2014-2015.

FINANCIALS

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OPERATIONAL OVERVIEW ECONOMY While all of Alberta was affected by the global economic downturn in 2014-2015, northeastern Alberta was hit particularly hard. Several major oil companies cancelled or postponed scheduled expansion projects in the region, scaled back operations and laid off staff due to the declining price of oil. The decisions affected not only those who worked directly for the companies but also the contractors, suppliers and service providers in the region whose livelihoods are largely dependent on the oil and gas industry. As a result, unemployment in the Wood Buffalo-Cold Lake Region (which encompasses much of the Portage Service Region) increased substantially. At the start of the fiscal year, with prices hovering above $100 a barrel, the unemployment rate was 4.1%. Twelve months later, with prices falling below $60 a barrel, the unemployment rate had doubled to 8.2%, 2.3% higher than the Alberta average. The forecast for 2015-2016 is bleak.

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Market Bulletins

The global economic downturn had a two-pronged effect on Portage College: 1.For the first time since 2011-12, enrolment increased from 798 full-load equivalents (FLEs) in 2013-2014 to 809 in 2014-2015. This translated into $270,000 more than budgeted for in student tuition and fee revenue. Preliminary numbers for 2015-2016 are even better, with an expected increase of 100 FLEs compared to the previous academic year. The College provided continuing education, ad-hoc training, certificate, diploma and degree opportunities to 4,525 students in 2014-2015. 3,041 (67%) attended on a part-time basis. Objectives continue to be to increase program attractiveness, provide small cohort delivery, design multiple entry and exit opportunities in order to improve long-term program viability and opportunities for part-time learners. Portage continues to keep its programs affordable for students. The College has the lowest tuition cost ranking in Human Services, Nursing and Trades ($3,484 per year) and the second lowest in Business ($3,484 per year) for comparable Comprehensive Community Institutions in Alberta.

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Student satisfaction levels remain high and in many cases increased in 2014-2015, with 88% of students recommending Portage College to others and 81% recommending their program of study. Despite the downturn in the economy, graduates continue to find employment, with 88% of the Class of 2013-2014 working, the highest recorded percentage since 2006-2007. 2. Conversely, the economic downturn has made it more difficult for Portage to find industry partners and sponsors for our programs and scholarships. For example, while individuals continued to support the College’s annual Sports and Education Dinner fundraiser in the spring, sponsorship levels dropped from $80,000 in 2014 to $39,000 in 2015. Overall, 2014-2015 College revenues decreased $43,000 compared to the previous academic year. FISCAL SITUATION For the year ended June 30, 2015, the College incurred an operating deficit of $442,000. This was due to the settlement of outstanding contract negotiations with AUPE staff and Faculty Association which were unfunded in our Campus Alberta Grants. The deficit is funded out of an $881,000 (July 1, 2014) internally restricted Operating Contingency Fund in net assets for precisely this occurrence. It is important to note that the College took proactive measures to reduce expenditures and to find further operating efficiencies in anticipation of funding cuts in 2015-2016. In January 2015, Portage eliminated 11 positions, mainly in support services, and incurred one-time severance costs. Additionally, the College closed our Bonnyville Campus leased facility at the end of the fiscal year and moved our Electrician program and Continuing Education staff to our Cold Lake Campus (discussed in greater detail below). In May 2015, the newly-elected Government of Alberta announced an increase of 2% to Campus Alberta Grant funding for both 2015-2016 and 2016-2017, reversing planned funding cuts of 1.4% in 2015-2016 and 2.7% in 2016-2017 announced by the previous Conservative government in March. The newly-elected NDP government also restored target enrolment expansion funding of $225,000 while freezing tuition rates for two years. The restoration was contingent on fee freezes. While the increased funding is welcomed by the College, particularly after several years of significant cuts, we still face significant cost pressures in the coming years. The College has a balanced budget for 2015-2016 but has no provision for collective settlements with the AUPE or the Faculty Association once the current agreements expire on June 30, 2016. It is imperative that the College remain fiscally prudent and introduce new programming that meets the needs of the students, communities and province that we serve. Partnerships with industry, high schools, post-secondary institutions, various levels of government, Aboriginal communities and municipalities have been and will remain critical to our success. CAMPUS CLOSURE Portage College has always adhered to the philosophy of bringing education to the learner. In 2014-2015, the College operated campuses in eight different communities. The College is faced with the challenge of providing services at these community locations including student support, computer and library services, and facility and equipment maintenance. While we continue to invest in our technology infrastructure to help provide those services, it has become an imperative for Portage to maximize utilization of space at College-owned facilities and eliminate reliance on leased facility space. The College did not receive facility “lights on money� for leased space at the Centennial Centre in Bonnyville, meaning the College had to pay rent out of our Campus Alberta grant. This left less funds available for academic programming and student supports. In anticipation of an austere provincial budget presented by the former Conservative government in March 2015, College management decided not to renew the Bonnyville facility lease expiring September 30, 2015. The closure meant that the Electrical program as well as Continuing Education staff had to be relocated to our Cold Lake Campus for 2015-2016. As noted in the Management Discussion & Analysis section of the Annual Report, the decision will allow Portage to redirect at least $1 million of lease cost avoidance back into programming and high priority service areas over the next decade.

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MAINTAINING INFRASTRUCTURE While developing capital projects such as the Pipeline Training Centre in Boyle or the Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul are critical for program development, it is equally important that Portage College effectively utilize and sustain its existing infrastructure. The College continues to focus on updating its Information Technology network, including improving wireless connectivity and videoconferencing classroom technology at all campuses. In 2014-2015, we also continued to upgrade our ERP system, with the implementation of a student accounts billing module which will allow the College to provide online statements and payments in a future project. The College still has in excess of $20 million in deferred maintenance projects to address. Deferred maintenance is particularly acute at our ageing Lac La Biche Campus. Portage has only received a small fraction of that total, making it difficult to undertake critical maintenance. In 2014-2015, Portage received an Infrastructure Maintenance Program (IMP) grant of $353,000. The College will continue to work with government and community partners in order to plan, finance, and develop its infrastructure effectively. STUDENT HOUSING A lack of housing for students is a perennial problem in Cold Lake. There are few affordable spaces available to them, particularly during upswings in the provincial economy. Unlike in Boyle, Lac La Biche and St. Paul, the College does not have any housing units available for students at our Cold Lake Campus. This acts as a deterrent for prospective students. The College continues to work with the City of Cold Lake to address the problem but will require financial assistance from the provincial government to do so. Currently, the College is unable to address even deferred maintenance issues with housing in Lac La Biche. ABORIGINAL STUDENTS For the past two years, we have noted that Aboriginal engagement for the region is in decline in all program areas. This decline is traceable to federal and provincial funding policy changes. Fewer Aboriginal students can avail of Academic bridging and funding than ever in our history. There is a growing number of disenfranchised Aboriginals without access to either education or jobs. For under-represented learners welfare is not a personal choice but the consequence of economics and local history. There is a social crisis emerging in the northeastern portion of Alberta that needs to be addressed by all levels of government. Access to education funding is one step to adverting this crisis, but not the solution. Adequate funding would see another 800-1,000 students engage in full-time learning and lead to subsequent employment.

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GOALS, PRIORITY INITIATIVES, EXPECTED OUTCOMES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2014-2015 was the first academic year that the College operated under the seven new strategic goals approved by the Board of Governors in June 2014. The goals were finalized after a year-long process to streamline with the College’s strategic initiatives and included consultations with industry, community advisory committees, College staff and faculty, students, and the Executive and Operations Committees. These goals are intended to guide Portage`s strategic planning for the next three years. The goals, organized by key categories, are listed below. ACCESS • Grow graduate and completion rates across all programs • Grow access to programs • Develop and implement centres of specialization QUALITY • Establish an effective and sustainable student support model (SEM) SUSTAINABILITY • Develop and implement a clearly identified brand • Reduce dependency on Government of Alberta base funding COMMUNITY • Employees have a clear sense of individual purpose, value and identity as it relates to College success The following section outlines the results of the projects and initiatives undertaken in 2014-2015 to try to meet the strategic goals outlined above. The strategic projects/targets and many of the initiatives/results listed below each goal are the ones identified in the 2014-2017 Comprehensive Institutional Plan.

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ACCESS Strategic Goal: Grow graduate and completion rates across all programs Portage College’s graduation rate was 66% in 2014-2015, 3% higher than in 2013-2014. This marked the third year in a row that the College’s graduation rate increased over the previous academic year. Of the 26 forcredit programs tracked in 2014-2015, 15 had higher graduation rates than the previous year. The graduate employment rate was 88%, the highest rate recorded since 2006-2007. A record 90% of graduates surveyed said that their Portage College credentials increased their chances to improve their income.

Strategic Project/Target

Student Retention

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Complete gap analysis of retention pillars

Develop multi-year retention plan

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Dashboard monitoring attrition rates benchmarks has been developed. Next step is to review attrition patterns by program in 2015-2016. The College’s 2014-2015 retention rate was 88%, 3% higher than the target. The 2015-2016 target is 86%. Multi-year plan will be built on data analysis of attrition patterns in 2015-2016. Initial strategies, based on best practice, have been focused on engagement/ experience: • Expanded regional recreation services to include Boyle Campus • Increased student activities by 45%. This included adding more student clubs, Learning Cafés and social activities • Promoted Student Ambassador program at all campuses. The program encourages student engagement, citizenship and volunteerism by helping out at events. PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Project/Target

Student Retention (continued)

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Develop multi-year retention plan (continued)

ANNUAL REPORT

• Re-engineered Student Orientation to focus on social interaction while introducing students to College life, support services and staff. Student survey feedback indicated an improved level of satisfaction. Developed Voyageur GPS program (pilot to be implemented in the 2015-2016 academic year), designed to provide participating students with one-on-one support from a designated staff member. The College employee acts as a guide, referring students to appropriate supports, providing advice and checking in on the students throughout the year to see how they are progressing.

Build accountability reporting

Dashboard has been created in our ERP system, enabling us to track attrition by program and the reasons students withdraw.

Discuss and document strategy implementation and impact at least twice a year

Teaching & Learning committee, a sub-committee of Academic Council, meets monthly to discuss retention and other teaching-related matters.

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Strategic Project/Target

Academic Support

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Increased pan-campus awareness of available support systems

Moved case conferences towards best practice for students at risk. Case conferences involve instructional staff, academic support staff and student services staff. The focus is on the student from all perspectives to ensure intervention strategies support the “whole” student.

Growing number of students attending learning cafés

83 students attended 19 different Learning Cafés in 2014-2015, which were also open to College employees and community members. This was an increase from 71 students and 16 different sessions in 2013-2014.

Growing number of peer tutors

Peer tutor network was not set up in 2014-2015. Focus was shifted to Student Ambassador program instead. Student Learning Services (SLS) organized and facilitated individual study groups with first-year Culinary Arts students at St. Paul Campus. The students eventually took control of the groups themselves and helped each other grasp the concepts they were learning in class. All students passed their first year. The initiative proved so successful that it is now being replicated with Baking Certificate students and at other Portage College campuses.

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Strategic Project/Target

Academic Support (continued)

ANNUAL REPORT

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Growing number of students using Smart Thinking

Hours decreased from 107.85 in 2013-2014 to 51.53 in 2014-2015. Focus in 20142015 was placed more on face-to-face tutoring and on offering more Kickstart tutoring sessions through SLS. The number of participants in Kickstart sessions increased substantially, from 77 in 20132014 to 168 in 2014-2015.

Growing number of students accessing Student Learning Services

A total of 317 students accessed SLS in 2014-2015, up significantly from 102 in 2013-2014. It is important to note that SLS changed its support model in 2013-2014, open to any student wishing assistance as opposed to only targeting those with learning disabilities.

Growing number of students accessing Learning Commons’ services

A total of 49,480 visits were recorded by SLS in 2014-2015, down from 56,649 in 20132014. The headcount decline is due in part to an increase in the number of online services being used (such as database searches and electronic book searches – up 279% over 2013-2014).

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Strategic Goal: Grow access to all programs Portage College’s vision statement is “building success by providing exceptional learning experiences.” Part of fulfilling that promise is the College’s commitment to provide our students with a larger suite of programs than has been available in the past. Portage has increased its program mix at all campuses by: using videoconferencing and online course delivery options, partnering with industry and other post-secondary institutions to initiate programs such as Heavy Equipment Operator or Business Administration Diploma specializations, and developing new and unique programs that fill the needs of the regional and the provincial economy, most notably at the Food Sciences Centre at our St. Paul Campus.

Strategic Project/Target

Program Expansion Plan

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

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Number of new programs launched Number of new program locations launched

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In 2014-2015, offered four new programs: • Aboriginal Arts Certificate • Baking Certificate • Culinary Arts Diploma • SAG-D De-Oiling and Water Treatment Operator Certificate Developed the following programs, to be offered in 2015-2016: • Artisan Entrepreneurship Diploma • Heavy Equipment Technician Continued to develop a Hairstyling Certificate program, including hiring an instructor and beginning design and development of new hairstyling lab. The program is scheduled to be offered in 2016-2017. The $1.1 million project is being funded solely by the College. Conducted labour market demand analyses for the following programs: • Dental Assistant • Diagnostic Medical Sonography • Hospitality Management

PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Project/Target

Program Expansion Plan (continued)

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

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Number of new programs launched Number of new program locations launched (continued) •

Aboriginal Community Access Plan

Increased Aboriginal student enrolment

Aboriginal enrolment in credit programs dropped by 5 students, from 409 in 20132014 to 404 in 2014-2015. Funding is still a challenge for many Aboriginal students.

Increased number of open campus locations

Operated an open campus pilot in Whitefish Lake First Nation #128. There was strong community support for the initiative and results were very positive. Course completions doubled from 2013-2014 to 2014-2015. Due to the success of the pilot, Portage will operate an Open Campus in Whitefish Lake First Nation #128 again in 2015-2016 with extended hours. The College is also examining the feasibility of expanding the model to other locations, including Heart Lake First Nation. The College was also approached by Aboriginal

ANNUAL REPORT

• Instrumentation Technician • Office Administration specializations • Pharmacy Technician Continued with Boyle Campus service expansion • Housing established (42-person camp in place) • Additional classroom space created • Acquired recreation equipment • Site security established

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2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

Increased number of open campus locations (continued)

Affairs and Northern Development Canada to help generate a set of best practices for open campuses.

Increased number of workforce development offerings in partnering with Aboriginal communities

Updated a Memorandum of Understanding with Buffalo Lake Métis Settlement regarding Heavy Equipment Operator and Introduction to Civil Engineering programs.

Increased transition of Aboriginal students into career, trades and university transfer programs

Number of self-declared Aboriginal students enrolled in career, trades and university transfer programs decreased from 300 in 2013-2014 to 277 in 2014-2015 with notable decreases in Early Learning and Child Care and increases in Apprenticeship trades and Culinary Arts. The reliance on self-identification likely means that the number of Aboriginal students is understated. It is also important to note that grant funding is only available for Academic Upgrading so Aboriginal students who do not receive band funding may be reluctant to take out a loan to cover their tuition, fees and expenses.

Increased number of training contracts in Aboriginal communities

Number of training contracts decreased from 58 in 20132014 to 36 in 2014-2015. Reasons for the decrease include a reduction in the number of forestry-related contracts in 2014-2015 and a downturn in the economy.

Strategic Project/Target

Aboriginal Community Access Plan (continued)

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Enrolment Plan (in FLEs) Budget forecast 2014-2015 FLEs: 755 Actual 2014-2015 FLEs: 809

The higher than forecasted enrolment is due to a few factors: 1. The decline in Academic Upgrading enrolment from 2013-2014 (183 FLEs) to 2014-2015 was less severe than historical year-over-year declines predicted. 2. Culinary Arts, moved from Lac La Biche to the Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul and extended from a certificate to a diploma program, increased from 5 FLEs in 2013-2014 to 26 FLEs in 2014-2015. 3. Slightly higher than predicted FLE totals for Apprenticeship programs and Power Engineering.

ANNUAL REPORT

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Strategic Goal: Develop and implement centres of specialization Part of providing our students with an exceptional learning experience involves offering them with unique programming and learning opportunities. Building centres of specialization will help the College achieve that goal as well as fostering economic growth and innovation in our stewardship region.

Strategic Project/Target

Food Sciences Centre (St. Paul)

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

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Launch five programs Launch Entrepreneurial Incubation Centre

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Launched two programs in 2014-2015: Culinary Arts Diploma and Baking. Continued to offer Institutional Cook while beginning research and development for a future launch of meat processing certificate and food processing technician programs. Sought and received (in the fall of 2015) Canadian Air Force approval for Culinary Arts Diploma and Institutional Cook programs. The approval means students can receive funding from the military to take the two programs. Renovation project completed in summer of 2015. Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul now includes the following: • Entrepreneurial Incubation Centre (now ready for occupancy) • Events Centre • Space for a retail store • Two-line commercial kitchen • Meat processing lab • Bakery lab • Packaging lab • Kettle lab • Specialized research lab The Centre is also available for commercial use for local and small businesses.

PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Project/Target

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Pipeline Training Campus (Boyle) •

Expand two programs

• •

Water Management Centre (Lac La Biche)

Finalize Memorandum of Understanding

Open Campus

ANNUAL REPORT

Evaluate pilot

Established 42-person working camp on site Continued to offer Heavy Equipment Operator program (three intakes). Students lived on campus during their 16-week stint and helped to prepare the site for future expansion. Partnered with Enbridge to offer a Pipeline Construction Worker training program for Aboriginal students. Program included guaranteed employment for graduates for 3-4 months after completing program. Continued discussions with various groups, including Lac La Biche County, to develop a potable reference testing lab as part of a larger Water Treatment Training initiative. Portage signed a $1 million MOU with Lac La Biche County to pilot Water Resource Training. The County will contribute $600,000 and the College $400,000. Open Campus pilot at Whitefish Lake First Nation #128 deemed a success: • 20 students enrolled and attended classes, including 9 who attended for 10 months to complete courses and tickets.

29


Strategic Project/Target

Open Campus (continued)

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Evaluate pilot (continued)

Aboriginal Arts Centre (Lac La Biche)

• •

Launch two new programs Launch Artist in Residence program

30

• Students obtained certificates in CSTS, WHMIS, TDG, ATV, H2S Alive, First Aid, and Flagging and completed Math, CALM, Computer, Science and Social Studies courses. Plan is to expand the project to eight campuses by 2020. Additionally, researching feasibility of implementing the Open Campus model in Heart Lake First Nation and Buffalo Lake Métis Settlement. Launched Aboriginal Arts Certificate program in 20142015 and developed Artisan Entrepreneurship Diploma program, to be offered in 2015-2016. Created an artist-in-residence position, with support from Devon Canada; artist worked from March to June on her own artwork while also working with students in studio, at elementary schools and in the community.

PORTAGE COLLEGE


Research, Applied Research and Scholarly Activities Portage continued to make strides in developing our internal research capacity in 2014-2015. The College, certified by both the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), undertook several program and research priorities outlined in the 2014-2017 Comprehensive Institutional Plan including completing construction of the new Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul. This helped create opportunity for more local food production and food-related research. Food Processing Technician Instructor Dr. Zifei Dai, in partnership with the St. Paul Municipal Seed Cleaning Association, led a $24,000 research project investigating field pea potential applications and market for Alberta Northeast Growers during the academic year. The project received Level 1 NSERC funding. In addition to leading the Open Campus pilot at Whitefish Lake First Nation #128 (referred to on the previous page), the Teaching and Learning department continued to focus on fostering a research culture at Portage in 2014-2015. The department held Learning CafĂŠs for faculty and staff, facilitated research discussions and encouraged faculty to undertake applied research projects. University Studies Coordinator Robin Tizzard and Faculty Development Facilitator Joan Wall investigated mobile device use by faculty and students and how to better integrate mobile devices in the classroom. The department also worked with the Vice President Academic and the College deans to organize a Scholarly Teaching Symposium which will be held in 2016. The College remained an active partner in the Alberta Rural Development Network and the NADC Northern Labour Market Information Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse includes representatives from Grande Prairie Regional College, Keyano College and Northern Lakes College and funds Northern-Alberta-specific research on community, economic and post-secondary topics such as skill shortages, information technology, student recruitment and innovation. In April 2015, the Clearinghouse completed a study examining models of supports for mature students attending northern colleges. Results of the research were shared not only within the respective colleges but also with post-secondary institutions across the province and with provincial government officials.

ANNUAL REPORT

31


QUALITY Strategic Goal: Establish an effective and sustainable student support model At Portage College, each student is an active and valued member of our community, even after they’ve graduated. As such, our goal is to provide students with information and support from the moment of their first enquiry to the moment they graduate and become an alumnus.

Strategic Project/Target

Revision of student enrolment process

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Improved conversion rates by 2% per year

• • • Student Information Portal

• • • • •

32

Automated activities to engage students through enrolment process Online payments and receipts Online statement of marks Online scheduling Self-enrolment

Accepted to registered conversion rate improved to 88% in the fall of 2014 (fall snapshot number), significantly higher than the 75% target set in the strategic plan Reviewed admissions and new academic year processes Implemented coordinated team approach to program recruitment Initiated skills training for all front-line staff As of the end of the academic year, the project had not been started as other steps had to be taken first before any work on the portal could be initiated. Specifically: • Re-design and launch of new, more student-focused and interactive Portage College website, expected to be up and running by December 2015. • Upgrade of ERP system • Phase I – Student Accounts Billing Module – completed. • Phase II – adding additional functionality currently underway. Once completed, set up of staff intranet and student portal can proceed. PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Project/Target

Student Information Portal (continued)

• • • • •

Alumni Development

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Automated activities to engage students through enrolment process Online payments and receipts Online statement of marks Online scheduling Self-enrolment (continued)

Phase I of the Student Information Portal is now in the planning stage.

Alumni Development

Portage College Alumni organization successfully established. Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram pages in place, in addition to alumni e-mail accounts. Part-time staff member hired to oversee the organization. The organization is geared towards keeping graduates in touch with each other and their institution and is not intended as a revenue source. By the end of 2014-2015, 214 graduates and former staff members had signed up.

ANNUAL REPORT

33


SUSTAINABILITY Strategic Goal: Develop and implement a clearly identified brand Effective marketing starts with consistent and reliable communication with all stakeholders, including staff, students, and the communities Portage College serves. During the past year, the College has undertaken several initiatives aimed at developing its brand and increasing awareness and enrolment.

Strategic Project/Target

Corporate Branding & Image Building

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Develop corporate marketing division

• 1. 2. 3. 4.

• • • • •

34

Develop and build internal capacity to implement and support project, eventually taking ownership Open up new markets Create brand loyalty/awareness Launch new brand and image Growth of brand awareness provincially and nationally

Four-person Corporate Communications division established: Team Lead Communications & Video Production Officer Corporate Communications & Promotion Officer Event Planner Undertook an extensive, province-wide study to determine Portage College brand recognition. A total of 2,410 interviews were completed as well as 43 telephone interviews with College stakeholders. The study, completed by Léger in June 2015, determined the following: • Only 18% of Albertans surveyed have heard of Portage College • Awareness increased substantially (64% indicated they were somewhat or very familiar with Portage) in our primary service region, compared to a similar survey conducted in 2008. • Those who are aware have a favourable impression of the College

PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Project/Target

Corporate Branding & Image Building (continued)

Marketing Plan

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

• • • • •

• •

Develop and build internal capacity to implement and support project, eventually taking ownership Open up new markets Create brand loyalty/awareness Launch new brand and image Growth of brand awareness provincially and nationally (continued)

Clear direction for student marketing Defined strategy for program areas, operations, executive

ANNUAL REPORT

Corporate Communications implemented a common visual ID policy for marketing materials and staff presentations (i.e. established common fonts, colours and logo placement guidelines) and re-designed the College’s main website. Identified the brand messages the College would like to portray: adventurous, passionate, personal, unique, genuine, flexible. Adopted the mantra of “We Are Voyageurs” and the tagline “Deny the Ordinary” to fit with the brand messaging. Re-designed a new, more interactive and studentfocused College website, expected to be launched by December 2015. The new website will be targeted towards prospective students and will be more interactive, mobile & tablet friendly and feature more visuals than our current website. Determined that targeting markets outside of the Portage Region would be of great benefit to the College. Plans include billboards, busses, targeted mailouts, radio blitzes and a concerted high-school recruitment campaign.

35


Branding Initiatives Over the past year we have clearly identified and defined our core brand messages moving forward. As a postsecondary institution that has undergone a significant change in our programming and student demographics, it was necessary to move towards a brand that better expressed the themes and vision for the future we needed to portray. In 2014-2015 steps were taken to lay the foundation for repositioning and growing the brand by creating and launching the following projects: Visual Identity, Website Redesign, Corporate Image events in Lac la Biche, Cold Lake and St. Paul, Three-Year Marketing Plan. We’re in a good position to operationalize these items and build on this foundation for future brand campaigns in 2015-2016. In order to reposition our brand to better suit our audience, we needed to clearly define who we are as a College and where we would like to go into the future. Portage College is a world-class post-secondary institution that delivers both practical and academic learning in a way that is innovative, personal, meaningful and empowering and combines narratives that follow the core themes that we have identified: adventurous, passionate, personal, unique, genuine and flexible. The Voyageur persona Our branding materials also seek to showcase our Voyageur mascot serving as a link to our history in northern Alberta and a persona for the present and future. With our materials and campaigns we utilize various taglines that fit with the theme of adventure and what it takes to be a modern day Voyageur both in and out of the classroom. Deny the Ordinary tagline The mantra “Deny the Ordinary” fits this brand message and key themes we’ve addressed and it speaks to our Voyageur persona. This tagline shapes the various image campaigns that we have put together in the past year including campaigns with the following themes: Discover the North, Do Extraordinary Things, and We Are Voyageurs. It also allows for a strong corporate image that our Recruitment team can take and sell to prospective students across Alberta and into British Columbia and Saskatchewan.   EXPERIENCE THE NORTH at Portage College

portagecollege.ca

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PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Goal: Reduce dependency on base funding In its March 2015 Report to the Legislative Assembly, the Office of the Auditor General (OAG) commended Portage College for the accuracy and timeliness of preparation of our consolidated financial statements and for implementing a 2014 recommendation to improve the accuracy of our perpetual inventory system at the bookstore.

Strategic Project/Target

Capital Campaigns

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

• •

• •

Implement capital campaign management system that focuses on planning, sustainability, and relationship building Raise expected revenue Increase partnerships and awareness

No capital campaigns were launched in 2014-2015, as the College was still setting priorities with regards to future projects and programs and conducting a provincewide brand awareness survey.

Ability to manage and track capital campaigns Manage donor relationships effectively

Donor Perfect software acquired and implemented to help better track fundraising results and cultivate donor relationships.

2015 Annual Sports & Education Dinner raised over $60,000 for scholarships and athletics

ANNUAL REPORT

37


COMMUNITY Strategic Goal: Employees have a clear sense of individual purpose, value and identity as it relates to College success Portage College recognizes the importance of employee engagement and development. An exceptional learning experience starts with an exceptional working experience. It is imperative that our employees feel valued and see how their contributions impact the College’s overall performance.

Strategic Project/Target

Improve Performance Management System

• • • •

• •

38

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

Improve performance management system to focus on evaluation of performance related to: • Performance related to job description • Performance and growth related to core attributes • Contribution to the strategic plan • Employees having the tools required to do their jobs Cascade the roll-out tiered from executive to front line over a period of 4 years Facilitate easier and more objective performance management practices Improve compliance with HR procedures and guidelines Promote working environment where every employee understands his/her role in the big picture and feels valued and challenged to grow in his/her role Create opportunities for growth pathways and succession planning Ongoing communications mechanism to ensure that employees have the resources and information to do their jobs

• •

Restructured how performance assessments (PAs) are administered and reported. Stricter PA completion timelines were implemented. Job descriptions updated to better match College goals and objectives. The intent of the process was to help employees see where they fit in the “big picture,” to understand how accomplishing their goals could impact their department’s goals and the College’s strategic goals as well.

PORTAGE COLLEGE


Strategic Project/Target

Internal Communication/ Information Portal

2014-2015 Initiatives/Results

2014-2017 CIP Outcomes

• •

Improved employee communication Reduction of number of inquiries regarding employee information

• •

ANNUAL REPORT

Employees able to access benefits, timesheets and other employee information

Upgraded Agresso, our ERP system, a precursor to creating an intranet and information portal for faculty and staff. Comprehensive employee assistance program in place (includes online resources) Improved internal communication by: • Upgrading the phone system in the College. Employees can now check their voicemail on their phones or online through their e-mail accounts. • Installing Skype for Business on all College employees’ computers • Creating a quarterly newsletter • Sharing summaries of Executive, Operations and Deans’ Council meetings with all employees, in addition to making meeting minutes available on a shared internal hard drive No online resources available to employees yet; ERP upgrade first step towards achieving this project.

39


OUR VALUED PARTNERS We are grateful to the following agencies, companies, municipalities and organizations for their ongoing support of our College. Their support has proven essential to ensuring that the College delivers on its promise to provide exceptional learning experiences for its students. A • • • • • • •

D • Devon Canada

• • • •

Access Pipeline Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry Training Alberta Construction Safety Association Alberta Employment and Immigration Alberta Health Alberta Human Services Alberta Lakeland Direct Marketing: Lakeland Heritage Partners Alberta Law Foundation Alberta Museums Association Alberta Pacific Forest Industries Alberta Rural Development Network Alberta Safety Council Alberta Snowmobile Association Alberta Sport, Recreation and Wildlife Foundation Alberta Sustainable Resource Development Alberta Tourism, Parks, Recreation and Culture Aspen View School Division Athabasca County

B • • • • •

Beaver Lake Cree Nation Big Dog 103.5 Lac La Biche Bonnyville Centennial Centre Corporation Boston Pizza Lac La Biche Buffalo Lake Métis Settlement

L • • • • •

Calnash Trucking Campus Alberta Canadian Natural Resources Limited Canalta Hotels Cenovus City of Cold Lake Community Adult Learning Councils o Bonnyville Community Learning Council o Cold Lake Community Learning Council o Elk Point & District Further Education o Lac La Biche Community Learning for Adult Student Society o Lac La Biche Program for Adult Learning o Smoky Lake County Community Learning Council o St. Paul Community Learning Association o VegMin Learning Society (Vegreville) Community Programs Branch of Alberta Innovation and Advanced Education

M • MEG Energy • Métis Nation of Alberta • Minor Sports (Lac La Biche)

• • • • • • •

C • • • • • • •

40

E • • • • •

Ecole Plamondon School Edcon Power Tongs Elk Island Public Schools Enbridge Pipelines Inc. Enform

F •

Frog Lake First Nation

I •

Imperial Oil Resources

J •

J.A. Williams High School

K • Kehewin First Nation • Kikino Métis Settlement Lac La Biche Canadian Native Friendship Centre Lac La Biche Childcare Society Lac La Biche County Lac La Biche Transport Lakeland Catholic School District

N • • • •

Northern Alberta Development Council North American Wildlife Technology Association Northern Lakes College Northern Lights School Division

R • •

Ramada Hotels Request Solutions

PORTAGE COLLEGE


S • • • • • •

Saddle Lake First Nation Samson Cree Nation Sobeys Lac La Biche St. Paul Education Regional Division Statoil Canada Ltd. Student Association of Portage College

T • • •

Town of Bonnyville Town of St. Paul TransCanada Corporation

U • University of Alberta • University of Calgary V •

Village of Boyle

W • • • •

Wajax Equipment Waschuk Pipeline Western Economic Diversification Canada Whitefish Lake First Nation #128

Portage College would also like to acknowledge the tremendous support received from residents of our service region for our annual fundraisers and events, student scholarships and bursaries, and Voyageurs athletics. Thank you.

Celebrity Chef Chuck Hughes with Portage College Culinary Arts students before the 2nd Annual Spring Gala at our St. Paul Campus

ANNUAL REPORT

41


2014-2015 SUPPORTERS & FRIENDS OF PORTAGE COLLEGE Portage College greatly values the donations made by individuals, businesses, organizations, and industry. We responsibly steward and allocate all contributions. Please note that the list represents donation revenue earned during the reporting period. Thank you to the following – $10,000 – $24,999 Access Pipeline Inc. Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. Cenovus FCCL Ltd. Crude Energy Services Devon Canada Enbridge Pipelines Inc. Lac La Biche County Leighton Makowichuk $5,000 – $9,999 Alberta Pacific Forest Industries City of Cold Lake Leijen Enterprises Ltd. Mary Neudorf Miller Thompson LLP Quinn Contracting Ltd. Rob Hetherington $1,000 – $4,999 BCMInns Lac La Biche Boston Pizza Community Futures Lac La Biche Crescent IDA Drugs Ltd. Dale Bouvier Edcon Power Tongs & Oilfield Services Ltd. Imperial Oil Resources – Calgary Jeff Erick Jody Durocher Lac La Biche Sobeys Leighton Grey Professional Corp. MEG Energy Nexen Inc. Northeast Alberta Information Hub OK Ford Osum Oil Sands Corporation Questfire Energy Ramada Inn & Suites Randolph Benson Professional Corp. River Cree Resort LP Site Energy Services St. Paul Lion’s Club TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. Trent & Bonita Keough Urlacher Construction Ltd. Village of Boyle 42

$200 – $999 Adam Albert Alberta Native Friendship Centres Association Alberta Union of Provincial Employees Ali Cunningham Athabasca County Barry & Donna Feledichuk Bill Britton Bob Carrington Brent Clark Carrie Froehler Chris Best Christelle FV Christine Martin Clark’s Plumbing & Heating Colosimo Consulting David & Kathy Yurdiga David Paul Dennis Comeau Eugene Cardinal Gary & MJ Siebold Gary Rogers Gerald & Julie Genoud Glen & Eleisa Anderson Graham G. Jackson Grant Theroux Guy Gervais J.A. Williams High School Jacquie Fenske Jamie White Jim Knight Joan Wall Jonathan Lambert Josee Amyotte Judith Hess Julie Benson Kathleen Skjersven Keyano Pimee Exploration Company Ltd. Lac La Biche Glass & Mirror Lac La Biche Kinsmen Club Lac La Biche Post Lyla Allan Mardere Birkill Marwan Maurice & Susan Plamondon Michelle Wright PORTAGE COLLEGE


$200 – $999 (continued) Mike & Nancy Broadbent Mike Shepherd Myrna Fox Omer & Bev Moghrabi Portage College Faculty Association Rachynski Land Surveys Servus Credit Union Shelley Franchuk Sherry Schultz Strad Energy Services Ltd. Syncrude Canada Ltd.

Sysco Tarrabain Motor Products Terri Ward Tim Thompson Town of Bonnyville Town of St. Paul Travis Lansing Twintel Communications Ltd. Venture Building Supplies Inc. Workun Garrick Partnership

We have made every effort to ensure all our contributors to our 2014-2015 fiscal year are correctly recognized in the Annual Report. We apologize if an error or an omission has occurred. The timing of your donation can also determine the year in which it is acknowledged.

The first annual Building Futures Gala raised over $40,000 for our Cold Lake Campus Expansion

ANNUAL REPORT

43


INTERNATIONALIZATION At a retreat in the spring of 2015, the Portage College Board of Governors directed administration to investigate the possibility of generating revenue by increasing international student enrolment. Out-of-country students have never accounted for more than 0.6% of overall enrolment at the College (there were four international students registered at Portage in 2014-2015), but Portage has never made a concerted effort to attract them. With unique offerings such as Aboriginal Arts and environmental-based programming, the College is well positioned to welcome more students from overseas. We recognize that Portage is not yet prepared to handle an influx of international students and needs to improve services and develop supports including a recruitment plan focused on specific countries and programs, an expedited application process and specific cultural supports to help them adapt to life in northeastern Alberta. The Associate Vice-President Academic has been tasked with developing an international strategy and will report back to the Board of Governors by the end of 2015. The College also continued to be a partner in OERu, the Open Education Resources Foundation’s world-wide network of free online learning opportunities, and developed several courses which should be made available online in 2016. The partnership allows Portage to collaborate in building and providing OERs to students, in an effort to expand program offerings and provide affordable access to higher education. Portage is committed to open-source access to disadvantaged international students. Working with OERu minimizes institutional risk while creating real learning opportunities for disenfranchised students. Although listed as a possible initiative in the 2014-2017 Comprehensive Institutional Plan, the College is no longer pursuing a foreign exchange partnership with the China Canada Association. The proposal would’ve seen a Chinese post-secondary institution send its students to take courses at our Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul while allowing our second-year Culinary Arts students the opportunity to study in China. While some preliminary discussions were held, nothing was finalized due to staff turnover and a change in direction. The College continues to search for opportunities to partner with other international institutions on student exchanges, knowledge-transfer, curriculum development and research collaborations. Target markets include Europe and Asia, where interest in Aboriginal Art, wilderness adventure and environmental research is particularly acute.

44

PORTAGE COLLEGE


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY As noted in the 2014-2017 Comprehensive Institutional Plan, more of Portage College’s programs are now being offered using a blended-delivery or fully-online model. Even courses and programs delivered face to face in a traditional classroom setting have Moodle companion sites and available online resources and supports. Many students now expect immediate, individualized service and support, making it essential for the College to continue to upgrade and expand our IT infrastructure, even in times of economic restraint. The table below summarizes the efforts undertaken in 2014-2015 to address this pressing need.

Project

Status

Expected Completion Date

Intranet Deployment

Not Started

June 2017

Still developing internal capabilities.

ERP Renewal

In Progress

June 2017

Phase I upgrade (Student Accounts) completed. Phase II underway. Goal is additional functionality. Completion of the project is a precursor to the Intranet Deployment project.

Progress Made in Last 12 Months

Disaster Recovery

In Progress

June 2017

Technology Expansion in Classrooms and Further Video Conferencing

In Progress

June 2016

ANNUAL REPORT

Operational disaster recovery site has been established at our St. Paul Campus. Have tested failover of ERP system. Have completed overhaul of five classrooms, providing enhanced video controls. In final stages of selecting vendor to refresh video conferencing capabilities. Using an additional $100,000 from Access to the Future funding to expand video controls in classrooms.

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CAPITAL PLAN Critical to Portage’s new programming initiatives are new facility construction, expansion and renovation.

PRIORITY PROJECTS

46

Type

Description

New

Pipeline Training Campus in Boyle

In Progress

Phase I – 2017 (includes Hired director of processing loop) development and Phase II – 2018 engineering firm to design process loop; $4 million, working camp, classroom space in place; Heavy Equipment Operator students continue to help prepare the site.

Renovation

Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul

Completed

June 2015

Status

Expected Completion Date

Progress Made in Last 12 Months

Project officially completed as of end of fiscal year – final phase of project included secondfloor entrepreneurial incubation centre, events centre and space for a retail store.

PORTAGE COLLEGE


OTHER

Type

Description

New

Water Treatment Training Facility in Lac La Biche

In Progress

Project taken off priority list in 2015-2018 CIP but work on the project continues.

College and Lac La Biche signed a $1 million MOU to pilot Water Resource Training. County will contribute $600,000 while College will contribute $400,000.

Maintenance

Replace domestic hot/ cold water distribution system in Lac La Biche

In Progress

June 2017

Partial funding in place from Alberta Infrastructure; engineer has been hired.

Maintenance

Electrical Distribution Renewal in Lac La Biche

In Progress

September 2016

Funding in place. Work started in 2014 and continues.

Maintenance

Asphalt overlay and line painting in Lac La Biche

In Progress

June 2017

Requested Alberta Infrastructure funding through BLIMS; painted new lines in parking lots.

Status

Expected Completion Date

Progress Made in Last 12 Months

Lac La Biche Campus

ANNUAL REPORT

47


Portage College’s number one priority capital project remains the development of Canada’s first Pipeline Training Campus in Boyle. Phase I of the $50 million project, which includes a $15 million process loop that will be able to safely simulate oil spills and pipeline breaches using non-toxic materials, will be part of a phasedcampus development that will eventually offer multiple programs relevant to the oil and gas pipeline industry. An engineering firm has been hired to design the process loop and conceptual drawings of the proposed campus have been completed. As of the end of the 2014-2015, $4 million was in place thanks to support from Alberta Human Services, Western Economic Development Canada, Rural Diversification Initiative, Portage College and the private sector. The College continued to develop the site in 2014-2015 with the help of students in the Heavy Equipment Operator program in Boyle. The Campus has a 42-person working camp on site as well as classroom and recreational space. As noted in our Comprehensive Institutional Plan, with increasing environmental concerns and continuing low oil prices, being able to move Alberta oil safely and respond to pipeline breaches is of paramount importance to the provincial economy. Meanwhile, the College continues to advocate for the project, garnering attention from media outlets and industry representatives from across Canada. Portage was approached last winter by companies from Alberta and Ontario about the possibility of developing an Oil and Gas Inspection Professional Certification program. The College conducted a survey of industry soliciting feedback regarding program pre-requisites, structure and subjects and held several meetings with the interested companies. Talks, currently focusing on mapping and course curriculum, are continuing. The College also recently hired a director of development whose sole focus is to see the Pipeline Training Campus project come to fruition. In 2015, the College completed renovations to the new Food Sciences Centre in St. Paul. The facility, which houses an entrepreneurial incubation centre, an events centre, space for a retail store, a two-line kitchen and several specialized labs, allows Portage to offer a suite of food-related programs. In 2014-2015, students were able to enrol in Baking and Institutional Cook certificate programs and a re-designed Culinary Arts Diploma (CULA) program. Future programs offerings are expected to include Meat Processing Technician and Food Processing Technician. We expect that the St. Paul Campus, which also has housing available, will draw students from across the province due to the unique program mix and the opportunity for students to operate a fully functioning food processing centre under the watchful supervision of trained scientists and technicians. Data from 2014-2015 supports this assertion as CULA enrolment increased from six students in 2013-2014 (when a certificate version of the program was offered in Lac La Biche) to 25 in 2014-2015.

Proposal for Boyle Campus

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PORTAGE COLLEGE


MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(thousands of dollars)

Management’s Responsibility for Reporting Portage College’s management is responsible for the preparation, accuracy, objectivity and integrity of the information contained in the Annual Report including the consolidated financial statements, performance results and supporting management information. Systems of internal control are designed and maintained by management to produce reliable information to meet reporting requirements. The system is designed to provide management with reasonable assurance that transactions are properly authorized, are executed in accordance with all relevant legislation, regulations and policies, reliable financial records are maintained and assets are properly accounted for and safeguarded. The Annual Report has been developed under the oversight of Portage College Board Finance Committee, as well as approved by the Board of Governors and is prepared in accordance with the Fiscal Management Act and the Post-secondary Learning Act. The Auditor General of the Province of Alberta, Portage College’s external auditor appointed under the Auditor General Act, performs an annual independent audit of the consolidated financial statements which are prepared in accordance with Canadian public sector accounting standards.

Dr. Trent Keough President & CEO, Portage College

ANNUAL REPORT

49


Introduction This Management Discussion and Analysis (MD&A) should be read in conjunction with the Portage College consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The MD&A and consolidated financial statements are reviewed and approved by the Portage College Board of Governors and President/CEO on the recommendation of the Portage College Finance Committee. The consolidated financial statements represent the financial position and results of operations of Portage College. The College’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Canadian Public Sector Accounting Standards and are expressed in Canadian dollars. The MD&A is an overview of the consolidated financial results Portage College achieved in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015 and offers a detailed discussion and analysis of the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Operating Environment Financial Results Net Assets Capital Spending Areas of Significant Financial Risk

1.

Operating Environment

In 2014-15, the former Alberta Government continued with its tightening of funding to the Post-Secondary sector with no inflationary increases to Campus Alberta Grants. With declining oil prices and a world-wide economic downturn the Alberta Government introduced an austere budget in March 2015 that resulted in a 1.4% cut to Campus Alberta grant funding for 2015-16 and a further planned cut of 2.7% for 2016-17. In addition, government funding for target enrolment growth was removed which required the College to self-fund $225 in program expansion introduced in 2014-15. In anticipation of funding reductions for 2015-16, College management took proactive measures to reduce operating costs and find further operating efficiencies. This included evaluating academic programs with low enrolments and reducing administrative overhead in support services. In January 2015, the College eliminated eleven positions and incurred one-time severance costs. In addition, the College closed the Bonnyville Campus leased facility and moved academic programming and Continuing Education to the Cold Lake owned campus facility. This cost savings measure will allow the College to redirect $1M back into programming and high priority service areas over the next ten years. In May 2015, the newly elected government reversed the funding cuts introduced by the former government of 1.4% (2015-16) and 2.7% (2016-17) respectively. Target enrolment expansion funding of $225 was restored for 2015-16 and onward. In addition, the newly elected government increased our Campus Alberta grant funding by 2% for 2015-16 with a further commitment of 2% for 2016-17 to provide predictable and sustaining funding. Tuition was frozen throughout the Post-Secondary sector at 2014-15 rates for 2015-16 reversing a planned 2.2% increase. In 2014-15 the College settled outstanding contract negotiations with AUPE staff and Faculty Associations. Settlements cost $438 when including increases for management and excluded staff. The College was not funded for cost of living increases in the Campus Alberta Grant and maintained a position of budgetary constraint until new funding was announced by the newly elected government in May 2015. The newly elected government has announced that they will undertake a review of the post-secondary funding model over the next two years. 2.

Financial Results

Restatement of certain 2014 financial information

In the 2015 audit the Auditor General of Alberta in discussion with College management determined that two adjustments were required for 2014:

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1. Reclassification of Consolidated Cash Investment Trust Funds (CCITF) of $4,638 from portfolio investments to cash and cash equivalents. Although the CCITF account is backed by short term investments products such as term deposits, bankers acceptances and short to mid-term fixed income securities the account should be treated as a deposit account to be consistent with Government of Alberta departments who have funds invested in CCITF. This resulted in a reclassification on the Statement of Consolidated Financial Position and Statement of Consolidated Cash Flows. The net effect of the reclassification in zero. 2. Correction of an error in Statement of Remeasurement Gains and Losses. In the 2015 audit the Auditor General of Alberta identified an error in the accounting of remeasurement gains and losses on portfolio investments for the prior-year. The error was corrected for 2014 and the 2015 results now reflect proper accounting. Although the error was deemed well below the materiality limit set by the Auditor General of Alberta in our audit, College management decided to restate 2014 amounts to ensure the most accurate and reliable reporting of financial information and prevent the error from being carried forward. For further details on the correction of error refer to Note 23 in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. 2015 Financial Results From total revenues of $35,191 for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015, the College incurred an operating deficit of $442. The operating deficit is primarily a result of the settlement of outstanding collective bargaining contracts that were unbudgeted and unfunded in our Campus Alberta grant. The College has maintained Revenues a $443 operating contingency fund in internally restricted funds in the event of an approved future deficit budgets as of June 30, 2015.

The College experienced a decrease in revenues of $43 (0.12 %) over the prior year and an increase of $1,123 (3.3 %) over the budget. The main source of revenue for the College is grants from the Government Revenues of Alberta which totaled $25,505, representing 72% of total revenues. Alberta Advanced Education is Theprimary College funder experienced decrease in revenues of $43 (0.12 %) over the prior year and an increase of $1,123 to thea College. (3.3 %) over the budget. The main source of revenue for the College is grants from the Government of Alberta which totaled $25,505, representing 72% of total revenues. Alberta Advanced Education is primary funder to

Revenue $000's 25,421

30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 -

25,439 25,505

715 944

1,026

4,537 4,866

3,891

3,725 3,661

3,391

Government Federal and of Alberta Sales of other Student grants services and government tuition and products grants fees

301 247 240

Donations and other grants

206 197 181

2014 2015 Budget

Investment income

Capital Revenue Earned Tangible capital assets purchased with externally restricted funds results in an obligation to the external funding agency to use the purchased assets over their useful lives in the provision of services. Under Public Sector Accounting (PSA) standards Capital Revenue Earned deferred capital revenue when earned must be attributed to the primary revenue source in the statement of operations. The following schedule depicts operating and deferred capital Tangible capital assetsfor purchased with externally restricted funds results in an obligation to the external revenue earned by source the year ended June 30, 2015.

funding agency to use the purchased assets over their useful lives in the provision of services. Under Public Sector Accounting (PSA) standards deferred capital revenue when earned must be attributed to the primary revenue source in the statement of operations. The following schedule depicts operating and ANNUAL REPORTcapital revenue earned by source for the year ended June 30, 2015. 51 deferred


Government of Alberta Grants Revenues from the Government of Alberta represent the College’s single largest source of income and play a key role in the ability to fund College activities. Government of Alberta grants increased by $66 over the prior year. Also, GOA grants was $84 greater than budget. The increase consisted of various government funded projects and initiatives such as: the main campus electrical distribution project $61, Safe Patient Handling project $56, Post-Secondary Pathway collaboration $62, Aboriginal Job Shadow training $51, increase in government funded capital asset purchase and amortization $25, various other initiatives $39, offset by reduced infrastructure maintenance projects ($210). Federal and Other Government Grants Revenues from federal and other government grants decreased by $311 over the prior year and were $229 lower than budget due to reduction in accrued commitment from the Lac La Biche County for the Water Reference Testing Lab $400, offset by increased project funding for Be Fit For Life $27, NSERC Field Pea Research funding $17, St. Paul Food Sciences Centre $15, increase in grant funded capital asset purchase and amortization $42, Regional Skills funding $13, and various other initiatives $57. Conditional grants will have a corresponding equal expenditure offset. Sales of Services and Products Revenues from sales of services and products increased by $329 over the prior-year and were $975 more than budget. Revenues from Continuing Education programming, MOU with Whitefish Lake First Nation #128 Open Campus, ancillary services (Book Store, Housing and Daycare) was $1,122 more than budget. This is partially offset by lower than budgeted revenues from ancillary services in the Cafeteria $120 and various other reductions $27. Student Tuition and Fees Tuition fees are regulated by Alberta Advanced Education under Tuition Regulation Policy. Tuition fees increased by 1% in 2014-15. Revenues from student tuition and fees were $270 higher than budget. This was due an increase in enrolments in Career related programming. Student full load equivalents (FLE) were 808.74, compared to the budget of 755.34 FLE. The 2015 FLE’s increased 10.50 from the prior year of 798.24. Tuition for programs funded under Alberta Advanced Education is regulated under a tuition fee policy and establishes maximum allowable increases based on a Consumer Price Index (CPI). Regulated tuition policy also

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ion for programs funded under Alberta Advanced Education is regulated under a tuition fee policy and ablishes maximum allowable increases based on a Consumer Price Index (CPI). Regulated tuition policy o stipulates that tuition revenue and fees cannot exceed 30% of the College’s net operating enditure. The table below depicts the College’s actual compliance rate. stipulates that tuition revenue and fees cannot exceed 30% of the College’s net operating expenditure. The table below depicts the College’s actual compliance rate.

Compliance with Tuition Fee Policy Compliance with Tuition Fee Policy

2014-15

2013-14

Tuition and Related fees revenue

$3,661

$3,725

$33,393

$32,164

11.0%

11.6%

Net Operating Expenditure %

Donations and Other Contributions

nations and Other Contributions

Donations and contributions were $7 greater than budget due to higher than budgeted scholarship donations,

nations and contributions were $7and greater than budget due to higher than budgeted scholarship fundraising activities capital revenue earned. ations, fundraising activities and capital revenue earned. Investment Income

estment Income

Revenue from investment income decreased by $9 over prior year, but was $16 greater than budget due to

increasedincome returnsdecreased in the financial than anticipated. enue from investment by $9markets over prior year, but was $16 greater than budget due ncreased returns in the financial markets than anticipated. Expenses by Function

penses by Function For the year ended June 30, 2015 the College recorded $35,633 in operating expenses representing an increase of $1,209 (3.5 %) from the prior year and $1,565 (4.6 %) greater than budget.

the year ended June 30, 2015 the College recorded $35,633 in operating expenses representing an ease of $1,209Instruction (3.5 %) from the prior year and $1,565 (4.6 %) greater than budget.

truction

Page

48

Instruction represents the single largest function at the College, representing teaching for all credit and noncredit programming. This category also includes non-sponsored research and scholarly activity undertaken ruction represents the single largest function at the College, representing teaching for allofcredit and by faculty and within College departments. Instruction accounted for 31.7% total expenditures for the year ended June 30,category 2015. With thisincludes functionnon-sponsored representing such a significant component of the College’s activity, the -credit programming. This also research and scholarly activity $240 decrease in costs over the prior year represents the accounted function’s proportionate ertaken by faculty and within College departments. Instruction for 31.7% ofshare totalof the College’s salary and benefits and material, supplies and services increase. The net decrease was primarily a result of budgetary enditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. With this function representing such a significant reductions made to reduce operating costs in anticipation of the March 2015 provincial government budget. mponent of the College’s activity, theby$240 decrease costs the prior year represents the This was partially offset increased costs in from the over settlement of collective bargaining contracts. ction’s proportionate share of the College’s salary and benefits and material, supplies and services In comparison to 2015 budget, Instructional costs were $1,287 higher than expected. Academic and Student Support Academic and student support is the second largest function at the College. This category includes Student Portage College 2014-2015 Annualand Report Services, Student Recruitment, Student Records Admission, Counselling, Social Development, Scholarships and other student related support. Academic and student support accounted for 18.5% of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses increased by $206 from the prior year and represent the function’s proportionate share of the College’s salary and benefits and material, supplies and services increase. In comparison to budget, academic and student support costs were $725 lower than expected. The decrease due to workforce reductions in January 2015 partially offset by increased workforce costs due to the settlement of collective bargaining contracts.

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Institutional Support Institutional Support represents activities for Executive and Corporate Management, Public Relations, Corporate Finance, Human Resources and other corporate administrative activities. It also includes amortization expense (except for ancillary services). Institutional support accounted for 26.9% of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses increased by $944 over the prior year due which includes an increase in amortization expense of $200 and settlement of collective bargaining contracts. In comparison to the 2015 budget, Institutional support costs were $1,012 higher than expected. Information Technology Information Technology represents activities for Computing Services, Network and Data Communication. Information Technology accounted for 5.3% of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses increased by $174 from prior year and $173 greater than budget. Facilities Operations and Maintenance This function represents all expenditures associated with facility operations and maintenance of buildings, grounds and equipment. It also includes all utility costs and rent of leased facilities. This function accounted for 10.3 % of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses decreased by $46 from the prior year and were $553 lower than budget. The variance consists of timing of maintenance activity, reduced infrastructure maintenance grant and costs associated with conditional grants. Ancillary Services Ancillary Services represents operating activities that are not grant funded which support students. It includes the College Bookstore, Cafeteria, Student Residences and Housing and the Lac La Biche Child Care Association. Ancillary services accounted for 6.3 % of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses decreased by $20 from prior year and were $101 higher than budget. Special Purpose Trust Special Purpose Trust represents costs for fundraising activities and other programs specifically funded from restricted grants and donations. Special purpose trust accounted for 0.8% of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses increased by $119 over the prior year and were $198 higher than budget. Sponsored Research Sponsored research represents expenditures for all sponsored research activities specifically funded through restricted grants and donations. Sponsored research accounted for 0.2% of total expenditures for the year ended June 30, 2015. Expenses increased by $72 over the prior year and were $72 higher than budget. Administrative expenditures as a percentage of total operating expenditures Alberta Advanced Education tracks the efficiency of post-secondary institutions by monitoring an institution’s administrative expenditures as a percentage of total operating expenditures. This percentage is calculated by taking Institutional Support function category expenditures and dividing it by total expenditures (minus ancillary services). The table below shows the College’s performance on this measure.

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3.

Net Assests

The College’s net asset balance is an important indicator of the financial health for the institution. It is comprised of Accumulated Surplus and Endowments. Accumulated surplus decreased by $442 over the prior year due to a one-time operating deficit of $442. This has resulted in an accumulated deficit from operations of $92 from an accumulated operating surplus from operations of $56 in the prior year. The College has maintained a $443 operating contingency within internally restricted surplus for approved future deficits as of June 30, 2015.

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55


4.

Capital Spending

Capital expenditures were $3,660 (2014 – $5,556). Capital expenditures consisted of $1,593 in contributed capital and $2,067 in self-funded capital. The following is a list of capital spending by project:

Acquisitions were made in the following asset categories: • Land $nil (2014 – $192) • Building, trailers and improvements $2,567 (2014 – $3,954) • Equipment $1,031 (2014 – $857) • Computer hardware and software $15 (2014 – $526) • Learning resources and other assets $47 (2014 - $27)

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5.

Areas of Significant Financial Risk –

Unfunded Deferred Maintenance The College directs a significant amount of resources towards renewing existing facilities to ensure that these facilities are updated with relevant technology and operate efficiently. A reduction in provincial funding for Infrastructure Maintenance, an aging infrastructure and a shortage of skilled facility maintenance workers has created a backlog of unfunded deferred maintenance in excess of $20 M. Budgetary Pressure Although the College has a balanced budget for 2015-16, the College is facing a number of risk factors. The College has reduced its operating budget over the past five years due to reductions in government funding and declining enrolments. The effects of the significant funding cuts prior to 2014-15 are still being felt as we recover through strategic investment in Centres of Specialization and new program offerings. In the 2015 Comprehensive Institutional Plan the College is projecting a 2% increase in our Campus Alberta Grant Funding for 2016-17 based on a commitment for sustainable and predictable funding from Alberta Advanced Education. Alberta Advanced Education will be undertaking a review of the funding model for PostSecondary Institutions over the next two years. The College has no provision for collective agreement settlements for AUPE or Faculty Associations when their contracts expire on June 30, 2016. Multi-year contract settlements by other Post-Secondary institutions for the 2016-17 fiscal year average 2.5% which equates to $500 for Portage College. Budgetary pressures is further compounded by limited opportunities to find new revenue sources and mandated freeze on tuition fee increases in 2015-16 and 2016-17. The College will continue with prudent financial management, introduce new programming and seek collaborative opportunities within the postsecondary sector to maintain a sustainable future. Enterprise Resource Planning System (ERP) The College operates an Enterprise Resource Planning System that is limited in meeting current demands of a contemporary post-secondary institution. The capital investment required to bring the existing ERP system to a level of acceptable functionality is beyond the financial means of the College. The College is working collaboratively within the post-secondary sector to find an acceptable and cost effective solution. The College is evaluating possible solutions including a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution with the University of Alberta, Campus Alberta Unified Services (CAUS).  

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PORTAGE COLLEGE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS June 30, 2015 Independent Auditor’s Report pg. 59 Statement of Management Responsibility pg. 60 Consolidated Statement of Financial Position pg. 61 Consolidated Statement of Operations pg. 62 Consolidated Statement of Remeasurement Gains and Losses

pg. 63

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows pg. 64 Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

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Portage College 9531-94 Ave, PO Box 417 Lac La Biche, AB T0A 2C0 780.623.5580 • 1.866.623.5551 info@portagecollege.ca portagecollege.ca

@PortageCollege

/PortageCollege

/PortageCollege 84

PORTAGE COLLEGE

2015 Annual Report  
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