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ISSUE 1, VOL. 1

A PUBLICATION OF POP-9 COMMUNICATIONS"

ISSUE 7, VOL. 1

A BI-MONTHLY PUBLICATION

AUGUST 31, 2011

SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

Assemblyman Gil Cedillo takes major steps toward making California the first state to legally recognize undocumented children Legislation would allow undocumented students to attend state colleges and universities...Story on page 4

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: • “The Irish Soldiers of Mexico” interview - Page 6 • Hispanic media moving up on Networks - Page 8 • Film about Latino soldier wins honor - Page 12 • More Hispanics going to college - Page 13

Community shows up in force at hearings 1


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-WARRIORFAMILY IS WORTH FIGHTING FOR Coming to Theaters September 9 Marine Tommy returns home from service after 14 years to enlist the help of his father to train for Sparta, a huge MMA event. His brother, Brendan also returns to the ring in hopes of saving his family from financial ruin. As the two brothers train – they eventually face the reality that they will have to battle each other in the ring.

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STARRING: Joel Edgerton (Animal Kingdom, Star Wars: Episode III), Tom Hardy (the upcoming The Dark Knight Rises, Inception, Black Hawk Down), Jennifer Morrison ("House", Star Trek) and Nick Nolte (Tropic Thunder, The Thin Red Line). The film is directed by Gavin O'Connor; screenplay by Gavin O’Connor & Anthony Tambakis & Cliff Dorman and story by Gavin O'Connor & Cliff Dorfman. Lionsgate and Mimran Schur Pictures present a Lionsgate / Mimran Schur Pictures production. A Solaris Entertainment and Filmtribe production.

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NOTES FROM THE PUBLISHER....

Welcome! Thank you for sharing this inaugural issue of

The Journal On Latino Americans E-zine. As we progress forward in this new realm of publishing, you will see continuous upgrades on this and other POP-9 produced online publications including: Apps to ensure easy access; QR Codes with special promotions for those who have access; and, full-page advertising with direct links to the specific sponsor. What you won’t see are those annoying pop-up ads, especially those that inhibit your ability to enjoy a specific article. Speaking about articles, we are dedicated to bringing you information about issues and people in the news in a manner that is respectful, unbiased, and includes those leaders taking charge to address those issues. And, the issues are aplenty…the economy, education, health, immigration, war, and the image of Latinos in general. We will also be featuring the works of a variety of contributing writers and authors including: Dr. Al Carlos Hernandez, Nilki Benitez, Joe Ortiz, American Latina Managing Editor Carlos Alacala, and many others. Plus lots of reports about Latinos living in the U.S. today. Finally, this online publication is dedicated to all Americans who know that diversity is the key to repairing our economic and social ills. Your feedback is important to us, so please feel free to let us know how we are doing.

CONTENTS California Dream Act (California Legislator Making History)...... Page 4 An Interview with the Author of “The Irish Soldiers of Mexico”...... Page 6 Hispanic Media In The US: Fairing better than mainstream media...... Page 8 Latina filmmaker telling it like it is...... Page 9 Latina picked as CEO of Girls Scouts...... Page 10 Documentary about Latino soldier takes ‘Imagen’ Award...... Page 12

Warmly/Abrazos

Hispanic college enrollment up, narrows gaps...... Page 13

Adrian Perez, Publisher info@pop-9.com

Latinos Across America...... Page 15

The   Journal   On   Latino   Americans   is   owned   and   published   by   POP-­‐9   Communications.    Any  article  and/or  opinions   expressed   therein   do  not   necessarily  re@lect   the   views   of   The   Journal   On   Latino   Americans   or   POP-­‐9  Communications,  but   remain  solely  those   of  the  author(s).       The   Journal  On  Latino  Americans  is  copyrighted   and  its  contents   may  not  be   copied   or   used   without   prior   written   consent   by   POP-­‐9   Communications.    Copyright  2011.

The Journal On Latino Americans is published bi-monthly. For comments or information, write: POP-9 Communications 1901 A Del Paso Blvd Sacramento, CA 95815 Website: www.journalonlatinoamericans.com

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POLITICS

California legislator making national history

Students, parents and community leaders witness history as the “California Dream Act” is passed by state legislature SACRAMENTO, CA – The California DREAM Act was passed and signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown, perhaps becoming the first law in the nation granting undocumented students the right to attend state colleges and universities. Assembly Bills (AB) 130 and 131 were carried by Assemblymember Gilbert Cedillo (D-Los Angeles), which were approved by the State Assembly and State Senate’s approval, with the the latter awaiting Brown’s signature. At a hearing held on Cinco de Mayo, AB 130 received the majority Assemblymember Gil Cedillo

votes from the Senate Education Committee after nearly one-hour of

testimony was presented by numerous organizations, individuals, students and key individuals representing education. This new law allows undocumented students to apply and obtain education funding from private sources. The second component, AB 131, which would allow undocumented students to apply for state sponsored grants, has created more of a stir, prompting Brown to state the bill needs some “tweaking.” “I was brought to the country when I was 3 days old,” Maria Luna told the Committee. “My mother, a U.S. citizen did not want me and crossed the border to have me and give me up. But my grandmother picked me up, brought me back and raised me.” Maria Luna, Undocumented Student

Luna explained that she attended UC Berkeley, but had to transfer to Sacramento State because she could not afford the tuition without financial aid.

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The California DREAM Act, first introduced by Cedillo in 2006, was reintroduced in two separate bills in January of this year. The first bill, AB 130, allows students that meet the in-state tuition requirements to apply for and receive scholarships derived from non-state funds. AB 131 would allow students that meet the in-state tuition requirements to apply and receive financial aid at California public colleges and universities. The types of financial aid these students would be eligible for include: 1.) Board of Governors (BOG) Fee Waiver 2.) Institutional Student Aid: Student aid program administered by the attending college or university (i.e. State University Grant, UC Grant) and 3.) Cal Grants. Both bills still require full Senate support before they move to the Governor for approval. -J

Senator Alan Lowenthal, Chair Senate Educ. Committee

David Rattray, Senior V.P. Education and Workforce Development Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

Testimony provided by community activist Carlos Alcala

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An Interview With the Author of “The Irish Soldiers of Mexico” By Nilki Benitez, Contributing Writer Michael Hogan was born in Newport, Rhode Island in 1943, but lives in Colonia Providencia, Guadalajara, Mexico, with his wife Lucinda Mayo. He is the author of sixteen books, including a collection of short stories, six books of poetry, collected essays on teaching in Latin America, a novel, and a history of the Irish battalion in Mexico which formed the basis for "One Man's Hero," an MGM movie starring Tom Berenger. His book, entitled Author Michael Hogan, “The Irish Soldiers of Mexico” "The Irish Soldiers of Mexico," has drawn critical acclaim among historians who point out this is the best and most accurate account of history during the Mexican war. One reviewer stated: "...it is not only wellresearched and well-documented but his is the only work which draws heavily on Mexican journals, manuscripts and archives." Hogan's work has appeared in many journals such as the Paris Review, the Harvard Review, Z-Magazine, Political Affairs and the Monthly Review. He is a consultant to the U.S. Department of State’s Office of Overseas Schools in Latin America. As an author he has received wide recognition for his work, including a PEN Award, two Pushcart Prizes, an NEA fellowship, the Benjamin Franklin Award, the gold medal of the Mexican Geographical Society. Recently, I caught up to Hogan and conducted an interview about his book "The Irish Soldiers of Mexico."

Listen to the interview at www.vidadeoro.com.

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Hispanic Media in the U.S.: Faring Better than Mainstream Media Spanish-language media remains important to the nation's growing and changing Hispanic population. And in the last year, this media sector tended to fare better overall than the mainstream English-language media, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism. Hispanic newspapers overall lost circulation in 2010, but not nearly to the extent of the English-language press. (English-language dailies saw a 5% decline for the six-month period from March to September 2010 compared with the same period the year before.) And daily Hispanic papers grew circulation by 1.9%. The financial picture seems to have improved as well in the last year. Spanish-language television had an even more positive year. Univision's audience continued to grow and now competes with----and in some timeslots outpaces----audiences for ABC, CBS and NBC, (and all of their stations), the 2010-2011 season is projected to bring in $1.5 billion in ad revenue. Hispanic radio and magazines also showed growth. The number of Spanish-language radio stations grew 8% for the most recent year we have data (from 1,224 in 2008 to 1,323 in 2009), and magazine ad spending increased in 2010. There are several ways to measure ad spending and revenue, and looking across all of these calculations, PEJ puts Spanish-language magazine ad revenue growth at about 5% in 2010. On the digital front, while Hispanic Americans do not access the internet at the same rates as other Americans, there is growth, and bilingual Latinos are already heavily online. This study is the latest edition to the Ethnic chapter of the State of the Media 2011 annual report. The State of the Media 2011 is the eighth edition of PEJ's annual report on the health and status of American journalism. Among the findings: • The total number of Hispanic newspapers remained stable in 2010 (832 versus 835

• •

in 2009), according to the Latino Print Network. And the largest cohort----weekly publications----grew by 18% to 117 papers. While daily audited newspapers grew circulation in 2010, weeklies saw a 2.5% decline to 11.08 million. This was still better performance than seen in Englishlanguage newspapers. Less-than-weeklies dropped slightly, 0.6%, to 4.92 million. Univision has plans to launch a 24-hour news network, Univision 24/7. The channel is expected to debut sometime in 2012. While details on the channel have yet to be released, it will be distinct from Univision's existing cable channel Galavisión and will draw heavily on the strength of Univision's current news division. Bilingualism seems to have led to less Spanish-language television watching, though viewing there is still strong. Almost a quarter of Hispanics who speak mostly English at home, 24%, watch one to three hours of Spanish-language TV a

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day according to data from Nielsen Media Research. Still, among those who mostly speak Spanish at home, 40% watch one to three hours of Spanish-language TV a day and another 26% watch more than three. Univision radio took steps in 2010 to solidify its place in the radio market. In April 2010, Univision Radio began to format more of its radio broadcasts so that Arbitron could collect audience ratings-a key metric used by advertising agencies and major advertisers. Bilingual and English-dominant Latinos are far ahead of Spanish-dominant Latinos in many measures of digital usage. Spanishlanguage Latinos are significantly less likely to use the internet, have a home internet connection, have home broadband access, or have a cell phone than English-dominant and bilingual Latinos, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. But internet usage

SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

among Spanish-dominant Latinos has increased from 36% in 2009 to 47% in 2010. The digital divide between Latinos and whites remained in 2010. About twothirds of Latino (65%) and African American (66%) adults went online in 2010, compared with 77% of white adults. And only 45% of Latinos have broadband access at home, compared with 52% of blacks and 65% of whites.

The report, "Hispanic Media: Faring Better than the Mainstream Media," can be accessed on the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism website. The Pew Hispanic Center and the Project for Excellence in Journalism are projects of the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan, non-advocacy research organization based in Washington, D.C. and funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Latina filmmaker tells it like it is Fanny Veliz is making it her business to change the image of Latinos in media. By La Cosmopolatina HOLLYWOOD - It’s no secret that Hollywood has never been great at portraying Latinos accurately. Latino characters on the silver screen are often underdeveloped, and the Latina filmmaker Fanny Veliz stereotypes surrounding them are rampant. Women are either the maid or the overly sexual, sassy sidekick and men are usually depicted as aggressive or gangster types. So what’s a young Latina actress and filmmaker to do? Take matters into her own hands, of course. Venezolana Fanny Veliz is such a Latina, and she is making it her business to change the image of Latinos in the media. She has been doing so since 2005 when she launched her own production company, Criolla Productions. Since then, she has written, directed and produced multiple short films that have been screened at various international film festivals. All of these projects have one common purpose: to create Latino characters that are rich and multidimensional, and whose struggles and achievements truthfully portray the experience of Hispanics in the United States. Her latest endeavor is a film called Homebound about the lives of a family in El Campo, TX. The film is currently gathering backers so it can get off the ground, so be sure to support a fellow Latina in her noble quest to make us look like the rockin’ badasses that we are. Or at least make us look authentic.

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Latina picked as CEO for Girl Scouts Ana Maria Chavez, a Mexican-American from Arizona, will be taking over the national Girl Scout's organization. By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK, NY — As a young MexicanAmerican girl, Anna Maria Chavez was a member of the Girl Scouts in a small farming town in southern Arizona. Now, she will lead the nonprofit as it experiences an increase in participation by Hispanic girls in the U.S., even as its overall membership has decreased. Girl Scouts’ CEO Anna Maria Chavez The New York-based Girl Scouts of the USA announced Wednesday it had selected Chavez as its new chief executive officer — the first Hispanic woman to serve in the position. "We wanted to find someone who had a strong leadership story of her own whose journey in life could serve as a shining example for all of our girls," said Connie Lindsay, the national president of the organization and a member of the search committee. Chavez, 43, has been the chief executive of Girl Scouts of Southwest Texas since 2009. She will be taking over for CEO Kathy Cloninger, who is retiring after leading an overhaul of the leadership organization's programs and direction over the past eight years. Chavez, born in Arizona, was raised in the small town of Eloy, about 50 miles northwest of Tucson, before the family moved to Phoenix. She said the experience of being a member of Girl Scout Troop 304 in Eloy was formative. "One of my best friends came to school one day and said she was going to be a Girl Scout, and I decided that was for me, even though my family hadn't had a tradition of Girl Scouting," said Chavez, speaking by phone from San Antonio. "The Girl Scout opportunity that went on from there really opened my eyes," she said. Before working for the Girl Scouts, Chavez served as an urban affairs policy adviser to former Arizona governor and current U.S. Secretary of

Homeland Security Janet Napolitano and for other state agencies involved in providing community services. She also worked for the federal government, including as chief of staff for the U.S. Small Business Administration's Office of Government Contracting and Minority Enterprise Development. The Girl Scouts is increasingly seeing its future in the growth of the Hispanic community. The organization, founded in 1912, said it had noted a 55 percent increase in the number of Hispanic girls who have joined its ranks over the past 10 years. They now account for about 12 percent — or 272,000 girls — of the nearly 2.3 million girls who were Scouts in 2010. In response to the growth of Hispanics among its membership, the Girl Scouts of the USA has redoubled its outreach to the community, including with bilingual public campaigns. Overall, membership has declined by 14 percent since 2006, when there were 2.7 million Scouts, the organization said. It attributed the decline to the economy and a decrease in funding for large nonprofits. GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA

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Documentary about Latino soldier takes Imagen Award 26th Annual Imagen Awards Gala honors Latinos in entertainment

John J. Valadez, Winner for “The Longoria Affair”

August 12, 2011 – Beverly Hills, Calif. Winners of the 26th Annual Imagen (Spanish for “image”) Awards, honoring positive portrayals of Latinos and Latino culture in entertainment, were announced August 12, 2011 at a star-studded dinner ceremony held in the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The awards, hosted by actress Maria CanalsBarrera, star of Disney Channel’s Emmy-winning “Wizards of Waverly Place,” were handed out in front of an audience of approximately five hundred attendees. Among celebrities in attendance were Edward James Olmos, Kenny Ortega, Esai Morales, Mark Ballas, Cote de Pablo, Eva La Rue, Lupe Ontiveros, Victoria Justice, Alexa Vega, among others. Also in attendance were U.S. Secretary of Labor Hilda L. Solis, and PBS President and CEO Paula Kerger. “We are proud of all the accomplishments that Latinos have achieved thus far throughout all facets of the entertainment industry; however, we must strive for continued progress of inclusion, particularly in decisionmaking and creative roles throughout the industry,” said Helen Hernandez, president of The Imagen Foundation.

Winners were selected in 19 different categories from film, television and the internet, and judged by an independent panel of entertainment industry executives and Latino community leaders. Special recognition went to Latino Public Broadcasting, who received the Norman Lear Award, named for the veteran television producer who conceived the Imagen Awards program, and Walt Disney “Imagineer” Alfredo M. Ayala, who was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award. Winner for Best Documentary/Television was the powerful film “The Longoria Affair,” which journalist Lola Rodriguez Rodriguez described the anticipation of its announcement as follows: “The best part of the evening came near the end when the nominees for Best Documentary on Film or Television were announced. As the titles of the films in competition were read: “Sins of my Father (Red Creek Productions) The Fence/La Barda (HBO), The New America (mun2). The

Longoria Affair (PBS), Monica and David (HBO)”, actor and Chairman of Latino Public Broadcasting, Edward James Olmos could be seen; eyes closed and fists clenched repeating to himself, “Longoria, Longoria, Longoria….” Then, from the podium came the words, “And the winner is…The Longoria Affair”, the entire ballroom shook with applause and gritos. As Director John J. Valadez and Co-Producer Pamela A. Aguilar took the stage amid a cacophony of claps and hoots, there came a lone voice above it all. It was impossible to tell where it came from but the words were clear and distinct and unmistakable: “Viva Hector Garcia!” Other voices echoed “Viva!” in response. Everything after that was a timeless and exquisite blur…” Congratulations to all the winners. Next up for John J. Valadez’ The Longoria Affair are the EMMY’s which will be held September 26, 2011. Check listings for times and channel. CLICK HERE to see the list of all the Imagen Award Winners.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE LONGORIA AFFAIR TRAILER 12


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Hispanic college enrollment up, narrows gaps

With a 24% Growth from 2009 to 2010, young Hispanics outnumber young African Americans on campus WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Driven by a single-year surge of 24% in Hispanic enrollment, the number of 18- to 24-year-olds attending college in the United States hit an all-time high of 12.2 million in October 2010, according to a Pew Hispanic Center analysis of newly available Census Bureau data. From 2009 to 2010, the number of Hispanic young adults enrolled in college grew by 349,000, compared with an increase of 88,000 young blacks and 43,000 young Asian Americans and a decrease of 320,000 young non-Hispanic whites. As a result of these shifts, young Hispanics for the first time outnumbered young blacks on campus, even though young black college enrollment has also grown steadily for decades and it, too, has surged in recent years. In 2010, 38% of all 18- to 24-year-old blacks were enrolled in college, up from 13% in 1967 and 32% in 2008. The Hispanic enrollment increase has been even more dramatic than the black enrollment increase because it has been spurred by a mixture of population growth and educational strides. High levels of immigration and high birth rates have made Hispanics the nation's biggest minority group, comprising 16% of the U.S. population as of 2010. In 1972, just 5% of the nation's 18- to 24year-olds were Hispanic. By 2010, that share rose to 19%.

However, population growth accounts for only a share of the 24% young Hispanic college enrollment spike from 2009 to 2010. During that same period, the total population of 18- to 24year-old Hispanics grew by 7%. Rising educational attainment is an important driver of these enrollment trends, over the long term as well as in recent years. The rate of young Hispanics enrolled in college rose from 13% in 1972 to 27% in 2009 to 32% in 2010. Young Hispanics are disproportionately enrolled in two-year colleges. They comprised 22% of two-year students but only 12% of fouryear students. Young Hispanics continue to lag other groups in completion of four-year college degrees. In 2010 32% of 25- to 29-year-olds had attained a bachelor's degree, in comparison to 13% of Hispanics of the same age. These findings are based on an analysis of the U.S. Census Bureau's School Enrollment Supplement of the October 2010 Current Population Survey (CPS), supplemented by historical time series based on the CPS. The CPS is the standard source for national rates of college enrollment and has collected college enrollment information in a consistent manner since 1947. The report, " Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups," authored by Senior Research Associate Richard Fry, is available at the Pew Hispanic Center's website, www.pewhispanic.org. The Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, is a nonpartisan, nonadvocacy research organization based in Washington, D.C. and is funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

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Obama Losing Latino Support, Will the GOP Gain the Latino Vote? By Texas GOP Vote

Obama has failed to deliver on his promise of immigration reform, and the Latinos that helped Obama win his election in 2008 may think twice about voting for him again. READ MORE…

Katt Williams Tells Latino Heckler “Go Back To Mexico” Written by Casey Gane-McCalla, Lead Blogger PHOENIX, AZ — Comedian Katt Williams got into a yelling match with a Latino heckler at recent show in Phoenix, Arizona. Williams showed a great deal of American patriotism while disrespecting the Latino man due to his pride about being Mexican. READ MORE…

Washington Post and National Journal: GOP Losing Latino Voters With Immigration Politics By Americas Voice Online

SEPTEMBER 1, 2011

Network aids Hispanic businesses Latino Business Alliance promotes entrepreneurship By Thelma Guerrero-Huston, Statesman Journal For the past 11 years, Baldo Delgado has wanted to make his pastry business known to other local businesses and the general public. To accomplish his goal, Delgado joined the Latino Business Alliance, a local organization that seeks to increase the visibility of Hispanic professionals and small business owners in Salem by providing a forum to network. "One of the benefits of being a member of the alliance is learning what is available for small businesses like mine," said Delgado, who owns La Bonita Bakery on Portland Road NE, said. "I'm learning about loans for small businesses and what the state government offers us." READ MORE…

Opinion: Hispanic student achievement still lags in one key area By Esther J. Cepeda

CHICAGO, Il -- Some people are never satisfied, even after hearing great news, and Rick Perry (R-TX) is just the latest candidate to use I'm perfectly content to admit I'm one of them. “the usual Republican crutch to justify his position, The news is that the Pew Hispanic Center has insisting that the border must be made secure just released data showing that the largest before reform is possible. But the border is more minority in America is finally starting to close secure than it has been in decades — as measured the gap on educational attainment. Hispanics' by the soaring federal presence and plummeting college enrollment jumped to an all-time high rates of illegal crossings and crime on the frontier in October 2010: 32 percent of Latinos 18-24 — and the GOP’s argument is looking increasingly are pursuing a higher education. Fifteen threadbare.” READ MORE… percent of all young adults in two- or four-year colleges are Hispanic, now representing the largest minority group on college campuses Breaking News:‘Vernon Killer’ and basically mirroring Hispanics' share of the U.S. population. READ MORE… Defeated On Senate Floor By Elizabeth Hsing-Huei Chou, EGP Staff Writer

A Washington Post editorial notes that Governor

SACRAMENTO, CA - Assembly Speaker John Perez’s nearly nine-month quest to dissolve the city of Vernon ended this afternoon after his bill, AB 46, failed on the Senate floor, on a vote of 13-17 against. READ MORE

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-------------------------Winner of the 2011 "Imagen Award" for Best Documentary -------------------------Wednesday, October 5, 2011 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. At The Artisan 1901 Del Paso Blvd, Sacramento, CA Hosted by The American GI Forum of California $12 per person (Only 250 Tickets Available) for more information, Email: info@vidadeoro.com 16


The Journal On Latino Americans - Sept 1