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The Reporter Population Connection

2013 Congressional Report Card Issue

Volume 45, Issue 3 September 2013


President’s Note

I

n his legendary 1948 campaign, President Harry Truman barnstormed across the nation. Everywhere, he railed against the “Do Nothing Congress.”

The plainspoken Missourian would level the same charge today. Not much gets done on Capitol Hill these days—though there are still some truly dedicated, able legislators on our side. The main “accomplishment” of the House this year has been to vote to repeal Obamacare no less than 40 times. And zealots oppose family planning programs at every turn. Despite the gridlock on Capitol Hill, we always find ways to move forward effectively. At Population Connection we focus 100 percent of our effort in two areas: education and advocacy. As the only nationwide provider of K-12 Population Education, we trained 11,000 educators in 2012 at 542 workshops on 164 college campuses and elsewhere. Some 50,000 American teachers use our materials in subjects ranging from math to science to social studies, from language arts to early childhood education. Three million students annually gain valuable insights into population issues through our hands-on activities carefully designed to meet constantly changing curriculum requirements. In terms of grassroots advocacy, we battle every single day against that strange bunch who hold some of the most powerful political offices. We work closely with the Obama Administration and our beleaguered, stalwart congressional allies so that vital programs get funded—albeit not fully.

In just the past year alone, America’s investment in international family planning: • • • • •

Provided birth control to 31.6 million women and couples Prevented 9.4 million unintended pregnancies Prevented 4.1 million unplanned births Averted 4 million abortions Saved the lives of 22,000 women

In the developing world, an estimated 222 million women have an unmet need for contraception. They want to avoid pregnancy, but face all sorts of obstacles. The U.S. share of the total investment that is needed to fulfill unmet need amounts to an additional $300 million a year—about one dollar per American. In terms of both education and advocacy, we know what needs to be done. And we know how to do it. We’re never satisfied with the pace of progress. That’s why we’re always seeking ways to train more teachers, reach more students, and reduce population growth through access to family planning here at home and around the world. Despite all the obstacles we face, with your help we are making real and measurable progress toward the critical goal of zero population growth. John Seager john@popconnect.org

Economic Experts: A Healthy Economy Doesn’t Require Population Growth

A broad panel of experts in business, economics, demography, and aging agree: Economic growth does not depend on population growth. That’s the conclusion reached by Population Connection’s Pathways project. The research portion of the project—available for download on our website at www.popconnect.org/pathways—is the culmination of more than a year’s worth of surveys, interviews, and focus groups. The project also found that heightened productivity, later retirement, and increased female participation in the workforce can help offset the economic effects of population aging. Fortunately, research shows that the United States can raise its productivity with a smaller workforce, but it must first invest in human capital and address age discrimination. The Reporter — September 2013


The Reporter Volume 45, Issue 3 September 2013

Board Chair

J. Joseph Speidel President and CEO John Seager

8

House of Representatives Report Card

20

Senate Report Card

Editor and Designer

24 House of Representatives Appropriations Committee Votes

Contributors

25

Senate Appropriations Committee Votes

Overpopulation threatens the quality of life for

2

Editor’s Note

national grassroots population organization that

3

Letters to the Editor

can be sustained by earth’s resources.

4

Pop Facts

Annual membership includes a one-year

6

In the News

$25. All contributions, bequests, and gifts are fully

26

Washington View

The Reporter (ISSN 0199-0071)

28

Field & Outreach

2120 L Street, NW, Suite 500

30 PopEd

(202) 332-2200

32 Cartoon

Marian Starkey

Rebecca Harrington, Stacie Murphy, John

Seager, Marian Starkey, Pamela Wasserman

people everywhere. Population Connection is the educates young people and advocates progressive

action to stabilize world population at a level that

subscription to The Reporter. Annual membership, tax-deductible in accordance with current laws.

Population Connection

Washington, DC 20037 (800) 767-1956

(202) 332-2302 fax

info@popconnect.org

33

Editorial Excerpts

www.PopulationConnection.org www.PopulationEducation.org

www.Facebook.com/PopulationConnection http://Twitter.com/popconnect

www.PopConnect.org/ConnectingDots

Cover Photo

U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, DC Photo: Mval, Dreamstime.com

www.popconnect.org

September 2013 — The Reporter

1


Editor’s Note

I

n looking for news items to report and votes to score in this year’s Congressional Report Card, I was struck by how thoroughly abortion legislation dominated coverage of reproductive health issues over these past few months. It seems like every time I check the news, another clinic is threatened with closure and yet another state has restricted access to the procedure. I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised by any abortion-related legislation at this point, no matter how mean-spirited or inane. After all, I have been a volunteer as a patient greeter at my local family planning clinic for six years and have witnessed vitriolic outbursts by crazed protesters week after frustrating week. They pace back and forth in front of the clinic, holding gruesome signs and shouting at scared and vulnerable patients who are attempting to do nothing but mind their own business and access legal health care services. They say they’ll help the women raise their babies and that it’s bad for their health to have an abortion. When that fails to elicit the desired reaction, they scream threats such as, “We will wrap your legs in barbed wire, and you will burn in hellfire!” Recently, when a fellow greeter and I were commenting to each other about the summer heat, one of the protesters warned, “You think it’s hot out here? Imagine what hell will feel like.” Loony bin stuff aside, in the first half of 2013, a variety of states adopted 43 restrictive abortion measures—the second highest in history (a whopping 80 restrictions were enacted in the first half of 2011). Right-wing politicians are trying to deny abortion access through all sorts of infuriatingly creative, medically moronic measures: mandating completely unnecessary hospital admitting privileges for abortion doctors; enacting Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers (TRAP) laws requiring abortion clinics to meet the same building standards as brand new ambulatory surgical centers; applying onerous waiting periods; requiring intrusive ultrasounds; banning the use of telemedicine for medication abortion; and even demanding that women complete courses on adoption—as if

2

The Reporter — September 2013

they are unaware that the option exists. Not to mention all their attempts to restrict the period that abortion is legal to as short as six weeks after conception, as in the case of the “fetal heartbeat bills” facing legislatures in several states. At that early stage, many women don’t even know that they are pregnant—which is the point, of course. These restrictions and requirements have forced clinics to close around the country. In Mississippi, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, only one abortion clinic per state remains. Nationwide, one-third of women must travel more than 25 miles to access abortion services; 17 percent must go at least 50 miles. For these women, especially, telemedicine can ensure that an abortion occurs as soon as the decision to terminate is made, rather than after the money has been raised, the childcare has been arranged, and the time has been taken off work. In Iowa, where telemedicine for abortion originated (and where it has since been targeted), data show that this is exactly what happened. But don’t let me get carried away with reason and logic. We all know that plays no part in today’s abortion debates. Take a look at how your members of Congress voted in this year’s floor and committee votes. The 2013 Congressional Report Card is a valuable resource for determining whether your elected officials truly represent your interests and concerns. If they do, take the time to thank them. If they don’t, raise a fuss. Write, call, and—most importantly—vote. Women around the country, and the world, depend on it.

Marian Starkey mstarkey@popconnect.org


Letters to the Editor

Send correspo

ndence to mstarkey@popc onnect.org. Letters are also accepted via postal mail. Le tters may be edited for clar ity and length .

Attn: Marian St Population Co

arkey

nnection 2120 L St., NW , Ste. 500 Washington, D C 20037

Re: “America is Doomed Unless Women Start Having More Babies,” June 2013. Women have been culturally programmed to have children to complete their “ideal” families. The fairy tale movies’ depiction of a loving, financially-supportive husband and wonderfully behaved children could indeed be a satisfying life. Unfortunately, the statistics, and particularly those for single parents, are staggeringly different from the ideal. It is scarcely mentioned what an enormous sacrifice women in particular make to raise their children. Having worked in the counseling field, I can recount difficult stories of heartbreak of women who were forced to have children they didn’t want, either due to religious convictions or not having sufficient funds or knowledge to prevent pregnancy. Is it really fair to those children who were never welcomed? The psychological damages inflicted on unwanted children can haunt them the rest of their lives. I, too, was one of the women who believed in living happily ever after, but the reality was that I became a single mother and had to fend for myself and my children without financial support. My children were planned, but I could have never imagined my subsequent single-parent reality. I worked seven days a week at three different jobs to pay for all the expenses. How much I would have loved some help or a day off. I felt guilty for having to work so much and not spending more quality time with my children. For them it was no picnic, either. I can honestly say after seven decades of living that I support any woman’s choice not to have children, for they are enormous responsibilities and financial liabilities lasting over decades.

time. But so often, parents are called upon to take care of their aging parents and their adult children who return home for support, often with their own children in tow. I am in the potential boat of having to start raising children—my grandchildren—all over again. It certainly is not a matter of not loving one’s children, but a contemplation of duties and responsibilities that should ideally ease with advanced age. Family planning is a most important aspect of life, and every woman MUST be able to decide whether to have children or not. In my opinion, those in favor of forcing women to bring children into this world should be made responsible to take care of them, paying all expenses to adulthood. A solution to the so-called problem of low fertility lies indeed in the closing statement of the above-mentioned article: “If women don’t want to have more children, then instead of abandoning women’s equality as a goal, we should rework our economic system so it doesn’t rely on a steadily growing population to function.” We have gained enormous insights as a society, but we still have to outgrow the handed-down beliefs that are attempting to make women the perpetual babymakers and caretakers of the world. Living in the 21st century should ideally reflect some of the wisdom gained from former generations and world affairs. Personal freedom to make one’s own childbearing choices and access to birth control have to rank near the top. —A still-not-so-liberated grandmother

One would assume that having helped healthy children to adulthood, one would have earned some personal space and www.popconnect.org

September 2013 — The Reporter

3


World Population Projected to Reach 9.6 Billion by 2050

Developing vs. Developed Regions 10 9 Population in billions

8 7 6

Developing regions

5 4 3 2

Growth is expected to be most rapid in the 49 least developed countries, which are projected to double in size from around 900 million inhabitants in 2013 to 1.8 billion in 2050.

Results presented are based on the UN’s “medium-variant” projection, which assumes a substantial reduction in the fertility levels of intermediate- and high-fertility countries in the coming years.

Developed regions

1 0 2013

2050

World Population Projections 2013 2025 2050

= 1 billion

Rapid population increase in Africa is anticipated even if there is a substantial reduction of fertility levels in the near future. The medium-variant projection assumes that fertility will fall from 4.9 children per woman in 2005-2010 to 3.1 in 2045-2050, reaching 2.1 by 2095-2100.

4

The Reporter — October 2012


2028 1.45 billion

It is now estimated that

48 percent of the

1.45 billion

world’s population lives in lowfertility countries, where women have fewer

The population of India is expected to surpass that

children on average

of China around 2028, when both countries will

have populations of around 1.45

More than half of global population growth between now and 2050 is expected to occur in Africa.

than 2.1

over their lifetimes.

billion.

By the end of the century, Nigeria could

start to rival China as the second most populous country in the world.

2013

>

2050

Nigeria

China

2100

= 1 billion

www.popconnect.org

Source: United Nations Press Release re: World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision, UN Population Division Design by Rebecca Dodelin

October 2012 — The Reporter

5


In

the

News

U.S. Fertility Rate Stabilizes in 2012 The general fertility rate (the number of births per 1,000 women of childbearing age) appears to be stabilizing after several years of decline. Data from the National Center for Health Statistics (part of the CDC) found that there were 63.2 births per 1,000 women ages 15-44 in 2012, down infinitesimally from 2011. The rate decreased nearly 3 percent per year from 2007 to 2010; it decreased about 1 percent from 2010 to 2011. The total fertility rate (the number of children the average woman would bear over her lifetime if current age-specific fertility rates remained constant over time) stood at 1.9—also unchanged from the year before. Estimates show that 1.3 million births were averted between 2007 and 2011 due to suppressed fertility. Those births may be made up in the coming years though, as couples who waited to have children until the recession abated begin to make up for lost time. Evidence supports this theory, as fertility rates for women ages 30-39 were up in 2012, at the same time that fertility rates for women in their 20s continued to drop. The birth rates in Idaho, Kansas, North Dakota, and Ohio all saw increases. The rates decreased, however, in Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and North Carolina. The rates in the remaining 33 states stayed 6

The Reporter — September 2013

the same as they were in 2011. Utah had the highest rate and New Hampshire had the lowest rate in 2012. The teen birth rate hit a new record low in 2012—29.4 births per 1,000 women ages 15-19. The peak rate was 61.8, in 1991. The birth rate for young women was also at a record low in 2012, at 83.1 births per 1,000 women ages 20-24.

Customers of Any Age Can Buy Plan B One-Step Without a Prescription In June, the Justice Department dropped its argument against Judge Edward Korman’s ruling to make Plan B OneStep emergency contraception available to customers of all ages. Since August, the pill has been available over-the-counter without proof of age. The two-pill version will still be subject to the age requirement set by the Administration (15 years of age). Teva Pharmaceuticals, the company that manufactures Plan B, will have exclusive marketing rights for three years and will be the only morning-after pill available to all ages without a prescription. The drug retails for $50-70. The price will likely drop after 2016, when Teva Pharmaceuticals will lose exclusive rights to over-the-counter sales.

Final Ruling on Contraceptive Mandate The Obama Administration issued the final ruling in June that requires most employers with over 50 employees to offer insurance plans that cover

contraception at no cost. Houses of worship will be excluded from the rule. The Administration considered over 400,000 comments to the original contraceptive mandate before announcing its final ruling.

Hobby Lobby Wins Stay Against Contraceptive Mandate Federal Judge Joe Heaton issued a preliminary injunction that exempts the crafts chain store Hobby Lobby and its affiliated Christian bookstore, Mardel, from the contraceptive mandate included in the Affordable Care Act. The case is on hold until October 1.

Medicaid Patients Can Access Planned Parenthood in IN, Judge Rules U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt ruled in August that Indiana cannot prevent Medicaid patients from accessing services at Planned Parenthood clinics. The 2011 law was halted by a permanent injunction that affirmed an earlier preliminary injunction, on the grounds that Indiana cannot violate Medicaid’s “freedom of choice” provision.

Telemedicine Banned for Early Abortions in IA A program pioneered in Iowa in 2008 to distribute abortion medication via video conference will end in November. The program allows women who live in rural areas to visit one of 15 clinics where they receive an examination by a nurse to determine whether the pregnancy is


early enough to terminate with pills. A doctor (usually located in Des Moines) then prescribes the medication and instructs the patient to take the first pill via video conference. The second pill is taken later, at home. The patient must report back for a follow-up appointment with a nurse to ensure that the pregnancy was successfully terminated and that there have been no complications. The state’s medical board voted 8-2 in August to end the program by requiring doctors to be physically present when they dispense the abortion-inducing pills, virtually cutting off the option of medication abortion for many women who live too far from a clinic with an abortion doctor. Earlier efforts to end telemedicine abortion failed in the legislature. The Board of Medicine took no action in 2010 when abortion opponents first petitioned them to vote to end the practice. Since then, the make-up of the Board has changed, with appointees from anti-choice Gov. Terry Branstad providing the necessary voting power to end the practice.

ND Abortion Restrictions Blocked by Judge The country’s most restrictive ban on abortion, set to go into effect in North Dakota on August 1, was blocked by a federal judge in July. The restriction would have banned abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, about six weeks into pregnancy. Many women are not even aware that they’re pregnant that early in a pregnancy. www.popconnect.org

The judge issued a temporary injunction that will stand until the trial.

TX Abortion Clinics Close Under New Regulations Texas Gov. Rick Perry signed a bill in July that implemented some of the country’s most restrictive abortion regulations. The bill bans abortions after 20 weeks, requires certain structural adaptations to make clinics comply with new ambulatory surgery center requirements, and requires doctors to have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles of their clinics. Texas had 42 abortion clinics when the bill went into effect; two have already closed and at least four more are preparing to close under the new law when it goes into effect in late October. Most physicians agree that fetus viability doesn’t occur until 24 weeks. Proponents of the bill argue that fetuses can feel pain as early as 20 weeks—a claim that is heavily disputed by physicians.

Federal Judge Blocks WI Admitting Privileges Law A new Wisconsin law that would have required abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital was put on hold by a federal judge in July. The hold was extended by four months in early August. Judge William M. Conley, who issued the holds, will make a final ruling after the trial, which is scheduled for November 25. He has said that he

believes admitting privileges don’t protect women’s health or indicate quality of care.

Female Inmates Sterilized Against Policy At least 148 prisoners at the California Institution for Women in Corona and Valley State Prison in Chowchilla were given unapproved, medically unnecessary tubal ligations from 2006 to 2010. Ten additional women claim that they were subject to other forms of sterilization, including ovariectomy. The California Joint Legislative Audit Committee unanimously approved an investigation and told the auditors to make the review their top priority. In the meantime, the doctors who recommended the procedures have been removed from their positions at the correctional institutions.

Unsafe Abortion in Africa Unsafe abortion takes the lives of 29,000 women each year in Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Another 1.7 million women are hospitalized due to complications. Abortion is illegal in 14 African countries and is restricted in all others except South Africa, Cape Verde, Tunisia, and Zambia. As a result, more than 6 million unsafe abortions occur each year in the region—making up the vast majority (97 percent) of all abortions obtained. To read the original articles from which these summaries were taken, see www.popconnect.org/news September 2013 — The Reporter

7


113th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives Ryan Budget Blueprint (H.Con.Res.25)

“The incidence of rape resulting in pregnancy [is] very low.”

3/21/2013 The House voted on the budget blueprint authored by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI). It called for dramatic cuts to foreign assistance funding that would have a devastating impact on U.S. international family planning programs. Our position: Oppose Result: Passed 221-207, 4 Not Voting

—Rep. Trent Franks re his 20-week abortion ban

20-Week Abortion Ban (H.R.1797)

6/18/2013 Introduced by Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ), the so-called Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act bans all abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The bill contained only very limited exceptions (there were no exceptions for fetal anomalies or health risks to the woman). Our position: Oppose Result: Passed 228-196, 10 Not Voting

Global Democracy Promotion Act (H.R.2738)

Introduced 7/18/2013 Introduced by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), the Global Democracy Promotion Act (GDPA) would prevent a future president from acting unilaterally to reinstate the Global Gag Rule. Our position: Support State

District

Representative

Alabama

1

Jo Bonner

2

3

4

5

6

Alaska

Arizona

7

Robert Aderholt

Mo Brooks

Spencer Bachus

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

x

x

x

Ann Kirkpatrick

3

Raúl Grijalva

5

Matt Salmon

x

x

1

2

6

7

8

8

Mike D. Rogers

Franks Bill

Terri Sewell

4

Arkansas

Martha Roby

Ryan Budget

9

1

The Reporter — September 2013

Don Young Ron Barber

Paul Gosar

David Schweikert

x

√ x

x

x

√ x

x

Ed Pastor

Kyrsten Sinema

Trent Franks

Rick Crawford

x

x

x

U.S. Capitol Dome. Illustration: Eric Pohl, Dreamstime.com


“I just find it astonishing to hear a phrase repeated that the incidence of pregnancy from rape is low. There’s no scientific basis for that. And the idea that the Republican men on this committee can tell the women of America that they have to carry to term the product of a rape is outrageous.”

—Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA)

State

District 2

3

California

4

1

2 3 4

Tim Griffin

Steve Womack

Ryan Budget x

x

Franks Bill x

x

Tom Cotton

x

x

Jared Huffman

Doug LaMalfa

John Garamendi

Tom McClintock

x

√ x

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

√ x

• •

5

Mike Thompson

7

Ami Bera

6 8

9

Doris Matsui Paul Cook

√ x

√ x

Jerry McNerney

11

George Miller

13

Barbara Lee

15

Eric Swalwell

10 12

14 16

Jeff Denham Nancy Pelosi

Jackie Speier Jim Costa

x

√ √

x

√ √

17

Mike Honda

19

Zoe Lofgren

18 20 21

22

23

California

Representative

√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor

Anna Eshoo Sam Farr

David Valadao

Devin Nunes

Kevin McCarthy

√ √ x

x

x

√ √ x

• •

x

x

24

Lois Capps

26

Julia Brownley

Adam Schiff

25 27 28 29 30 31

32

Howard McKeon Judy Chu

Tony Cardenas Brad Sherman Gary Miller

Grace Napolitano

x

√ √ √ x

x

√ √ √ x

33

Henry Waxman

35

Gloria Negrete McLeod

34

www.popconnect.org

Xavier Becerra

• • •

September 2013 — The Reporter

9


113th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives State

District 36

39

Ed Royce

x

x

√ √

43

Maxine Waters

45

John Campbell

x

Ken Calvert

Janice Hahn

Loretta Sánchez

x

√ √

x

√ √

47

Alan Lowenthal

49

Darrell Issa

x

x

48

50

51

Dana Rohrabacher

Duncan D. Hunter

Juan Vargas

x

x

x

52

Scott Peters

1

Diana DeGette

53 2 3

4

5

6

Florida

Lucille Roybal-Allard

Mark Takano

46

Delaware

Linda Sánchez

GDPA Co-Sponsor

41

44

D.C.

42

Connecticut

Franks Bill

Karen Bass

40

Connecticut

Raul Ruiz

Ryan Budget

37 38

Colorado

Representative

7

1

2

Susan Davis Jared Polis

Scott Tipton

Cory Gardner

Doug Lamborn

Mike Coffman

Ed Perlmutter

John B. Larson

Joe Courtney

√ √ x

x

x

x

√ √ x

• •

x

x

x

3

Rosa DeLauro

5

Elizabeth Esty

4

1

2

3

4

5 6

10 The Reporter — September 2013

Jim Himes

John Carney

Eleanor Holmes Norton Jeff Miller

Steve Southerland

Ted Yoho

Ander Crenshaw

Corrine Brown Ron DeSantis

√ x

x

x

x

√ x

√ x

x

x

x

√ x


√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor State

District 7

8

x

x

Franks Bill

11

Rich Nugent

x

x

13

14

15

16

17

Daniel Webster

Gus Bilirakis

Bill Young

x

x

x

x

x

Vern Buchanan

x

x

Tom Rooney

x

x

x

Kathy Castor

Dennis Ross

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

x

Alan Grayson

12

x

x

18

Patrick Murphy

20

Alcee Hastings

22

Lois Frankel

19

21 23

24

Trey Radel

Ted Deutch

Debbie Wasserman Schultz

x

√ –

x

√ √

Frederica Wilson

26

Joe Garcia

1

Jack Kingston

x

x

25

27

2

Mario Diaz-Balart

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

x

x

√ x

x

Sanford Bishop

4

Hank Johnson

6

Tom Price

x

x

3

5 7

8

Georgia

John Mica

Bill Posey

Ryan Budget

9

10

Georgia

Representative

9

10

11

12

13

14

Lynn Westmoreland

John Lewis

Rob Woodall

Austin Scott

Doug Collins

Paul Broun

Phil Gingrey

John Barrow

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Hawaii

1

Colleen Hanabusa

Idaho

1

Raúl Labrador

x

x

2

www.popconnect.org

Tulsi Gabbard

• •

• •

x

David Scott

Tom Graves

x

September 2013 — The Reporter 11


113th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives

Franks Bill

District

Illinois

1

Bobby Rush

3

Dan Lipinski

x

2 2

4 5 6

Mike Simpson Robin Kelly

Luis Gutiérrez Mike Quigley

Peter Roskam

√ √ x

√ √ √ x

• •

9

Jan Schakowsky

11 12

13

14

15

16

17

18

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Tammy Duckworth Brad Schneider Bill Foster

William Enyart

Rodney L. Davis

Randy Hultgren

John Shimkus

Adam Kinzinger

1

12 The Reporter — September 2013

x

x

Todd Rokita

Susan Brooks

Luke Messer

x

x

x

x

– x

x

x

x

André Carson

Todd Young

x

x

Larry Bucshon

x

x

Bruce Braley

Tom Latham

x

x

David Loebsack

Tim Huelskamp

Kevin Yoder

√ x x

x

x

√ x x

x

x

Mike Pompeo

x

x

Brett Guthrie

x

x

Ed Whitfield

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Marlin Stutzman

Jackie Walorski

Lynn Jenkins

2

x

2

4

x

Aaron Schock

Steve King

3

Pete Visclosky

4 1

Iowa

3

1

2

Cheri Bustos

Iowa

Kentucky

I

x

Danny K. Davis

10

Kansas

x

GDPA Co-Sponsor

7 8

Indiana

Representative

Ryan Budget

State

x

• •


√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor State

6

1

2

5

6

1

2

1

2

3

Hal Rogers

x

x

x

x

Andy Barr

x

Cedric Richmond

John Fleming

x

x

Steve Scalise

Charles Boustany

Rodney Alexander

Bill Cassidy

Chellie Pingree Mike Michaud

Andy Harris

Dutch Ruppersberger

John Sarbanes

x

x

x

√ √ x

x

x

x

x

√ √ x

6

John Delaney

8

Steny Hoyer

Elijah Cummings

Chris Van Hollen

2

Jim McGovern

4

Joe Kennedy

1

3 5

Richard Neal

Niki Tsongas Ed Markey

√ √

√ –

6

John Tierney

8

Stephen Lynch

7

Michigan

Donna Edwards

7

Michigan

Thomas Massie

4 5

Massachusetts

John Yarmuth

5

3

Maryland

GDPA Co-Sponsor

3

4

Maine

Franks Bill

Representative

4

Louisiana

Ryan Budget

District

9

1

2

3

Mike Capuano Bill Keating

Dan Benishek

Bill Huizenga

√ √ x

x

√ √ x

x

5

Dan Kildee

7

Tim Walberg

x

x

6

8

9

www.popconnect.org

David Camp

Fred Upton

Mike Rogers

Sander Levin

x

x

x

• • •

x

Justin Amash

4

x

x

x

September 2013 — The Reporter 13


112th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives State

District 10

11

12

Minnesota

Tim Walz

2

John Kline

Erik Paulsen

√ x

x

6

Michele Bachmann

x

x

8

1

2

4

Keith Ellison

Collin Peterson

√ √

Bernie Thompson

Steven Palazzo

x

x

Gregg Harper

x

x

3

Blaine Luetkemeyer

x

x

Vicky Hartzler

x

x

x

x

5

Emanuel Cleaver

7

Billy Long

x

x

Steve Daines

x

Lee Terry

x

8 1

2

Sam Graves

Jason Smith

Jeff Fortenberry

3

Adrian Smith

2

Mark Amodei

1

4

1

2

1

2

3

14 The Reporter — September 2013

x

x

I

x

x

x

x

x

Joe Heck

x

Carol Shea-Porter

Ann McLane Kuster

Rob Andrews

Frank LoBiondo

Jon Runyan

√ √ x

x

x

Steven Horsford

x

Dina Titus

x

William Clay

Ann Wagner

x

1

2

x

Rick Nolan

Alan Nunnelee

x

x

Betty McCollum

3

New Jersey

Gary Peters

4

6

New Hampshire

1

14

4

Nevada

x

3

Nebraska

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

7

Montana

John Dingell

x

x

Franks Bill

John Conyers

5

Missouri

Candice Miller

Kerry Bentivolio

Ryan Budget

13

3

Mississippi

Representative

x

√ √ x


√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor State

District 4

5

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

x

8

Albio Sires

10

Donald Payne, Jr.

12

Rush Holt, Jr.

Steven Pearce

x

x

11

Leonard Lance

Bill Pascrell

Rodney Frelinghuysen

1

Michelle Lujan Grisham

3

Ben Luján

2

1

x

√ x

√ √

x

3

Steve Israel

5

Gregory Meeks

Peter King

Carolyn McCarthy

x

x

6

Grace Meng

8

Hakeem Jeffries

7

Nydia Velázquez

9

Yvette Clarke

11

Michael Grimm

x

x

10

Jerrold Nadler

Tim Bishop

2

4

• •

12

Carolyn Maloney

14

Joseph Crowley

13 15

Charles Rangel José Serrano

16

Eliot Engel

18

Sean Patrick Maloney

17 19

20

21

New York

x

x

Franks Bill

Frank Pallone

9

New York

Chris Smith

Scott Garrett

Ryan Budget

6 7

New Mexico

Representative

22

23

Nita Lowey

Chris Gibson

Paul Tonko

√ √ –

√ √ √

Bill Owens

Tom Reed

x

Richard Hanna

√ √

√ x

x

√ x

24

Dan Maffei

26

Brian Higgins

25 www.popconnect.org

Louise Slaughter

September 2013 — The Reporter 15


112th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives State

District

North Carolina

1

27

2

3

4 5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

North Dakota Ohio

x

David Price

Virginia Foxx

Howard Coble

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

1

2

3

4

x

x

Robert Pittenger

x

Richard Hudson

Patrick McHenry

Mark Meadows

x

x

x

x

√ x

x

x

x

x

x

Kevin Cramer

x

x

Brad Wenstrup

x x

x

x x

x

Joyce Beatty

Bob Latta

x

x

Jim Jordan

Bill Johnson

Bob Gibbs

x

x

x

x

x

x

Marcy Kaptur

Marcia Fudge

Tim Ryan

Steve Stivers

x

x

John Boehner

Mike Turner

Pat Tiberi

David Joyce

x

x

x

x

I

x

x

x

Jim Renacci

x

x

Markwayne Mullin

x

x

Jim Bridenstine

Frank Lucas

x

x

x

x

Tom Cole

x

x

Suzanne Bonamici

2

Greg Walden

x x

x

Mel Watt

James Lankford

16 The Reporter — September 2013

5 1

x

Mike McIntyre

Steve Chabot

4

Oregon

Walter Jones

Renee Ellmers

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

1

2

x

Franks Bill

George Holding

5

Oklahoma

Chris Collins

Ryan Budget

George Butterfield

13

3

Oklahoma

Representative

x x


√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor State

Franks Bill

GDPA Co-Sponsor

Earl Blumenauer

Kurt Schrader

Representative

3 5

4 Pennsylvania

Ryan Budget

District

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Peter DeFazio Bob Brady

Chaka Fattah

Mike Kelly

Scott Perry

Glenn Thompson

Jim Gerlach

Pat Meehan

Mike Fitzpatrick

Bill Shuster

Tom Marino

Lou Barletta

Keith Rothfus

Allyson Schwartz

Michael Doyle

Charlie Dent

√ √

√ x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

√ √

√ x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Matt Cartwright

Joe Pitts

Timothy F. Murphy

x

x

x

x

Rhode Island

1

David Cicilline

South Carolina

1

Mark Sanford

I

x

2

2

3

4

5

6

South Dakota Tennessee

7 1

2

3

4

Tennessee

5

6

7

www.popconnect.org

Jim Langevin

Joe Wilson

Jeff Duncan

Trey Gowdy

Mick Mulvaney

√ x

x

x

x

√ x

x

x

Kristi Noem

x

x

Phil Roe

Jimmy Duncan

Chuck Fleischmann

Scott DesJarlais

x x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

Jim Cooper

Marsha Blackburn

x

x

Diane Black

x

x

Jim Clyburn

Tom Rice

x

September 2013 — The Reporter 17


113th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives State

District 8

Texas

9

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Stephen Fincher

Ryan Budget x

Franks Bill x

Steve Cohen

Ted Poe

x

x

Louie Gohmert

Sam Johnson

Ralph Hall

Jeb Hensarling

Joe Barton

John Culberson

Kevin Brady

Al Green

Michael McCaul

Mike Conaway

Kay Granger

Mac Thornberry

Randy Weber

Rubén Hinojosa

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

√ x

x

x

x

x

x

GDPA Co-Sponsor •

x

x

x

x

x

x

√ x

x

x

x

x

16

Beto O’Rourke

18

Sheila Jackson Lee

20

Joaquín Castro

Pete Olson

x

x

17

19

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33 34

Texas

Representative

35

36

18 The Reporter — September 2013

Bill Flores

Randy Neugebauer

Lamar S. Smith

x

x

x

x

x

x

Pete Gallego

Roger Williams

x

x

Kenny Marchant

Michael Burgess

Blake Farenthold

Henry Cuellar

Gene Green

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Eddie Johnson

Pete Sessions

x

x

John Carter

x

x

Marc Veasey

Lloyd Doggett

Filemon Vela, Jr.

Steve Stockman

√ x

√ x


√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor State Utah

District 1

2

3

Vermont Virginia

1

Rob Wittman

x

2

Peter Welch

Scott Rigell

√ x

Franks Bill x

x

x

√ x

x

Robert Scott

5

Robert Hurt

x

x

Randy Forbes

Bob Goodlatte

Eric Cantor

√ x

x

x

x

Jim Moran

10

Frank Wolf

x

x

x

x

8

Morgan Griffith

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

3

9

x

11

Gerry Connolly

2

Rick Larsen

1

3

4

5

Suzan DelBene Jaime Herrera Beutler

Doc Hastings

Cathy McMorris Rodgers

√ x

x

x

√ x

x

Derek Kilmer

8

Dave Reichert

x

x

Jim McDermott

9

Adam Smith

1

David McKinley

x

10

2

3

Dennis Heck

Shelley Moore Capito

√ x

x

6 7

• • • •

x

Nick Rahall

x

2

Mark Pocan

4

Gwen Moore

6

Tom Petri

x

x

1

3

5

7

Wyoming

x

7

Wisconsin

Jason Chaffetz

x

x

Jim Matheson

6

West Virginia

Rob Bishop

Chris Stewart

Ryan Budget

4

4

Washington

Representative

8

www.popconnect.org

Paul Ryan

Ron Kind

Jim Sensenbrenner

Sean Duffy

Reid Ribble

Cynthia Lummis

x

√ x

x

x x

x

√ x

x

x x

September 2013 — The Reporter 19


113th U.S. Congress Senate

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

Fischer Amendment

3/22/2013 During debate on the Fiscal Year 2014 budget, Sen. Deb Fischer (R-NE) offered an amendment to repeal the no-copay birth control benefit offered under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Our Position: Oppose Result: Failed 44-55, 1 Not Voting

Shaheen Amendment

3/22/2013 During debate on the Fiscal Year 2014 budget, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) offered an amendment designed to reaffirm the no-copay birth control benefit offered under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Our Position: Support Result: Passed 56-43, 1 Not Voting

Cruz Amendment

3/23/2013 During debate on the Fiscal Year 2014 budget, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) offered an amendment to ban all U.S. funding to any agency of the United Nations in the event that any member state of the UN were found to be involved in coercive abortion. Our Position: Oppose Result: Failed 38-61, 1 Not Voting

Global Democracy Promotion Act (S. 119)

Introduced 1/23/2013 Introduced by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA), the Global Democracy Promotion Act (GDPA) would prevent a future president from acting unilaterally to reinstate the Global Gag Rule. Our Position: Support

—Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX)

“No one—no one in this body supports forced abortions. No one. However, the United Nations has no authority to control the acts of any individual nation. Instead of punishing the country that maybe—that is carrying out the bad policy, [the Cruz] Amendment would go after an entity that has no control over the policy and all the while negatively impacting our national interest.” —Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ) 20 The Reporter — September 2013

Robert Menendez. Photo: Scott Anderson | Dreamstime.com

“I recognize that members of this body have differing views on the right to life, but surely all of us can be agreed that for a woman to be forced against her will to abort her child is a horrific evil.”


√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor Fischer Amendment

Shaheen Amendment

Cruz Amendment

x

x

State

Senator

Alabama

Richard Shelby

Alaska

Lisa Murkowski

John McCain

x

x

Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine

Jeff Sessions Mark Begich Jeff Flake

Mark Pryor

x

√ x

x

x

x

GDPA Co-Sponsor

x

Dianne Feinstein

Mark Udall

John Boozman Barbara Boxer

Michael Bennet

Richard Blumenthal Chris Murphy Tom Carper Chris Coons Bill Nelson

Marco Rubio

Saxby Chambliss Johnny Isakson

x

√ x

x

x

x

√ x

x

x

√ x

Mike Crapo

x

x

x

Jim Risch

x

x

√ x

Dick Durbin

Dan Coats

x

x

x

Mark Kirk

Joe Donnelly

Tom Harkin

Jerry Moran

x

x

x

Chuck Grassley Pat Roberts

Mitch McConnell Rand Paul

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Susan Collins

Angus King

www.popconnect.org

x

x

x

Mary Landrieu David Vitter

x

x

x

Brian Schatz

Mazie Hirono

x

September 2013 — The Reporter 21


113th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

Senate State

Senator

Maryland

Barbara Mikulski

Massachusetts

Elizabeth Warren

Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada

Ben Cardin Mo Cowan Carl Levin

Debbie Stabenow Amy Klobuchar Al Franken

Thad Cochran Roger Wicker

Fischer Amendment

Shaheen Amendment

Cruz Amendment

GDPA Co-Sponsor

√ x

x

√ x

Mike Johanns

x

x

Deb Fischer

x

√ x

√ x

√ x

x

New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen

New Jersey

New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania

Harry Reid

Max Baucus

x

Jon Tester

√ x

x

Claire McCaskill Roy Blunt

Dean Heller

Kelly Ayotte

Frank Lautenberg

x

x

x

x

x

x

Bob Menendez

Martin Heinrich

Tom Udall

Chuck Schumer

Kirsten Gillibrand Richard Burr

√ x

√ x

√ x

Kay Hagan

Heidi Heitkamp

Rob Portman

x

x

x

John Hoeven

Sherrod Brown Jim Inhofe

Tom Coburn

x

√ x

x

x

√ x

x

x

√ x

x

Ron Wyden

Bob Casey, Jr.

Jeff Merkley

Pat Toomey

22 The Reporter — September 2013

√ x

√ x

√ x


113th U.S. Congress

√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor

Senate State

Senator

Rhode Island

Jack Reed

South Carolina

Lindsey Graham

Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

Shaheen Amendment

Cruz Amendment

GDPA Co-Sponsor

Sheldon Whitehouse

x

Tim Scott

x

x

x

x

x

Tim Johnson

Lamar Alexander

x

x

x

John Thune

x

Bob Corker

x

x

John Cornyn Ted Cruz

x

x

x

Mike Lee

x

x

x

Orrin Hatch

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Patrick Leahy

Mark Warner

Bernie Sanders

Tim Kaine

Patty Murray

x

Ron Johnson

Joe Manchin, III

x

x

x

x

x

Tammy Baldwin

John Barrasso

x

x

x

Mike Enzi

“Sadly, the U.S. has one of the highest rates of unintended pregnancy in the industrialized world. And preventing unintended pregnancy just makes fiscal sense.” —Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH)

www.popconnect.org

x

Jay Rockefeller

Maria Cantwell

x

x

Unplanned  Pregnancy:  Cost  to  Taxpayers   Upper   Es-mates  

South Dakota

Fischer Amendment

$12.6  

$6.2  

Mean  

$11.3  

$5.6  

Lower  

$4.7   $0  

$5  

Annual  Cost  to  Taxpayers   Savings  by  PrevenFng   Unintended  Pregnancy  

$9.6   $10  

$15  

Billions  of  Dollars   Data from Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 2011, 43(2):88–93

September 2013 — The Reporter 23


113th U.S. Congress

Roman: Republican Italic: Democrat Bold: Independent

House of Representatives Appropriations Committee State

Alabama Arizona

Arkansas

California

D Representative

1

2

3

4

x

x

x

1

Jo Bonner

7

Ed Pastor

Robert Aderholt

Florida

Georgia

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana Maine

Maryland

Minnesota

Mississippi Nebraska

New Jersey New York

13 Barbara Lee

20 Sam Farr

3

Steve Womack

17 Mike Honda

x

√ x

x

√ x

x

√ x

Oklahoma

Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas

28 Adam Schiff

42 Ken Calvert

x

x

x

Virginia

x

Washington

3 4

Rosa DeLauro

Ander Crenshaw

13 Bill Young

17 Tom Rooney

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

23 Debbie Wasserman Schultz

1

x

x

x

25 Mario Diaz-Balart 2

Jack Kingston

x

x

x

Sanford Bishop

2

Mike Simpson

x

x

x

1

Pete Visclosky

14 Tom Graves 5 3

3

5

5

1 1

4 1

1

x

x

x

Mike Quigley

Tom Latham

x

x

x

2

3

13 Tim Ryan

4

x

x

x

14 David Joyce 2

Tom Cole

7

x

Chaka Fattah

Chuck Fleischmann

x

x

15 Charlie Dent 3

x

John Culberson

12 Kay Granger

√ x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

28 Henry Cuellar

8

Jim Moran

3

Jaime Herrera Beutler

31 John Carter 10 Frank Wolf

x x

x x

x x

1. Lowey Amendment

7/24/2013 During mark-up of the Fiscal Year 2014 State Department/ Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill, Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) offered an amendment to strike language reinstating the Global Gag Rule and to restore funding to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Our Position: Support Result: Failed 24-26, 1 Not Voting

2. DeLauro Amendment

Betty McCollum

Jeff Fortenberry

x

x

x

3. Lee Amendment

Hal Rogers

Rodney Alexander Andrew Harris

Alan Nunnelee

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x x

x

17 Nita Lowey

15 Jose Serrano

9

1

Chellie Pingree

Kevin Yoder

11 Rodney Frelinghuysen

North Carolina 4

D Representative

7/24/2013 During mark-up of the Fiscal Year 2014 State Department/ Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill, Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) offered an amendment to fund UNFPA only for very specific purposes. Examples include providing contraception, encouraging safe childbirth, ending female genital mutilation, and eliminating child marriage. Our Position: Support Result: Failed 24-26, 1 Not Voting

21 Bill Owens

Ohio

x

40 Lucille Roybal-Allard

Florida

x

21 David Valadao

Connecticut

x

State

David Price

Marcy Kaptur

24 The Reporter — September 2013

√ √ √

√ √ √ √

√ √ √ √

7/24/2013 During mark-up of the Fiscal Year 2014 State Department/ Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) offered an amendment to fund UNFPA only in several high-need countries where the United States does not currently have any bilateral family planning program. Our Position: Support Result: Failed 23-26, 2 Not Voting


113th U.S. Congress

√ supported Population Connection position x opposed Population Connection position – no vote recorded I ineligible • co-sponsor

Senate Appropriations Committee State

Alabama Alaska

Arkansas California Delaware Illinois

Indiana Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana Maine

Senator

Richard Shelby

Vote

Missouri

√ x

Dianne Feinstein

Dick Durbin

Mark Kirk

Dan Coats

Tom Harkin

Jerry Moran

Mitch McConnell Mary Landrieu Susan Collins

Thad Cochran

Mark Pryor

Chris Coons

Mississippi

Maryland

John Boozman

Senator

x

Lisa Murkowski Mark Begich

State

√ √ x

√ x x

√ √

Montana

Nebraska

New Hampshire New Mexico

North Dakota Oregon

Rhode Island

South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Vermont

Washington

Barbara Mikulski Roy Blunt

Vote √ x x

Jon Tester

Jeanne Shaheen

John Hoeven

x

Mike Johanns Tom Udall

x

Jeff Merkley

Lindsey Graham

x

Jack Reed

Tim Johnson

Patrick Leahy

Lamar Alexander Patty Murray

x

Shaheen Amendment

“When it was in place, the Global Gag Rule blocked funding for basic family-planning services, contraception, and preventative care for women around the world. The policy needs to be permanently repealed so that this funding isn’t jeopardized in the future and women have access to the reproductive care they need.” —Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) www.popconnect.org

Julia Freeman-woolpert | Dreamstime.com

7/25/2013 During mark-up of the Fiscal Year 2014 State Department/Foreign Operations Appropriations Bill, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) offered an amendment to permanently repeal the Global Gag Rule. Our Position: Support Result: Passed 19-11

September 2013 — The Reporter 25


Washington View

Budget Battle: House and Senate Set to Clash Over 2014 Spending By Stacie Murphy

T

he Fiscal Year is set to end on September 30th, so it’s time for Congress to pass a new budget for FY 2014. Of course, with a deeply divided House and Senate and ongoing debates about long-term fiscal policy, doing so will take patience and time. In fact, it’s probable that neither chamber will be able to debate and vote on all of the various spending bills coming out of subcommittees before the deadline. And even if it were to happen, it’s even more unlikely that the House and Senate will be able to come to an agreement on the vastly different versions of the bills they’re likely to produce. That means that the bills we are seeing right now are only opening plays in a longer negotiation, one that will likely take months to resolve. Nevertheless, the decisions being made right now could end up having a profound impact on the strength and effectiveness of our international family planning programs. And for those programs, the House and Senate visions could not be more different.

The House Makes a Statement

Before adjourning for the August recess, the House Appropriations Committee finished its work on the Fiscal Year 2014 State Department/Foreign Operations 26 The Reporter — September 2013

funding bill—the primary source of funding and policy relating to U.S. international family planning programs. The draft version of the bill was terrible—it cut more than $100 million from family planning, capping our contribution at $461 million. It also banned any funding for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and reinstated the Global Gag Rule.

• Finally, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) offered an even narrower amendment to fund UNFPA only in a few high-need countries where the U.S. does not currently have any family planning program.

Family planning champions on the committee were unable to fix the many problems with the bill, despite mounting a valiant effort. Although they knew they were outnumbered, several committee members offered amendments intended to highlight the vital work done by family planning programs around the world:

The Lowey and DeLauro amendments failed 24-26, while the Lee amendment failed 23-26. Two Republicans—Reps. Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) and Charlie Dent (R-PA)—broke otherwise solid party ranks and joined every Democrat present in supporting each amendment. The defeat of all three of these amendments highlights the seemingly reflexive rejection by House conservatives of family planning aid in any form.

• Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) offered a broad amendment to both strike the Global Gag Rule language from the bill and restore funding to UNFPA. • Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) offered an amendment to fund UNFPA only for the purposes of nine very specific objectives, including things like providing contraceptive services, preventing coercive practices, promoting safe childbirth, preventing and treating obstetric fistula, eliminating female genital mutilation, and eliminating child marriage.

And that attitude can have real consequences. If the budget bill passed by the House Appropriations Committee were to be enacted, the impact on women and families in the developing world would be devastating. Analysis suggests that cuts of the magnitude contained in the bill would lead to more than 5 million women losing access to birth control. There could be up to 1.5 million more unintended pregnancies, and 700,000 more abortions. Those additional unintended pregnancies and the oftenunsafe abortions that would follow


could ultimately result in about 4,000 additional women dying of pregnancyrelated causes.

And the Senate Responds

Only a day after the House committee passed its funding bill, the Senate Appropriations Committee began work on its own version of the measure. It is a vast improvement over the House bill. The Senate committee voted for $669.5 million in international family planning funding, with $39.5 million for UNFPA. And it includes an amendment offered by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen to prevent a future president from reinstating the Global Gag Rule. Unlike in the House, that amendment had bipartisan support, passing 19-11. The Senate bill also includes language to allow the Peace Corps to pay for abortion services for volunteers who have been raped, or whose lives are endangered by their pregnancies. After the votes in the House committee, it was reassuring to know that there are still strong advocates for family planning in positions of power on Capitol Hill.

Beyond the Budget Battle

In mid-July, Rep. Lowey reintroduced www.popconnect.org

the Global Democracy Promotion Act (GDPA, H.R.2738) in the House of Representatives. The bill, which would permanently bar a future president from unilaterally reinstating the Global Gag Rule, had 114 original co-sponsors, all Democrats. The high number of original co-sponsors is a strong statement of support in a House that will certainly not allow the bill to come to the floor. Blatantly unconstitutional abortion restrictions, however, have a smoother path to a floor vote. Earlier this year, Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) introduced the Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which bans nearly all abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Supporters of the bill assert that at 20 weeks gestation, a fetus has the ability to feel pain and should therefore be entitled to legal protection, a position which puts the bill directly in conflict with Roe v. Wade. In reality, science does not support that assertion, with most mainstream research indicating that the brain structures necessary to perceive pain do not develop until much later—well into the third trimester. At any rate, when the House Judiciary Committee considered the bill in midJune, the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Democrats on the committee

offered amendments to include exceptions for the life and health of the mother, as well as a rape and incest exception. All were rejected along party lines. The bill went to the House floor for a vote only days later, where, after the addition of a much narrower rape exception than the one rejected by the committee, the measure passed, 228-196. The bill has no chance of becoming law, since it could not pass in the Senate. Even if it somehow did, President Obama would certainly veto it. However, it is a further demonstration of the willingness of this House of Representatives to take every opportunity to restrict abortion access and engage in grandstanding around issues of women’s health.

Looking Ahead

It may be months before we know the final outcome of the FY 2014 appropriations process, but one thing is already perfectly clear: this House of Representatives is unbelievably hostile to family planning. And whether by attacking its funding or through the introduction of inflammatory bills, there’s plenty of evidence to suggest they will continue to attempt to restrict women’s access to family planning and reproductive health care, both here in the U.S. and around the world.

September 2013 — The Reporter 27


Field & Outreach

Volunteer Spotlight: Derrick Belgarde By Rebecca Harrington

D

errick Belgarde, a graduate student in Seattle, says that he has enjoyed working with Population Connection and attending Capitol Hill Days (CHD) for the past two years, but that getting involved initially was challenging. As an introvert, CHD—a large and interactive event— really pushed him out of his comfort zone. His first Capitol Hill Days was particularly hard, as he attended on his own, and didn’t know any of the other participants prior to the trip. He recalls that he thought about backing out, but channeled “inner strength,” confronted his trepidation, and ultimately decided that it was important that he push himself to attend. Derrick describes experiencing “total culture shock” upon his arrival in D.C. “I thought I was coming from a big city, but when I got [to D.C.] I began to shrink. Everyone was in a rush. The Metro system was quite scary. I felt like a kid having to ride the bus for the first time. So I was very nervous, but to my surprise I began calming down after I checked in and met a few people. I soon realized that everyone was there for different reasons. And some people there were as clueless as I was as to what we were all expected to do!”

28 The Reporter — September 2013

The opportunity to lobby is what first drew Derrick to Capitol Hill Days in the spring of 2012. As a student at Seattle University majoring in Public Affairs, meeting with his legislators on Capitol Hill struck him as a unique complement to his academic work. Once he arrived in D.C., however, and learned more about the struggles women face to access family planning, he began to view the opportunity through a different lens. As he watched the documentary Mother: Caring for 7 Billion and listened to expert speakers, he was astounded by “how women are denied equal opportunity in this country, and around the world.” As a father, he wants to build a better world for his 11-year-old daughter—one in which she’s “empowered and doesn’t have to cower to men.” Derrick, 40, returned to college a couple of years ago after working, raising children, and overcoming some personal struggles. This life experience allowed Derrick to bring an informed, realworld perspective to his studies and volunteerism. To that end, Derrick is a committed community advocate in Seattle. While still an undergraduate, Derrick began working for El Centro de la Raza, a Seattle

non-profit that works to empower the Latino community, but provides services to people of all races and ethnicities. He now works at El Centro full time. In his role there, Derrick is an assistant to the Director of Community Programs, where he supports low income and transitional housing programs, promotes volunteerism, engages in immigrant and civil rights advocacy, and helps to coordinate social justice and cultural events. He is passionate about advocating for the homeless, a problem he’s witnessed in his own community (Derrick is an enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz, and is also part Chippewa-Cree). Derrick has also contributed volunteer time to Native American Engagement in HIV Clinical Research (NAEHCR), a partnership between the Legacy Project in Seattle and the National Native American AIDS Prevention Center. He’s worked with NAEHCR to develop community education outreach strategies to create awareness in the Native American community about ongoing HIV/AIDS clinical research. Since he first learned about our work in 2012, Derrick has organized and participated in several in-district lobby meetings for Population Connection with Reps. Dave Reichert (R-WA) and


Suzan DelBene (D-WA). He returned to D.C. with his wife, Lua—also a participant—for Capitol Hill Days 2013, where they served as excellent role models for the less-experienced activists in the group. In considering why he is committed to the empowerment of women through access to family planning, Derrick says: “I believe there is a direct correlation between the state of the world’s affairs and the disrespectful way women are treated. I was taught that the harmony and balance of all things was knocked out of whack when male domination and male-dominating religions took over the world and spread the belief that it was not only man’s right, but his duty and responsibility to conquer, dominate, and suppress women and everything feminine. The earth being feminine in nature—because she nurtures, shelters, and takes care of all our needs—is treated in the same destructive manner. I know it may be hard for a non-Native to tie the two (women and earth) together, but everything is intertwined, and all is related. I was taught that as soon as we begin to honor and respect our women as sacred again, the world will find its balance and once again find harmony. ” www.popconnect.org

Derrick and his wife, Lua, at Capitol Hill Days 2013. Photo: Jonathan Look, Jr.

In June, Derrick graduated magna cum laude from Seattle University, with a degree in Public Affairs and a minor in Sociology. This fall, he will begin a master’s program in Public Administration at Seattle U. His career ambitions include one day founding a non-profit organization that focuses on either homelessness in the Native American community or youth education and empowerment. Derrick has grown tremendously as an advocate since he made his first apprehensive trip to D.C. We are grateful for his dedication and commitment to the

population cause, and look forward to an ongoing partnership with him as we continue our grassroots outreach efforts in Washington State. “Positive change is possible, and we don’t all have to be on the exact same page with each other, or subscribe to the exact same set of beliefs in order to make that change a reality. We just have to agree on the same end goal. In this case—a happy and healthy world for people, plants, animals, and all other things in this web of life.” —Derrick Belgarde September 2013 — The Reporter 29


Teachers Across the Nation Praise PopEd PopEd

By Pamela Wasserman

Leadership Weekend in the Tar Heel State

Each summer, PopEd brings together an impressive group of educators from around the country to participate in a weekend-long Leadership Institute, designed to prepare them to facilitate workshops in their local areas. This year’s event, held July 26-28 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, included 35 university faculty, K-12 teachers, and nonformal educators from 18 states. The weekend kicked off with a welcome reception Friday afternoon on the lush grounds of the Rizzo Conference Center, once a private estate, and now part of UNC’s Business School. Rizzo’s state-of-the-art meeting space was ideal for Saturday and Sunday’s agenda, which featured hands-on activities on population dynamics, environmental connections, and global development. Outside of the conference center, attendees enjoyed networking and sharing their PopEd ideas over some mouth-watering local fare such as shrimp and grits, barbecue, and peach pie. As a final activity, participants identified future presentation opportunities—many of which are already scheduled for the new school year. Those who teach future teachers (more than half of our attendees) will 30 The Reporter — September 2013

2013 Leadership Institute participants and staff in Chapel Hill, NC. Photo: Robert Campell

be introducing PopEd to college students on campuses from West Virginia to Washington State this fall. Others will be presenting to teachers in school districts, conferences, and at nature centers.

There are not enough kind words that I could say about how much I enjoyed this training—literally the BEST that I have ever attended! Sarah Lee Meigs Intermediate School Middleton, Ohio

Thank you for your recent workshop. It was one of the best-organized, enjoyable, and relevant workshops I have attended. I’m very eager to start implementing the PopEd activities.

I had an absolutely fabulous time. I learned so much, and I’m super excited to get to work with the PopEd information.

Howard Aprill Wehr Nature Center Franklin, Wisconsin

Wendy Scott Old Dominion University Norfolk, Virginia

What an amazing experience. I truly appreciate and value the information and expertise presented by you and your staff. I look forward to working closely with you this semester to provide workshops to my pre-service teachers.

You have an awesome team! You are doing a wonderful job. I am excited to be one of your ambassadors and look forward to embedding the themes and principles of PopEd in everything I teach. Thank you for an awesome weekend full of great experiences. You should be proud of what you are doing!!!

Christine Mayfield California State University Fullerton, California

Comfort Ateh Providence College Providence, Rhode Island


www.popconnect.org

For more information about our teacher training workshops, visit our website at www.populationeducation.org.

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• 97 percent of PopEd workshop attendees rated the demonstrated materials as Excellent or Good. • 80 percent of respondents rated our workshops as better than other professional development workshops they’ve attended as far as content, usefulness, and presentation quality.

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Here are some of the findings:

Our results confirm that our workshops and curricula are valued by teachers, and that supporting PopEd is a worthwhile investment in building population literacy among young people.

In comparison to other professional development workshops you've attended, how did the Population Education workshop compare in terms of...

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To help us evaluate the effectiveness of our teacher education program, we solicit the feedback of past workshop participants through a biennial online survey. This past spring, we emailed attendees from 2011 and 2012 workshops to find out whether and how they’ve implemented PopEd in their classrooms. Within a week, we had over 1,400 responses, more than enough to help us gauge our impact.

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Our staff and volunteer trainers can tell you that teachers (and future teachers) seem to enjoy our workshops—the hands-on activities, lively discussions, and discoveries. But what happens after the workshops? Do the activities make it into classrooms and engage students? Do teachers share their PopEd materials with colleagues?

PopEd lessons in their classrooms. • 4 in 5 teachers discovered a change in their students’ thinking regarding population growth after presenting Population Education materials. • 86 percent of teachers saw our materials increase their students’ critical thinking and/or problem solving skills.

• 96 percent of workshop participants have used or plan to use the activities in their classrooms. • 60 percent of educators who have taught with Population Education materials used them to fulfill state or national content standards. • Teachers who have used our curricula have done so in several subject areas, most notably: social studies (52 percent), science (41 percent), and math (20 percent). Many used it to teach multiple subjects. • 9 in 10 teachers found that PopEd materials effectively engaged their students. • 94 percent of teachers saw an increase in their students’ awareness of population issues after sharing

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PopEd by the Numbers— Measuring Our Impact

Above Average Average Below Average Poor

September 2013 — The Reporter 31


Cartoon

Used with the permission of Clay Bennett, the Washington Post Writers Group, and the Cartoonist Group. All rights reserved.

32 The Reporter — September 2013


Editorial Excerpts

Mandaluyong City, Philippines

McLean, Virginia

With the population galloping toward the 100-million mark, the Philippines will be among one of several developing nations leading global population growth in the coming years, according to the United Nations.

Beginning this month, the Affordable Care Act requires that most health insurance plans give women access to FDAapproved contraception methods, including birth control pills and the “morning after pill.” The law is right to require this: The Institute of Medicine and common sense say contraception is basic health care for women, and the prevention of unplanned pregnancies can cut abortion rates and give women a better chance at education, work, and planning family size.

With limited resources and economic growth failing to keep pace with the population boom, this means more people getting an ever-shrinking share of the pie. Persistent urban blight is testament to the continually growing demand for jobs, housing, and the most basic necessities such as water, food, and sanitation. Maternal and child mortality rates remain high because of the weakness of reproductive health programs. Large, unplanned families make poverty alleviation more difficult. While landmark legislation was finally passed by the 15th Congress to promote reproductive health, the measure remains stalled in the Supreme Court, and opponents have vowed to derail its implementation. In the meantime, women and children suffer from poor health and the many other afflictions that hit the impoverished, and strong economic growth figures are meaningless to millions of Filipinos.

Ultimately, the issue is one of balance. The effect of health insurance on business owners is indirect. Employees may or may not use insurance to pay for birth control, just as they may or may not use their salary to pay for something that would violate the company owners’ faith. The circumstance might be discomforting. But the alternative—granting religious exemptions to private organizations—is more troubling. It would be open to abuse, putting the government in the position of determining which business owners were sufficiently religious. That is an outcome neither side should want. —August 11, 2013

—June 17, 2013

www.popconnect.org

September 2013 — The Reporter 33


Population Connection 2120 L Street, NW, Suite 500 Washington, DC 20037

NON PROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID POPULATION CONNECTION

Your legacy...people and the planet in balance Have you considered leaving a legacy gift ensuring that your commitment to zero population growth continues well into the future? By remembering Population Connection in your will or estate plan, you can make a meaningful contribution to stabilizing population and improving the quality of life for everyone, everywhere. We also offer charitable gift annuities, which provide guaranteed lifetime payments and significant tax advantages. We are proud to honor our legacy donors as members of The ZPG Society. For more information, please contact Shauna Scherer, Director of Development, at shauna@popconnect.org or (202) 974-7730.

Population Connection members Katharine and Julian Donahue, visiting Iguazu Falls in Brazil.

If you’ve already included Zero Population Growth (ZPG) in your estate plans, there is no need to change any language. We proudly maintain the name and the mission. 34 The Reporter — September 2013


The Reporter, September 2013