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Pooja Shah, Undergraduate.

PORTFOLIO

architecture + design


As a student for the last four years at the Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture, J.V.P.D, Mumbai, I have been involved in the intense process; one that has shaped my observation, my thought process, and my analytical abilities and my strength in a manner that my interest in the art of building, got a new dimension. The first year began with the deconstruction of my understanding of Form and Space through various materials and mediums of art. It helped me imagine architecture as the art of space construction. The second year allowed me to imagine scale and the architectonic with an understanding of a program. The third year brought in, structure through several design and construction techniques which gave me a holistic understanding. The fourth year gave me an insight to master planning and understanding design through large scale programs. From my cumulative experience of four years, I am in the process of putting together a thesis based on certain questions asked via research methodologies. In the following Portfolio i have showcased my process and architectural abilities working backwards from now to the initial years. Furthermore I have added miscellaneous but significant byproducts of the process which I find equally important. 01

the ARCHiTECT

“I prefer drawing to talking. Drawing is faster and leaves less room for lies�. -Le Corbusier


CONTENTS

c.v. 05 11. 19.

INDIAN EMBASSY IN SRI LANKA

35. M

CREMATORIU

03 37 LIGHT+ WIND+ WATER=

MASTER PLANNING -

DESIGN DISSERTATION

BANARAS MEASURED HAND DRAWINGS

HOUSING EXCHANGE PROGRAM

MUMBAI-SHANGHAI

INSTITUTION BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

SAME SAME

? 39. 41. 43

HAMMAM

OBJECT+ ARCHITECTURE

27. 31. MAJULI 45 47. BASIC DESIGN ILLUSTRATIONS POSTERS URBAN DESIGN HISTORY

MODELS 02


POOJA A. SHAH Date of Birth: 17th April 1991 Indian Nationality Minerva Mansion, 3RD Floor, Flat No: 14, S.V.P. Road, 359/373 Prarthna Samaj, Mumbai: 400004 Email: pooja_shah456@hotmail.com Contact: +919820297685

Qualif ication Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute Of Architecture and Environment Studies / Mumbai, India. Fifth Year Architecture Student

April 2014

Academic Proile Fourth Year B.ARCH Third Year B.ARCH Second Year B.ARCH First Year B.ARCH

First Class First Class First Class First Class

June 2012 - April 2013 June 2011 - April 2012 June 2010 - April 2011 June 2009 - April 2010

Distinction (87.50%)

July 2008 - March 2009

First Class (84%)

July 2006 - March 2007

/ K.R.V.I.A, Mumbai University

H.S.C. Board (Junior College) / Jai Hind College, Maharashtra board

I.C.S.E. Board (High School) / G.D. Somani Memorial School

Academic Achievements First Rank in Building Technology Fourth Year B.ARCH

June 2012 - April 2013

/ K.R.V.I.A. Mumbai, India

First Rank in overall H.S.C. Examination S.Y.J.C. Commerce

July 2008 - March 2009

/ Jai Hind College, Mumbai, India

International Exchange Programs Mumbai-Shanghai Same-Same Exchange Program affiliated with Tongji University / Shanghai, China 03

June 2011 - April 2012


CURRICULUM VITAE Work Experience SHROFFLEoN

May 2013 - June 2013

/ Mumbai, India Worked and completed a Monograph of works for Rumy Shroff & Associates.

Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute Of Architecture

August 2013

/ Mumbai, India. Teaching Assistant for the 1st year Introductory Workshop

PentArch and Associates

May 2012 - June 2012

/ Mumbai, India Worked on Interior Layouts on and off field for diamond offices in B.D.B, B.K.C.

Skills & Software Proficiency AutoCad I Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign I Google SketchUp I Rhino: Basic Modelling I Microsoft Office I Hand Drafting & Model Making I Laser Cutting I Watercolor+ink Painting.

Extra Curricular

Visited New Delhi, interviewed and studied Ar. A.G.K. Menon and his architectural practice INTACH, a non-profit organization. The study was compiled with 39 other architectural practices in New Delhi in the form of a book publication by our fourth year studio.

October 2012 I Publication

Participated in a workshop conducted by Anagram, which tried to engage Architecture with Electronic Media/Social Networking I Theatre Workshop I Graphic Design Workshop Visual Art Workshop I Waste in Nalasopara (conducted by Robert & Rajiv)

K.R.V.I.A I Workshops

Organized and participated in Annual Exhibitions for K.R.V.I.A. I Worked on Hand drafted/rendered drawings and Timber Structures for the Study trip exhibit on Majuli, Assam. I Organized and worked on various Geoffrey Bawa buildings visited in Sri Lanka for the Sri Lanka study trip exhibit.

K.R.V.I.A I Exhibitions

Designed posters for the Annual exhibitions and workshops.

K.R.V.I.A I Graphic Design

Elected as the Class Representative for two consecutive years. Part of the Study Trip Organization Committee.

Other Amateur Photography I Graphic Design + Art Work I Travelling I Hiking I Sports I Water Painting I Reading. 04


Conceptual drawings trying to capture the physical markers through, event choreographed by the body, the space affected by the body and the movement by the body.

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DESIGN DISSERTATION BANARAS, VARANASI - A STUDY OF ARCHITECTURE IN A MNEMONIC DRAWING GUIDE: ROHAN SHIVKUMAR A drawing is a medium that translates a mental conception into a physical reality. It is seen as a suspended reality. Drawing also exists in this heterotopic space; the grey area, where it not just lies in reality but also lies outside reality.

“Like a shadow, there I am down where I am not.�

Drawing is a depiction of our memory or affected memory. It starts becoming a complex space of events, movements, superimpositions, and juxtaposition of memories. In a 2 dimensional space it starts to talks about a 3 dimensional experience. All of this yet directly never results into architecture. It takes a complex process of breaking down the conventional elements in its present context through its historical influence if any. Drawing begins with the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience and senses. These spur associative thoughts, as the line suggests new forms it starts to undergo a set of reductions/slippages or additions. CARTOGRAPHY - THE SCIENCE OF DRAWING MAPS A map starts to explore a space that undergoes reduction or additions, through knowledge of the existing and imagination of the unknown, mapped with a scientific lens. Borges criticises the authenticity of the act of drawing a map. A map is a representational drawing that helps us understand our

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physical territory. It can never duplicate what exists and therefore becomes E RK MA a drawing that starts having additions and slippages according to what it T RKE MA ARK R K E T has toM show. Some maps are an illustration of the spatial relationships, actual E T KE R or symbolic, of a place, event or a concept. They include the depiction of A T TM RKE KE the entire cosmos, the souls, and spiritual journeys and imagined worlds. A MARKE map is drawing where the conceptual arc meets reality by a physical mark. A territory. This conceptual arc can only be experienced by a physical mark. M A R K E T T ATH HVAN KE VI S Our mind starts to map the physical terrain to attain a conceptualK A Sframework HI VISHVANATH GA LI KASHI through the act of drawing in our mind, which now becomes a complex D GODAULIA ROAD deconstruction of an event, space and movement of the G Obody. (This results in architecture with programming which is produced from a R complex KE MA juxtapositions and superimpositions of the surrounding.) ET MARKE MARKE ARK RKET M T The physical markers freeze time and space through events, KE E T movements K AR R M A T T TM KE resulting in architecture. RKE KE The drawing is now seen, felt and experienced, through the body. The body becomes the pencil that starts mapping complex relationships of space through events,K E movements and time resulting into architecture. Architecture E R RK MA is about Esomething that happens in it. (The drawing is built in the head) MA T RK A SITER K E T M AR K E T search for a site led me to Banaras where the entire city exists in a LI conceptual form, through the present reality. ThisD A Upilgrimage city of Banaras L GO MAL is above all universal, cosmic andSHAHPUin a sense a timeless sacred space. RI T KE AR Banaras is Unique, where the city’s location on the western banks of the river M IA R O ET UL K A D G O point of the elevated riverfront where Ganga which flows upstream at Athe D RO the bathers always face the rising sun above an empty landscape. The city UL

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19. ASTHIKSKEPA

20. KIKESHVARA 22. CHITRAGUPTESHVARA

18. HATAKESHVARA 21. BHARBHUTESHVARA

23. CHITRAGHANTA

24. PASUPITESHVARA

25. PITAMESHVARA

17. GOKARNESHVARA

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48. ISANESHVARA

15. VAIDYANATHESHVARA

61. 71.

60. 56.-59.

16. DHRUVESHVARA

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38. KARUNESHVARA

52. DHUNDHIRAJA

55. 39. TRISANDESHVARA

49. CANDI DEVI

42. VISVABAHUKA 51. BHAVANI SHANKARA 41. DHARMESHVARA 40. VAISALAKSHI 47. MANAHPRAKAMESHVARA

6. GANGA KESHAVA 7. LALITA DEVI 46. BHRAHAMISHVARA 43. ASA VINAYAKA 45. CHATURVAKESHVARA

44. VRDDHADITYA

8. JARASANDHESHVARA

9. SOMANATHA 12. AGASTISVARA

14. KASHYAPESHVARA

13. KASHYAPESHVARA

11. BRAHMESHVARA

10. VARAHESHVARA

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26. K


30. AGNISVARA

31. NAGESHVARA

29. VIDYESHVARA

KALASESVARA 27. CANDRESHVARA

28. VIRESHVARA

4. VASUKISHVARA

32.HARISHCANDRESHVARA 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 5. PARVATESHVARA

3. KAMBALAVATAREHVARA

2. MANIKARNIKESHVARA

1. MANIKARNIKA TIRTHA

is a part of a more complex “imagined landscape� in which mythology and topography are interlinked. Banaras exemplifies a duality of concepts of space and place. Place is what is directly experienced, specific in nature and concrete, where as space is more of general notion, abstract. The specific is always embedded in a larger conceptual framework. This can be seen by the cultural representations of space in Kashi by the pilgrimage drawing (map) of Banaras. The drawing starts to mark the conceptual city of Banaras with the help of the physical territory marked by the architecture of the temples encircling around the entire city. The journey of the pilgrim is real but conceptual in nature (of taking a pradakshina). Along the journey the physical territory of the temples marks the points of actual reality. At these points the drawing of the mind is a complex juxtapositions of EVENT SPACE TIME AND MOVEMENT creating a set of relationships. My thesis tries to create architecture for the in-between experience of the real and the conceptual. By physically marking the conceptual arc this thesis constructs a series of programs that emerge from the journey/route of the pilgrim. The project tries to understand and engineer choreography by the body through the event of the pilgrim encircling the route of the physical territory. meeting the conceptual arc. Architecture which becomes the result of the juxtaposition of events, space, time and movement also create a sense of identification of such markers, which are lost.

Pg.09 - Initial design drawings. Superimposed: The panchakroshi and the antargriha yatra.

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YOUTH. COLLECTIVE.

CENTRIC. HOUSING.

4TH YEAR STUDIO I ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I SITE: VILLE PARLE I 8TH SEMESTER GUIDE: SAHIL LATHEEF, EKTA IDNANY & NIMIT KILLAWALA

The major shift away from traditional agricultural or production based economies is seeing the rise of a new or emergent class or demographic segment made up of knowledge workers, intellectuals, various types of artists and a general restructuring into a more complex economic hierarchies. The studio was concerned with the buzz words of this new emergent class ‘innovation, collaboration, design’. A suitable site with respect to the program was indentified in the midst of a rapidly evolving higher-education precinct, in the western suburb of Ville Parle. The site is abutted along its southern edge by a linear canal and is connected to higher education institutes in its close vicinity. The project offered the potential to contribute positively to a network of open spaces which are being planned and executed by the local citizens along the canal. Along with incorporating those open spaces in the design itself, the design tries to create a mix within the “creative class” at various levels, with a number of community gathering functions and programs. The design strategies adopted in the project come from the various patterns of settlement offered by the different kinds of stake holders, helping to understand the already existing typologies of housing in the precinct.

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M e e t i n g - C o l l e c t i v e Of f i c eS p a c e s

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Above: Diagrams to understand the relationship between the user+program

Above: Deconstructing the patterns of settlement around the precinct of the site. Gaothan Housing, Moragaon fishing village.

Above: Initial sketches of form exploration

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Above: Identifying different patterns of settlement. Diagrams showing the site strategies.

Above: Proposed Masterplan

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Top: Horizontal Section AA’, Bottom: Longitudinal Section BB’

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Open Spaces for Public Gathering/ Activities.

Terraces at different levels for activities like, jogging tracks, plantation etc. for the user.

Double height spaces for miscellaneous programs which tie the housing units together.

MiscellaneousPrograms: Community research facilities, cafes, art studios & workshops.

Vertical circulation via lifts and staicases.

Courtyards at different scales to create a buffer between the tight housing units.

Left: Unit Typologies (From top) Hostel Apt, Studio Apt, 1bhk & 2bhk Right: Plans at different levels

The street abutting the canal pulled in and landing on the deck housing public activities.

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Bottom: South Elevation of the structure overlooking the canal. The red indicates the public spine.

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Shell Covering with light slits

Structure of the buldge housing the activity

Wall as a vein guilding the activity

Exploded Axonometric of the Women Welfare Center

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MADE IN U.S.A.


ARCHITECTURE FOR THE PERIURBAN CONDITION

4TH YEAR STUDIO I A.D. I SITE: ULHASNAGAR - RIVER ECOLOGIES I 7TH SEMESTER GUIDE: RUPALI GUPTE & KALPIT ASHAR In India there has been a massive restructuring of production, where the traditional assembly line under one shed has been dismantled to create multiple fragments of production and new networks between them. These fragmented processes inhabit various geographies inside and outside traditional city limits. These processes have in turn created city-like conditions at the peripheries of major cities. In Mumbai, these conditions are seen in the case of places like Bhiwandi, Kalyan, Ulhasnagar etc. My project tries to network the fragmented economies considering the urban transformations. The project initially begins with research of the existing conditions which led to creating of a master plan for the same. The masterplan incorporates larger strategies trying to create a hybrid between social and infrastructure locating various institutional projects onsite, and detailing them. The concept of the veins running in the city which are tight network of mixed activities is derived and identified from the site. It starts building the architectonic of my project. The project encroaches the open/barren spaces which are activated by the plug-in hybrid programs designed.

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Above: Diagrams to formulate site context and help generate the idea of form.

Above: Conditions of the existing veins between the tight chawls having all the activities juxtaposed.

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Above: Concept of the vein. Pg.22: Masterplan


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Above: Plan of the Women Welfare Center & Plan of the farmers market. Below: Section of the workshops for the women.

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Above: Various sections cutting through the Women welfare center

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View from the amphitheatre looking at the teachingstaff quarters.

View of the entrance of the welfare center.

Overall view of the women welface center.

View from the courtyard which encapsulates all the spill out activites.


View of the creche area for children.

View of the structure housing the workshops.

View of the farmers market.

View of the inbetween transition spaces from one program to another.

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Initial Viginettes of the Embassy

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LANGUAGE & IDENTITY

3RD YEAR STUDIO I A.D. I SITE: SRILANKA I 6TH SEMESTER I INDIAN EMBASSY GUIDE: NEMISH SHAH A public building representing a foreign country, especially its Embassy, represents countrys’ people, thier culture and also the relationship between the two countries. The architecture of this project begins with a courtyard. A courtyard is seen as a common element of architecture in both India and Srilanka. This couryard is deconstructed and understood with variuos scales and volumes it has to house as a fucntion. The Embassy located on a prominent site in Colombo, at the independence square, screams Sri Lankan-ness as a ceremonial country. To house an Indian embassy admist the vast open spaces around it, made the project take very public friendly approach working ways through the tight security much needed for the embassy. The building sits within the site gentlely yet screaming projection of Indianness towards the people of Sri Lanka. The design allows intense cultural exchange at the same time respects the Independence Square opposite to it. A series of models exploring volume and space to combine 3 distinct programs; the Highcommisioners residence, The Indian Embassy and a Cultural annex are created. The architectural language of the visual creates an entire formal approach to the design.

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Above: Viginettes of the project and site strategies.

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Left: Exploring types of courtyards through different scales and volumes.


Top: Plans at various levels, of the Indian Embassy, the high commisioners residence and the cultural annex

Top: Sections of the Embassy, cultural annex and high commisioners residence


CHANGING HISTORIC LANDSCAPES

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Origami models with illustrations to explore the changing historical landscapes of Wai in relation to the Krishna River (Wai+Water)


ARCHITECTURE Of THE CREMATORIUM 3RD YEAR STUDIO I A.D. I SITE: WAI, MAHARASHTRA I 5TH SEMESTER GUIDE: VANDANA RANJIT SINGH Wai is an old town - the newer part of the town is 200 years old, and the older part, over 350 years. Wai is known in Maharashtra for its ghats on the banks of the Krishna river and its temples. The intense history attached to this place resulted in a series of insitution programs, one being the cremetorium. The ritual of a death ceremony comprises of various acts and public occasions. it almost talks about a journey to the afterlife. Wai having a great historical value resides along the Krishna river which emulates this journey. It has ghats along the entire riverfront and the last ghat is the cremating ghat which ends into nowhere. My design tries to work which the existing randomness of the site meandering through absolute silence. Death is a part of life, and the only space that constantly stays with you is the architecture of the space around you. The crematorium embodies these experiences. My design creates only required guestures of the functions framing the surrounding landscape at every point. Architecture of only the necessary. The spaces thus developed shift scales between ceremonial functions and private spaces. The design tries to transform a death ritual into a last journey emulating the course of the river.

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Open Pyre

Stone Padding

Rubble Wall

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Left: Initial experience sketches. Right: Detail of the open pyre stand & the record room.

Record Room Slits for Light


Program: Cremetorium, Wai. Top: Plan at 1.5 mts from ground level, Bottom: Sections - AA’ & BB’

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O B J E C T + I M A G E A R C H I T E C T U R E 2ND YEAR STUDIO I A.D. I SITE: MAJULI, ASSAMI 4TH SEMESTER GUIDE: GINELLA GEORGE

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Left: Plans at various levels Right: Axonometric of the Hammam


ARCHITECTURE OF A BATH HOUSE - HAMMAM 2ND YEAR STUDIO I A.D. I SITE: IMAMWADA, MUMBAI I 3RD SEMESTER GUIDE: BINDI A Hammam is a traditional turkish public bath house. A handfull of these bath houses still exist in the fast growing city of Bombay. The conditions of these bath houses are almost obsolete. The concept of the bath house is not just a recreation, but also has a lot more rooted values to it. Bathing in the hammam is almost considered as a ritual before the muslim prayers. The site is located in the inner city of Bombay, in Imamwada next to Null Bazar. The small yet existing Iranian bath house is right next to a beautiful mosque which has a sense of mystiqueness to it. The site houses a very conservative kind of muslims, with heavily imbedded traditional values. The redesigning of the Hammam was a challenge to keep all the contextual study alive yet to be intervened. My design strategy starts working on the idea of a grid. The concept comes from the intricate stone walled designs of the mosque and the hammam which followed a strict geometry of its own. Keeping in mind of the geometries, the design looks at 3 kind of spaces - a public bathing area, a semi-public semi-dry area and a private bathing area. My design is an extension of the existing hammam which brings together the new and the old bathing areas interlinking with a number of pools.

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Left: Section of the Namghar, Right: Akashbanthi

Front elevation of the Namghar

South elevation of the Namghar

North elevation of the Namghar

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MEASURED

DRAWINGS

2ND YEAR STUDIO I A.D. I SITE: MAJULI, ASSAM I

Auniati Satra was first estanblished in Majuli in 1663, but constant shifts in the islands landscape had forced the Sattra to relocate a number of times, the latest in 1957. It is the largest Sattra on the island, yet entirely selfsustained. The Sattra is planned such that it forms a perfect square around the centrally places Namghar. The Namghar in Auniati is the only one to have a steel structure. Situated around the periphery of the sqare are the houses of the disciples. These row houses are connected by a common verandah that runs along its entire length. Beyond the houses lie large patches of fields since the main occupation of the disciples is farming. The entrance of the Sattra, the Namghar, the Sattraadhikaris house all lay along the same axis. Four large man-made lakes lie in the square, which provide for the Sattras water requirements. Dance and music form a vital part of the day to day life in Auniati. The commencement of evening prayers is marked by the resounding crashes of cymbals and drums by a group of children singing exuberantly. The drawings shown are hand rendered, to-scale drawings of the Namghar of Auniati Sattra.

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EXCHANGE CHINA, SHANGAI I SAME-SAME I

PROGRAM

Growing up in the suburban part of a city, the fate of which aspires to be in Shanghai, it was both fascinating and exciting for us to take up the opportunity of studying the fabric of this city - Shanghai. The burden of the history of a Communist Chinese Government, ideas of its rehabilitation mandate and the ever increasing manufacturing unit of China gives birth to distorted images of what this country would be. And these images flooded our heads with many questions and in a bid to get answers from them we took our flight to Shanghai. The project “SAME -SAME” prompted us on a journey of inspection into the lives of our fellow exchange students from the Tongji University. With inputs of what life was back home, much to their amazement, we got in bargain an opportunity to see their lives through the lens of their eyes. The project shaped itself around the understanding of four basic ideas of living cultivated in Shanghai. Each idea placed us into space frames of varying nature, within varying scales, through different timeframes and positioned us within different perspectives. We studied a protagnist, residing in Shanghai and traced his/her life as a space and saw the transformations it had undergone. The transformation began from the traditional housing typology termed “Sikumen” located in the leart of the city followed by government housing a little far away and then thier owned houses at the complete periphery. After studying these places we constructed a typical chinese - FOLD-OUT drawing, which illustrated the entire story of the protagnist.

Pg.41: Fold out drawing of the protagnist studied.

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Top: Elevation of the Embassy. Bottom: Basement of the Embassy. Pg.44: Folded Plate Constructional details. Detail Section of the residential complex.


TECHNICAL

DRAWINGS

5TH YEAR STUDIO I WORKING DRAWING & CONSTRUCTION.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN + posters + URBAN DESIGN

Top: Illustration of Bentota Beach resort, Sri Lanka.

Top: Illustration of Lunuganga, Sri Lanka.

Upanagar Shikshan Mandal’s Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute For Architecture & Environmental Studies Cordially Invites you

27th J 2

U 0

L

1

Y 3

9:00 a.m. Parent Student Orientation 11:00 a.m. Introductory Workshop Exhibition

Vidyanidhi Marg, off 10th road, Juhu Scheme Mumbai - 400049 email: admin@krvia.ac.in website: www.krvia.ac.in Tel : 91 2226700918, 91 2226208539

Top: Invitation designed for the first year workshop.

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SUBODHI INSTITUTE

The Institute for Integral Education was created by the Catholic Church to offer

GEOFFREY BAWA 1978-1981

facilities for intensive residential courses. It is founded by Dr.Mervyn Fernando, having identified a suitable site on the road between Moratuwa and

Piliyandela.

The site was a part of an old rubber estate called Brookside and occupied a steep valley running down through a grove of rubber trees to the edge of the Bolgoda lake. The general layout and the form of the individual buildings were established by Bawa on site in response to the exact shape of valley sites, and the design was conceived as a promenade through an ever-changing sequence of loggias, links and open spaces. The buildings are modest and simply built, but demonstrate Bawa’s growing skill for manipulating elements in a landscape to exploit the terrain and the potential views.

Top: Urban Design

Top: Subodhi, Sri Lanka. Poster designed for an exhibition.

T.Y.B. ARCH

K.R.V.I.A

2011-12

Top: Graphic design; Petra Winery in Tuscany, Itlay. A drawing to explain the comcept of the building.

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MODELS

Top: First year, Basic design. Object- Computer mouse. Tranformation models breaking the object into planes by file card.

Top: Second year, Architectural design. Site model, Process models for the Hammam.

Top: Third year, Architectural design. Model of the Crematorium.

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Top: Third year, Architectural design. Process models for the Indian Embassy in Sri Lanka.

Top: Third year, Architectural design. Final model for the Indian Embassy in Sri Lanka, deepstructure models.

Top: Fourt year, Architectural design. Final model for the youth centric collective housing in Juhu, Site model for the same.

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PoojaS Architecture+Design